Million Dollar Monday

12 Week Year Mindset with Brian Moran

May 17, 2021 Greg Muzzillo
Million Dollar Monday
12 Week Year Mindset with Brian Moran
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

The 12 Week Year is all about creating a 12 week execution cycle so that you can take back control of your day, increase your income, balance the priorities in your life, lower your stress and accomplish your goals in record time. Brian Moran, Founder of The 12 Week Year, shares the steps to achieving more with Host Greg Muzzillo.  If you are ready to get more done in 12 weeks than most people do in 12 months, tune in to this week’s Million Dollar Monday.

Chapter Summaries 

  • 00:47 - All About Brian Moran
  • 01:56 - One Minute Manager
  • 04:33 -12 Week Year
  • 06:34 - Knowledge without Action is Worthless
  • 08:22 - Healthy Urgency
  • 11:52 - 5 Disciplines of Execution
  • 14:20 - Know Your Why
  • 16:40 - Vision and Tactical Plan
  • 18:26- Keeping Score
  • 20:29 - Time Blocking
  • 23:05 - Accountability
  • 25:20 - WAM GROUP   
  • 27:34 - Creating Intentional Imbalance
  • 28:52 - The 13th Week
  • 30:30 - Field Guide


Key Quotes/Concepts

  • Knowledge without action is pretty worthless
  • We have tons of ideas, we have tons of resources, and it's really about the execution. It ties to a personal level as well. If you're going to have a better relationship, if you are going to be a better parent, if you are going to have better health - you've got to act on it. You can't just know it.
  • It's not about working harder or longer. It's certainly not about taking everything you do in 12 months and trying to cram it into 12 weeks. But it's working with consistency on the things that really matter with some healthy urgency.
  • We use a system called performance time which uses time-blocking to take back control of the day. The first is a strategic block. It's carving out time during a normal workweek, three hours at a time that's uninterrupted where you are going to do quality work on the business, not in the business. The second is a buffer block, which is time dedicated to dealing with the lower-level activities to be more efficient and free up time to be more "on purpose" during the day. The third is a breakout block to spend time away, turning off the business to recharge mentally and physically.
  • Do something different this week and reconnect to your vision and "why" it matters!
  • It's about intentional imbalance and being intentional about where we spend our time and where we do not spend our time. And that's why having a vision, having goals, having plans really helps make those choices more effectively.


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Greg Muzzillo:

Hello, and welcome to Million Dollar Monday. I'm your host, Greg Muzzillo bringing you real successful people with real useful advice for people with big dreams. I understand big dreams. I turned an investment of $200 and a lot of great advice from some really successful people into my big dream Proforma. That today is a half billion dollar company. Well, hello, and thank you for joining me. Are you ready for more? Are you ready to get more done in 12 weeks than most people get done in 12 months? Well , then buckle up and listen up because I am excited to introduce my guest for today. My guest for today started a business called The Execution Company and has authored a book called The 12 Week Year, The 12 Week Year is all about creating 12 week execution cycle so that you can take back control of your day, increase your income balance the priorities in your life, lower your stress and accomplish your goals in record time. So let's get to talking about it. Please welcome Brian Moran Brian, welcome.

Brian Moran:

Thanks for having me. It's great to be here.

Greg Muzzillo:

Great to have you and thank you very much for your book. Of course. Thank you very much for some of the training you've done for us and for our people, but let's get right into it and let's start by talking about a little bit about your background, your educational background, your career background. What were those things that brought you to creating the execution company and writing the book the 12 week year?

Brian Moran:

Yeah, interesting career path in that I never set out to be an author per se . Although, I think the stat is something 80 plus percent of the people want to write a book and I was probably a neck , but you know, it wasn't, it wasn't like, Hey, I'm going to be an author. I was , I was working for ups, pay my way through college. I was part-time and I mean , I had always grown up as a hard worker, good work ethic coming from the family I came from and , so much so that they noticed me and they offered me a promotion to run the reload. So the operation I was working still part-time better pay better benefits. I was getting a degree in physiology though. I was going to be a strength coach and I thought, you know, the heck do I want to do in management? But, you know, I thought about it a little bit, talked to my folks. And I said, you know what? You never know. So I took the job. I ended up working for a guy Greg at the time that was very much a coach. Now, today, that sounds big deal. But this was a thousand years ago, you know, it was not, it was not even on the radar. No one thought about that. No managers acted that way. And certainly in that environment, we were, we were unions . So they manage the contract more than they manage people. Anyways, I learned a lot from the sky, really kind of got switched onto this, the whole management business aspect and actually switched my degree, finished my degree in business, moved out to Southern Cal with PepsiCo. And I remember my regional manager, gave me a little book called one minute manager and I started to apply some of that. And then that's where I think my, my real hunger to learn and grow kicked in. And I started reading everything. I bought the cassette programs and I , since I was in Southern California. So I spent a lot of time i n traffic and just learn and, and grow it. And, I got a degree in business, but the real degree i s, is kind of self-taught from learning things and trying them, you know, joined a consulting firm, which was an amazing experience. We worked with large companies, all trying to improve performance with different cultures. And all of that, one of those companies offered me a position as vice president of sales. So did all that, but I had this inkling to be on my own. And so I eventually left there, ended up starting a company in health services called Biocare. We do onsite medical surveillance, still, up and running and doing very well. I'm just involved on the board. I don't do anything day to day, but my heart was about , helping others grow and helping others succeed . So kind of started what we're doing today. And then , a gentleman I know from the consulting days, joined me, Michael Lennington , the co author and interesting story Greg. We were headed to a conference as a vendor, and we were thinking about, you know, what shiny stuff do we hand out and I'd been thinking about writing a book. And , I said to Michael, I said, look, let's just write a short format book . Let's leave out all the fluff . And , and so we wrote the precursor to the 12 week year. It was called Periodization 12 Weeks to Breakthrough. Now the crazy thing about that is we wrote that book in 12 weeks and then, and we self published and self published means you go down to Kinko's and you print copies. So that's what we did. And the big gamble was, Hey, do we print 50? Do we print a 100? We didn't want to take a bunch of books and bring them back. Right. So we gambled, we printed a hundred, I think we sold them for 10 bucks a book, and we sold out of them. And from there we sold like a hundred thousand copies of that book. It literally changed this, changed our life. It , and it was done in 12 weeks. So that was kind of , but, but I think what made that book interesting and what makes the 12 week year so powerful is we didn't sit down, and write a theory. We just documented what we were doing with our clients. And that's really what the 12 week year is all about. So

Greg Muzzillo:

Was it on purpose that actually the whole book got written and published or whatever in 12 weeks? Or was that on purpose because that was the periodization you were working on or did you kind of, did it just sort of happen that way?

Brian Moran:

There was a little bit of both, you know, we had been applying to periodization and then the the conference was scheduled for that date. That just happened to be about 13, 14 weeks out. So we said, okay, look, we're gonna , we're operating this way anyways. Let's knock this thing out. Yeah.

Greg Muzzillo:

Yeah. Awesome. So you write this book then the 12 week year , which I love. And I , and I know, you know that, so let's start at the beginning, the challenge, the challenge that all people face, because as you say in the book, it's not what you know, it's not even who, you know, but it's really what you implement that counts. So talk a little bit about the challenge that most of our listeners are having in getting things done.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. I think, I think the big thing is we're always searching for better ways to do things, which is great. I mean, that's smart, but the fact of the matter is we're, we're adding potential when we haven't actualized the potential we have, right. We're not even applying what we already know. I mean, I talk all the time about, look, if you just d id more of what you already know, you'd be happier, you'd be healthier. You'd make more money and without learning anything new and, and I'm all for learning new stuff, but in our world, from our point of view is, you know, knowledge without action is pretty worthless and great ideas unless they're implemented the marketplace doesn't care. And that's true in your personal life too. Right? Most people know how to be healthy yet. You know, so, so many of Americans anyways, and around the world, really, but certain here at home are overweight or obese and it's, it's not for lack of knowledge. A nd, and so when Michael and I kind of began to think about where can we add value for organizations? Yeah. Initially we thought, well, you know, we'll, we'll bring them new ideas, new techniques. And we r ealized, you know, they have tons of ideas. They have tons of resources. It's really about the execution. A nd, and it ties through to a personal level as well. If you're going to have a better relationship, y ou going to be a better parent, right. You're going to better health. You've got to act on it. You can't just k now. Right,

Greg Muzzillo:

Right, Yeah. At the end of the day, it really isn't what we planned to do or hope to do. It's what we do that either creates our success Or as I tell so many people, a lot of what people do creates d o-do because they're doing the wrong things or they're doing them the wrong way. All right. So when did it become concrete? Talk to us about this whole idea of redefining the year and discarding, a nnualized thinking and creating more of a 12 week period.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. So we've been working with the fundamentals of execution, right a set of disciplines and principles. We'll probably touch on those, but, we were working with them in an annual environment. C ause that's just the way everybody worked and no one had ever questioned that. And then one of our clients was in the cycling and came to, came to me and said, Hey, are you familiar with this concept of periodization? And I remember it from my college days when I was working out and things like that. And so Michael and I took a look at that and we really borrowed from that, the things that made it effective, which was kind of this focus, this, these shorter sprints, that type of stuff. And we said, you know what? That has applicability for what we're doing in our business, what we do with our clients. And so we took it out of athletics, adapted it to work in a personal and business setting. And that's really where the 12 week year was born. Because although, you know , we were doing what most people did, we'd get with our clients, we'd set annual goals and build annual plans. We break them down quarterly and monthly and weekly, and Greg, we were getting good results, but it just, it felt like there was more there, and what we realized it was the annual environment that was holding us back because of the fact that it's just too much time. It allows you, you know, the mindset is I've got plenty of time. So you put things off until you get really late in the year, and then you go crazy to get it over the finish line. And, we just saw that so many times in virtually every industry and what periodization was, it was a way for us to, to restructure that in a way that shifted that, thinking that shifted that thinking away from I've got lots of time, cause you might catch up and hit the goal, but you can't go back and recapture capacity left, you know, last week, last month, last quarter. And that's, and that's the difference where people are currently performing, what they're capable of. It's not about working harder or longer. And it's certainly not about taking everything you do in 12 months and trying to cram it into12 weeks. Right. But it's, it's working with a consistency on the things that really matter , with some healthy urgency. So what The 12 Week Year does is it creates , a deadline, right? A line in the sand where you're g oing t o measure your success or failure. And it's near enough that there's urgency day in and day out. But the 12 weeks is a long enough period of time to make, make significant progress.

Greg Muzzillo:

Yeah , Healthy urgency. I like that one, you know, I lived that in college, you know, I think like most people, I know we had weeks or maybe even months to write a term paper, but it's incredible how the healthy urgency of that paper being due the next day m ade m e very creative. Like my creative juices were the best, l ike two days before or the day before. There's just something about that healthy urgency. I think it brings out the best in many people, at least who can kind of handle the stress of i t.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. It d epends o n how you're wired, but nonetheless, that deadline, whether you wait u ntil a few weeks before you go like crazy, or you're one of those t hat p lan early, the deadline at a, at a reasonable distance creates that urgency, right? Where in an annual environment, you just don't have it throughout most of the ye ar k ind of like, well, if I get to it gr eat, if not there's tomorrow and the next step

Greg Muzzillo:

I do like how you , immediately after you start talking about the importance of periodization , you get into the whole emotional connection because if people don't have visions and dreams, none of this all matters. Right? Tell us a little bit more about that. Yeah. So that

Brian Moran:

Kind of brings us to the disciplines right. There, there are five disciplines of execution performance and we didn't invent this stuff, but the first is really it's that emotional connection, which is the vision. And , people have heard that, but most people don't really do the work around the vision. And if they do, it tends to be just on their business. And so w ith The 12 Week Year businesses is part of life, we start, as you know, G reg, we start with your life. What do you want your life to look like three years from now, five years from now, 10 years from now. And so the emotional connection comes in connecting, connecting my daily actions to the life I want to live. That's when it's powerful, otherwise vision is kind of flat, right? It's one of those things t hat's always out in front of me and I never get to it, but when I can connect it to the daily actions, that's powerful. That gives me the motivation then to take the action and do the things I need to do to create a different result.

Greg Muzzillo:

You know, Proforma i s in the franchise business, right? So I've been spending over 40 years, I guess, recruiting franchise owners and helping recruit salespeople. And one of the most important questions I ask and our team always asks is, so where do you want to be in three to five years? And it is amazing to me. I bet I've talked to 10,000 people. It is amazing to me. How many people, when you ask them that question have no idea. They haven't thought about it. They have no answer. I t's just that they wake up and repeat. They wake up and repeat. And of course that chapter is so important because at the end of the day, like Simon Sinek says, if you don't know your why, right. The rest of it doesn't matter. And so many people don't know their why,

Brian Moran:

No, they're not clear on it. And so we get really clear on it and we document it. Write it down and stay connected to it because it's, it's one thing to kind of create it's another thing to stay connected to it in the , in the recent research on the brain shows that that's so powerful because it creates new neural pathways, which ultimately helps you act on it. So it's not, it's not one of these things it's just nice to do. It really is the cornerstone. And if you think of, you know, top performing athletes a nd y ou m ay have a clear vision, a picture of how they want to p erform a nd, a nd that's part of what makes them so disciplined, but i t's, it's what keeps t hem motivated.

Greg Muzzillo:

Right. So for those many listeners right now who are tuning in and actually, if they were being honest with themselves would say, you know, I'm not really clear what I do want my life, my business , or any of that stuff to look like in three to five years, how would you help them simply? How , what would you suggest they do to create a more compelling vision, a more compelling Why?

Brian Moran:

Yeah. There's a few exercises in the book and there's a free getting started I'll give you the link t oo. But, but it's really just sitting down and thinking about, w e, like to do a, Have ,Do, Be exercise, create three columns, brainstorm all the things you want to have in life. Things you want to do in life. Things you want to be in life and get really crazy with it. Right. Have fun with it. And then come back and look and kind of sort through what really matters. There's another exercise. If you think about, you know, sometime in the future, whether it's, whether it's, y o u know, when you're in your nineties or whatever, but looking back on your life, what do you want as you look back, what do you want hav e stood for? What is it you wanted to accomplish? What did you want to embrace? Who did you want to be? Right. How did you want to show up? Did you want to show up as a leader? Do you want to be generous? Do you want to be kind right? All of those things matter. but it, it takes some thought it takes some work. And that's the , the problem, especially today is there's no, there's no margin in our day. There's no deep thought. And vision is deep thought. And so you've got to carve out some quiet time, turn the phone off, turn the TV off, turn the internet off and kind of think about, you know, if, it were wide open, which it really is, w hat d o I want my life like? You know, what's the life I want to l ive? What, what really matters to me? Otherwise, s ociety's going to define for you what matters right there. They're just itching to tell you what should matter for you. And so if you don't do that work by default, you end up with what just society and the a dvertisers say you should Value. Yeah.

Greg Muzzillo:

I love the one quote in a book where you were , I forget who said it, the brain is an amazing organ It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and it doesn't stop until you get to work. I think that's true. It's true of me. Even sometimes I can show up at my desk and , I don't know that I brought my full brain, my full why , my strategic plan with me and with all the distractions today, it's so easy to get lost. And , and it's so easy to kick the can down the road because it's only January, January. I can say in January, I, you know, we got so much more time left. So talk to us , describe more about this whole building out the 12 week plan and doing it one week at a time.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. This is so much more powerful than the way people operate. Yeah . You know, when we bring that horizon near term 12 weeks, what happens from a planning standpoint is there's greater predictability. But also 12 week plans are much more focused, right? When we're building an annual plan, most organizations, most individuals take on too much because again, there's this illusion, I've got lots of time. I got 12 months, right. I got an entire year. And so we start out overwhelmed. We go through the year, diffused, make a little bit of progress across that broad spectrum. Right. That's a recipe for mediocrity. So with the 12 week year, we're going to focus that in on one or two things, right. Maybe one goal in your business, one in your personal life , something like that. And then from there build out a tactical plan, which is very different than most plans. Right. But we're going to, we're going to set goals that are 12 week goals that are connected to the longer term vision. Right? So there's this thread running through, but it says, okay, here's I need to be in the 12 weeks to be, to be standing at ground, to be living into that vision. And then we figure out if that's the, what the, how is the tactics? What are the critical few again, focus. Right. Not everything we can think of goes into plan, but just the critical few that the least number of actions still accomplish the goal.

Greg Muzzillo:

Right. So I'm sure our listeners who are thinking well, t hat's just sounds easy makes sense, makes a lot of common sense. So let's get to the tough, the tough discussion about none of this matters without keeping score.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. And, so, i magine now you start with a lon g-term vi sion. You bring that near term, you 've go t 12 week goals. You've got this tactical plan, which is different than traditional conceptual plans, right. As you know, Greg, that translate that really describes for you what has to happen every week. and so that creates your weekly plan for you. it tells you, it de fines how you win the week, which is really important bec ause mo st people, again, don't know, they think you win the week just by taking the day as it comes and Woodlands bac k do wn and going home exhausted. That's not how you win the week or, or we judge it by outcomes which are lag, right. The real focus, the things we can control or no t the outcomes through the actions, the goals of the outcomes, the tactics, are the act ions. So when we talk about measuring, we're going to measure lead and lag indicators. Your listeners have probably heard those terms, that the end results we're going to measure those. We're going to measure the lead indicators. That there's a correlation between those, but one of the things that we do different with the 12 week year is although we measure lead in lengths , we actually score your execution. So that weekly plan becomes a scorecard. And you're going to know how you performed this , the CEO of your world, whether you're 90% or 30% or wherever you're at week in, week out. And , that honestly is the most powerful lead indicator you have, because again, we control the actions. So, you know, if you want to predict the future, look, do daily actions. So we've got that combination of they've got an execution score and I'm tracking the results. And in those two sets of numbers, everything you need to know is in those two sets of numbers.

Greg Muzzillo:

Yeah, absolutely. Clearly probably the most tough discussion is that whole measurement and accountability we're going to get to that. But I love what kind of comes next in your book where you talk about time blocking and the three kinds of time blocking , tell us more about that whole concept.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. I like what Benjamin Franklin said. He said, if you take care of the minutes, the years take care of themselves, which, which is really wise, but, you know, I've found that there's all kinds of things that crowd out my minutes. And , and Greg, there was a time earlier in my career when I thought someday I'm going to be able to eliminate all of that. And I realized that's never going to happen. And so effective time use, isn't trying to eliminate all that stuff. It's really about carving out time for what matters . And so we use a system called performance time, which uses time-blocking to take back control of the day and three primary blocks. As you, as you mentioned, the first is a strategic block. It's, it's carving out time during the normal work week, three hours of time, that's uninterrupted, where are you going to do quality work on, on the business, not in the business. So we're, building things that probably don't have any impact today, but if I don't invest in them today, there's never, there's never any benefits. The second block is a buffer block, which is, might be 15 minutes. It might be an hour. It might be once a day, it might be three or four times a day, but that's the deal with all the lower level activities . So from voicemails that emails to drop ins , Hey, you got a minute sure. Between 11 and 12: 45 come back then. Right. And, and it allows me to deal with that stuff more efficiently, where it doesn't consume my day, because if you take the day as it comes, you've all had those days where , we're just, we're running gun. And all day we get to the end of the day and we look back and we did a ton of stuff, but none of it really matters , right? So your this hamster on the wheel. And so what the buffer blocks allow you to do is really kind of take that stuff and put it in specific blocks where you can be more efficient at it, which frees you up to be more on purpose the rest of the day. And then, and then an important one, especially for entrepreneurs is what we call a breakout block and that's just time away. And it's just as important physically as it is mentally and emotionally, right? Turning off the business, getting away , out of the business on a, on a regular basis, like a mini vacation, only with the vacation, you come back to a stack of work, right. And it's been, well, I should have never left. So it's getting that. Just being able to turn it off, come back, refreshed, come back excited.

Greg Muzzillo:

So we've gotten into part of the tough discussion, obviously, which is measuring results. Then the next piece of the tough discussion is accountability build a little more on the importance of accountability and how to build accountability into our lives and see it as something good.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. It's , you know, every, successful person I know is accountable. And yet I think that concept is really misunderstood and people tend to shy away from it because the way it's spoken of in society and the way we experience it in most businesses is we e xperience accountability as negative consequences. Yes. Right. People talk about holding others accountable. A nd, and so o ftentimes w e want nothing to do with accountability. And you know, an example I like to use as an athlete does something he, or she is not supposed to do person authority like the coach or the commissioner comes out and says, w e've g ot to hold this person accountable. And then you know what they do, right. They fine them, they suspend them. They create some form of negative consequence. And Greg it's really like that. It's like the, the notion of accountability a nd negative consequences are one in the same when they're not, they're very, very different. And, you know, we talk about accountability a s ownership and at the heart of accountability is freewill choice. The recognition that you always, always, always have c hoice. Right. And then taking ownership of those choices. And, and that's where accountability really, t he true understanding of accountability probably becomes the most empowering concept. We have to live the life we want to live.

Greg Muzzillo:

Yeah. So how can people build accountability? Because I think that that wording implies or would include working with others. How can people build accountability into their life into the 12 week, year away ?

Brian Moran:

Well, there's, it happens at two levels, one at the individual level, right. It's really setting goals that you own, right. That are connected to your vision. That's , we're back to why vision matters. If it's, if it's my boss's goal or someone else's goal. And I don't have ownership of it, the probability of me hitting it is really low because I'm not going to do what it takes. It's taking ownership of the actions that looking at the actions and saying, okay, even though I want to, I don't want to do these things. Am I willing to do them to hit the goal to live the life I want to live? That's where the ownership is created at an organizational level. It's recognizing that you can't force someone to do something. Yeah,

Greg Muzzillo:

No, you can't. There's no way you can. I, in the book, you talk a little bit about wham groups, do you want to talk just briefly? What is it because, i t just such a powerful concept.

Brian Moran:

Yeah studies study after study have shown that if you go i n alone, y ou're really stacking the odds against yourself and that you're much more successful with peer support. So, so t he, the wham group is our term for weekly accountability m eetings. I t's an acronym. A nd in the past, you know, if you thought of accountability as consequences a nd t he hell with that, I'm not showing up to that. But, but if you understand accountability a s choices, ownership, then it's really getting with a couple of your peers once a week for a few minutes to just talk about how you're doing on your outcomes and how y ou doing with your execution. Y eah. A nd, and what happens in that? Is it just, again, it creates accountability to self in an environment where a couple other folks are going to challenge you and encourage you so that, you know, I've done this for decades. I still have bad weeks, but I have weeks when I don't do well. When I stumble a nd s till my accountability group comes a nd they pick me up and they say, okay, r ight. It's one week you can't change the past. Right. What are you going to do different this week and reconnect me to the vision and the why and why it matters so that, you know, I go out this week and I have a better week. And again, when we talk better weeks, right. I'm not talking outcomes, I'm talking a ctions. Right. S o, so I 'm taking the actions I need to take, whether it's f or my health, my marriage, my business. R ight,

Greg Muzzillo:

But the actions that drive the outcomes

Brian Moran:

Absolutely. Absolutely. That peer support is a game. It's a game changer. Yeah,

Greg Muzzillo:

For sure. For sure. You know, it's interesting. I interviewed somebody else recently that had written a different book about taking control of your life. And it was interesting in the book, she mentioned that 80 to 90% of premature deaths come from just people making bad decisions. That's kind of shocking. Right. But it really is that decisions in what we eat or how we live or smoking or whatever it might be our choices are so important in our lives. And like one other concept you talk about in the book and it's , creating intentional imbalance , bringing that all together and , talk a little bit about intentional imbalance balance.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. I l iked that concept because I think w e're led to believe, you know, this whole notion of life balance is a bit of a misnomer. I t's sort of leads you down this path t hat I'm going to spend equal time a nd equal areas, which isn't r eal. Even if you could do that, it's not going to produce what you want. It's really about intentional imbalance being intentional about where we spend our time and where we don't spend our time. Right. And that's why having a vision, having goals, having plans really help you make those choices much more effectively. So, you've sat down, y ou've thought deeply about really what matters and, and there's different seasons in life. Right. I'm I made different choices when my kids were young than I'm making. Now that t hey're, they're almost grown. And, but, but I'm really intentional about i t. And so, you know, there's always going to be i n b alance, is it, is it the way y ou, you want it to be, or, or is it just happening randomly? And so the concept of intentional i mbalances look, it's never g oing t o feel balanced. It's really about what areas m atter to you and how do you dedicate time to those areas?

Greg Muzzillo:

All right. So the 12 week year is followed by the 13th week. Uh , tell us a little more about the 13th week.

Brian Moran:

Yeah. The 13th week is a flex week. It's a , you know, if I need to really keep gunning to hit the goal, I use it that way, but it's also time when we stop and we look back and, and learn from the past 12 weeks, what worked, what didn't work, where were my assumptions on, where were they off on ? What do I want to carry forward? And then we're going to lock and load for the next 12 weeks. Right and if I'm doing it individually, I do it that way. If I'm part of a team, we do it as a team, but I'm also going to in a 13th week, take some time to celebrate. And this is , this is critical because too often, you know, for high performers, it's, as soon as we get there, there's a new there and there's a new there and there's a new there. And so what you celebrate matters, it creates focus. It creates energy. And so you've got more opportunities to celebrate. It might be, it might be for an evening. It might be the whole week for our company and specifically for my family, we typically go, we take a trip every, every 12, 13 weeks, you know, we're going somewhere to celebrate the progress and celebrate the success to create family memories. And , and it makes a huge difference. Yeah .

Greg Muzzillo:

Yeah. It's a great concept. And for those people who are listening and are doing the math, that actually for 13 weeks in a year, not just for 12 weeks, so the whole 12 week concept plus that 13th week, I think is brilliant. It's a wonderful concept. Talk to us a little bit about now this, this 12 week, year field guide, is that, is that something that could help people in teams bring all of this together?

Brian Moran:

Yeah. It's really, what's designed to help you apply what's in the book. I mean, we wrote the book to where you can apply it, but the field guides another step in that it gives you more e xercise. Like when you were asking, what do we do with vision? There's a number of exercises in there, a nd It will walk you through creating a vision. It'll walk you through creating your first 12 week plan. And so there's worksheets in there and all kinds of, additional exercises to help you apply it. So you'll, you'll learn it a little deeper. It's a really, a great tandem to the book if you haven't read the book, I wouldn't necessarily start with the field guide. I'd start with the b ook concept, but the field guide is going to help you apply it.

Greg Muzzillo:

Yup. Great stuff, Brian. And I know we could talk a whole lot more , for those of you who are listening that are ready to get more done in 12 weeks plus that 13th week , than most people get done in 12 months let me encourage you of course, to pick up the book the 12 week year. Let me also encourage you to learn a little bit more about Brian in this company, the products and services that they offer. They offer a workshop. I attended one of the workshops. It was really mind blowing the authors offer leadership development courses, consulting online video courses, and more, and you can learn more at 12 week. I think it's 12weekyear.com. Is that right, Brian ?

Brian Moran:

Correct. 12weekyear.com Yup.

Greg Muzzillo:

I really appreciate you. I appreciate all that. You brought to my life in our company. I appreciate your joining me today. Thank you very much. Thanks .

All About Brian Moran
One Minute Manager
12 Week Year
Knowledge without Action is Worthless
Healthy Urgency
5 Disciplines of Execution
Know Your Why
Vision and Tactical Plan
Keeping Score
Time Blocking
Accountability
WAM GROUP
Creating Intentional Imbalance
The 13th Week
Field Guide