Unknown Origins

Csaba Dancshazy on Social Media

October 11, 2020 Csaba Dancshazy Season 1 Episode 12
Unknown Origins
Csaba Dancshazy on Social Media
Chapters
00:01:24
What inspired and attracted you to be a Social Media Entrepreneur?
00:07:43
What is your Creative Process?
00:18:42
What are the key skills needed?
00:26:39
Lessons learned: Pitfalls to avoid & keys to success?
00:33:41
What is your vision for the future?
Unknown Origins
Csaba Dancshazy on Social Media
Oct 11, 2020 Season 1 Episode 12
Csaba Dancshazy

Social media entrepreneur Csaba Dancshazy’s approach is based on validation, convincing someone else of something valid. To do so, he follows a process. He says, “How do I prove that this has any kind of bearing on the real world? How do I know that this truly does, in fact, represent what I think it represents? And so, now comes in yet another cycle of trial and error. If you're going to try something creative, anything creative, you're going to be inevitably going to places that you may not have expected. Being willing to go down that path as a part of the process is quite important. I obviously would never have gotten here, had I sort of kept banging my head against the wall in the direction that I originally started in. So being adaptive and being willing to adjust is definitely crucial.”

From Budapest to Harvard, Csaba Dancshazy blazed the trail to make sense of social media by building a social media analytic platform and practice at Microsoft, online consumer behavior at Wayfair, to founding D-Tag Consulting that provide expertise, analytics, training and custom consulting solutions that empower companies to build out and expand their ROI from social media analytics.




Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Social media entrepreneur Csaba Dancshazy’s approach is based on validation, convincing someone else of something valid. To do so, he follows a process. He says, “How do I prove that this has any kind of bearing on the real world? How do I know that this truly does, in fact, represent what I think it represents? And so, now comes in yet another cycle of trial and error. If you're going to try something creative, anything creative, you're going to be inevitably going to places that you may not have expected. Being willing to go down that path as a part of the process is quite important. I obviously would never have gotten here, had I sort of kept banging my head against the wall in the direction that I originally started in. So being adaptive and being willing to adjust is definitely crucial.”

From Budapest to Harvard, Csaba Dancshazy blazed the trail to make sense of social media by building a social media analytic platform and practice at Microsoft, online consumer behavior at Wayfair, to founding D-Tag Consulting that provide expertise, analytics, training and custom consulting solutions that empower companies to build out and expand their ROI from social media analytics.




Roy Sharples:

Hello, I'm Roy Sharples, and welcome to the unknown origins podcast series, the purpose of which is to deliver inspirational conversations with creative industry experts on entrepreneurship, pop culture, art, music, film and fashion. Today's focus is on social media, what I'll be chatting with the erudite Csaba Dancshazy, who is a social media expert and entrepreneur, from Budapest to Harvard, by blazing the trail to make sense of social media, by building a social media analytical platform, and practice Microsoft online consumer behavior at wayfair, to finding D-Tag Consulting, that provide expertise, analytics, training, and custom consulting solutions that empower companies to build out and expand their ROI from social media analytics. Hello, and welcome Jabba.

Csaba Dancshazy:

Hello, Roy, thank you for having me.

Roy Sharples:

That's a very colorful, the checkered background you have there?

Csaba Dancshazy:

Well, I've tried to keep things interesting. It's definitely, you know, been a process of discovery and exploration, to the extent that I was able, but it seems I can't escape the gravitational pull of of social media. So I keep coming back to it in one shape or another watch fractured into that domain. Oh, boy, where do I begin? I guess, you know, I did study psychology in school. But a little less known fact is that actually, when I started out, I was a neurobiology cognitive neuroscience major, I wanted to with, you know, with a youthful optimism, to try to learn as much as I could about how the human mind works, how the human brain works, what makes us human, how do we think how do we interact? And the reason why I kind of really got pulled into social media is because of this kind of gradual realization that I had sometime around maybe 2005, 2006, which is concerning the the nature of what social media really is. And I'm going to kind of go off on a bit of a tangent here. So you know, just feel free to interject. But, look, I mean, if we think about how humans have evolved, and what sort of differentiates us in a big way, is our ability to communicate, the way that we talk to each other, the way that we share knowledge, the way that information can be stored and passed on from one generation to the next is a large part of what enabled us to, to build out civilization and science and culture and, and so mechanisms and this sort of transmissions of information are, I think, really vital to the way that the brain works. I mean, at the end of the day, that's what our our minds are, is tremendously powerful processors of various types of information, linguistic information being being one of them. And so what struck me, you know, I'm one of those dinosaurs, right, I remember using Netscape Explorer, I remember, you know, using telnet, to send the primitive email messages when only educational institutions and research institutes were connected to the internet. So, so we go way back. But anyway, my sort of aha moment was when I kind of realized at least to myself that, you know, as we discovered, writing, as we discovered the printing press, and the fax machine and the Xerox, the internet is another sort of force multiplier, that escalated our ability to, to communicate and connect to each other, in such an exponential way that that is kind of unfathomable, that I think, you know, over the last 10 1520 years, things have been sort of developing really rapidly. And this is another conversation but perhaps more rapidly than our people, human minds can sort of keep up with the changes. But what struck me about the internet and about the way that social networks developed and people were able to confer voice to express and to share their opinions to get feedback and instant feedback about their sort of vocalizations is that it really reminded me sort of, of the way that the mind works the way that the brain works, right? You have, you know, nerve cells that are sending out signals and they get received by other neurons. There's ones that amplify those ones that inhibit and through this complex network of interactions between the various parts of your brain individual cells within it is how thought processes are made their how pathways are established and reinforced the this is how you learn how to ride a bike or to you know, write your name on paper, and To me the way that information and these electrons are, you know, whizzing back and forth on the internet, as people interact with each other as they read each other's thoughts as they watch each other's videos, as they listen to each other's words, they're able to not only passively receive this information, like you, you know, could when you were watching the television or listen to the radio and days of yore, when you can actively, instantly inject yourself into that interaction. And so that, to me, is really what has remained fascinating. You know, things have developed, right, I was around when when Facebook was not yet IPO, and it was still just restricted to college campuses for Twitter, came out and then began dropping, it's a little bit of, you know, first hundreds of thousands and then hundreds of millions of posts per day, causing a big headache for people like myself, who were in the business of trying to capture everything and sort of make sense of it. Because it overloaded the systems that existed at the time, there simply wasn't capacity for it. What, what what has emerged for me is that it truly a contains and represents the collective opinions and sort of consciousness of the people of today. And to be able to make sense of it and to listen to it and to understand it brings us I think, quite a bit closer to understanding how people think and act and why. And, you know, I haven't yet fully sort of abandoned the idea that if we are to sort of get to any kind of next stage of societal evolution, then then the internet didn't, and then the social media through which we communicate with each other, is definitely going to be a massive part of that. I mean, you know, you can't turn on, I don't know, TV news, at this point, without there being a ticker of social content at the bottom, you know, telling you what people are saying online, things have definitely changed really, really rapidly in the space of just a few years. I think that this is kind of a sort of an endless source of fascination information, insights, and, and that's why I kind of have more or less dedicated my career to, to continuing to try to make sense of it and understand as best as I can, and hopefully, use it for a little bit of good.

Roy Sharples:

Excellent, right. So in the pursuit of that passion. And so you started off going to detox analytics as a way of taking things to the next level in that realm. Right? So within that, how have you taken your ideas, and turn them into concepts and then bringing those creative concepts to life? And what's the creative process that you've went through from it from initial idea to actualization?

Csaba Dancshazy:

So I'm, I don't know, in my romantic fantasies, I like to picture myself as a as a creative person. But, but to be honest, or to be fair, or to be brutally candid, I am much more of an analytical than I am a creative mind, if you gave me a canvas and drawing instruments, I would not likely do very well. My musical talents are more or less limited to the enjoyment of music that others create. But let's, I mean, I can give you a specific example, right? Where I thought the rather that, you know, I was able to kind of express my creativity through the process of analytics. So a long long time ago, back in sort of the the cloudy dark days of 2008 2009. Just as the the first great financial crisis was coalescing and enveloping the world, the company that I was working for, mainly, service or other large portion of the clients that we had were financial institutions, they were banks, retail banks, investment banks, they were insurance companies that were credit card companies. They were essentially brokerages and and people involved in sort of the the storage and movement of money. And as you can imagine, in sometime in late November, early December of 2008, as sort of, you know, everything was coming down. The stock market was crashing, there were tremendous concerns about bank runs and about the ability of companies to stay above water. There were companies going bankrupt, left and right. Governments had to intervene, central banks had to intervene in a big way. And so I remember very distinctly I was on a bull conference call with our major client base. Imagine something like 100 plus top executives from these companies like, you know, just as literally as examples Bank of America or Barclays or visa, or or Prudential. And it boiled down to one question, we were trying to present sort of findings and market research from other parts of our company, not specifically social. And after the presentation, they came back to us and said, You know, that's all nice and fine and interesting. But at the end of the day, we're interested in very few kind of existential questions that really pertain to the survival of our business, which is, how do we measure and how can we increase the level of confidence that consumers have in financial institutions? And how can we sort of measure the amount of trust that they have or don't have in our specific institution, if I don't trust my bank, I'm going to, you know, walk down or run down to the local branch, withdraw my money. If I do that, that's not a problem. But if every single other account holder does that, that is a huge problem, because there isn't enough cash on hand to sort of satisfy all these demands. And, you know, this is obviously a gross oversimplification. But that's a large part of where this sort of self feeding spiral began, that the financial crisis ultimately led to back in 2008, and nine. So I was given the task by my marketing director at the time, to come up with a way to measure confidence and trust in, in sort of the broad consumer base towards financial institutions. And so what I ended up trying to do, the process ultimately was a lot of trial and error. Literally, I would spend days if not weeks, sort of tinkering and coming up with ways to try to create a definition tried to create a verbal sort of summary of what it means to have confidence what it means to have trust. And at the end of the day, I was quite frustrated, they're much like Edison trying to figure out how to build a light bulb, I definitely went through the 999 ways of not doing it. But in the end, you know, what, what happened is that I ultimately was forced to change tack, right, I came to the conclusion that I simply could not succinctly enough and accurately enough, sort of define with words with keywords, what what it meant to have trust what it meant to have confidence. But what I noticed was that as I was trying to go through this, and going through this process, I got a lot of negative examples, right, bad examples, right? People, not trusting people being fearful being being sort of anxious. And so this was kind of a realization, I guess I should have come to it a lot faster than I did, given my background in psychology. But fear is a much more visceral, much more, sort of deeply rooted and strong emotion than, for example, trust and confidence. And so I was in the end able to create a reasonably accurate definition of people's negative feelings towards finance in towards the state of the economy. So people being afraid of not being able to pay the mortgages, not being able to go out to dinner, being afraid of bankruptcy and unemployment and, and other financial calamity. And by measuring this, sort of, by measuring the absence of confidence, by measuring the absence of trust, I was able to come up with a way to sort of generate the kind of a mirror image and inverse of the metric that that was that was needed. And so I don't know that to me, I guess was the was the creative process is sort of learning as you go, making making sure to sort of take detailed notes of all the failures and all the ways in which, you know, you were not able to initially succeed, because in the end, that is what sort of brought me to, to the solution that I was actually looking for. And then I guess the other part of it was validation, right? This is a great I think I'm a genius. I'm really figured this out. Here it is. It's on my screen, it works. But okay, how do I convince someone else that this is actually valid? How do I prove that this has any kind of bearing on the real world? How do I know that this truly does, in fact, represent what I think it represents? And so now came in a yet another sort of cycle of, of trial and error. I basically, you know, went back to the drawing board and started to do some research about, okay, what other elements or real world aspects are in fact being measured? And so I looked at things like, you know, revenue receipts from the park. in stores, I looked at taxes collected, I looked at the income by various ministers and from various institutions in the economy. And so after about maybe a dozen or more of these, I landed on something that is, you know, it's a it's a macro measure, right? It's, it's published by the Federal Reserve Bank. And ultimately, it showed the amount of retail spend in the US economy. And it was aggregated monthly. And so it nicely lined up with the data points that I had. And I was able to sort of create a direct match, I was able to show that the metrics that I was getting from the conversations happening online happening in online forums and in newspaper articles and blog posts, when I filtered it and sort of twisted it, and the massage did not massage this, that's a really wrong word for it, but but sort of, you know, filtered out the portion of it that I was interested in, which is people's expression of, of anxiety and fear. It was really shocking to me to see the outcome. And the shocking part was that there was a correlation above 90%, with the actual economic metrics that that were published by the Central Bank. And not only that, but the data that I had access to the data I was working with was about a month to six weeks, in some cases, eight weeks preceding the officially published financial figures. So, you know, it's not that, you know, I had a magic crystal ball, it's not that I was doing something, you know, esoteric, or supernatural, it simply was the fact that people were talking about and expressing the way they felt the way they thought and sort of foreshadowing what they were going to do. And the actions and the natural behavior, that the materialized as a result, sort of took time to actually have an impact in the economy. And, of course, it takes time to gather these figures and sort of crunch them together and publish them as well. So there was simply a natural lag time, but the upshot of it was that, you know, starting from my idea, which is that, Mike, my customers have a very real and very immediate need to be able to measure trust and confidence, I was not able to give them that, but I was able to produce something that was almost as good, or at least, arguably, more useful, which is, how much money are people going to spend next month or two months from now. So that's maybe the last lesson I guess, if I wanted to sort of draw, you know, a conclusion from all of this is that don't sort of Don't be afraid to, to try and to accept sort of the gifts along the way, right, I was not expecting this at the beginning, by any means. But in the end, that was very grateful to have sort of landed in this spot. If, you know, if you're going to try something creative, anything creative, you're going to be inevitably going to places that you may not have expected. And so being sort of willing to, to go down that path to go through that door that that you've discovered as a part of the process is, is quite important. I, you know, obviously would never have gotten here had I sort of kept banging my head against the wall in the direction that I originally started in. So being adaptive and being willing to adjust is definitely crucial.

Roy Sharples:

What do you think are the key skills and capabilities that's needed to be a social media specialist,

Csaba Dancshazy:

I'm coming across any number of my sort of younger colleagues in this space who are digital natives, right? They grew up in an era where it has always been a given that social media exists, the platforms that I'm quote, unquote, used to and the ones we still consider to be, the behemoths of online communication, Twitter and Facebook are, you know, an anathema to, to the younger generation, my kids won't be caught dead, looking at any of those things, but with regards to what kinds of skills are needed, I would argue that more than ever, there is actually quite a bit of need for an analytical mind. One of the biggest challenges that I see in sort of absorbing and using the internet or social media is the the ability to find things and then the ability to discern truth from fiction. There's a tremendous amount of both presence everywhere on the internet. I don't have to tell you this or anybody else, but being able to effectively search for things is a really critical skill. I know names Is that how, you know, my children or my colleagues, for example, that I that I've been working with over the last few years, had grown up as digital natives yet, the ability to search effectively to construct the keyword terms and sort of to sort of sift through and filter through the results is not as easy for them as I would have assumed it would be now I obviously have, you know, a lot of experience, I spent a lot of the past several years doing nothing but that so that that's understandable. But, but that act of being able to retrieve and sort of to seek out information is, is not as easy as it sounds, right. And because of this sort of short attention span, culture that we're all gradually becoming more and more immersed in, and I'm no exception to this, by the way, I'm definitely not trying to put down anyone, especially not younger ones, about this, but people just are sort of forced to or exposed a lot more to short form mediums. And the ability to amass lexical knowledge is in some cases, you know, it's seen as being less important, when you know, when now even if you and I were going to, to secondary school or to university, the the need for memories, rote memorization, the need for actually, like carving into your brain, the the specific tenets of whether it was, you know, physical rules or, yeah, or moral philosophy, it was a lot bigger part of our education. And I think that the the direction that things have gone over the last few decades is that the educational institutions tend to sort of focus on and to value, the ability to synthesize information, to sort of formulate opinions about and know how to find information, which is great, it's definitely very important that certainly provides for a more flexible way of thinking, and I think that's definitely advantageous. But in my opinion, you need some sort of core, you know, you need a little bit of material in the sort of databanks to be able to build upon it to be able to know which source which encyclopedia, which website, which reference, you need to seek out, and I guess that's what, for example, my dad always told me is that the, you know, the smart man doesn't know everything, the smart man knows where he can go look for things. Yeah. And I think that's, that's something that perhaps people should consciously pay more attention to is, is gaining the ability to sort of seek out the right kinds of information. And then the other is, you know, sorry, the original question was about social analytics, that social media, who, you know, what kinds of skills I need, I think are needed. The ability to speak succinctly, and to write succinctly is kind of a another one of those, you know, dying breeds or losing arts or lost arts. We, we are convenient, we're creatures of habit. And if we're given a chance to, to abbreviate something, and to be less sort of expressive than, then we're going to take it, why shouldn't we now and in day to day, sort of casual conversation that works really well. And we're able to sort of exchange quite a bit of nuance and quite a bit of detail through through very short messages, but sort of being able to write well, being able to be thoughtful and be expressive and be compelling. And the way that you write is, you know, if you weren't further in between, so that, to me, is kind of a both a lament, as well as something that that I think is always going to be in demand. If you're doing social analysis, the chances are, the reason you're doing it is not just to satisfy your own innate curiosity. Of course, that is a big factor for me. But it also doesn't always pay the bills, you need to be able to summarize and to convey information to be able to give recommendations to people to be able to convince them that some course of action is warranted or not. And so this ability to sort of take, you know, a big tome or thousands of pages of content, and be able to distill it into a few sentences, or bullet points is, is definitely critical. You can't just dump a bunch of numbers on somebody. You need to be prepared and able to clearly explain what these numbers mean and then what they should be doing about it. And so that's another part that is tricky, right? It requires training. It requires practice and some amount of innate ability, not everyone can do it, I'm definitely not the best at doing it. I'm much better with the numbers part of the analytics Part I, you know, I try, I've been become sort of moderately proficient that this, this kind of executive summary level writing, but I have several friends and colleagues that are substantially better at it. So, you know, like any sane person would do, I leveraged them, and I and I use the help and I, and I go to them, say, Hey, you know, I created this, I've got two thirds, three quarters of it done, please do your magic, and then help me get this to a state where we're truly is an exceptional output. And so that brings us to the last point, which is teamwork, basically, none of us are islands. But in this kind of line of work, or in this area of work, there are so many things, that it's become impossible to keep it all in one head, you can't be an expert at all aspects of the things that you need to, to be able to do well. And so sort of divide and conquer is, is almost a necessity, and certainly improves the outcome. So I would, I would definitely sort of recommend that. That people who are able to and work well with and can communicate effectively with others, in their group are going to do better at this than people like myself who, you know, have to struggle not to be a lone wolf.

Roy Sharples:

Yeah, that's excellent. And you've got the rear, you're looking at the rearview mirror now. And if you were 18, again, and you know what you do now, what would you do different, if at all, anything in the context of this job, right? So what's your lessons learned so far? in your career? So what would be the pitfalls to avoid and the keys to success that you can share with other aspiring social media specialists and entrepreneurs?

Csaba Dancshazy:

Okay, um, wow. That's a question I should have seen coming. But now, I have to think a little bit about it, I guess. Look, I'm at this, you know, everyone's experiences is their own personal one. And the one thing that, you know, always comes up to me, when when I'm asked this question is, I should have stayed in school, I ended up sort of finishing my last year of college desperate to get out and to do something real to you know, forget about all this theoretical hypothetical, academic, sort of environment and go out into the real world and do stuff and sort of do something actual, tangible. And sort of get on my, with my life, I would maybe caution, or recommend, to anyone out there that's in the shoes to now to, you know, reconsider, maybe be a bit more patient and, and definitely consider at least going after that master's degree a PhD, it definitely pays a lot of dividends down the line is, in some cases, excruciating the boring, it takes a long time, it takes a large toll. It's certainly costly, in some cases, or at least forces you to sort of remain at a lower standard of living than you might like, but I think it's definitely worth it. My one sort of lament is that I didn't take the time at the time to do it. Um, I'm slowly sort of hacking my way through, you know, sort of, you know, working off that deficit right now and getting an advanced degree. But it's not only valuable simply because of the sort of the paper represents, but because the programs that are available today, in today's universities are both a lot faster, a lot cheaper, and a lot more hands on and the programs that were available to me at the time. So I would certainly encourage everyone to, to go out and seek real world experience as soon as possible, do internships, possibly take a semester, even a year off? You know, you know, we're definitely planning to convince our kids to, let's take a year off between high school and college. There's nothing wrong with that. But I would, I would definitely encourage you to think about staying in school sort of longer than than the sort of the bare minimum. So that's, that's one thing, in terms of specifically in terms of social media. Look, I mean, for the longest time, I kind of resisted The mathematical nature of of kind of superficial things like, you know, likes on Facebook or, for example, Twitter, it took me a really, really long time as a practitioner specifically supposed to be focusing on topics like this, to truly understand and take value from the contents of Twitter. Now, of course, that too, has evolved quite a bit, you're now able to post a lot of a lot more characters so that the 135 limit is of tradition, it's no longer an actual requirement. But, but more importantly, it has been adopted as the lingua franca of the thinking world, you are going to want to be on it. And you need to be listening to it, if you want to stay informed if you need to, if you want to be engaged. And and so I guess what I'm suggesting is, methods and platforms will continue to shift and change. Right? So Tick Tock is a silly example maybe, right? It's it's gathering a bit of uproar. The president wants to ban it. Who knows how much personal data is or isn't in fact being harvested? And whether it is going to various places in the Far East is another question. But that's not my point. My point is that is tremendously popular. It is a medium that sort of, like everything else in social media creates a level playing field, it lowers barriers to entry, it allows you to be seen to hear people and to be heard by people. And so, you know, again, maybe I'm making assumptions about you know, today's generation and the generation that's about to come of age, but you know, the the broad view or stereotype is that is that these folks are all very comfortable with and, and perfectly familiar with things like tik tok, or YouTube or, or Twitter or Snapchat. But I wouldn't sort of take that at face value. Man, all of these are, obviously, you're constantly evolving. There's new features and new changes in the way people interact with them every day. I guess my recommendation is to sort of always keep a feeler out, right. So make sure that you are familiar with sort of the the current standards of exchange, the current platforms that are that are highly popular, but do also sort of keep an eye out for the next thing that's coming. And that, you know, is easier said than done. In some cases. I don't know if anybody here still remembers MySpace or AOL. But those seemed like they were ubiquitous, they seemed like they had sort of formed the layer of the Earth's crust and, and are there to stay. And, you know, after three, four or 510 years, they're nowhere to be found and all but been erased from memory, I'm expecting more of that to happen with the platforms that we that we have, they will merge, they will sort of spring up new ones. ones that seem to be at the forefront, will will fade away into nothingness. And that's a natural process, it's just that it's happening at a much faster pace than ever before. And as time goes on next year, year, after that, I expect these changes to continue to speed up. And so it's going to be challenging to stay on top of it and sort of keep abreast of development, you have to remain flexible. You have to be like the the way and and and make sure that you're able to adapt.

Roy Sharples:

Excellent. So looking forward Csaba, what's your vision for the future of social media? And specifically with regards to the forces that's driving change in the domain from a social, socio cultural, economical, political, and obviously, technological perspective? And how are those drivers helping formulate new, innovative solutions, solutions and opportunities in the social media space?

Csaba Dancshazy:

Wow, that is a huge question. We're going to try to sort of chip away at it a little bit. But, but look, I mean, at a kind of a kind of high level, what I view, this whole evolutionary process as being is that it's let's go back to our analogy, my analogy at the beginning that, you know, to me the, the way that people interact on the internet and the way that this complex network of social media works is much like much like the human brain. We aren't able to instantly share communication, cascades of of ideas can suddenly overwhelm and create sort of almost a mania, whether we're talking about social movements, whether we're talking about outrage, whether we're talking about something positive, these these sweep through the network and sweep through sort of pretty much everybody's screens and minds instantaneously. So what I see is that social media is becoming integrated, right, it's becoming a part of the way we interact with the world, it's becoming much more accepted and much more ubiquitous. Think of it as turning into utility, it is becoming essentially something that is not exactly like the, the telephone that you use to lift to, to call customer service. But increasingly, companies are interacting with their customers, through online chat through Twitter, through Facebook, it, I think it's something that essentially is seeping into sort of the cracks and crevices and nooks and crannies of, of societies and businesses. And, and will continue to become sort of an even more important part of our lives. Think of it like, you know, connective tissue, right? It's, it's filling out all of the spaces in between people. And sort of, you know, creating almost this enveloping bath of sort of content information exchange and, and transmission mechanisms. So that's one, the other is that this process of connecting people, this process of sort of making you as a person, almost instantaneously aware of the thoughts and, you know, the woes and worries and, and joys of everyone else, is leading to a bit of information overload, right, that's something that we've already become conscious of, it is already causing substantial problems for for people and for societies. I don't have a solution for this, there's not a vision, this is a worry, that we are not yet capable of handling and filtering out and sort of dealing with this amount of information, especially emotive information, right? It's not just facts, its its feelings, its its attitudes, it's, it's things that are, that are that are visceral, it's the things between the lines, not just the words themselves, but what they convey and what they mean. I don't know that, that we've really ever, as a species been sort of exposed to this much information, and it's gathering steam, and it's still continuing to increase by the minute. And so whether we can change fast enough whether we can adapt our own cognitive mechanisms, the way we approach the world, or listen to the world? Is this is an open question. I'm not convinced that, that it's possible to do that. And that's kind of what worries me about the pace of technological advancements that, no, I'm sure, you know, everyone's familiar with the concept of the singularity. And the idea that, eventually, at some point, we'll be able to create artificial intelligence that is superior, whether in speed or in capacity to the human mind. I don't want to dwell on that, although I do have my opinions on that. But what is for sure happening is that the pace of change the pace of technological change, societal change, behavioral change that is going through the world today, is fast approaching our capacity to be able to comprehend it and adapt to it, right. So you know, if you think about it, and I always think about it from an evolutionary perspective, we had, you know, a few million years to get used to the concept of using tools and, and, and being omnivores instead of, instead of just pure carnivores, learning to build a fire learning to to build shelter, learning to start cultivating plants, and in doing agriculture, those are all things that happened over the space of, you know, decades, centuries, millennia, or in some cases, millions of years. The changes we're talking about are happening over the course of three months, six months, two years, five years. It's simply rapid and increasingly difficult to to keep the pace. So coming back to your question. What I'm hoping for, what I'm truly hoping for is that we're able to, to leverage each other to be able to use social media to collectively adapt, because it's increasingly difficult session possible to remain isolated. From the rest of the world, from the society, and for me, that's a huge positive that social media brings. We just need to be able to sort of avoid the cognitive overload. that goes with that kind of connectedness and sort of instant feedback from from all sides. The gist of it is not to forget humans, right? We started talking about creativity. I'm, you know, tremendously respectful of most people that I consider to be more creative than myself. But I guess whether you're trying to do science, whether you're trying to be an analyst, whether you're creating art, whether you're starting a new business, I think the one common thread is is that other people, other people are critically necessary to, to exchange ideas with human direct conversation, talking with someone face to face, being able to, to share a new concept to try to convince them that, that what you're doing or you're thinking about has merit. And getting the feedback about that is, I think, very, very important. I know that, you know, there are some that that are, you know, singular lone wolf geniuses, and then they they go off into their study or their studio or whatever it might be in the process of creation itself, can be and mufon should be a solitary engagement, that's how I do my best work. In some cases, but in between, right, you need that connection. So look, the short summary of where I'm trying to go with this is, is invest in and actively seek out a community, a circle of friends, a network of mentors, peers, who are able to, to give you honest feedback, were able to motivate you with new ideas, just by explaining your point of view to someone forces you to structure it in such a way that you might not have done just speaking to yourself, or by looking at a blank piece of paper, trying to put it down. And so I think is very, very helpful in whatever art endeavor, whether it's artistic or otherwise, that you're engaged in, make time for it make an effort to consciously do it. And, and, you know, I guess, warning people not to be afraid of silly I don't think most people are afraid but, but I don't know that everybody recognizes sort of how important the part of the process this is. And it is what allows you to advance and to escalate and to move to the next level and to improve at what you're doing. You can be extra excellent and whatever you're doing now, and you can continue to stay at that level, simply by honing and perfecting your skills on your own. But, you know why? why stop there? If it's if it's possible to jump to the further stages higher inspirational insights, Csaba!

Roy Sharples:

thank you.

Csaba Dancshazy:

Thank you for the chance, always lovely to talk to you and look forward to speaking with you. Again.

Roy Sharples:

For more information about Csaba:

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//www.linkedin.com/in/csaba-dancshazy-409241/y - For more inspirational conversations with creative industry experts on entrepreneurship, pop culture, art, music, film and fashion. Please go to the unknown origins website at unknown origins.com

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