Drink Like a Lady Podcast

Season 3 Episode 6: How to Create a Culture of Psychological Safety On Teams?

May 28, 2021 Joya Dass Season 3 Episode 6
Drink Like a Lady Podcast
Season 3 Episode 6: How to Create a Culture of Psychological Safety On Teams?
Show Notes Transcript

In Season 3 of the The Drink Like a Lady Podcast, we are focusing on what we learned from the pandemic and where the growth opportunities are. This as the conversation turns to recovery. In Episode 6, we will be discussing the most inviting of leadership skills for the post-pandemic —creating PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY for employees.

The benefits of creating psychological safety is agile teams and the ability to adapt quickly.  

IDENTIFY BURNOUT

Signs of “burn out” include

  1. Becoming more cynical with time
  2. Everything that occurs gets to be a big deal or seems to be a big deal.
  3. Feelings of uselessness or not purposeful are discussed openly.
  4. Depression and anxiety are now commonplace and identifiable.
  5. Excessive use of alcohol and drugs becoming more recognizable
  6. Haven’t use their time off, vacation, or taken sick days when needed

 NEXT STEPS: Create the right climate for open-minded thinking

  1. Developing positive mindsets. Create safety in risk taking
  2. Role model behaviors such as compassion, respect, and support – starting with the individual.
  3. Positive team climate is the #1 driver of psychological safety and occurs when leaders demonstrate supportive, consultative behaviors, and then this is when the real power of leadership folds into the mix of management and leadership.  
  4. A shift In leadership style that work is key: The traditional command and control leadership is no longer key to success. In fact, this form of style is detrimental to psychological health and well-being.

Here are some key metrics on the positive relationships of leadership behaviors and their outcomes:

  1. Authoritative Leadership- -.08% impact
  2. Consultative Leadership- +.54% impact
  3. Supportive Leadership- +.33% impact 

6. Using a combination of the consultative and supportive leadership styles shows that the POSITIVE TEAM CLIMATE impact is +.77%

  1. Consultative leadership solicits input and considers the teams views on issues that affect them.
  2. Supportive leadership has an indirect effect by helping to create a positive team climate, ie “What do you need to meet the objectives set out for you?"

All of these behaviors encourage team members to support one another…mirroring the executive leadership’s behaviors. It all starts with a catalyst…and that is from the top down.

 YOU are or can be that catalyst!

Speaker 1:

Hey, Kathy , how are you? We are starting a , yet another episode of drink, like a lady, our weekly podcast, where we're talking about ways that female leaders can get a seat at the bar and get a seat at the table. How are you doing

Speaker 2:

This week, Kathy ? Hi , I'm good. I'm good. It's uh , it's getting ready for Memorial day. We always assume that we're going to be relaxing on that day. So I'm looking forward to

Speaker 1:

That. Can you believe it's already may of 2021 last we knew the draft was getting canceled. The NBA draft was getting canceled tanks and COVID in Australia and all of a sudden we're at the next Memorial day already.

Speaker 2:

There we go . There we go.

Speaker 1:

Well, on today's episode, episode six, we are focusing on psychological safety and what are kind of the ways that we as female leaders can make sure we're creating that for our teams, that we're creating that for ourselves and we're creating that in our businesses. But I think that step one of really kicking off this episode, we need to talk about the benefits of psychological safety. So I'm going to leave that one to you.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. This is, this is sort of the core of what I do in motivating teams. And that is to find those individual components of safety that allows someone to just unfold to allow them to just be so empowered that they feel that they can do anything. Um, once you do that with teams, you know, it's very motivating. The energy is very high. Um, there's very little resistance. And in that , um, in that regard, we can adapt quickly, which is what we needed to do during , um, COVID and we're very agile. So with that, we're , uh, we're open to new opportunities,

Speaker 1:

Everybody and their mother is complaining about burnout right now. So I think it's very important to say, what does burnout look like when you're seeing it in your teams?

Speaker 2:

You know, Julia , I have to tell you, it's almost, I'm seeing it. I'm going to say daily, but I'm seeing it hourly and people and how they respond to emails and how they're responding to you, make a comment. And all of a sudden it's a big blow up. So some of the components that you can look for that people are becoming more cynical. You're , they're taking things much more personally than they should be. You're you might have a conversation with it , um , with them. And all of a sudden it's , you're , they're becoming defensive. Like my husband said at lunch, we eat lunch together. He said to me , um, you know , um , that person is on the defensive, you know, in athletics as well. Um, everything becomes a big deal. And I think to myself, there can't be that many big deals. We , you know, this really simple, let's get it together. Um, and then I feel useless. You know, there's a purpose, listen , this , that goes around it. And they talk about it. You know, where, you know, in the past, people might not have talked about it, but there's , they're like, why am I really here? Why , why am I doing this? Um, depression and anxiety? You see that a lot. We know that there's a lot of mental health issues. People are talking about it over and over on the news , um, excessive use of alcohol and drugs, you know , um, and maybe even starting earlier that, that happy hour. Um, and then here's the one thing that I always noticed very early on my , your people stopped taking time off, or they had to work more, work more do with the grind, et cetera. Um, very key as we go into how we can help them is let's make sure that we're saying to them need to take a day off.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And you'd be surprised how many people feel like they don't have permission. They're actively seeking permission to take time off. And I fall into that bucket, but you can give yourself permission. And that's a huge way to like circumvent the burnout that we're seeing. That's running rampant everywhere. Now that we've gotten done a little bit of exposition and setting up, we want to get to like what to do to start to create psychological safety as the conversation pivots from

Speaker 2:

Pandemic, to going back to the office. So

Speaker 1:

Creating the right climate for open-minded thinking, what does that entail?

Speaker 2:

Well, what that really is, is you're allowing individuals to think out loud. I mean, there , there are some people who think out loud, I don't want , you'll hear them say, did I say that out loud? But you want more individuals to be we to think out loud and have it safe to do that without them being well, why didn't you say that? What did you do that for us ? Um, you know, what does that really mean? That makes no sense. Guests lighting, you know, that we were very common . So the point is allowing individuals to have those conversations, right from the get , go , make them feel safe about doing it .

Speaker 1:

We had a speaker come through at my women's platform and he talked about , um, creating space, like actively as a leader, creating space in the calendar for people to be creative, it's unstructured time or creating time for people to just be able to innovate and come up with new ideas. I know Amazon is a big fan of this. So to me, you recreating that climate for open-minded thinking also goes hand in hand with creating space, actual sanctioned time and space for those things to bubble up. Um, the second point is developing positive mindsets and creating safety in risk-taking .

Speaker 2:

Well, you know, here's the point, you know, we're, we are a do, do, do perform, perform, perform, succeed, succeed, succeed society. All right . And , um, you know, the old adage is that this guy made a million dollar mistake and he went into his boss and he said to his boss, I'm going to quit. And he said, are you kidding? I just invested a million dollars in you. You're not quitting. You've got to learn from this , um , this error. And that's the other thing I've been thinking about even more so it's not that the people feel shame with when someone says you made a mistake, but when you make an error, it may be wrong based on some assumptions, right ? So we've gotta be able to say to people that that mindset is and pivoting, pivoting, and decision making and pivoting in what you can do to get out of that. Um, making them feel comfortable that they can come to you. The other thing is , um, I know there was an individual , uh , director who came to me at one point and he was telling a problem and I finally made him safe enough to come quickly. You know, don't come when we're further down the line there. And it's a harder to turn around. And I

Speaker 1:

Also think it's important to lay the bumper guards around what is, what is safe to do. What's not safe to do here's when you come to me, here's when you're on your own jurisdiction. So that way you're also kind of not only creating space for innovation or creating space for creativity and thinking out loud or open-minded thinking, but you're also saying here's, here's the , uh , pool that you can wait in. It's this big, it's this wide, and now take all the risk you want within these parameters. And when you fall on your face, make sure you come in . Right. Right. And then , and the third thing is mentoring behaviors such as compassionate , respect, and support. And I actually would say that it's important to role model those behaviors in order for your team or your business to do the

Speaker 2:

Same. And that's important. They want to make sure that they have someplace to go, you know, if they're having a bad day and we all bring , um , we bring our personal life to work. Whether people believe that or not, we do that. We are we're human beings, we're beings rather than doing so , as they say , um, so compassion is really important and people have tough days. You never know quite what's going on in their life or what may be impacting them. Respect is important, even if you disagree. I mean, I'm a strong proponent of two , do not agree with somebody at least do it with respect, keep the person's dignity and actually show what kind of professional person you are, and then support, especially as a manager and as a, as executive leader , um, let them know that they can lean on you. You know, especially if they're having a tough day , um , if they're having a tough week, whatever they're having, you know, let them to know that you'll help them get through it.

Speaker 1:

I had a mentor once tell me that I needed to kind of really shut down and hit reset for August as I was redoing my website. And , and I remember this stuck with me. She's like, you need to role model this for all of the people that are in your community to know that it's okay to take a break when you've got a big task that you need to give your a hundred percent focus to . And I know you have a story that you wanted to share is illustrating psychological safety and

Speaker 2:

You know what, this just happened. This happened last week. Um, one of the , uh , team members on the governance team, he emailed, he goes, I have an idea. And what he did was basically he wanted to discuss that. He thought we should bring in some expert in order to help us with governance within the organization. Now , um , I was away for the weekend. Therefore I did not respond. And there's two of us who he reports to and he was excited. You could tell him the email, he was excited, this gentleman , um, the other actually said, no, you can't do it. Um, you know, that costs money and immediately shut this guy down. This guy has brought us more great ideas than I can, you know , say on , on both my hands at this point, of course I was appalled. I thought, oh, you know, how do we do this in this environment? Um, where people are themselves, you know, they're , they're trying to be creative. They're trying to get out of their own self. So , um, what I did was I actually emailed back without getting into an email confrontation with the other leader. And I said, that may not be the time. Here's what we'll do to make sure we get there . Great idea. Let's work on this, you know, in the future as well, different approach, different responses. Here's the key. The key is we had a very important governance meeting on Friday at four o'clock. He did not show up. And I really believe that he did not show up because he was, you know, so in pin put the pin in the balloon and they were like, they deflated him. Um, cause otherwise he's very active in making those decisions. So that was sad for me. I'm a creative guy in this regard.

Speaker 3:

Well,

Speaker 2:

That's a tough one. Yeah. So today

Speaker 1:

We're just to reset the conversation and recap some of the points that we've already covered off on. We're talking about creating psychological safety for your teams. And this is important for female leaders, especially as we're seeing kind of our moment in the sun, because we're realizing that people need a lot of this good stuff, but also the fact that we are transitioning back to the office. So number one, creating the right climate for open-minded thinking number two, developing a positive mindset, but also creating a safe space for risk-taking to happen. What are those bumper guards going to look like? A role modeling, mentoring behaviors, such as compassion, respect, and support. And then number four is a positive team climate. What does that mean?

Speaker 2:

Positive team client means that you, you know , that you're working towards the positive components and opportunities that are available to you. One of the other things that I think is really important with psychological safety is you bring the best of the F of the skills of each person in their functional skills. Once you , you get the , you know, allow that to happen, bring that team, you know, glue together. It's amazing what they can do, and they feel safe with each other because they'll turn around and go, Tom, what do you think? Or, you know, Monica, what's your feeling on this? Because you're the expert on this. And then the entire team actually rises in terms of how they feel about , um , the results. Right.

Speaker 1:

Uh, what happens though, when a negative thing happens, how do you, how do you address it? Maybe do a post-mortem and wonder the positivity, because I think that's when the rubber really hits the road.

Speaker 2:

Well, when I see someone within the team behave and I it's a behavioral thing, as far as, and a habit , um, they say, well, you know, I'm just, I'm the realist. I pull them aside , um, separately, not in front of individuals, et cetera , and depending on where they are and let them know how they're impacting others sometimes , um, they're tonal deaf. They may not know how they're impacting other people. They don't know how they're impacting the team. Um, and I actually had to ask someone to , um, consider resigning recently. And , um, he was , uh, surprised. Uh, but I said, I, I think a, I think you you're burned out. I had to use that word because that's, what's going on. You can come back, you've got great skills. I think you just need to go back and regenerate and really do that privately. And once again, give them the dignity that they still have value. Um, they just may need the new energy , um , in order to get there. Yeah. Resetting is so key and I

Speaker 1:

Don't think that people get again, give themselves permission to do that. Number five is a shift in leadership style and there's actually a couple of ways that people can lead. There's the authoritative leadership style that we all are very familiar with. Here's my word. This is, this is the edict, and this is what you have to go act on consultative leadership and then their supportive leadership. I know you're most interested in the combination of the last two to find them first. What does that mean?

Speaker 2:

Well, first of all, consultant consultative leadership means that you solicit input from those individuals within your team. How they see it sometimes, you know, what I always say is the individual at the bottom may have a very simple solution. We can't figure it out because we're not actually in that execution stage, but by also engaging them in the solution, they will own it. They'll do the buy-in. They're going to make sure that it happens once you put that into place. So getting their viewpoints, making sure that we understand the issues . Sometimes we think it's one issue and it's not that issue. It's some other issue that's consulted that consultative leadership. The second one is supportive leadership. Um, that's indirect effect and that's once again, as you give them, you know, team objectives, et cetera, checking in with them , how are you doing? What do you need then ? You know, and it may be what does the team need? And it may be other , um , resources, but what does the individual need as well? And that's important when you put those two together, it's like , uh , putting together a nice sandwich. And what that does is it actually increases the combination , um, of that in a positive team impact by seven 70, per 77%. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

I always say I had someone asked me a question the other day, you know, how do I try this out before I really need to lean on these skills? How do I try it out? And I always say, you know, you can do it in a low stakes environment. You know, maybe, maybe it's , um , being supportive to somebody in the grocery store and not elbowing them. We know we all have sharp elbows here in New York. He's going to your local bookstore and asking a question. I don't know, but like starting to flex these skills in places where it's low stakes. Like if it doesn't really matter, if, if things don't your way, because that way you get, it becomes a secondary muscle. And now you can start to flex that in your teams and in the office where it really matters.

Speaker 2:

I think that's a great point. I think, you know what repetition creates habit and , but you have to do it often. You have to change the , the way that you might think about it, the way that you've done it. Authoritarian authoritative leadership really came from the fact that we were factory minded for so many years and then came out of that. Um , so we, as women are, have these other supportive, consultative , uh, skills that are natural to us. Um, and don't feel like you , um , need to put them aside because someone else is telling you that's not going to work. And that's

Speaker 1:

The byproduct of moving from an industrial economy to a service economy. We forget that really our feminine traits as leaders have had their moment in the sun right now. Exactly.

Speaker 2:

So perfect time. All right .

Speaker 1:

So next week is episode seven. We're going to be discussing what

Speaker 2:

We're going to discuss. Um , how stress is part of our everyday life, but how do we utilize this stress in order to optimize performance? And we're going to have some key metrics for people, key action items as well. And hopefully people won't bring the stress with them to our , uh, our podcast.

Speaker 1:

And if people want to work with you, Cathy , how do they get in touch with you? They can do one

Speaker 2:

Of two ways. They can call me directly six oh nine nine three three seven 600. That's my direct line and or , uh , Stuart Cathy at Gmail, S T U a R T K a T H I [email protected] And I

Speaker 1:

Am a longtime television anchor. I now work with corporate women who want to be able to carry a room with authority, have influence, get buy-in. And so I'm happy to work with you on a one-on-one basis or in my masterclass to teach you the art of better communication. And you can always get ahold of me at Joya , dusk , J O Y a D a S S. Or you can email [email protected] . Kathy , we're going to do it all again next week. Any closing thoughts?

Speaker 2:

No. I just think, you know, like you said, take our everyday life and start creating new habits. Awesome. We'll see you next week. Take care now. Bye.