Collaborating for Change: Transforming Cultures to End Gender Based Violence in Higher Education

Transforming Campus Rape Culture in Canada: Lessons from Complexity Theory with Diane Crocker and Marcus A. Sibley

October 06, 2020 Susan Marine and Ruth Lewis
Collaborating for Change: Transforming Cultures to End Gender Based Violence in Higher Education
Transforming Campus Rape Culture in Canada: Lessons from Complexity Theory with Diane Crocker and Marcus A. Sibley
Chapters
Collaborating for Change: Transforming Cultures to End Gender Based Violence in Higher Education
Transforming Campus Rape Culture in Canada: Lessons from Complexity Theory with Diane Crocker and Marcus A. Sibley
Oct 06, 2020
Susan Marine and Ruth Lewis

In this episode, Diane Crocker (St Mary's University, Canada) and Marcus A. Sibley  (Carleton University, Canada) join Ruth and Susan to explore how rape culture, as a concept, is used to mobilize efforts to reduce campus sexual violence in Canada, and how activists’ understanding of rape culture has limited our ability to change it. They help us understand that while rape culture is not simple, our responses often assume it is. This insight is informed by complexity theory. We begin with the assumption that rape culture is a complex context that does not respond well to solutions that assume static, cause-effect relationships. Our guests conducted research that used narrative methods specifically developed to capture students’ ideas and experiences about rape culture, inviting them to code their own stories, and illuminate how rape culture manifests in their day to day lives. Their stories point to important shifts in current efforts to transform campus rape culture in Canada and beyond.

Show Notes

In this episode, Diane Crocker (St Mary's University, Canada) and Marcus A. Sibley  (Carleton University, Canada) join Ruth and Susan to explore how rape culture, as a concept, is used to mobilize efforts to reduce campus sexual violence in Canada, and how activists’ understanding of rape culture has limited our ability to change it. They help us understand that while rape culture is not simple, our responses often assume it is. This insight is informed by complexity theory. We begin with the assumption that rape culture is a complex context that does not respond well to solutions that assume static, cause-effect relationships. Our guests conducted research that used narrative methods specifically developed to capture students’ ideas and experiences about rape culture, inviting them to code their own stories, and illuminate how rape culture manifests in their day to day lives. Their stories point to important shifts in current efforts to transform campus rape culture in Canada and beyond.