Children's Stories for Bedtime. 3yrs +

Robin And Rebecca

May 24, 2022 Bernard King Season 1 Episode 85
Children's Stories for Bedtime. 3yrs +
Robin And Rebecca
Children's Stories for Bedtime. 3yrs + +
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Show Notes Transcript

A flying banana,  a fire in the kitchen,  and Rebecca lost in the forest. It must mean Robin has been at work again!


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Robin And Rebecca 

Robin and Rebecca were cousins. Robin was a rascal. Robin was always causing problems. Robin was always in trouble. 

Rebecca was a rascal. Rebecca was always causing problems. Rebecca was always in trouble. So, can you imagine what happens when Robin and Rebecca play together! 

Plenty! 

The other day Robin picked up a banana from the fruit bowl in the dining room. With a big grin he raised it above his head, then swinging his arm all the way back he spun in a circle and let go of the banana! 

Rebecca screamed with laughter. The banana had shot out of the window! 

Rebecca’s father wasn’t laughing. He was bending over in the garden pulling out some weeds when, SMACK! The banana hit him on the bottom! 

Banana’s can fly, can they? He scratched his head and looked up the sky wondering where the banana had come from. 

This made Robin and Rebecca scream even louder with laughter. Rebecca though it was so funny she fell on her back and waved her legs in the air. 

“Wouldn’t it be fun if we pretended there was a fire in the kitchen?” Whispered Robin. 

Rebecca thought for a moment and then pulled a face, she could not see anything funny about Robin’s idea. If fact she thought it was rather silly. 

“If the grownups think there is a fire, they will come running, “grinned Robin. That, thought Rebecca was a bit better, but she still could not see anything funny. 

“If we lock the kitchen door and they can’t get in, they’ll go all funny and shout.” “Yes!” laughed Rebecca. “Now that would be funny!”
 The two children first went into the kitchen and then waited for a few moments. “You will have to scream,” whispered Robin. “To make it seem real.” 

Turning the key and taking it out of the lock, Robin carefully put it on top of the china cupboard in the dinning room. 

“Ready?” Robin giggled. Rebecca nodded happily. 

“Help! Help! Help!” Robin yelled so loudly and so suddenly Rebecca did not start to scream until they were almost in the garden. 

Robin’s mother and father jumped so high when the children, shouting and screaming, rushed into the garden, they made big dents in the grass when they landed. 

“There’s a fire in the kitchen!” screamed Robin. Rebecca could not say anything as she was already screaming. 

“Oh my goodness!” Robins father was already running into the house. His mother pulled the children away from the house, guarding them behind the biggest tree in the garden. 

Rebecca stopped screaming and started to laugh but stopped when she received a kick on the ankle from Robin. 

  

“Not yet!” He hissed 

“Who locked the kitchen!” Now Robin’s father was shouting and tugging at the kitchen door. 

“It’s not locked!” Shouted Rebecca’s mother. 

Robin was pulling a funny face to try to stop laughing, Rebecca was biting the sleeve of her jumper very hard to stop from exploding with mirth. 

Rebecca’s father shot out of the house bumped his head on the kitchen window and peered inside. 

“Where is it?” he yelled. 

“Where’s what?” Shouted Rebecca’s mother. Rebecca’s father was now hopping up and down trying to open the kitchen window. 

“The fire!” Now he was banging on the window.”I can’t see it!” 

It was too much for Robin. The face he was pulling suddenly split into a broad grin and his laughter started, getting louder and louder until he was /holding his side to stop himself from falling over. Rebecca popped, screaming with laughter she slipped down the side of the tree on legs that were weak with cackling. 

Slowly Rebecca’s father turned around. 

“Where is the fire Rebecca?” He demanded. Rebecca could not stop herself, she screamed again with laughter, fell on her back and waved her legs in the air again. 

“There isn’t one daddy!” Big tears of mirth were rolling down her cheeks. “It was a joke!” 

“Well here is a bigger one.” Rebecca’s mother was not at all amused. “You can go to your room and not come down until tomorrow!” 

“What about my dinner?” Cried Rebecca.
 “It got burnt in your fire,” snapped her father.
 Robin was making another face, this time a very worried one. Rebecca’s father got hold of 

him by the scruff of the neck and frog marched him to the front gate.
 “And I do not want to see you again for a week!” With a push he sent Robin staggering off 

in the direction of his house.
 Rebecca and Robin were very miserable for the next week, because they were not allowed 

to see each other.
 On the Monday Robin knocked nervously on Rebecca’s front door. Robin’s father opened 

the door and stood looking very sternly down at Robin.
 “I don’t want any more fires,” he snapped.
 Robin shook his head and went quietly up to Rebecca’s room, Rebecca was overjoyed to 

see him and after giving him a big kiss they played with her toys for the rest of the morning. But in the afternoon, Rebecca had an idea.
 “Let’s pretend there is a great big spider in the green house,” her eyes were bright and 

excited by her idea.
 “But your father might go mad again,” moaned Robin.
 “No he won’t, it’s not a fire and daddy is not afraid of spiders. It will be a good trick!” Very slowly Robin nodded his head, he was not sure, but Rebecca was so thrilled with her 

joke he did not think she would stop anyway.
 Rebecca’s mummy and daddy were relaxing in the sunshine on the lawn before starting 

the washing up.
 “Mummy!” Rebecca was shouting again. “There’s a huge spider in the green house!” Rebecca’s mother shot up her chair.
 “I hate spiders!”She screamed.
 Then she ran, her arms waving in fright, as fast as she could towards the house. Rebecca 

fell flat on her face with laughter, and Robin, even though he did not think it very funny, sniggered down his sleeve behind the green house. 

But then Rebecca stopped laughing. Her eyes opened wide with shock.
 Her mother in her dash to get away, tripped over a flower basket.
 You will never guess what happened. It was very serious and you must not laugh when I 

tell you.
 Rebecca’s mother flew high in the air, and with a scream, landed, face down, in the 

goldfish pond!
 It was not very deep but it was very muddy. Muddy enough to ruin the new dress her 

mother was wearing.
 Rebecca went white. Robin ran, as fast as he could, across the garden, down the path, 

along the street to his house, shot into his bedroom and hid under the bed!
 Rebecca had to stand in the corner, every day for an hour, for a whole week.
 In fact it was nearly two weeks before Rebecca knocked on Robin’s door.
 “We are going on a picnic,” Rebecca smiled. “Mummy and Daddy have invited you.” “Ar you sure?” Robin could still remember being marched out of Rebecca’s garden. “Oh yes,” Rebecca, took Robin’s hand, “They have forgotten all about the fishpond.” And so Robin and Rebecca, with all their parents, drove out into the country where they 

laid a large tablecloth on the grass in a field. The lunch was delicious, and everyone ate too much, especially the adults who soon fell fast asleep in the sunshine. 

Rebecca crept across to Robin and took his hand again, the pair tiptoed away from their parents to the edge of the field, then through a gate and into a big wood. They wandered around the wood for a long time, looking up at the big trees and listening to all the birds chirping as they flew from branch to branch. 

“I’m going to climb that big tree.” Robin was fed up just playing on the ground, he wanted to climb something. 

“It is too high for me,” Rebecca watched as Robin climbed higher and higher until she could not see him anymore through the thick green leaves of the huge tree. 

He climbed so high it was not long before she could no longer hear him shouting and suddenly she realised she was all alone in the big forest. 

“Robin! Robin!” she called. But there was no reply. Robin was much too high to hear her. 

Slowly she turned her head to look behind her, a low moaning sound was coming out of the trees, then they started to rustle, and creak, and rattle, very loudly. 

Rebecca became very frightened and started to move away from the noise and down the path, back to the edge of the forest. With a loud howl the wind rustled the trees even harder, giving a frightened scream Rebecca rushed down the path, her hands covering her eyes and with tears streaming down her cheeks as she cried and cried. 

Robin was almost at the top of the tree, but, although it was a big tree, when he finally reached the top, he realised he had wasted his time. All he could see were even bigger trees and, so, grumbling to himself, he started to make his way down. 

“You know Rebecca, this is not the biggest tree in the forest,” he called as he climbed slowly lower and lower. But getting no answer, the moment his feet touched the ground he began to look everywhere for is friend. Rebecca had vanished. He looked around one tree and then another and then went to the clearing where they had been playing. 

After calling for several minutes he realised Rebecca must have got fed up waiting and had gone back to the field and their parents. Taking the path, he slowly strolled back through the woods to the big field. 

His father was reading a news paper and his mother was still asleep. Rebecca’s mother was putting the lunch things back in the car and Rebecca’s father was shaking then folding the tablecloth. 

There was no sign of Rebecca. He had not seen her on the way back to the field and, she was certainly not in the field. 

To be sure, he peered into the both of the cars, looked around the field again and even went back to the path. 

“Rebecca is lost,” he stuttered.
 “Ha,” said his father.
 “Ha, ha,” said Rebecca’s father.
 “Ha, ha, ha,” said his mother.
 The grown ups were not taking any notice of him! “Really! She really is lost.” He cried. 

Ha, ha,” said his father.
 “What’s funny?” His mother asked as she woke up.
 Ha, ha, ha,” laughed Rebecca’s father.
 “Ha, ha, ha, ha!” Rebecca’s mother was not really laughing, just sounding as if she was. “Really, really , really!” This time Robin stamped his foot in anger. They must listen to 

him. “Rebecca is lost in the forest. She is all alone.”
 “Like the fire in the kitchen.” Laughed his father.
 “And the spider in the greenhouse,” snapped his mother.
 “Nooo!” Robin was beginning to panic. “I climbed a tree and when I came down she was 

not there!”
 “Robin - go and tell your joke to someone else.” This time it was Robin’s father who was 

smiling.
 “She,” now Robin was jumping up and down. “Really,” and getting higher and higher. 

“Is,” Now he was waving his arms in frustration. “Lost!” With a final leap in the air he thumped to the ground, folded his arms across his chest, and sulked. 

Rebecca’s father crossed to the path that lead into the forest. 

“Rebecca, you can come out now, your trick has not worked and we are going home.” He called. 

Everyone listened and listened, Rebecca’s father laughed. ‘Come on Rebecca we are going home.”
 Robin kicked a piece of grass and sulked on.
 “Rebecca!” Her mother was fed up. “Joke over.” 

“We are leaving!” Her father started loading the picnic things in the car. 

“You can’t go, you can’t leave Rebecca behind!” Robin tried to stop Rebecca’s father closing the car doors. 

“Get in.” Ordered Robin’s father. Reluctantly Robin climbed into his seat and looked miserably out of the window as the two cars drove out of the field. But they didn’t go far. As soon as they had turned around the hedge, out of sight of the field, Rebecca’s father crept back and peered around the gate. 

“Now we will see who the joke is on,” Rebecca’s mother smiled. 

Rebecca’s father waited a full five minutes for Rebecca to appear. With a hard push Rebecca’s mother hurled the car door back, then marched into the field. 

“Now that’s enough Rebecca, you come out immediately, the joke is over and you will get wet.” 

But all the grown up could hear was the steady patter as the rain fell. 

‘I told you, I keep telling you. But no one believes me.” Robin walked angrily into the field. “Rebecca is lost!” 

The four grown ups looked at each other.
 “If your joking...!” Rebecca’s father looked very stern.
 Honestly,” Robin was wringing his hands anxiously, how could he make the grownups 

believe him? 

Robins mother looked closely at her son. “He’s telling the truth,” she said. “Robin never cries and he’s crying now.” 

It was true, great tears were rolling down his cheeks. 

“Oh my goodness, she will catch her death of cold in this rain.” Rebecca’s mother ran down the path followed by all the others, calling and shouting her name. 

Robin showed them the tree he had climbed and where he had last seen Robin And Rebecca 

/////////////////////////


Robin’s mother and father jumped so high when the children, shouting and screaming, rushed into the garden, they made big dents in the grass when they landed. 

“There’s a fire in the kitchen!” screamed Robin. Rebecca could not say anything as she was already screaming. 

“Oh my goodness!” Robins father was already running into the house. His mother pulled the children away from the house, guarding them behind the biggest tree in the garden. 

Rebecca stopped screaming and started to laugh but stopped when she received a kick on the ankle from Robin. 

  

“Not yet!” He hissed 

“Who locked the kitchen!” Now Robin’s father was shouting and tugging at the kitchen door. 

“It’s not locked!” Shouted Rebecca’s mother. 

Robin was pulling a funny face to try to stop laughing, Rebecca was biting the sleeve of her jumper very hard to stop from exploding with mirth. 

Rebecca’s father shot out of the house bumped his head on the kitchen window and peered inside. 

“Where is it?” he yelled. 

“Where’s what?” Shouted Rebecca’s mother. Rebecca’s father was now hopping up and down trying to open the kitchen window. 

“The fire!” Now he was banging on the window.”I can’t see it!” 

It was too much for Robin. The face he was pulling suddenly split into a broad grin and his laughter started, getting louder and louder until he was holding his side to stop himself from falling over. Rebecca popped, screaming with laughter she slipped down the side of the tree on legs that were weak with cackling. 

Slowly Rebecca’s father turned around. 

“Where is the fire Rebecca?” He demanded. Rebecca could not stop herself, she screamed again with laughter, fell on her back and waved her legs in the air again. 

“There isn’t one daddy!” Big tears of mirth were rolling down her cheeks. “It was a joke!” 

“Well here is a bigger one.” Rebecca’s mother was not at all amused. “You can go to your room and not come down until tomorrow!” 

“What about my dinner?” Cried Rebecca.
 “It got burnt in your fire,” snapped her father.
 Robin was making another face, this time a very worried one. Rebecca’s father got hold of 

him by the scruff of the neck and frog marched him to the front gate.
 “And I do not want to see you again for a week!” With a push he sent Robin staggering off 

in the direction of his house.
 Rebecca and Robin were very miserable for the next week, because they were not allowed 

to see each other.
 On the Monday Robin knocked nervously on Rebecca’s front door. Robin’s father opened 

the door and stood looking very sternly down at Robin.
 “I don’t want any more fires,” he snapped.
 Robin shook his head and went quietly up to Rebecca’s room, Rebecca was overjoyed to 

see him and after giving him a big kiss they played with her toys for the rest of the morning. But in the afternoon, Rebecca had an idea.
 “Let’s pretend there is a great big spider in the green house,” her eyes were bright and 

excited by her idea.
 “But your father might go mad again,” moaned Robin.
 “No he won’t, it’s not a fire and daddy is not afraid of spiders. It will be a good trick!” Very slowly Robin nodded his head, he was not sure, but Rebecca was so thrilled with her 

joke he did not think she would stop anyway.
 Rebecca’s mummy and daddy were relaxing in the sunshine on the lawn before starting 

the washing up.
 “Mummy!” Rebecca was shouting again. “There’s a huge spider in the green house!” Rebecca’s mother shot up her chair.
 “I hate spiders!”She screamed.
 Then she ran, her arms waving in fright, as fast as she could towards the house. Rebecca 

fell flat on her face with laughter, and Robin, even though he did not think it very funny, sniggered down his sleeve behind the green house. 

But then Rebecca stopped laughing. Her eyes opened wide with shock.
 Her mother in her dash to get away, tripped over a flower basket.
 You will never guess what happened. It was very serious and you must not laugh when I 

tell you.
 Rebecca’s mother flew high in the air, and with a scream, landed, face down, in the 

goldfish pond!
 It was not very deep but it was very muddy. Muddy enough to ruin the new dress her 

mother was wearing.
 Rebecca went white. Robin ran, as fast as he could, across the garden, down the path, 

along the street to his house, shot into his bedroom and hid under the bed!
 Rebecca had to stand in the corner, every day for an hour, for a whole week.
 In fact it was nearly two weeks before Rebecca knocked on Robin’s door.
 “We are going on a picnic,” Rebecca smiled. “Mummy and Daddy have invited you.” “Ar you sure?” Robin could still remember being marched out of Rebecca’s garden. “Oh yes,” Rebecca, took Robin’s hand, “They have forgotten all about the fishpond.” And so Robin and Rebecca, with all their parents, drove out into the country where they 

laid a large tablecloth on the grass in a field. The lunch was delicious, and everyone ate too much, especially the adults who soon fell fast asleep in the sunshine. 

Rebecca crept across to Robin and took his hand again, the pair tiptoed away from their parents to the edge of the field, then through a gate and into a big wood. They wandered around the wood for a long time, looking up at the big trees and listening to all the birds chirping as they flew from branch to branch. 

“I’m going to climb that big tree.” Robin was fed up just playing on the ground, he wanted to climb something. 

“It is too high for me,” Rebecca watched as Robin climbed higher and higher until she could not see him anymore through the thick green leaves of the huge tree. 

He climbed so high it was not long before she could no longer hear him shouting and suddenly she realised she was all alone in the big forest. 

“Robin! Robin!” she called. But there was no reply. Robin was much too high to hear her. 

Slowly she turned her head to look behind her, a low moaning sound was coming out of the trees, then they started to rustle, and creak, and rattle, very loudly. 

Rebecca became very frightened and started to move away from the noise and down the path, back to the edge of the forest. With a loud howl the wind rustled the trees even harder, giving a frightened scream Rebecca rushed down the path, her hands covering her eyes and with tears streaming down her cheeks as she cried and cried. 

Robin was almost at the top of the tree, but, although it was a big tree, when he finally reached the top, he realised he had wasted his time. All he could see were even bigger trees and, so, grumbling to himself, he started to make his way down. 

“You know Rebecca, this is not the biggest tree in the forest,” he called as he climbed slowly lower and lower. But getting no answer, the moment his feet touched the ground he began to look everywhere for is friend. Rebecca had vanished. He looked around one tree and then another and then went to the clearing where they had been playing. 

After calling for several minutes he realised Rebecca must have got fed up waiting and had gone back to the field and their parents. Taking the path, he slowly strolled back through the woods to the big field. 

His father was reading a news paper and his mother was still asleep. Rebecca’s mother was putting the lunch things back in the car and Rebecca’s father was shaking then folding the tablecloth. 

There was no sign of Rebecca. He had not seen her on the way back to the field and, she was certainly not in the field. 

To be sure, he peered into the both of the cars, looked around the field again and even went back to the path. 

“Rebecca is lost,” he stuttered.
 “Ha,” said his father.                      
 “Ha, ha,” said Rebecca’s father.
 “Ha, ha, ha,” said his mother.
 The grown ups were not taking any notice of him! “Really! She really is lost.” He cried. 

Ha, ha,” said his father.
 “What’s funny?” His mother asked as she woke up.
 Ha, ha, ha,” laughed Rebecca’s father.
 “Ha, ha, ha, ha!” Rebecca’s mother was not really laughing, just sounding as if she was. “Really, really , really!” This time Robin stamped his foot in anger. They must listen to 

him. “Rebecca is lost in the forest. She is all alone.”
 “Like the fire in the kitchen.” Laughed his father.
 “And the spider in the greenhouse,” snapped his mother.
 “Nooo!” Robin was beginning to panic. “I climbed a tree and when I came down she was 

not there!”
 “Robin - go and tell your joke to someone else.” This time it was Robin’s father who was 

smiling.
 “She,” now Robin was jumping up and down. “Really,” and getting higher and higher. 

“Is,” Now he was waving his arms in frustration. “Lost!” With a final leap in the air he thumped to the ground, folded his arms across his chest, and sulked. 

Rebecca’s father crossed to the path that lead into the forest. 

“Rebecca, you can come out now, your trick has not worked and we are going home.” He called. 

Everyone listened and listened, Rebecca’s father laughed. ‘Come on Rebecca we are going home.”
 Robin kicked a piece of grass and sulked on.
 “Rebecca!” Her mother was fed up. “Joke over.” 

“We are leaving!” Her father started loading the picnic things in the car. 

“You can’t go, you can’t leave Rebecca behind!” Robin tried to stop Rebecca’s father closing the car doors. 

“Get in.” Ordered Robin’s father. Reluctantly Robin climbed into his seat and looked miserably out of the window as the two cars drove out of the field. But they didn’t go far. As soon as they had turned around the hedge, out of sight of the field, Rebecca’s father crept back and peered around the gate. 

“Now we will see who the joke is on,” Rebecca’s mother smiled. 

Rebecca’s father waited a full five minutes for Rebecca to appear. With a hard push Rebecca’s mother hurled the car door back, then marched into the field. 

“Now that’s enough Rebecca, you come out immediately, the joke is over and you will get wet.” 

But all the grown up could hear was the steady patter as the rain fell. 

‘I told you, I keep telling you. But no one believes me.” Robin walked angrily into the field. “Rebecca is lost!” 

The four grown ups looked at each other.
 “If your joking...!” Rebecca’s father looked very stern.
 Honestly,” Robin was wringing his hands anxiously, how could he make the grownups 

believe him? 

Robins mother looked closely at her son. “He’s telling the truth,” she said. “Robin never cries and he’s crying now.” 

It was true, great tears were rolling down his cheeks. 

“Oh my goodness, she will catch her death of cold in this rain.” Rebecca’s mother ran down the path followed by all the others, calling and shouting her name. 

Robin showed them the tree he had climbed and where he had last seen Rebecca, everyone went in different directions shouting and calling again. 

For half an hour they searched the forest but Rebecca had vanished completely.
 “Perhaps she has been eaten by wolves.” Robin began to cry again.
 “Rubbish,” snorted his father. “There are no wolves in England. You stay close to me we 

don’t want you lost as well.”
 It was another ten minutes, Rebecca’s mother was passing a bush when she heard a 

whimper.
 “Rebecca?” she cried.
 “Mummy, Mummy, Mummy!” Rebecca, her face streaked with tears, crawled out from 

under the bush.
 “We’ve found her!” Rebecca’s mother and father shouted, with relief and happiness. “We didn’t you come sooner I have been so frightened.’ Rebecca was shaking with fear. 

Robin ran up and gave her a big kiss, so pleased to see his friend again.
 “We didn’t come earlier because we did not believe you were lost.” Rebecca’s father said 

sternly.
 “We thought it was another of your silly tricks.” Added Rebecca’s mother.
 “So, when something serious happens, no one believes you.” Said Robin’s father. Robin’s mother did not say anything. She knew it was not necessary. From the 

embarrassed expression on Robin and Rebecca’s faces, she knew they would never play stupid tricks again. 

Rebecca, everyone went in different directions shouting and calling again. 

For half an hour they searched the forest but Rebecca had vanished completely.
 “Perhaps she has been eaten by wolves.” Robin began to cry again.
 “Rubbish,” snorted his father. “There are no wolves in England. You stay close to me we 

don’t want you lost as well.”
 It was another ten minutes, Rebecca’s mother was passing a bush when she heard a 

whimper.
 “Rebecca?” she cried.
 “Mummy, Mummy, Mummy!” Rebecca, her face streaked with tears, crawled out from 

under the bush.
 “We’ve found her!” Rebecca’s mother and father shouted, with relief and happiness. “We didn’t you come sooner I have been so frightened.’ Rebecca was shaking with fear. 

Robin ran up and gave her a big kiss, so pleased to see his friend again.
 “We didn’t come earlier because we did not believe you were lost.” Rebecca’s father said 

sternly.
 “We thought it was another of your silly tricks.” Added Rebecca’s mother.
 “So, when something serious happens, no one believes you.” Said Robin’s father. Robin’s mother did not say anything. She knew it was not necessary. From the 

embarrassed expression on Robin and Rebecca’s faces, she knew they would never play stupid tricks again.