Unknown Origins

Roy Sharples on Creative Leadership

October 07, 2020 Roy Sharples Season 1 Episode 7
Unknown Origins
Roy Sharples on Creative Leadership
Chapters
0:47
What inspired and attracted you to creativity as a profession?
1:59
What does Creative Leadership mean to you?
2:26
What is your Creative Process?
3:36
What are they key skills needed?
5:36
What are your lessons learned: pitfalls to avoid and keys to success?
6:22
What is your vision for the future of Creativity?
Unknown Origins
Roy Sharples on Creative Leadership
Oct 07, 2020 Season 1 Episode 7
Roy Sharples

You must aspire to be as great as the things that are influencing you. Not to be like them, but to be as influential. Creative leaders are iconoclastic. They walk to the beat of their own drum in their relentless pursuit to produce beauty and value that transcends the obvious and routine.

Founder and CEO of Unknown Origins, Roy Sharples provides his perspective on Creative Leadership and why falling in love with your craft and pursuing it with intensity, capitalizing on your strengths, freeing yourself from the expectations of others, and to walk away from the games and boundaries they impose upon you to fully realize your dreams!

Attitude. Imagination. Execution.

Web: www.unknownorigins.com
Twitter: UnknownOrigins9
Instagram: unknownoriginsuo77

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

You must aspire to be as great as the things that are influencing you. Not to be like them, but to be as influential. Creative leaders are iconoclastic. They walk to the beat of their own drum in their relentless pursuit to produce beauty and value that transcends the obvious and routine.

Founder and CEO of Unknown Origins, Roy Sharples provides his perspective on Creative Leadership and why falling in love with your craft and pursuing it with intensity, capitalizing on your strengths, freeing yourself from the expectations of others, and to walk away from the games and boundaries they impose upon you to fully realize your dreams!

Attitude. Imagination. Execution.

Web: www.unknownorigins.com
Twitter: UnknownOrigins9
Instagram: unknownoriginsuo77

Paula Sharples:

Hello, I'm Paula Sharples, and welcome to the unknown origins podcast series, the purpose of which is to deliver inspirational conversations with creative industry experts on entrepreneurship, pop culture, art, music, film and fashion. Today's focus is Creative Leadership with Roy Sharples, who is the founder and CEO of unknown origins on a mission to unlock everyone's creative potential, what inspired and attracted you into creativity as a profession.

Roy Sharples:

I've never viewed creativity as a profession, rather than a core discipline, like reading, writing and arithmetic, under way of life. I was born into and grew up in an environment that armed me with a strong work ethic and do it yourself sensibility, which contributed toward my need for independence, and to be self dependent at a young age. I looked and felt different, which propelled my natural instinct to be a lone wolf, and to continuously swim against the tide of growing up in a pedestrian town, in the northeast of Scotland. So by possessing a strong aesthetic orientation, an eye for well designed things and the independence to freely follow my impulses to create, combined with boredom, is the seedbed that triggered my imagination and gravitation toward a metropolitan space to express myself and to self actualize

Paula Sharples:

what is creativity?

Roy Sharples:

Creativity is the ability to see the unseen, to make what is from what is not. imitation is not creation. It's about connecting the past with the present and creating something new.

Paula Sharples:

What does Creative Leadership mean to you?

Roy Sharples:

It's about attitude, imagination and execution. Creative leaders do things that inspire the rest of us to follow suit. By defining your own process of self discovery, experiment, try, except that you can feel discover the unorthodox, people who achieve greatness do not fit a formula or follow a structure. They break the mold by making their own path to achieve mastery, they walk to the beat of their own drum, and manifest their inner feelings and the world around them by influencing their innate point of view and talents by crafting poetry. In a world where there is only prose and produce art, or that is only architecture. They help us view the world in a new dimension, by lighting the way into the future. They don't fit a particular formula or mold. They define their own pathway. They stretch the imagination, navigate the ambiguity, take risks, experiment, and critically and constructively analyze and provide an alternative that transcends the obvious and the routine.

Paula Sharples:

What is your creative process?

Roy Sharples:

The four phases are dream make do an alchemy, the sequence is iterative and constant. Dream is about imagining the impossible by making the invisible visible. Thinking as an outsider with childlike imagination and wonder. gain an analytical and external view of the challenge. Then dream up purposeful breakthrough ideas and brainstorm ideal solutions to find the future by using divergent thinking, to conceive creative and radical ideas. Make is by taking what is not and making what is by applying a do it yourself sensibility to originate create and craft. By adopting a maker mindset and using convergent thinking, to review and select the best ideas and then rapidly prototype and construct a plan do is by getting it done by turning ideas into solutions. Reviewing the solution in order to identify improvements, making eliminations, removing obstacles or mitigating risks. And then alchemy is bringing it to life with your audience and markets.

Paula Sharples:

What are the skills needed for Creative Leadership?

Roy Sharples:

creative leaders are iconic plastic, they walk to the beat of their own drum, express and influence through their innate imagination, navigate ambiguity, take risks, experiment, the critically and constructively analyze our manifestos of themselves and the world around them and their relentless pursuit to produce beauty. and the value that transcends the obvious and routine creative leaders. Look at exactly the same thing as everybody else, but see something different. They think with their own mind, which comes from their heart and make with our own hands. They strive for simplicity to remove never to complicate design for people, not machines. They know what technology can enable. But know there are times and places where technology is not the right answer. They love a blank canvas. Because that is the most powerful tool. They seek freedom, not compliance. Respect standards, but thrive by breaking the rules to help realize the best solution to the problem. Invent, make mistakes, improve, seek excellence, not conformity and mediocrity.

Paula Sharples:

What are the skills needed for Creative Leadership,

Roy Sharples:

it is important that you aspire to being as great as your influences, not to be like them, but to be as influential. Don't let the world or anyone within it define you define your own purpose and mission, having personal constraints, barriers, principles and standards, as critical to defining yourself by what you are, and what you are not, and appreciate the difference. Be excellent at your craft, what you do and how you do it. It has to be of substance and integrity. Be clear about yourself, as this will guide you to where you go next, and act like a magnet to attract the right people into your life. Our outputs are the next generations inputs, so make it count.

Paula Sharples:

Is it a state of mind and a way of doing

Unknown:

Yes, precisely?

Paula Sharples:

What are your lessons learned and keys to success from being a creative leader and entrepreneur?

Roy Sharples:

creativity can be subscribed to or bought off the shelf. It's a social system about values, skills, craftsmanship, relationships, networks, a way of doing a lifestyle.

Paula Sharples:

What advice would you give to teams and organizations that would like to be more creative?

Roy Sharples:

It's not simply a mandate that gets handed down. It needs to be embraced to allow people to create without fear. It's something that is nurtured, imparted and practiced that throughout the team and organization. It takes skill, practice and persistence, and the results pay off. instill in values and translating experiences across space and time. What is

Paula Sharples:

your vision for the future of creativity,

Roy Sharples:

the need for creativity will become a necessity, I see a much more universal focus on creativity being instilled in education as a core discipline, the fact that many jobs of the future is still to be created. I find that an exciting prospect and a positive way for education, governments and industry to work close together to imagine and shape that for the better. Societies will be designed as catalysts for dreaming, making undoing where the conditions such as architecture, collaborative spaces, atmosphere, incentives, and regulatory policies will be created for people to dream make and do as a way of life. A social system with distinct values, attitudes, and feelings learned and transmitted from generation to generation

Paula Sharples:

don't those places already exist?

Roy Sharples:

There has and has been hubs for this for sure. I'll be not as universally on the present, as it should, and could be, for example, historically, societies such as classical Athens, underneath Lawrence, Florence, the French Revolution and romanticism in Paris, to post war in New York and swinging London to industrial cities with a maker and do an ethos such as Detroit, Glasgow, Manchester, and portends with constant exchange, diversity of people and international trade, such as Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Dublin and Liverpool.

Paula Sharples:

And in more recent times, places like Berlin Reykjavik, St. Petersburg, Melbourne, Montreal,

Roy Sharples:

yes, Berlin, for example, since the dumbness of the wall, it has become a hub for avant garde art, techno music, and innovative design, living the Bohemian dream, and reveling in the city's grittiness as disrespect for authority, cheap rents where artists can actually afford to live that what role will technology play in enabling this evolution? technology will continue, as always has to modernize and revolutionize how things get done, and how people work and being a tool to further enable our imagination.

Paula Sharples:

The impact of technology in the creative industries alone has been profound. Take music, for example. Yes,

Roy Sharples:

although sales or physical product have decreased, the demand for digital music has dramatically increased, primarily because of its convenience and accessibility. The current market players such as Apple, Amazon, and Spotify are providing opportunities to deliver music in new ways to the consumer. If that means democratizing technology in a way that unlocks new value creation for the artist drives more reach to consumers at global scale. And that the business model is truly artist LED and customized authentically for the consumer, then surely, that's goodness. Imagine democratizing technology in a way that enables every single person on the planet to have the provision to be able to hum a tune and have the technology automatically can That into instrumentation under song to use predictive analytics as a tool to help make a hit record by analyzing data from different compositions to create musical pieces through learning what an algorithm learns what characteristics and patterns to create music that is enjoyable, or that it mimics a certain genre.

Paula Sharples:

Thank you For insightful perspectives ROI.

Roy Sharples:

Always. love what you do. Don't waste a second, and never ever give up on your dreams. Only you know your true worth. And remember ajoute imagination and execution.

Paula Sharples:

For more inspirational conversations with creative industry experts on entrepreneurship, pop culture, art, music, film and fashion. Please go to the unknown origins website at unknown origins.com

What inspired and attracted you to creativity as a profession?
What does Creative Leadership mean to you?
What is your Creative Process?
What are they key skills needed?
What are your lessons learned: pitfalls to avoid and keys to success?
What is your vision for the future of Creativity?