Grit Nation

Lousy Leadership with Brian Lousy

April 01, 2022 Brian Lousy Episode 27
Grit Nation
Lousy Leadership with Brian Lousy
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to Grit Nation

I’m Joe Cadwell the host of the show, and in this episode, I have the pleasure of speaking with jobsite foreman, self-taught communication expert and author of two books on construction leadership, Brian Lousy.

Brian landed on the literary scene with a thud in early 2016 with his book, The Mind-Readers Guide to Supervision, in which he introduced the practice of managing construction projects by intentionally holding back production goals and expectations from his crews. 

In this book Brian promotes a supervisory style that requires workers to use their ability to mindread or guess what their foreman or supervisor’s thoughts are, in order to get their work done. 

Now after selling nearly a half- dozen copies, he is back with his second work titled, 

Git-er Did Dummy: A Guide to Leadership the Lousy Way

In Git-er Did Dummy, Brian again introduces a unique and unconventional style of leadership, by claiming that a crew’s loyalty and respect can be achieved by using the hazing, belittling, and dismissive behavior techniques taught in his book.

We’ll open our conversation by learning why Brian wanted to write Get-er Did and the philosophy behind it. 

Next, we’ll discuss why Brian feels most leadership programs are a waste of time and why he invented the acronym R.A.G.E to deal with conflict resolution on the jobsite and at home.

Brian will then explain why effective leadership communication shouldn’t rely so much on calm, rational and respectful discourse, but more on the volume of your voice.

And we end our conversation by learning why Brian believes derogatory name calling on the job can be an effective tool in inspiring others to reach their fullest potential. 

And in case you're still  wondering if this is real. It's not. Happy April 1st

The Show Notes

Below are links to leadership programs  that may actually help your career.

Breslin Strategies
https://breslin.biz/

Inspire Your People
https://www.inspireyourpeople.com/

Walk the Talk
https://www.walkthetalk.com/

Grit Nation  Webpage

https://www.gritnationpodcast.com

Follow Grit Nation on Twitter
https://twitter.com/gritnationpod

Email comments or suggestions to:
joe@gritnationpodcast.com

Grit Nation is a proud member of the Labor Radio / Podcast Network
https://www.laborradionetwork.org/ 

Tihsllub Industries
Innovators of nano-technology self drive construction fasteners

NW Carpenters Union
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, Regional Council in the Pacific Northwest

Union Home Plus
Union Home Plus helps union members save money when they buy, sell, or finance their home.

The Martinez Tool Company
Martinez Tools, built tough and built to last a lifetime.

Joe Cadwell:

Welcome to Grit Nation. I'm Joe Cadwell, the host of the show, and in this episode I have the pleasure of speaking with jobsite foreman, self taught communication expert and author of two books on construction leadership, Brian Lousy. Brian landed on the literary scene with a thud in early 2016. With his book a mind reader's guide to supervision, in which he introduced the practice of managing construction projects by intentionally holding back production goals and expectations from his crew. In his book, Brian promoted us supervisory style that required workers to use their ability to mind reader guess what their foreman or supervisors thoughts work in order to get their work done. Now, after selling nearly a half a dozen copies he's back with a second work titled Get'er Did Dummy - A Guide to Leadership The Lousy Way. With Get'er Did Dummy, Brian again introduces a unique and unconventional style of leadership by claiming that accrues loyalty and respect can be achieved by using his hazing, belittling and dismissive behavior techniques taught in his book will open our conversation by learning why Brian wanted to write and get her did and the philosophy behind it. Next we'll discuss why Brian feels most leadership programs are a waste of time, and why he invented the acronym rage to deal with conflict resolution on the job site and at home. Brian will then explain why effective leadership communication shouldn't rely so much on calm, rational and respectful discourse more on the volume of your voice, and will enter Congress conversation by learning why Brian believes derogatory name calling on the job can be an effective tool and inspiring others to reach their fullest potential. After this episode, be sure to visit the show notes to find resources that will actually help you get ahead in your career. And now on to the show. Brian lousy Welcome to Grit Nation.

Brian Lousy:

Hang on a second there, Jim. I put in a fresh dip.

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah, sure. No worries, Brian. And by the way, it said Joe.

Brian Lousy:

Oh, yeah, sure. Were you ready to get this thing going? Or what?

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah, yeah, you bet. You're Brian. So again, thank you so much for taking your time to be on the show today. I'm really excited to talk with you about your books and the new leadership program you've started. I understand you developed it to mirror your own experiences in the trades. So what can you tell our listeners about why you started lousy leadership? Well, John, Hey, Brian, it's it's Joe.

Brian Lousy:

Oh, okay. Sorry. So Joe, it's like this. You know, over the past 30 years, I gained a lot of experience in construction. I saw the industry changed dramatically in my time, opportunities opened up for all sorts of people to make a decent living doing what they loved. Yeah, I

Joe Cadwell:

agree. It's a totally different world than when we started.

Brian Lousy:

Yeah, it is. Some of its good. Some of its not so good. You know what I mean? But with all that change, you know, some things just didn't need to change really like what, what's the way they're treating each other out on the job, they're just not giving each other enough crap nowadays, there's not enough yelling or name calling anymore. You know, heck, even hazing has gone away. So, you know, I said enough's enough. And I decided to change that.

Joe Cadwell:

And that's why you started the Brian lousy Leadership Program.

Brian Lousy:

I'm sure it is. You see, there's a lot of programs out there that claim to teach leadership, but none of them teach you what it's like in the real world. You know, these other programs want you to teach communication and collaboration and blah, blah, blah, but not mine. Brian lousy, teaches leadership, the lousy way.

Joe Cadwell:

That's an interesting point you got there, Brian. You know, it pretty much goes against the grain of modern day leadership philosophy, though.

Brian Lousy:

Philosophy. And you see that that's the problem. The nice thing about my program is there's no philosophy. You either figure it out, or I find someone else who can in the real world, we don't philosophize. We point we grant and we expect people to catch on. It's that simple.

Joe Cadwell:

Oh, that sounds kind of like the premise of your first book the mind reader's guide to supervision.

Brian Lousy:

Yeah, sure is, you know, I wrote that book to counter what I felt was going wrong in the industry.

Joe Cadwell:

Gotcha rebuttal to clear, concise, respectful communication and leadership. That's interesting. I understand that book didn't sell too. Well. Why do you think that is?

Brian Lousy:

You don't have that. What's that? Your coffee? Don't a cup?

Joe Cadwell:

Actually, I'm still using it. Why I need something to spit him. Dude, you got a cup right to your right, grab that instead. Alright, so again, your book didn't sell too. Well. Brian, why do you think that is?

Brian Lousy:

I think maybe it had too many words.

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah. Okay. So so now let's get into your second book. Get her did dummy. This book definitely took a different direction from the norm. Why did you write a follow up book and where did you do your research for this

Brian Lousy:

one? There is no research. It's like philosophy. I wanted to create a book that drew up on my experience of what it was like when I was coming up in the trades, and people treated me like crap. I remembered that and I wrote

Joe Cadwell:

it down. Alright, that's interesting. So go on. You see,

Brian Lousy:

I learned the hard way for some real hard asses. You know, for men who didn't give two hoots if you caught on it Not, you know, like I said earlier, I had to keep up or they'd find someone else who would get her did is my attempt to pass down that kind of knowledge. It's not this kumbaya nonsense.

Joe Cadwell:

Hey, Brian, I'm gonna have to disagree with you there. I mean, sure, a lot has changed in the trades over the years. But I think one of the most significant shifts has been the attention given towards developing real leaders, people can not only get the job done, but are good at communicating and motivating their people. I hate to say it, but your book seems to be perpetuating some pretty old school attitudes.

Brian Lousy:

bull puppy, you know, I checked out those other programs to one to lead gently stir fry Breslin. None of them made any sense. There's too many words, there's not enough real action.

Joe Cadwell:

Well, you do got a point there. I mean, most communication training does use a lot of words. It's kind of the point. I mean, how we use words can be the difference between building someone up or tearing them down.

Brian Lousy:

Exactly. That's why I try not to use them. You know, I'll let you know what I'm thinking. When I'm getting ready. You screw up, you're gonna know about it.

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah, I kind of get that from looking through your book. I noticed it's pretty much filled with pictures of you yelling.

Brian Lousy:

You damn right. It is a picture, as they say is worth 1000 words. Need I say more?

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah, but I mean, how does that really teach anyone about leadership? I mean, seriously, here's a picture of you yelling at a fence post. What's that about?

Brian Lousy:

Oh, that's me practicing vocal projection. Lousy leadership relies heavily on your pipes. I believe the louder you get, the more respect you get. And that's pretty much the core of my program.

Joe Cadwell:

Yelling is the core audio program.

Brian Lousy:

It works great.

Joe Cadwell:

Man. Once again, I hate to say I'm gonna disagree with you. I mean, seriously, I've worked with a lot of folks whose default was yelling. It's never helped. It's always made things a lot worse.

Brian Lousy:

I'm not sure I'm following. You know, yelling is a great motivational tool for me. I love seeing people pop tall when I get pissed. It's kind of a power trip.

Joe Cadwell:

And that Brian seems to be the problem. I mean, putting people on edge does not make them perform better. Your book even has something called rage in it. What is rage about?

Brian Lousy:

Well, thanks for asking Jeff. You see, rage is an acronym, our ag E. It's a technique I created to deal with conflict resolution.

Joe Cadwell:

Alright, so now it sounds like we're actually getting to something useful. So what's the R stands for in rage? Hold

Brian Lousy:

on, hold on, hold on. You got to ease into rage.

Joe Cadwell:

What do you mean?

Brian Lousy:

Well, here's the deal. Rage is used to deal with conflict, right? Sure. So first, you need to find some conflict. Pick a topic to discuss work sports politics, it doesn't really matter. Eventually, someone's going to say something you don't agree with. That's when you rage.

Joe Cadwell:

So let me get this straight. You use rage when someone has a point of view that's different than your own

Brian Lousy:

zactly. Now you're getting other people's thoughts. Just get in the way. Who's got time for that? So to answer your question, the R is for React. Don't worry about listening anymore. Forget about counting to 10 or taking a deep breath just react.

Joe Cadwell:

It's that simple. So seriously, that's the er, yeah,

Brian Lousy:

see reacting is just the first step. Then it's time to amp up.

Joe Cadwell:

And that's the A and rage. Sure.

Brian Lousy:

I mean, if someone's not agreeing with you, things are about to get real. Therefore you need to get amped

Joe Cadwell:

it sounds like amping up is escalating the situation. I thought this was supposed to be conflict resolution. I hate to ask but what's the G stands for get a gun? G

Brian Lousy:

means get close. Closer, the better get right up in their face. You need to let whoever you're dealing with know that you mean business buddy.

Joe Cadwell:

Holy smokes. That doesn't sound too smart. To me. It's almost like you're looking for a fight.

Brian Lousy:

Well, funny. You should say that because I want to try to rage on my kids karate instructor and that didn't go too well. Yeah, imagine that. Kind of change the E up after

Joe Cadwell:

that. So let me guess. After that conflict, you must have changed the E to something like engage in respectful conversation.

Brian Lousy:

Are you kidding me? No way. He means time to explode.

Joe Cadwell:

Seriously, you change the E to explode. What was it before?

Brian Lousy:

It doesn't matter? What does matter is that you're now in full Rage Mode.

Joe Cadwell:

Brian, that's about the dumbest advice I've ever heard to deal with conflict resolution.

Brian Lousy:

Well, I'll count to 10 and consider your point of view there. Jeff.

Joe Cadwell:

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Brian Lousy:

No. I mean, not at all on the job. I use funny nicknames for folks all day long. Especially the apprentices, Hammerhead box rocks. Hey, lunch box. It's all in good fun. They love it.

Joe Cadwell:

Well, once again, guess what? I'm gonna disagree with you there. I mean, name calling. That's a thing of the past. We need to be better than that as leaders.

Brian Lousy:

Look, you know, I call it like I see it. If a first timer makes a boneheaded mistake, they should carry a name of shame around for a while. That's my style.

Joe Cadwell:

Trust me here. I mean, people look up to the foremen and supervisors to set the tone on the job site. If you set a low bar, it's going to have a negative impact on the whole crew. I mean, as leaders, we need to be better than that.

Brian Lousy:

And that's why I started lousy leadership. That's not the way it is out there. People need to feel like crap about themselves to do their best.

Joe Cadwell:

Look, I'm not advocating holding anyone's hand. I'm just saying our default shouldn't be to always put people down. It's got to be to help them up. I mean, belittlement name calling. It's lazy and weak, taking the time to teach folks to do things the right way. That's where the hard work begins.

Brian Lousy:

Yeah, well, you might have a point there. I never really thought about it

Joe Cadwell:

that way. You mean we actually agree upon something? Mm. Well,

Brian Lousy:

yeah, maybe I guess we do. You know, like I said, things have changed over the years in construction. Safety is a big deal. Now. You know, the zero tolerance for drugs and alcohol anymore. This new leadership thing may not be such a bad idea after all.

Joe Cadwell:

Yeah, I mean, I get it. You know, old ways are hard to break, but we got to try. You know, I mean, treating apprentices like real people, it's not the worst thing. I know, I made my fair share of mistakes. I know you must have made yours to

Brian Lousy:

never. But you know, you're right. We all got families to feed. And being in the trades is pretty damn hard as it is. And I reckon we don't need to make it harder by being jerks.

Joe Cadwell:

Wow, that was pretty well said, Brian. Thanks. So Brian, lousy. What's next for you and lousy leadership?

Brian Lousy:

Hmm. Well, you know, sitting here and talking. I think I just found the inspiration from a new book. Really? What about Transformative Leadership?

Joe Cadwell:

Wow, that sounds pretty cool. What do you think you'd call it?

Brian Lousy:

Huh? Yeah, I think I'll call it pull your head out of your rear and get your leadership into gear.

Joe Cadwell:

I love it. Pull your head out of your rear and get your leadership into gear. Brian louses has been a fantastic conversation. I want to thank you for taking your time to be on the show. And for everyone who's listening. Happy April Fool's Day. I guess this has been Brian Lausen, author of bitter dead dummy a guide to lousy leadership. For more information about leadership strategies that actually work or martial arts instructors near you. Be sure to visit the show notes for this episode. And also visit the grit nation website at www grit nation. podcast.com at grit nation podcast.com Till next time, Joe Cadwell reminding you the work safe, work smart and stay union strong. Thanks again for taking your time to be on the show and Happy April Fool's, everybody. We'll work on that one when we're done. Let's go and we're pretty good though.