Self-Inflicted Aural Nostalgia

Bonus Episode // Travis Harrison

December 09, 2018 A Fan's Guided By Voices Podcast
Self-Inflicted Aural Nostalgia
Bonus Episode // Travis Harrison
Chapters
Self-Inflicted Aural Nostalgia
Bonus Episode // Travis Harrison
Dec 09, 2018
A Fan's Guided By Voices Podcast

My talk with the engineer of the last three GBV LPs. Plus the next two.   

Show Notes Transcript

My talk with the engineer of the last three GBV LPs. Plus the next two.   

Speaker 1:

Hello and welcome to another bonus episode of south conflicted oral nostalgia that guided by voices podcast. This time around, I spoke with Travis Harrison, the cofounder of serious business recording studios. He engineered the last three Gvv, lps and continues to work with your band to this day, have an engineered next year, a double album discipline over China. He also worked with the band on the upcoming series of Eps, which will eventually be collected as the album warp. And woof, here's our conversation. Okay.

Speaker 2:

Before we talk about your work with Gpb, tell me about how you got started in music and how you made that made that leap from being a drummer into being a producer and an engineer.

Speaker 3:

Well, I grew up on long island and started playing drums when I was about 10 years old and I never really had anyone to play with throughout, throughout high school or whatever. But, uh, as I got a little older, I started playing with bands and, um, I just, at a certain point the responsibility for documenting what we were doing, I had to fall on someone. And uh, so at a certain point I took up with the range was one of my high school bands and uh, then I just kind of never looked back. Um, I had a friend of mine in college, Andy, Andy Ross, who, um, he, um, was like a computer whiz to Kinda guy and uh, he is. And uh, he got pro tools, role, you know, for me it seemed like it was pretty early on around 2004. So I, uh, you know, we just kind of jumped in and learn together and then as time went along I got more and more serious and next thing I know when 20 years later almost still doing it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Uh, and then in terms of the label series business, did you always intend to work with other bands or was that sort of, I know that I think that's hard to just to release your own stuff. And then how did you branch out into being a, a true label?

Speaker 3:

Uh, I, well not, it was never a true label. Um, you know, I guess it just started because we had a band and we wanted to document what we were doing but didn't, we didn't have any illusions that we were going to be able to get signed to a label or anything and so we just figured we'd make our own, you know, in the spirit of whatever diy, Indie Rock, whatever it might be. But we, uh, we tried and I put a lot into it. It just basically became a vessel for me to, uh, help friends out. Sure. Um, and uh, it was very, uh, it was, it was, I worked hard at it, but I didn't get very far in the business game. They know the business part of serious business, but kind of ironic that, don't

Speaker 4:

you think? Absolutely, absolutely. It was really all about the music and just helping France and that was it. Yeah. Now at this point it's been, I think you said like it's been 20 years since he sort of started being an abandoned then went to the other side of being a producer engineer. Do you miss it? Would you go back and be in a band he missed being on stage? Okay, sure. Yeah. I mean, I love a lot of play and I still do, but it's just, you know, my, my days are pretty taken up at the moment by making records and stuff. But uh, yeah, I'm on. I love, I love plenty. I'm sure. So you mentioned Andrew Ross before from okay, go in there of course known for those like amazing mindblowing videos. Have you ever heard of a rejected idea that they had that was like, just too amazing to do like the space shuttle and there's monkeys and they're on the moon or something? No, I don't know. I think they put a lot of work into those same data.

Speaker 3:

They put a lot of work into that stuff and uh, I, yeah, I don't, I, you know, I'm not privy to hearing any, uh, rejected ideas or anything, but I know that they, they, there's,

Speaker 4:

uh, those things like it looks like they just pull it off like a in one take or whatever, but there's just weeks, months of preparation. Yeah. Okay. So to start talking about Pollard and guide my voices, do you remember like what your first exposure to the band was? Like where you were and maybe what that was it a song was at a certain record. Where were you and how did it hit?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, totally. I was in college, uh, in college. I was always been a psycho for records. I mean, I just hoard records and anything I could hear when I want it to. Um, and I grew up on long island and you know, w, w, W, whatever was available to us came through before the Internet. I guess. So, or before music was an internet thing, so it was MTV and not, you know, I'm not coming. I didn't have, I had some musical mentors but not people who were, couldn't know who got about voices was in the nineties. Um, but when I got to college it was different. And uh, I had some friends who were big into Gbv and Kinda kept pushing the issue with me and I'd be like, ah, okay. You know, and mix tapes were made. And, uh, for my girlfriend at the time who's now my wife and I never, it took me until towards the end of college, um, to, to stumble upon isolation drills and a right when isolation drills came out. It was a record store in the dorm where I was living, bought it, loved it, thought it was great. Um, but I was like, what? So okay, now I'll go back to these recommendations. They've been coming in like, okay, alien lanes. Got It. Then the switch was flipped with lanes and I was in love and obsessed, totally obsessed with that record. And then started building out from there, buying every record. Um, you know, so, and then I just became a, you know, determined to figure this out. What's, who is this guy? What is this? What? And then when did you, when did you see them live? Was it, was on that tour? Was. It was right? It was, I think it was Ken and marches first tour. I'm actually, um, uh, or no. Yeah, I think it was Kevin Marches first tour and uh, so I guess universal truths in cycles. And it was a, I needed to see them live and for whatever reason, the New York dates, we're not going to happen. And I wound up getting a couple of tickets to see them at Tla and Philly and convinced a buddy to go with me and I just got totally rocked. I was just, you know, I was, I was, it was over at that point. I was just like, this is the greatest band I've ever seen. These are the best songs I've ever heard. And I just was coming at it from the perspective of someone who loves rock and Roll Live for rock and roll. And I just didn't know. I just didn't know, you know? And I feel like that this is kind of happy still like that. Now, you know, there's a lot of people out there who love rock and roll and they live for rock and roll, but they just don't know about Gbv because it's a, it's kind of a cult thing and it's, which is in its own little world. But it's not music. Like you said, it's like it's so extensible. That's what. It's not like Daniel Johnston, it's not like out there stuff. Yeah, it's, yeah, it, um, you know, the presentation obviously low or early on. That's a big part of the impression that people have that it is kind of a, um, difficult music or something like that. And, and I think to a certain extent that's true. If you're going to dive in with the grand tower or you're going to dive in with some, you know, vampire otitis or would, you know, at both those records have incredible pop music embedded in a pretty gnarly stinky shell, you know. Um, but, uh, when you, when you really look at the songs and the approach that he's taking from the beginning. I mean, I'm not any of us who are fans know that, uh, you know, just the pure songwriting part of it, the chords, the melody and the words. I mean, it's just like great. It's so on, on undeniably great that, um, you know, it doesn't matter the presentation that it comes in. Once you get past that and start realizing that this guy is like touched by something. And especially when. Yeah, when you say when you see them live to like, they're just so, uh, they're just like amazing live, especially in the early days when people knew the quirky records and that they just like kicked out the jams. I'm sure there've been many converts who maybe were, you know, drag. Totally. And then we're like, wow, this is just fucking amazing. Yeah, you don't expect it. Really? Um, yeah. And then you get the kicks. When I first saw them, you know, I, I, I didn't know I was going to get kicks. I knew that they drank and stuff, but I, I was like just so overwhelmed by the, the beer situation on the stage as part of the show. Not even like, you know, I love drinking beer. I thought it was cool, but it was just like, why that is, that is the coolest thing. I mean the cooler and he was giving them out to the fans and uh, and the whole ritual of it. And I really, I saw it like the, the, the, the beauty of that kind of, um, it was almost kinda like the punk rock, you know, putting the band on the same level as the audience, like we're going to share our beer with you. Sure. You know, uh, I was just blown away. I was like, Holy Shit, I need in a, I need. I needed every record, you know, and I, and it was around that time he was doing so much weird stuff like new new new stuff like circus devils. And uh, his relationship with todd was really starting to get rolling and so many great records came out of that. So it was an interesting time to start becoming a fan. A little frustrating because it was the end of that, that Prime Guillard run there. Um, but yeah, that's it. And then I think your first sort of formal contact with the band, wasn't it sort of like Dillard, I think your band young, sacred heart's played with his band at pianos and you kind of professor loved the Gbb. What was that meeting like and what did you, how did he react? Uh, oh, Doug's coolest dude. He was so, so cool. Um, yeah, you know, pianos used to be booked by a good friend of mine and Zach, Zachary, Mexico is a matter of fact who, uh, shout out to Zach, who, who's the owner of babies. All right. A very popular awesome venue in Brooklyn and he was actually one of my friends in college who was recommending Gbv vigorously to me. And um, so, uh, Zach book, pianos and no, he knew that I had, you know, Joe Fullan and love, love Gbd so much. And uh, we were, we were friends and, and uh, he was, he was also a fan of my band and his band was on my label, a serious business at the time. And so, um, he put us on this bill with Doug. Doug was doing a residency at pianos planning once a week to support his record call from restricted. And I, I, you know, we, we played our show, whatever. I just went up to him and just, you know, made conversation and I think we just carried it on, um, uh, with emails or my space or something, but I do remember specifically, um, I mean it was small talk in person, but I did specifically reach out with an email to him, you know, I don't remember a few months later, a year later or something, but specifically bringing up the idea of a, the lifeguards album that we did together. Sure. And then, so you say, Hey, let's all do another record. I've got a label, I can record you guys. Pollard says, okay, like, what was it like that moment when you met Paul, he comes into the studio. This guy is a, obviously a hero. What, what was that like and what was he like? What was your reaction? He's the coolest again. They've always, everybody in the whole band has always made me feel so comfortable and it was, it was great. But in my, in my mind, the morning that the session is happening and Bob's coming over, I am freaking out, you know? And so I went, I knew he drank Miller lite, so I was like, okay, this has got to, I got to do this ride. So I went to every, uh, local Bodega or whatever that I could find on my block. And it's, I don't know if you know, but in New York City, in Brooklyn, a Miller light is not as common as it is throughout the rest of the country. It's a little harder to come by for whatever reason. Well, it's people, it's not even ironic like pabst. Right, right. Yeah. And it's like Miller lite is just kind of like regular, you know, and a lot of places don't carry it. So I would go and I would find like, oh, they have one six pack of Miller lite here, I'm going to get that. And then I was like, I'm going to need way more. So I go to another place. And it was like they have the tall boy icon, the 24 ouncers I'm going to get a bunch of those. So I admit I get, I get this giant Miller light salad for three different places that I went to. And I stocked the fridge and uh, that was my ritual to get done before the session. The session itself was incredible. Um, Doug was there, his wife Allen was there and Bob came with his friend Taz and we, we just, we just had a great time. I mean, I don't know if. I'm sure you've heard about how bob works in the studio, but it's, he's very quick, very confident. He sounds like Bob right out of the gate. There's no struggle. There's no, um, there's a lot of people when they're cutting vocals are very, they get into a very critical headspace and I think that's good a lot of times. But for Bob, um, he doesn't need to. And he just is like, what you hear on every Gbv record, every single one. A maybe with a few exceptions, I don't know, but I think is pretty much Bob's like, okay, I'm going to sing that now. It goes in front of microphone, sings, it, listens back if he, if he hears problems, so he'll repair the problems. But he's very confident. And um, so that was great. That's a dream to work with because he's, you know, you don't have to like coax somebody into performance. I mean, you're just getting it. Sure. You know, when I want to ask too when you for the newer records, but that sort of process was like, because I think you did them at another place. But before we get to that, I want to talk about the next thing I think you did was the Esp Ohio project. How did that come up and how was, how did you sort of drawn back into that world? Well, Doug and I, uh, I, I became close with Doug and went to playing drums and doug's solo band and um, Doug. So, uh, you know, he, he doesn't play a ton, but it was a while. We're like, yeah, there was quite a few shows going on and then mark became the bass player and then that was great because I knew Mark A. Little bit from some other places, but like we are doug and mark and I are broken down all the time, you know, and, and we wound up having a wind up having a, uh, opportunity to open up for Gbv in 2014 after Kevin March came back in on the cool planet tour. Oh cool. And so we did two shows in DC and a bowery ballroom in New York City. Nice. And for me that was a dream come true. Obviously, you know, I'm like, wow, I get, I'm on this, I'm playing on Kevin's drums. I'm like, you know, it was, it was, it was, it was great. And it shows we're good. And uh, there was another guitar player who's in that band too, Russ, think who's on for those shows. Um, but, uh, yeah, now mark had known Bob a little bit at that point, but um, I think bob saw the band and stuff and uh, it, you know, putting his head that maybe like mark would be a good guide to ask to join if ever there was a, if ever there was an opportunity. So, um, we're doing doug village solo shows and stuff and um, you know, that's, that's kind of on the near horizon, you know, marketing, getting that call. But before that, before that I had moved out of my, a long standing studio relationship spot. I had a spot in Manhattan and it was expensive and you know, I finally had a minute to breathe or whatever and I decided that I was gonna just reach out to bob a little bit, say hello. Uh, you know, we wrote letters always, you know, bob's a great with letters and that's how, you know, we had a relationship before when we were doing the lifeguards things. I wrote some letters and stuff and he, he wrote back saying, Hey, come to come to heat fest. I said, sure, I'll be there. So that was 2015 went down to heed fest and he fessed is where magic is made, you know, he, he, he, he'd fest is just such a love fest. It's such a great, uh, experience. I don't know, have you, did you, were you, I didn't meet you, were you there this year? I've never been. Well, come next year and for real seriously. And you know, it's such a great experience and it's such a great hang. Um, so yeah, I mean that hang happened and um, bob wound up there, our conversation kept going forward and, and uh, it wound up being that mark and Doug and I uh, God, a batch of Bob Pollard songs late, late, late on us. So when we got the demos that USB allow record, I was like definitely stoked. I was so happy and uh, we made. We made quick, quick work of it. No. Did you know, was there talk of it being a Pollard Solo record, a Gbb record? Was this always going to be. I want to call it, this is gonna be called the Esp Ohio. It was like, um, he's definitely had espo how as a name I'm floating around for a lot of years. Um, different projects have had that name. Maybe we're going to be attached to it over the years. And uh, yeah. Um, I think there was a circus. The circus devils' record that was, um, maybe my mom, my mind has seen the white trick I think was the one that started with vocals or something. He was not going to call it circus. I could be wrong or that somebody should, uh, but I think he was going to call that Esp Ohio and I know there was a moment where he was going to call that lifeguards record esp, Ohio. So I had heard that years before, but actually when we started that he has be Ohio process. Um, it wasn't called you at the Ohio who was called a Esp New York that made more sense. Um, but I, you know, I think he was just Kinda, you know, I don't, it wasn't, we were just, that's what he was calling it at that moment. And uh, um, but yeah, it was still good. It got to be called Esp, Ohio. I think it looks great on paper. It looks great on the album cover two and it's been an awesome covering. It's a super, super nice record. Thanks. It is one of my favorite covers that he's done a, I love that cover. So after please be honest, came out. That was a record that bob like played all the instruments on his bicep by himself. How did you get the call to for August by cake? Um, well when that please be honest. Record came out. That's when he put the new band back together. We'll put the new bands who put the band back together, but with the new guys and the new thing. Um, and uh, I was very excited. Um, and uh, I was very excited for mark and uh, because we were hanging all the time and so that was, that was a big deal. And, and I, we were just basking in the afterglow of finishing that Esp Ohio thing and pop was really stoked on it and everybody was stoked on it and it was just like, just great times. And I was, I, I traveled to a few shows, um, on that first run, uh, I was at their first show in Nashville, uh, when, and then, uh, I saw them a couple of times during the nic three nic shows during those shows where nick was in the band and, um, it was just a pretty exciting time and I was just around and I think bob had in his mind that, um, he was going to do, um, he had a batch of songs that I'm was like a single single albums, width, um, and he was trying to figure out exactly how he was going to, how he was going to proceed with them because then the band situation was new and he had a lot of options on the table. He just basically did a please be honest with, you know, clears the deck or reshuffle the deck or whatever. It just kind of was a statement, you know. So it's guided by voices. Pollard. Yeah. Um, so, uh, I think what wound up happening was, uh, he, uh, had that batch of songs and um, I think it was going to record it in Dayton and uh, but he asked me if I could master it because, um, he was going to collect some recordings that, uh, he was going to do in Dayton, please be honest, style with some, with some band recordings, which is what August by KC became a. and so he asked me if I would master it. I said, sure. And then within a couple of days, uh, it became, well, can we just come to New York to do it, to record it? Sure. Why not? I'm going to go ahead and say, yeah, I'm going to go out on a limb and uh, respond in the affirmative. Um, so yeah, that's how, that's how it went down. It was a very comfortable vibe for um, mark and doug who were here all the time and uh, worked with me quite a bit. I'm Kevin Lives in New Jersey, so it was a, it was a comfortable vibe for him and Bobby Bare Juniors, just a comfortable kind of guy so he can be comfortable wherever it is. And uh, and, and Bob was really stoked and it was a really magical session, was great.

Speaker 4:

So yeah, so that's interesting. Then he, so pollard new than at the outset it would be kind of a mixed source of audio because again, it's kind of a transitional record because some of it sounds like, to be honest, because it's that cyber techniques, Ohio stuff, some of it's low fi almost reunion lp stuff and then like five degrees in the inside. That's something that you did that's like full band. So what was, as a master as a mixer, what are the challenges going in dealing with like all those different sources, all those different fidelities a, what's that do to you as a, as a, as a mixer and a master.

Speaker 3:

I'm just had to listen to it over and over and over again and try to find the threads between the disparate kind of sad song sounds, you know, and um, but the way that I didn't really have that much time to think about it because I did, I did. Well I shouldn't say that I did. There was, I had the demos for the, for the, for the songs for, for awhile. And I don't remember the exact chronology of when I, you know, when everything happened exactly. But, um, the original title of the Demos was psychopath time card. That was the 17th foggy. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So that was, I think that was the 17 tunes that are like the meat of August by KC. And I had those for a while, was listening to them intently and we're trying to like go and figuring out his notes and try and prepare as best as I could, but when the actual session happened, um, I mean everybody knows that Bob works very quickly, very quickly. And um, that was the biggest challenge for me was to be able to put myself in a position where, uh, you know, technically in my setup, in my studio where everything, where it's like, okay, I'm going into this knowing that like as soon as it comes out of the speakers and hits his ears, he digs it. That's pretty much it. It's going to be done, you know. Um, so, and it's not that literally, you know, it's not susie here's playback percentage over, but, you know, it's, it, it is a quick, there's not a process of like, okay, so like take these roughs home and like think about, um, and, you know, maybe you'll come up with some new ideas and no, it's like immediate. Everything is immediate. Um, so we would work all day, uh, you know, get together like 10 and Kinda get some food, maybe around five, six. Bob would go home after we had a good or go back to the hotel after we had a nice meal. And then I would go back to the studio, do overdubs with doug a night and stay until 2:33. I am trying to get mixed together, anything I could get together and uh, it was all culminating in, you know, the big listen through, which is what Bob wanted to do. You want it to take. He had his zipper technique songs and we had also done the solo band songs prior to this couple of weeks before. So, um, W, it, kate all came, you know, the last day of the session, which was actually moved up a day early because we were going so fast. But I was like, is it okay if I go, we finish tomorrow. I was like, yeah, that's cool. We don't need to have that extra day to mix and. No, that's fine. We'll just, we're good. We're good. Yeah. So, uh, yeah, we had a big like listening party. It was awesome. We had it all. We had it all mastered and you know, had all the songs going into one another. Um, so all the basic shape of the. Pretty much the done record was, was done during the session of a couple of days. Although I, you know, I did have to go back and make it, you know, little things. Yeah. I had to make it ready for retail. And then so was it around. So when did you start doing the bands live sound? Um, that didn't come about until the end of last year. Um, so that was toward wrapping up the, how do you spell heaven? Run of shows? Um, I came on August 30, first 2017. And what sort of led to that? Just because you obviously, you know, the songs, you know, the band, they just want it to be there. Yeah, I definitely want to be there. But, um, I was asked, you know, and I don't know, leading up to it, it's not like I'm, I'm out making, making my living doing live sound. Um, so, um, I was, you know, I'm a studio guy. Um, so it wasn't like they were like, oh, we need to get this hot front of House Guy. You know, it was more like I'm very, very, very fortunate to be able to be in a position where I've been able to be friends with those guys. You know, and I think that's really what it is for Bob. I think he's, he's just, I'm interested in having people around them who is comfortable with and how, who are get it and we were, you know, part of the team that are there for him. So, uh, yeah. And then what's the challenges in terms of Gbv as a live band? I know that like to play loud, is it trying to like balance them being loud with actually being able to hear what it is. It's all, even though a lot of the venues, the venues very wildly, um, so um, that's a big thing. Making sure that the band can hear themselves as clearly as they can on stage. I'm bobby's a lot of stage volume from his mic making the, trying to get him as clear as possible in the house. Um, the biggest challenges are, are, are the audibles you got to call every day at the different venues because we're not touring at a level where you can control all those conditions. So that's it. You just deal with DNA as they come. And so let me ask, like, I'm always curious about like, you know, bands on tour is, um, what do you do on an off day? What do you do when a tour day do you do? Do you like to see the site? We had sit downs, you know, what, you haven't heard about this, but we go to Italian restaurants. Okay. Uh, yeah. So, um, we have a sit down, mandatory sit down, the band goes out together, go out to dinner. Okay. Um, and uh, yeah, it's a big, it's a big deal. Uh, so then there'll be these off days and um, yeah, it's a time where we, we, we celebrate our success of being out on the road and living life and enjoying a traditional Italian food together and we call them sit downs. What's a. So I like that. It's almost like a band meeting kind of thing. Totally. But it's not a meeting, it's a, you gotta tell me what's Bob's go to order at a traditional Italian spaghetti with. Yeah, well Bob's vegetarian now, so he is, he loves to, he loves tomato sauce. He lives, you know, Marinara sauce. Um, he loves, you know, caprese salad or you know, like he loves tomatoes. He was big into maters. Have you ever heard the song hold? Yeah, that's where they came from. He's, he's a vegetarian. Would you know what that sprang from? Yeah, sure. I mean, he, it's some ethical issue, but I don't want it, you know, I, I don't feel super comfortable talking about north pops, you know, personal stuff. But yeah, he talks about it on stage. I mean, it's open. Yeah. He's, he's like more, I guess. No, he's not like Morrissey. Well, you know, 20 percent. I'm a big more militant. Well, but the song bob wants us to eat. Bob wants us to eat meatballs, you know, he's like, go ahead, hit me. Hit those balls, you know. Uh, he, marcy does not want anybody eat meatballs, but I both allowed on. But pauline hangs out at the wings place. How does that work? He doesn't eat the wings. Okay. He's just doing the salary of the ranch dressing. Yeah, totally. Yeah, it's more, you don't go to the wings for the cuisine, although their cuisine is pretty good. I mean, I'm not knocking their cuisine. It's pretty good, but it's a, it's a hang a. my mind is blown, actually a good. He's a sensitive guy. I like that. Well, you know, when you. Yeah, I mean, bob is, he is. I don't want to offer up stuff too much, but yeah, I mean he's just, he, he's, he's, he's connected to the universe, you know, he feels the pain of, of the, uh, everyone of animals. Definitely, you know, you know, animal. He loves animals. You know, he's almost like Tony Soprano, you know, the boss, you know, he's got the, watching the ducks, you know, and, and like watching the ducks come into his pool and uh, he just like has a revelation, you know, when he sees the ducks, you know, it was just something clicked in his mind. And I dunno, like hugs animals. I never the universe. Not that I wouldn't have thought that, but again, he's just such an so. Okay. So one of the reasons I love this band and why I love this guys, because I think that he does have layers. I think that he's. I think Steve, I think, you know, one of the things I've loved doing the podcast is looking at some of the lyrics and seeing how good they are and I get frustrated when gpb is seen as like a, you know, hey, this drunken rock band, whatever, and I think they're saying that. So I love to. I'd love to hear that. He's a deep guy. Yeah. And thank you for saying that too, because I really think that's part of what you're doing that's so valuable to fans and prospective fans and fans of the future was to kind of tell the story and give a guided tour of the Gbd, if you will. Um, but um, you have, uh, a really, um, Sharp, um, perspective on, on the lyrics and stuff. And I just think that's really important because people don't realize how deep it goes that people just, I think there's still, there are certain myths and um, maybe, uh, barriers, a preconceived notions that people who love rock and roll but have not quite gotten to the Gbb table yet. And these myths and barriers. I'm like, those people from, from coming in, you know, and I think that people might think that he's, Oh yeah, they're just a bunch of drunks or there's one good song on every album or there's a, you know, there's no, it's he needs an editor or whatever these things are where they might prevent people from coming, but when you have someone like you, like take someone by the hand and say, I was like, yeah, you know, there's just a little truth to all that. But at the end of the day, um, there's, there's all this depth, um, and, and you can kind of like hanging out in this universe forever and keep finding new things and um, it's, it's pretty exciting, you know, it's all there anyway. So then how did you, after August by cake, how did you sort of get the nod to do like the next record? Obviously they were pleased with the results. Yeah, I think it was just kind of soon as we start on the August by KC probably rejected. Maybe not as soon as we started, but as soon as bob was here and it all kind of started clicking then, I don't know, I think it was just kind of all in place, you know, um, you know, how quickly he works. So I think he was pretty immediately gonna start thinking about his next batch, knowing that he's got some people back them up and you know, and people you can count on. So that's what became, how do you spell head and I think it was pretty quick turn around with that. And then. So I think you sort of alluded to the way that recording works today. So you all get Bob's demos, you get some notes from Bob and then the guys and you lay down the tracks in New York. Is that pretty much the way it works? Yeah. Yeah. Do all the songs come in and one big batch? Do you get five and then two and he says, Hey, I've got two more. Or do you get like, like, you know, 17 selling big bitch. Wow. One big batch in sequence that was done

Speaker 5:

is done always. So you get a CD, Scott's numbered one through whatever the sequence is, the sequence that the album is going to be, and it's Bob playing on a boombox, you know, playing his guitar into the boombox and singing. Um, and you've heard the, the Boston spaceships. I'm letting demos. That's right. That's a good example of this process. And I think on lead unleaded beard, I can't speak exactly if you started getting into this at that point, but you know, there'll be these kinds of awkward pauses in the listening experience. You know, you kind of pauses and then like a new park kinda comes in and that's kind of part of his, his process of editing and arranging to. So he'll heal in a bit of inspiration, right. It spontaneously almost sometimes. Um, and then go back and then, you know, form and structure are very, very important to him. So he will go back and, and, um, sometimes, uh, build the structures I'm using his, uh, believe it or not, it's boombox in a CD burner. And so he'll sing the demos into his, his boombox, and then burn it to a CD up until a certain point, hit pause, then put the park, the other part that he wants to go on pause now. And that's how he builds out the demo is a sense of the band. Um, and so what we do is, um, I mean, I, I, I know, uh, that he worked in a similar way with todd and Chris. I know, I know Chris put in a tremendous amount of work. Um, and those guys, I mean, wow, they did so much great stuff. Um, all of them. And uh, what, what we had been doing is taking the demos and, and I'm trying to just make it so that we could play along with them so when there's pauses or whatever will kind of smooth those out and I'm making so that we can just track with Bob even though he's not there, you know. So we'll use his, his, his demo, acoustic guitar and voice in there. So that's what Kevin plays too. Um, and uh, yeah, we build up the tracks with Bob and then eventually we take it out and then we got our track.

Speaker 2:

He is still, he still uses that boombox.

Speaker 5:

Uh, he, yeah. Yeah, I don't, it's not valid boombox anymore. Um, he, he did it but he has another, he got, he's had gone through a couple that are in the same. He, I think he'll say that none of them are as good as the original, but I think the original apparent I guess made might've been a Kotter's book or some other place I read recently and they were like the original headlight, like a multitrack

Speaker 2:

function, two tracks. Have you ever heard of that before? And a boombox. And in fact somebody asked in the facebook group, they're like, what, what is this? You know, where can I get this?

Speaker 5:

I don't know if that's true. I don't know. I mean, I mean, not, not doubting, I'm sure it is, you know, but I'm just, I don't know if it's specific tech what the specific technology was, but what I, the boombox that he uses now, he's a boombox. Uh, but it like an eighties, one kind or early nineties one, you know, um, but it actually has a really cool sound to have it. I'm a really cool sound and I don't know how much people know how great a guitar player Bob is, but um, I've got to take a minute to put Bob's guitar playing over because the sound of guided by voices, his guitar playing in it a huge to a huge degree and I did not realize it as much. I did not realize that until I, until I started working with him. I'm, his right hand is incredible. It's, he's got such super powerful rhythm. He plays really loud, gets a huge sound out of Acoustic Guitar, huge, loud, like really aggressive. Um, and then, um, anybody who plays guitar to try to learn guided by voices, songs, you know, everything's in standard tuning, but you know, he has certain moves that he does where you kind of move shapes around and there's always a combination of open strings and open chords and power cord, single note risks. A lot of, oh, always. A lot of open strings. He's a little things that he does that are very him, he's totally untrained, totally self taught, but his guitar playing is the shit. So, um, and, and Doug is so intuitive and has been playing with him so long, he knows exactly what Bob's doing. Noses voicings. Exactly. So when Bob plays, you know, if it's, you know, the chord sequence might be like he be a, something like that, but he might be using voice things that are specific to stuff that he does. Um, any guitar player, you know, when you, when you get in there and try and learn Gbv songs, you know, it, it, it doesn't always work out right. If you're trying to approach it, which is just like regular major or minor chords,

Speaker 4:

there's a lot of feel in there that only he brings to it

Speaker 5:

feel and. But yeah, just the voicings that he uses, the shapes that he uses on the guitar. It's just unconventional. Like have you, you know, like if you take the shape, we make an a chord and then he just moves at all up and down the neck. So you would hear that in lots of different, lots of like tracker rape, Shane, you know, is kind of, that has that kind of vibe where it's like a modified version of that. But um, yeah, boss guitar, playings and credible. So that's what you get on the demos and his rhythmic sense is really for, in those demos, like the rhythmic structure of the songs are really clearly articulated in them. It's a little odd that there's a lot of information in them. So what Kevin does is, you know, um, he just learns that precisely and then plays it.

Speaker 4:

Can you think of a time when you get in these, these demos that you like get the chills either because you're like, oh my God, this is like amazing or else, Fred, from an engineering standpoint, do you ever as a telegraph to you that you're like, oh, I know exactly what I'm going to do. I'm going to double track and guitar and I'm going to this. I'm going to that. Do you feel that when you're at that stage or do you sort of wait until the guys come in and they start to do their stuff?

Speaker 5:

Um, it's a little bit of wait for the guys, for the guys, but there are certain times bob will have very, very specific notes. Well, I should maybe I shouldn't say very. Sometimes they're very specific where there's just like at this point, use this kind of an instrument or something like that. Um, but other times, um, uh, it just kind of happens, you know, I'm listening to the stuff, listening to the songs they demo for them is a different experience because it really demands a lot of attention to get, to extract what he's presenting. Um, whereas when you hear the band play at it's way more immediate, like it's a rock song. Sounds fucking awesome. But like when you're listening to the demos, um, especially when they're doing their, when they're chopped, you know, when there's interruptions and things in them and sometimes you can't hear all the words. They're harder to, you know, you'll know it's a great song right away. Sometimes you don't know what you're hearing right where, you know, you know, it's going to be great because it's Bob, but a lot of times it takes a few lists which you actually listens to, like figure it out and you gotta listen to it a lot. Um, and we just try and try and extract all the information that's in those demos, like down to the little, um, rhythmic inflections of like how he's strumming a, how he, he's doing the intro and the outro of the song and all that stuff is intentional. Nothing he puts on the demos is an accident, like a, like a, like a fucking, you know, like, oh yeah, just like jam it out at the end or whatever. No, I mean sometimes he'll say he wants a fade, you know? Um, and sometimes you will say I want you to jam it out at the end, but he'll have all these kind of orchestrated

Speaker 3:

don't go on forever. And it's just, that's it. You do that. And that's what makes it like surprising and unconventional. And I dunno. So Bob Pollard.

Speaker 4:

So if you guys were in the studio, he's not there. His is like Doug, sort of the bandleader. Is it more democratic in terms of there's got to be still, you know, little decisions you have to make along the lines in terms of what I'm going to do, six guitars, I'm going to do three, I'm going to do my Les Paul and I'm going to do an SG. Or like how are those decisions getting made?

Speaker 3:

It's a lot of band members handling their own business. Um, you know, everybody just trusts each other so much that uh, yeah, Doug plays his ass off so you know, like he knows what to do and I'm there to help them do that, you know? Um, every time he steps up to the plate, he's, he pretty much knocks it out of the park. So I'm just there to like help them. We've recorded stuff in different ways. Uh, so there, there's been stuff that's a recorded live, you know, like August by kc was pretty much the whole band, including bob altogether. Uh, or at least the 17 psychopath timecard songs. I'm breaking hot news with that psychopath timecard bit, therefore I never, I never heard that. But the psychopath timecard songs. Uh, yeah. So that, that was alive in the studio. Um, then we did how you spell heaven. We didn't do anything like that. Everything was built up. So the drums, we couldn't. Kevin came for separate sessions with just drums, bass, and then when we would do a guitar. Um, and then space gun was a combo. Okay. We did. Um, and then going forward, um, we've, we've done other discipline over China Combo Combo platter. Um, and going forward, I mean, and then we can keep going forward into the future we've done on other things. Um, but yeah, there's, so there's, there's like two poles to it there. It would be like the live every locker room, cutting it live. And then on the other side is a piece by piece, instrument by instrument. And then we do owe everything in between, you know, sometimes it's a hybrid.

Speaker 4:

What sort of necessitates or makes the decision in terms of which way you go with. Is it just sort of like Bob's fancy? Is it that he's going to be in town on, for a tour or you know, what makes, do you know how that decision gets made in terms, hey, we're going to just

Speaker 3:

get the whole band there were going to do half and half. Yeah, it's, it's pragmatic. Okay. Yeah, it's just, um, how do you spell heaven was we just finished August by cake and it was like Bob said, it's another batch of songs. They were fucking great and we just jumped in right away and got, um, got drums from Kevin and Kevin's and incredible drummer. Um, and so he can listen to those demos and just like hear exactly what he's supposed to do and also bring all this incredible creativity to it, like in his head basically. And he writes it. He went to Berkeley school musical. So he, like, he writes the notes out and Shit, you know, and like, and like he, he knows the parts of, he'll come in at first, take it, you know, second take it. Um, so he knocks his stuff out. And then um, and then I would have sessions with mark and Doug and bobby would send his stuff in from Nashville. Um, and then for space gun we did, uh, we did, um, a couple of sessions just to get back to doing more live together. We did a pretty cool session with bobby flew in and we were all coming together where we got a few tunes on that album, like um, flight advantage and a Kangaroos and uh, trying to remember the third one, the other ones. But where we, we, we, we cut those live like together to tape in my studio. I'm a guitar over dubs on top. But um, and then other other tracks on that record, on space gun, we're, we, we did some, we even started with base or started with guitar and then put drums on after. We did an all kinds of different ways to try to keep it fresh. But it's pragmatic. It's like we need to get this done by certain time who's available, who's got. And then, and then home recording too. I mean God's will will definitely contribute home recording stuff. And nowadays technology is such that like, who gives a shit? So that was great, you know. And it was funny, I was totally stunned. I was reading in an interview about the lifeguard record that doug came in with garage band demos. A. Doug is the one of the world's greatest masters of garage band. Because I live, I make music, I use garageband and I thought I was like a total heel. I'm like, Oh my God, I'm, I need to tell people that. Use Garage band, you're not a heel, you're not a hail. You were a babyface, babyface, listen, garage bands, fine. Whatever, you know, it's like you use whatever you have, you know. Um, and um, Doug, uh, uses the shit out of garageband and um, yeah, I mean I'll just leave it there. He knows what he's doing. So I know for a vocalist, for some of the records, those are done separately. Um, whereas that done the liner notes, list them as being still water river lodge is that I had found in a hotel and a river in Ohio. Is that the place? It's an airbnb. Yeah. Lovely family. Owns a beautiful home on the, uh, on the stillwater river, I think it's called. Yeah. And an end date in there. And uh, uh, yeah. Um, we drove a mark and I'll go in there and go in and hold up in the house for a couple of days. Send, uh, usually the actual tracking is pretty quick. I'm actually, let me rewind. It is always pretty quick. Uh, and it will be the actual recording of Bob's vocals. Like he does. He records everything in sequence, you know, so it's like, okay, we're going to start with birthday democrats. Okay. You Ready? Yeah. At pop. Can you sing it for me? Wants to get a sound. It was a uh, yeah. Okay. You know, but it's like, whatever he's saying it, I'm recording it without. That'll do. Sounds good buddy.

Speaker 4:

So what are you, what are you recording that on then? Is that like a laptop or something? What's that setup

Speaker 3:

for protools. Protools. Okay. In my role and my laptop. Yeah. And, and the first couple times we went there, I brought like a little more of an elaborate rig, you know, I brought like Nice studio monitors and brought options for microphones and all this crap. And then, um, for how do you spell heaven. And that was mark and doug and I went and, and honestly as I've gotten more into doing this work with Gvv, I've just gotten more and more into the power of 2018 level audio technology and just like we can get incredible sounds anywhere, you know. So like now, you know, when we go, like I won't bother bringing the crazy rig. I mean I just bring more of the bare, bare essentials. And the most recent record we did warp and woof. I mean we were doing vocals and hotel rooms and uh, um, like on, on unconventional places, you know, I'm just kinda like getting it done.

Speaker 4:

Well one of the things that I love about, like the last couple of records though is like, even though he comes in, he records you, someone takes, like you're doing some really nice things with the vocals. There's a lot of a double tracks, there's a lot of sort of effects and the vocals are treated where I hadn't really heard that in the past. Is that something that Bob just more open to? I know there's double tracked, it sounds like he's not as he actually doubling those vocals. Are you doing that with a engineering?

Speaker 3:

Not Bob. Bob knows where he wants to put doubles and knows where he wants to do harmonies. Um, he kind of. When we did. How do you spell heavy started? Uh, just, he didn't really change anything. He just kind of like with the process it way we did it, you know, he would sing the songs and then he would just say, yeah, make it sound good. It's like go for it. Whatever you want to do, and then we'll have a little back and forth if there's, if there's something that he's not digging, but you know, it's like in general, I mean it's just, it's kind of, it's, it is still pretty raw. I mean it's just kind of what he's singing. But I will take a little time to, you know, maybe you experiments a little bit, um, maybe, you know, just trying to think about like, what's the best way to put this particular song over where when you're in the running gun shotgun kind of style that GDP is known for. And like how we did August by cake, actually vocals for that. He would sing the songs as we went along. We'd cut instrumental tracks and then he'd be like, all right, I'm going to go second and then he'd be going saying it or maybe we have a few, maybe three or four in a batch that we had just cut and then it would be kinda like everything's kind of on the fly and then it'd be like getting mixes like on the fly. Um, so, you know, it might have a little bit of a more of a rough shod kind of equality where if I'm going to get vocals to kind of work with a, I'm going to spend a little more time to just get him to fit into the track. Nice. And you know, just have them be kind of a part of the band, you know? Um, so I don't know, just two different approaches. I like them both. Sure.

Speaker 4:

But I like, it's, it's funny you never think of Gbv is like a headphones band, you know, whereas like I've been listening pretty closely to like space gun and, and how do you spell heaven and it's like there are lots of little touches and again his voice, he's got a great rock voice. But I always, I always think that everyone, I love to hear like double track and I'd love to hear just a little effects and harmonies and stuff. Whereas I just, I don't know if I'd heard that in. Certainly not the low fi days, just didn't have the luxury on a four track to do stuff like that. And the second matador error when it's Kinda mid fied in here. A lot of that. So I'm just, I, I love those little touches.

Speaker 3:

That's true. But there are things, there are gestures that are made on those records that are huge to me with vocal sound. You know, like, I'm just thinking like the best of jewel hods oh yeah. Which has that really like slicing bright echo thing going on, um, which is kind of like, it's a super bold move. Um, and uh, if, I don't know if they thought about that, probably not. It's probably like in the moment. And Bob's like, yeah, that's awesome. You listened to all the John Chow records, you know, stuff where anything John Chow worked on in that period, uh, um, you might hear some really cool vocal effects. Kid Marine, uh, has some crazy stuff. I'm just weird, weird, long reverbs and um, and on the low fi stuff, it's great vocal sounds. Um, in fact, you know, Bob, uh, would say that, uh, you know, he finally started getting able to send, he liked around the time of [inaudible] and alien lanes and whatever. If it was sinking into, you know, an sm 58 going into the four track, the trouble turned the way up or something like that. Um, I do. Those are influential sounds to me, you know, like, um, there's like an echo thing that it's done under the bushes on the store size and a lot of those songs. So there's always this experimentation that he's, he's open too and he likes effects and things. Um, it's, I kind of dig having him there to do that kind of stuff and we haven't. It's been kind of up to up to us doing this kind of remote work, you know, where, you know, he's not there during the mixing or do you know, but um, in August by kc we came up with some wild ass shit off off the cuff, you know, like, um, warm up to religion has like bizarre memory men echo on his voice, you know, and we would just, it's just kinda like a, I don't know, just very intuitive, just kind of roll with it, see what happens, try, you know, generally Bob's very excited when he hears things like that, you know? Um, unless it's counter working counter to his goals for the song. Well let's hear it like, have you ever gotten it really wrong? Like maybe. Yeah, because he's not there that you're asking all these little decisions and maybe you know, Doug's is all want to do something a little crazy on this and he'll hear it and be like, no, it's a good question. I, yeah, I totally, I get it wrong all the time. I mean, but um, I think a good example would be, um, lots, I mean, whatever. It's don't be. This is like any record making process. There's a lot of back and forth and stuff like that. Hey, check this out. No, no, no, you're not. Um, there's so little of that CPD process that there's so much trust and there's so much. There's so many people involved who were just very intuitive knowing kind of like what Bob Diggs, that we don't do it a lot, but yeah, like blink blank on space gun. I'm Bob Kahn. I always heard that it's like I'm actually a, like a kind of like a punk rock kind of a vocal. Um, and like really raw and uh, where we, we, we did kind of like a spaced out kind of a track, um, with all kinds of cool stuff. So I had to kind of, a little bit of a space, your vibe going on the vocal and he was like, yeah, no, you can get dry that off. Go ahead and draw that off. I'm going to have those one. Yeah. And that's fine. I mean I, and whenever any, anytime he says something and I'm like, Oh my God, thank you. Really don't hesitate because sometimes I can't believe, you know, how pleased he, he'll, he'll, he'll, he'll just love stuff, you know, as soon as he hears it. Um, so I, I love it whenever he can give us a little feedback, I look about him. He seems like he's such a genuine music fan, you know, and I don't owe the sense of like, you know, radio head that they sit around and be like, oh, look at this old movie cops and go, you know. No, I mean he is the ultimate music fan authority. I'm a record collection is as I'm sure you've heard. Have you seen unbelievable have seen it in person? Absolutely. When you know, when before you were like, what do you guys do on off days? And I was like, oh, we do sit downs, we go to sit down. So you don't do Italian restaurants. We also go to record stores. Wow. Um, and uh, yeah man, like he's, he knows his shit and uh, you just so much to learn. Uh, and uh, and uh, you know, I've always been a record nerd and have a crazy record collection and you know, and Bob's on another level and uh, yeah, so like when he has this enthusiasm and this child law, like, you know, almost, you know, enthusiasm about how fucking awesome it is to get, to make your own records, you know, it's like he's still, he's 60 but whatever 60 and it's still kind of that, or at least that I know the past couple of years, you know, there's still like a connection to the spark of the dude who's like jock, who's kind of like making the fake album covers and make and as a creative fake albums with fake band names and so stoked about that and only wants to do start a band. He's so excited. Like there's that spark. It's just, it's like, well, we go to a rec. Yeah,

Speaker 2:

no, that, that's great. And I think that's something that the bill that we lose that ability to like play and create and like when he does like collages like that when I was a kid I used to love to just, you know, cut paper and glue and stuff and, and when you lose that sense of play and you get a job and you were down and you worry about making money and buying cars and stuff, that, that's not a good thing.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. It's not, no, it's not an. And also with music too, like there's a lot of opportunity for us to be more practical about how we're going to conduct our musical labs as we get older and stuff. You know, if you're a musician and you're like well this way wasn't working and now I'm into this other thing and you know, not all of us are as lucky as bob to be so incredibly talented and to have your vision. So I'm honed, you know, but he's just like, he's just on another level. He's a, he's a virtuoso.

Speaker 2:

And so tell me about, it sounds like you are no, um, that you're, you're, you're a modern guy, you believe in pro tools and all that. Do you, when you record the band is at all a digital, some analog, are you doing anything to take? Okay,

Speaker 3:

totally. I have my studio 24 track tape machine, two inch tape. Uh, so, uh, I didn't use it on August by cake because I knew we needed to go really fast and we didn't have, we didn't have any moments to spare and I didn't use it on heaven. Um, I started using it on space gun and I use it a ton on Zeplin over China for the sound or for, for why? For the sound. And I liked the work. I liked the workflow that it creates. I like, um, I like to have the band. I like, I like to use it when it's a live band tracking session whenever was all together. Um, and then I, but then I will dump that stuff into digital world. Um, and then, uh, but then yeah, do just, we have plans to do another session coming up. We're going to do stuff on tape again. Um, but it's kind of like all over the map. I mean, it also, you can tell. I mean the sound is awesome, but if, if like if I told you like, okay, Zeppelin over China, half of it was done on tape and have, it was done not. And like, you know, people, people would all get it wrong, you know, I'd be like, all right, pick out which ones everyone would get it wrong. You would know. Maybe that's about it. Yeah. Maybe, but not, you know, it's not, it's more, I'm just very pragmatic, you know, I just, I'm like, let's do this and the way that makes the most sense for right now and getting the job done so well. I like both and I love the sense that, and we've, we've referred to it a couple of times about your philosophy and the band is being pragmatic and that's just, that's like realistic. That's, I think that's where the band's. Last night I was talking to a friend of his who was talking about his approach to music and it's like a, he's just a, he realizes that it's, it's know it's a business, it's something you kinda sit down and you just do. There's none of this sort of like, you know, sitting around waiting for artistic inspiration or being guided by dogma, you know, you just kind of goes with his instincts and it's going to be analog. It's analytics will be digital. It's digital. Yeah. I mean, Bob's not really concerned with the technological part of it. He's worried about the artistic part of it, you know, and um, he works with people that, uh, through the years that have used all different kinds of methods, you know, as far as I know. And I haven't met Phil, but Phil who run cyber techniques in Dayton has a totally analog workflow. I mean, he's, he's totally on two inch tape. His stuff sounds great. Um, I wish, I wish we could just do it only on tape because that would be so fun. But, uh, you know, we're doing a lot of volume, you know, and I love pro tools. Oh God, I love it. I love it so much. You know, you could go fast because you can do a lot of so fast and make shit sound great fast. And, and, and do whatever I want and serve the song without any limitation. Um, you know, this, not to get too far ahead of ourselves here, but you know, there's these, we've got these eps coming out, you know, that are going to culminate in warp and Woof, which is the post Zeplin over China album for 2019. And we did those on little go, man. Those are like, and they sound, it's probably the most high fi sounding record that we've made or wow, by maybe, I dunno, maybe I'm wrong, maybe people can, can correct me on that. But from my years it's like it's sounds pretty fucking rocking. And uh, we, we recorded guitars, you know, at 70 miles an hour in the van, you know, it's, it's not, you know, we're, we're taking full advantage of of 2018 tech. That was Austin to get rocked made.

Speaker 4:

So then also too, just real quick from like at the final stage if you're, so you're pretty interesting in that you're engineering your mixing in your mastering, um, when you're mastering, you know, Gbv, he's got a, a huge contingent of their fans are like vinyl enthusiasts, you know, that might have some high end gear at home and that a lot of folks, younger kids you know, or like streaming this stuff on spotify. How does, how does that play in decisions you make when you're finally mass mixing and mastering all this stuff down to what's going to be available to people to Dubai or listener stream?

Speaker 3:

Good question. I don't know. I mean, I guess vinyl is always, the vinyl is always the ultimate like target point because that's what Bob is connected to. Um, so we kind of do make decisions based on whether or not it's gonna work on vinyl. I don't want to overstate that too much because I'm not saying like the band makes decision, you know, I'm like, you know, maybe me technically and I'm like, okay, well this is going to be vinyl. But um, I don't really differentiate that much. Um, you know, uh, I just, there's a certain standard that we got to try and hit and uh, we just don't want it to sound too much shittier than, you know, the last one that I did want to keep making them better, you know, so, um, I dunno, I dunno.

Speaker 4:

Okay. Um, so in terms before we move on to a space guns, so how do you spell heaven? Uh, anything, anything stick out in your mind in terms of like the sessions or anything you're like, just super proud of that you captured or brought to the band that hadn't been there before?

Speaker 3:

Well, I don't know. I mean, I don't know that I'm super proud, but you know, there are a couple of cool things on, um, how do you spell heaven that might not have been on records before. One one is the song boy [inaudible] that doesn't, it just has, it just has a pretty wild, like strong thing going on that Kevin, that's an example of Kevin's then opposing that. I'm, no, that's Kevin playing, but it's edited. It's edited. And then there are, there are samples. Um, it's Kevin playing for sure. Um, but yeah, I mean it's chopped up. I thought that was coming onto the sides, but that's an overdose, but that's kind of employing for sure. Um, and uh, but that's something that's, that's uh, Kevin, I'm composing that and writing it out and we kinda went back and forth. I'm like, he sent me the, he sent me the beat that he wrote and I kind of mocked it up with fake drums and stuff and then he came in and performed it and then added those overdubs. And then I think there might be some, some like drum machine high hat in there. It could be wrong. I haven't listened to in a long time, but um, you know, but that, that's just, I don't know, you know, maybe there's certain fans are here. They're like, Eh, yeah, I'll pass on that. That's not Gbv to me, but, and that's totally fair. And I, I don't know, maybe, I don't know, it never gotten a set. So who knows? But if it was um, it was something where it was like, all right, this is like giving, you know, we're, we're, we're, we're, we really are trying something here. I mean, you know, ca and Kevin is, it was Kevin's beat, you know, when we did it, you know,

Speaker 4:

but that's what I liked about Gbv is like there is no Gbv. It's like it's, it can be whatever it wants to be an I get like, like whenever I see a picture of a band and there was like a guy with a saxophone, I'm like okay, so every song's this guy is going to have to like figure out, oh, when do I get to play my saxophone? It's like, well fuck that. Does the song need a saxophone? You know? Or like the jeep. Exactly. The GBV is Bob, it's this, it's these guys. It's the so called classic lineup. It's like whatever he wants it to be. And it's so easy,

Speaker 3:

there's always a lot of variety on Bob's albums. So, um, even when they are all done in one fell swoop, I'm, when you get into the little universe of the album, you'll start noticing all this variety and be like, whoa, that's a crazy transition from this, like full rock song into this really weird, um, you know, whatever. Like I don't know, how do you spell having like, what is, what would, what kind of, what kind of songs they fall silent, you know, it's like, so weird. It's like Prague, like King Crimson, but like just acoustic. I don't even know what it is, you know, but it's beautiful. And, and you know, what kind of a song is 10th century, um, two songs, three songs. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know. I mean it's, so that's where a lot of that Prague kind of influenced Bob comes in and um, I don't know if I'm strange too far, but like, I think this from the question, but like his, um, he's got this band that's very capable of attacking his songs from anyone of the four p's perspectives, punk, pop, Prague, psych. Um, and um, the prog part, you know, like, you know, these guys are crazy good musicians. Um, you know, mark is an amazing bass player. I can't wait for people to hear some of the new stuff. Mark has been playing some of the most signature incredible baselines. Um, so yeah, it's just a wild

Speaker 4:

team effort and I have no idea if that answered your question. No, that's all rambling. I'm rambling man. But I'm not dickey betts. I got, I got no agenda here other than just to hear you talking about the band and have a good conversation. So let's say I want to talk about Kevin again for a second because again, I think that he's, he's brought a total level of musicianship to the band. Seems like a total liquid guy. And for me, one of the revelations about August by cake with his two songs, which were not only, not only good songs for that record, but we're like good songs for anything. I mean they're just gorgeous. Do you know, uh, is he working on like a solo record? Did that people know that he's that good of a singer as well? People know now that he's that good of a singer as Bob and Mike gave him a mic this year. Two on stage. So I'm

Speaker 5:

anybody who's come to see the band in 2018 on the space go on tour, has noticed that, um, the backing vocals, which already we're sounding great with bobby bear junior in the and nick and Doug and then Doug, um, uh, and, and, and mark to, through the whole first year on 26, 2017 backing vocals sounded great. Then this year 2018, Kevin gets Mike and Kevin is like, he is so great. Um, he doubles Bob a lot and choruses and he's so dependable. Pitch wise and his tone blondes with Bob perfectly. So as a singer. Yeah, I mean he's, I mean, whatever, singing, backing vocals on stage, but it does make a big difference to me. It, it sounds great. So was his songs. Yeah man. I mean he's just, he's phenomenal. Um, is he making more workout as you working on a solo album? I don't think so right now, but um, let's, let's, uh, let's keep the cards and letters coming because uh, I would, I would like to hear that. Um, he does have, he's just an incredibly talented guy. I'm as all the guys in the band are and they all could do. I mean, doug is a solo artist. Bobby Bear Junior for the love of Christ is he, I mean he basically put a pause button on his already, uh, you know, very successful solo career. I mean, I don't know, I don't want to oversell it, but I mean bobby is toward the world as a solo artist going to meet him. He's got a movie about him. He's got lots of records and I mean bobby is a, he's amazing. So you've got all these guys who were in this band who, who are front people in their own bands and I think bob realized that and that's kind of what made August by cake, kind of have that contour where we brought, brought in all their songs and yeah, Kevin Songs 10. What were a hit? I mean, people love Kevin Songs. I love Kevin and the funny thing is that they were, those were his home demos. What you just handed in that. Oh yeah. I didn't have anything to do with that. I mastered them. Yeah, Home Demos, home demos. Those were his uh, I think he did them. Maybe these is like on his laptop. He's like pro tools on his laptop or something. Yeah, total homes. All also those two songs. And Kevin's do songs, no real drums, no real drums. Drum machine and, and in I think he might've like play drum sticks on like a chairs. I don't know, something like that, but um, no real drums.

Speaker 2:

So that's just making me mad at this point. I know that like to like cancel whatever he's doing on Sunday, send the kids to the soccer, whatever and like, you know, put out some more fucking stuff.

Speaker 5:

He actually, I think he had those songs in his back pocket just as like some stuff he was just doing for fun. Maybe. I can't say specifically when he did those, but I do not think it was in the same time period that the re, the reconfigured guided by voices was going on. So I got. I have to ask him. It's so annoying. I love that you're annoyed by that. It's so cool. Um, yeah, I mean he's just, he's just a talented guy and like, he definitely has a great knack for hooks. He's a pokemon.

Speaker 2:

So then I think on, so we kind of tasted like Zeplin over China. The single, the flip side was a song, uh, your cricket is rather unique. Was actually an old suitcase for Bob singing. Is that him? Is that Kevin March singing out on the, on the flip side?

Speaker 5:

Yeah, you're correct. It is rather unique. Absolutely.

Speaker 2:

And then how, how did that convert and whose decision was that? He sounds great. Again. I,

Speaker 5:

um, so okay. Uh, that one was, as you know, um, you know, uh, you know, bob will, he likes to put out singles and a lot of times he doesn't decide that he wants to put out a single until the last minute or something in the past and there's been, um, you know, there's mark and Doug told a story about doing something nice city which is the b side of just to show you, which is kind of like last minute thing. But in this case, weirdly, um, you know, that single showed up in July of 2018 and the album is not showing up until like January, February 20, 19. So it's not exactly the last minute and, but at the time we thought it was the last minute because we just finished up one over trying to. Bob was so stoked on Zippo, Virginia that he wanted to release seven singles a month every month. So we were racking our brains like we need to come up with, besides like, let's get this done and we got to start now and how we've got to start now because if we were going to do this seven single plan, um, we're gonna we're gonna have to, we're gonna have to get one out for July. So, um, that's what happened. So we needed your crooked ready. We needed to find a beside. So I talked to the guys, we talked to Bob or whatever and we came up with a list of potentials. And your quicker is rather unique. Was a song that I, uh, picked out from the, from the suitcase thing as a potential esp, Ohio beside back when we were still, we did, um, what was the esp, Ohio beside? We did for world cyclopedia was another, uh, uh, hit me with tonic, that song that I recorded drums for that and cricket at the same time. And then we wound up deciding to work on, hit me with the time and then shelled cricket. Coming back to it, I said, well, I had the drums done for cricket. Can we put the rest of the group with the guys on it? I will. So then, um, and since, since it was my drum thing, we were like, well, wouldn't it be cool if Kevin saying it? So Kevin Sang it and uh, it's kind of like an Esp Ohio Drum outtake with a, uh, a jug Guillard, uh, and, you know, the whole mark and the band and everybody then and then Kevin singing and Marxists and two. So, uh, uh, it was like a weird, what we felt like we had to get it done immediately. We were like, this need to get rushed out because we got to get the first single app and then just about decided that he didn't, didn't want to go through with doing all seven.

Speaker 4:

Do you know what that was born out of? Just being like, Eh, you know, it's going to be too much work or you just,

Speaker 5:

I don't know exactly. I mean, I would've been a cool idea, but yeah, it would have been a lot of work. And, um, uh, I think the real root, you know, whatever I mean the, the business of putting together the guys who put together the, the, the rockets on guys. I mean, there's a lot to do with that and, and, uh, it might not have made sense to do seven singles, but, um, it would have been cool. Um, but, uh, that's why it came out in July and, but at the time I'm Bob Doug quicker is rather unique and was like, okay, that's going. And so we, we've had the demos for what, for the album that it's getting confusing with all these albums. But we've had, we've had the demos for what street party was formerly known as cheap party since April, May, June, or whatever have of this year. So we were listing, we've been listening to those demos all year. We haven't recorded them yet. Um, so, um, when we gave him the beside, he was like, oh, okay, that's going on, that's going on the album that's going on, street party, that's going to be, you know, he had specific spot in the sequence that was going to be um, and then uh, his thinking on street parties evolved and at this point it is not called street party anymore. It's called, but it's still the same batch of songs and we're going to work on it this winter and you have in the rise of the rise of the ants and this is, I'm not breaking news with that, but it says this stuff onstage, so

Speaker 4:

I haven't seen their coming here in a month. So

Speaker 5:

yeah, I'll see you there. I'll see you there buddy. I'll look at the board for sure. But um, yeah, rise of the ants. Uh, so yeah, so that's really awesome and it's on the back of that signal from the forthcoming album, the street party and who knows, rise. The answer might get changed and it might be something else or whatever. And that's part of the fun of coming along for the ride. It's like, that's.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's gonna be Miller light salad. I like that.

Speaker 5:

Lights out. Did you, did you look at, you know, bob put out earlier this year? He did that like typed up. Oh yeah, notes the fans. Did you like that?

Speaker 2:

I, I was, I was so fucking stunned by that. But like, he's, he's like a military general with a campaign, you know, it's like he's just, it's all in his head. He's, he's, he's, he's march and he's got all these plans and everything sort of fits and he plays cash rivers off at Gbv and then you got the eps and they're going to collect it and like he, he just, he knows he's just, he's just got to slow down and to be a fan now I'm is just so good and so incredible.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. Well that's awesome. I love hearing that. It made me so happy when he, when he typed that up and was going to send it out because I'm a fan, I'm still a fan first. And, and, and I always will be. And like that just tickles my funny bone man when I see that, when I, when I see that typed up thing, when the, you know, he's got like, you know, that he actually sits there and types that out and um, he wants to communicate with everyone and let everyone know what's going on. And, and, uh, um, it's so wild. It's so much. There's so much, especially after this year where we're space going, you know, there was this concerted thing we're like, okay, like he was, this is bob wanted to do like a, it was like, I want to do space gun, I want to do three singles leading up to it. I want to let people like sit with it. I don't want to flood them out. I just want them to like get a chance to like sit with space gun. Um, and that's what we did. But this is the result. Get ready for 2019 because it's going to be mean things that it's gonna be a wild ride and, and hopefully it keeps going with the same amount of volume because I just fucking love that. I just think it's so cool. I don't care that it's overwhelming for people. It's part of the fun.

Speaker 2:

So let's. Okay, so as we begin to wind down a bit, so let's go back to, you know, you making that lifeguards record, uh, a. Did you ever think that you'd be like this ingrained with the band back then? Like, you know, no, people didn't know the TPP was coming back.

Speaker 5:

No, I mean I wanted to be obviously, but like I just was trying to. I'm a very humble and very. I mean, hope I was coming off. It's humble, but I just couldn't believe I was in a position that I was in to be able to work on a record with Bob. So it was surreal. It was, I don't know. I mean it was, it was a dream come true. That's what it was. Straight up dream come true and it still is. I'm still in it. You know, but um, did I think if I was going to be no way, you know, I remember we were working on the album, the lifeguards thing where we were in the process some point in the process and was talking on the phone with Bob and he was telling me about um, the prospect of the band back together, um, the matador thing or whatever. And I was like, Holy Shit. It was like, that's great. They seem pretty excited about it at the time. And um, um, I thought that was cool and, and, and I was so excited about that, but I didn't have any. I didn't have anything to do with that. Doug didn't have anything to do with that, so we didn't know. I was, you know, and I'm friends with Doug and I were just happy to see that there was, they were playing and that it was going well and they were playing in front of big crowds and stuff and started. I was psyched around that time because I got, I got put on the guest list, I got put on the guest list. Jeff, imagine that now I'm in the van, but I got put on the guest list. That was enough for me to get put on the guest list. Oh my God. That was so fucking cool. And I, you know, I'm still, I still think it's so cool. And uh, yeah, so like, uh, uh, you know, and then I, but doug did say something around that time or were you just hanging out? And he was like, you know, I dunno, you know, bob might find, you know, just just, just to let you know about my life, what we're doing here. And you might get the ball again someday, you know, something like that. He said something he kind of, he liked foretold the future in a casual kind of off offhand comment that I was like, oh no, whatever. Um, and just put it in the back of my mind, you know, but um, you know, later on years went by and he had kind of worked out that way.

Speaker 2:

So do you get the sense like again, we're talking about these guys and this, this lineup in this, these last couple records are just like amazing. Do you get a sense that within the band that they, they're taking the same view of this? Like again, as a fan, I'm like, just so blown away. I like space gun I think is one of the top five records of all time. I think it sounds so good. What we're hearing from the new stuff is just like so good and I'm like amazed after 30 years that this band is still so vital and important. Um, do you think that they get a sense that this is kind of a new golden era for them or they just kinda like, you know, it's gonna go well,

Speaker 5:

yes, totally. Everybody's totally tapped into that. Um, I love the new golden era term. Uh, not to. I mean I just, we use that. We talk because look, we are all fans is fan first. Um, mark is a big time fan. I'm Bobby Bare Jr fan. I'm bobby saw them run the two to collapse time. I'm Kevin Fan. We Love Bob, you know, and that's where we're just so excited to be there for him and they just give him a, give him what he needs to do, what he does at the best that he can, you know, at the best possible level available to us.

Speaker 2:

And that's not to be a downer, but I think like the thing that makes me

Speaker 4:

really nervous is just how talented the guys are and the fact that they are kind of all front man, you know, like mark writes his own songs. There's a really good Doug Bobby, like I'm just like, I'm always, maybe I'm a pessimist by nature. Some of them and I'm like, I'm, I just hope he can keep these guys together because it's so good and I know that they're all so talented and maybe they can do stuff on the, you know, on their own and then an interim or something. But I want to see them in together.

Speaker 5:

Yeah, I'm with you, man. I hope, I hope it goes on for a long time, but I always, I always say, um, I know that Bob, his number one priority is going to be his art and he's got more integrity than anyone I've ever worked with as it in terms of, as an artist, you know, um, and, um, that's always going to come first and he's got to protect that. Um, so throughout his career he's gone through. He, we make jokes about a lot of people coming in as the band and stuff. But then at the bottom, the bottom line of it is I think he's protecting his art. And so with this current lineup, I mean, I always say like, Oh, you know what Bob, you know, the time ever comes. I'd take it like a man because I know that he, I know that that's what I know, that that's what he's doing, you know. And so often it's not personal with people that, you know, in ways that he's moving as an artist. Um, I mean there might be personal things that had come into play, but at the end of the day he's protecting his, his, his art and his business and it's his, it's his, it's his livelihood, but it the most important part of it to him as his artistic part and uh, so, you know, I hope it goes on for a long time. Um, and I think we are all really aware of that. Um, we're all really aware of that dynamic, you know, and um, we want to protect it to and we want to be there for him. So, um, you know, I don't think it's going to be, you know, it's a very strong, like the guys in the band, everybody. We're very, everybody's very close right now. So, and I think that's kind of what he's always wanted is to, just to have like the guys, you know, the club, the fucking drinking buddies or whatever, you know, but it's, it's like, yeah, go ahead.

Speaker 4:

The club is open. Let's just hope it stays open.

Speaker 5:

Totally. Yeah. Um, yeah. And yeah, it's going good.

Speaker 4:

Travis, thanks so much for your time today. It was my pleasure. That's it. I'd like to thank Travis again for his time. Check back next week for the final episode of the series here at comms space gun five.