Podnews Weekly Review

Ross Adams from Acast; Pete Birsinger from Podscribe; and the last word in podcasting news

September 22, 2023 James Cridland and Sam Sethi Season 2 Episode 40
Ross Adams from Acast; Pete Birsinger from Podscribe; and the last word in podcasting news
Podnews Weekly Review
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Podnews Weekly Review
Ross Adams from Acast; Pete Birsinger from Podscribe; and the last word in podcasting news
Sep 22, 2023 Season 2 Episode 40
James Cridland and Sam Sethi

Send us some fanmail, via Buzzsprout

Ready to elevate your podcasting knowledge? Our latest episode is a deep dive into the evolving world of Apple Podcasts and Acast, promising to enhance your understanding of the industry's latest developments. We explore Apple's new Episode Art feature in their iOS 17 update and discuss the layoffs at Sony Music's podcast division.

What's the buzz about Acast's strategic decision to not accept campaigns using Spotify's ad analytics? We unpack Acast's newly formed partnership with PodScribe and discuss how it underlines the importance of maintaining independence and objectivity when measuring and reporting on campaigns. We also delve into Acast's deal with PodScribe and its implications for podcast brand safety and contextual targeting - something every podcaster needs to be aware of.

Finally, we cover a range of industry updates and news. From a spine-chilling Australian horror film about podcasting to the unveiling of Edison Research's upcoming Latino podcast listener report. Plus, we analyze recent appointments in the podcasting industry and discuss the controversy surrounding Russell Brand.

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us some fanmail, via Buzzsprout

Ready to elevate your podcasting knowledge? Our latest episode is a deep dive into the evolving world of Apple Podcasts and Acast, promising to enhance your understanding of the industry's latest developments. We explore Apple's new Episode Art feature in their iOS 17 update and discuss the layoffs at Sony Music's podcast division.

What's the buzz about Acast's strategic decision to not accept campaigns using Spotify's ad analytics? We unpack Acast's newly formed partnership with PodScribe and discuss how it underlines the importance of maintaining independence and objectivity when measuring and reporting on campaigns. We also delve into Acast's deal with PodScribe and its implications for podcast brand safety and contextual targeting - something every podcaster needs to be aware of.

Finally, we cover a range of industry updates and news. From a spine-chilling Australian horror film about podcasting to the unveiling of Edison Research's upcoming Latino podcast listener report. Plus, we analyze recent appointments in the podcasting industry and discuss the controversy surrounding Russell Brand.

Support the Show.

Connect With Us:

James Cridland:

It's Friday, the 22nd of September 2023.

Speaker 2:

The last word in podcasting news. This is the Pod News Weekly Review with James Cridland and Sam Sethi.

James Cridland:

Oh yes, I'm James Cridland, the editor of Pod News, and I'm Sam Sethi, the CEO of Podfans. In the chapters. Today, new Apple podcasts in iOS 17 on iPhone and iPad Acast slips in free music. Sony Music announces significant layoffs in their podcast division. Also, podcasts are continuing to go global on the YouTube Music app. Where did the $4 million owed to cast media's creators go? And Albi launches the Zap Planner Plus.

Ross Adams:

Hey, it's Ross Adams, ceo of Acast, and Albi on Latex. Talk about our partnership with Podscribe.

Pete Birsinger:

Hey, it's Pete Bursinger, CEO of Podscribe, and I will be on later. Talk about our partnership with Acast.

James Cridland:

They will. This podcast is sponsored and hosted by Buzzsprout. Last week, 3,084 people started a podcast with Buzzsprout Podcast hosting made easy with powerful tools and remarkable customer support and AI to help you publish your show, with even more AI tools now available. And we're sponsored by Pod News Live in London next week, next Wednesday, the 27th of September. Tickets are available now at podnewsnet slash live. From your daily newsletter, the Pod News Weekly Review.

Sam Sethi:

Okay, James, let's kick this show off. What's first up this week? Apple's added Episode Art. Come on, tell me what's new in iOS 17 with Apple Podcasts.

James Cridland:

Yes, well, episode Art, that's a new thing. So Apple Podcasts has historically been the only podcast app not to support Episode Art properly. It supported it for, I think, aac, enhanced AAC files or something. Anyway, it was a very complicated thing. It didn't support it for much else.

James Cridland:

It now supports it for everything, which is really nice, what it's doing in the new app, and I'm sure that you've all had a look at the new app, and why did I just say you've all just broken all the rules and I'm sure that you've taken a look at the new app, but there's a little overlay on there with the main logo of your podcast over the episode artwork and everything else. It all looks quite smart. But, yes, so they're joining Spotify and Pocket Casts and other podcasting 2.0 apps like Fountain, pod Friends and Pod Fans, and we do Episode Art. It looks fantastic in the Pod News Daily podcast and it looks pretty good in this very podcast. Some of the text goes over the top of some of it, so at some point we'll redo that template, but still, have you taken a peek at it, sam?

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, I've been on the developer program from the beta, so I have seen it and yet it's great that they've done it. I'm excited for this release not because of actually Episode Art. I'm excited because iOS 17 has greater PWA support, much, much greater, so push notifications, home screen buttons and everything else. I'm really excited for iOS 18, though, because I guess it will be when we get Chapter Art, JSON scripts and any form of comments and feedback.

James Cridland:

But anyway, we'll have to wait for that next year.

James Cridland:

Well, yes, and I think that they do support ID3 Chapter Art. So that's Chapter Art, which is actually within the file. That's not something that we do on this podcast Buzzsprout doesn't support that but it is something that other people do, and if you've got Hindenburg, you can shove in the Chapter Art directly in through that and for many podcast hosts that'll actually still stay there. But, yes, it would be nice if they supported more of the Chapter Art. I'm possibly speaking out of turn. I still don't understand why Podcasting 2.0 redesigned chapters completely, but still fine that's a fine thing, but I think comments as well is a really interesting idea too.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, I mean it doesn't have to be boosts, grammes and zaps. It can be just straight comments, which would have been nice. But I do love how some of the Podcasting 2.0 apps now, I think, have actually leapfrogged Apple and Spotify in functionality. I think they've gone beyond in terms of what the user would want. I think that it's been a catch up game for over two, maybe three years, but I think some of the apps have now gone beyond it, which is really cool, oh yeah.

James Cridland:

No, absolutely. I think that some of the new apps are looking really good, but I have to say the Apple Podcast app is looking better than it ever has, which is really nice. We're up to Internet Explorer 12. I think that it's done. No, I think, seriously, it's a very smart thing. I have actually spent the time over the last couple of days tweaking the Pod News daily feed so that it shows very nicely in the Apple Podcasts app. It's not my number one app by any stretch, but nevertheless it's worthwhile making sure that it looks a little bit nicer. So you will notice, for that, the episode art is slightly changed. I've moved where the Pod News logo is on the episode art to the bottom right instead of the top right, so that you don't get two Pod News logos within Apple Podcasts, and there are a few other things that I'm doing just to sort of smarten it up a bit. But yeah, I think it's a worthwhile thing. There are other bits of Apple News, aren't there?

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, Apple has put an Apple Podcast studio in Cupertino.

James Cridland:

Yes, it was a team of Spanish podcasters. What was the name of the Spanish podcasters? Oh, thanks.

Sam Sethi:

Oh, leave that one to me. You see what I did there on the Pod News daily podcast.

James Cridland:

Yesterday, as I said, a Spanish podcaster, yes, so a team recorded in what they called the Apple Podcast Studio in Apple Park in Cupertino, directly after Apple's Wunderlust event last week, and it looked very, very smart. They described it in a blog post as a generously sized recording room that includes everything any podcaster needs to produce quality content, and I now hear that it isn't a generously sized recording room at all. It's a generously sized room which they use for a lot of different things and sometimes they put some podcast recording equipment in it. So it's not actually a podcast studio at all, it's just a fancy room, but it's nice that this team really, really enjoyed it. Anyway, I tell you what Sam. I mean, you know, regardless of whether or not it's a permanent studio or a temporary studio, I mean this show would sound great from there, wouldn't it?

Sam Sethi:

I think it would and you know, obviously I'd love a little tour of the Apple spaceship That'll be, nice Meet the Men in Black.

James Cridland:

I've never met the Men in Black, so maybe we can go and have a look around the entirely enclosed ecosystem that the Apple Park is, and I feel that invitation slipping away.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, I think it went when I called it IE7.

James Cridland:

Right, let's move on to story number two, which is ACAST.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, ACAST have announced a partnership with something called Slip Stream, which is offering all ACAST podcasts access to more than 70,000 royalty free music tracks. So it allows ACAST creators to get free access for six months, which sounds very good, James. A little bit of music to play and again, if it's free, what's to worry about?

James Cridland:

Yeah, no, I think you know it's a smart thing. It's just a free trial, but they've managed to negotiate quite a decent free trial, so I think that that's quite an interesting thing. It does show that some podcasters really want music in their shows, and this is perhaps a way of doing that. Of course, you won't probably have heard of any of the 70,000 tracks or songs that you could actually choose from, but nevertheless they are there. But they are royalty free, and I think, royalty free in eternity. So if you are using them, then you know you can use them for forever. But obviously you get free access for the first six months into the directory and then after that you have to pay a little bit. But I think that that's a good thing. But ACAST has also been doing and of course Lizzie Pollert, lp, from ACAST, is speaking at Pod News Live next week. Acast has also been doing all kinds of other things, haven't they?

Sam Sethi:

Back in August, acast also sent you a press release saying that, from the first to September, they'll no longer accept campaigns that use Spotify's ad analytics. They also said that ACAST will offer attribution from independent analytics companies, namely PodScribe, for free to all advertisers, and I was like, oh, what does that mean? So, james, I thought I'd reach out to Ross Adams, the CEO of ACAST, and the CEO of PodScribe, peter Bursinger, and find out what the relationship and partnership was all about and why ACAST wasn't going to be using Spotify's ad analytics anymore. Why don't we start off with who or what is PodScribe?

Pete Birsinger:

Got it. Yeah, we, I would say we at PodScribe are a tool to help buyers scale their advertising and similarly for publishers to help scale their sales, and under that we have a couple key components, but the two most prominent are verification and attribution, so helping buyers and sellers make sure the buys are running as they expect and then how do they perform. So those are our two biggest focuses and we we are a bit. We've been doing the verification piece, I would say longer, and that is probably how a lot of our strongest relationships have been formed. But I think that's really built the foundation for the attribution side of things.

Sam Sethi:

And the underlying technology you're using is AI or partly AI and partly human.

Pete Birsinger:

Yeah, yeah, you could. You could say there's a mix of man and machine in there. So, yeah, it depends kind of which part of it we're talking about, but yeah, there is. We do, for instance, for the verification side of things, where we find the advertisers ads in the podcast. That is a mix of man and machine, because sometimes the transcript is imperfect, it can be hard to tell the exact word and ad starts and ends. So we've got it pretty close to fully AI, but there is a level of human review in there. So that's just kind of one example, but that's how a lot of our tools are with it, with a mix.

Sam Sethi:

Ross, hello, how are you? Hey Sam, you're on. Yeah, very well. Now look, august the 17th, we get a press release that says Acast has announced that from September 1st, it will no longer accept new campaigns that use Spotify's ad analytics. And right at the bottom that it said we will offer attribution from independent analytic companies, like a PodScribe, free for all advertisers. So that piqued my interest. But let's start off with. Why have you decided, as of 1st of September, no longer to accept campaigns that use Spotify's ad analytics?

Ross Adams:

This isn't a knee-jerk decision from an Acast. It's something we've been working on for quite a while. We work with thousands and hundreds of advertisers and agencies daily across the globe and through data we make informed decisions, and this is something that has been spoken to us about by different brands, especially when pod sites and chartable got bought across over to Spotify now Spotify analytics. We champion the open ecosystem. Acast believes clearly in independence and kind of objectivity. We believe that's crucial, basically for advertisers and the industry. When it comes to the likes of measurement and for us to maintain impartiality, we've always worked with trusted third party partners for measuring and reporting on campaigns. Obviously, advertising is our bread and butter and so relying solely on a one publisher environment for data aggregation we believe can introduce biases and self-promotion and that kind of hinders the object analysis of data across all types of the supply. So PodScribe is also worth knowing doesn't sell media. Spotify does so again, this is kind of what's made the decision there.

Sam Sethi:

Does this mean, though, that you might eventually look? I'm not putting words into your mouth, but would you eventually acquire PodScribe? I mean, is the market being MNA, or is it just to be a partner?

Ross Adams:

For us as a partner. We also partner with kind of many of the other attribution sites from Clarity Assets, AI, magellan, verotonic but I think the deep partnership with PodScribe highlights the differences PodScribe has with any of the others in the marketplace. We want to offer our advertisers and agencies the best tools we can, which is why we've done this partnership with PodScribe.

Sam Sethi:

Peter, so when you got the call from Acast, that must have been a great exciting moment for you, growing company as you are. What do you think you bring to the poverty, though? What's the thing that PodScribe, more than any other, will help with? Acast customers?

Pete Birsinger:

I think well, first off, I think, kudos to Acast, because it's not I don't think it was an easy move to take a stand like that and in a lot of conversations with other publishers following the PodSciites acquisition, I think it's a thing that most, if not all, of them were thinking. So I think definitely kudos to Acast, not only, of course, for picking us that's great but I think also taking the stand on independence, because I don't think it's necessarily an easy thing to do when some advertisers may still press them for it. So I think it sort of sets a tone for the space to make it easier for others to follow suit. So that's the first thing. But in terms of what we bring, I think historically our client base is largely advertisers. So I think we in advertisers from the beginning have a trust of our verification and results. So I think it is.

Pete Birsinger:

And there have been times when, for certain publishers, even Acast sometimes will say, oh, this ad had this issue or that issue, even while we were talking about the partnership. So I think we I don't think it's necessarily, I think it's recognized by the industry that maybe, if anything, were too much on the side of the buyers to provide independent, impartial reporting, not only for did my campaign run to get what I paid for, but also how did it perform. So I think there is a strong understanding, at least in circles of the industry, that we can provide that. So we're thrilled about the partnership and looking forward to growing it further.

Sam Sethi:

So, ross, we were happy to interview recently Greg Glendane, who's just joined you as your Global Business Director. So what's you up to? It's one of those questions. When I looked at what Glenn was doing he's getting product reporting to him, strategy reporting to him I was like hey, ross is off on on sabbatical, what's Ross doing?

Ross Adams:

Yeah, no, I think you know products. He reports to me. So from Greg's side, greg's been brought in to look after kind of that commercial and revenue side as well as the content side and how we kind of sew them all together. You know, also, us is such a huge market If we look at the kind of you know you compare the likes of maybe the second biggest market, uk, out there and what's the UK worth? About 70 million pounds in terms of commercial value, whereas you look at the US podcast market it's worth $2 billion last year.

Ross Adams:

So the opportunity is, you know, definitely in the States. You know US clearly is obviously a local business. So we need local talent who understand the industry here and part of the role that I've played in moving over to New York is to expand and move forward the ACAS business alongside Greg. So Greg's here to help accelerate that for us. We also got, you know, the likes of BizDev as a department as well. That falls under Greg. So there's, you know, acas. We wear many hats and we're not a huge organization per se when you compare us to kind of some of the larger brands out there. But you know Greg's very much going to help us accelerate our business here in the US.

Sam Sethi:

Brilliant. And again, congratulations on the promotion for Lizzie. She's done well.

Ross Adams:

Yes, thank you, sam for that. That was all you, mate, I'd love to take credit for nothing there.

Sam Sethi:

Absolutely nothing, but thank you very much. Just one other story that came out last week You've done an announcement with Slipstream. What's that one about?

Ross Adams:

Yes, a slipstream. What it does is anyone who is hosted with Acast as an Acast customer allows you to use that service for free for six months, and it gives you access to 70,000 song and music beds to use within your podcast, which give you the rights to be able to use them. Basically, so it helps promote that service, but it helps promote another service to our creators to make better content for the ecosystem.

Sam Sethi:

Cool, look, I won't take up much more of your time. This deal sounds interesting. It's gone live now. First of September has passed, so this is now active. What's the uptake been like?

Ross Adams:

I mean from our side we deal with thousands and thousands of customers. So I think it's landed very well, this deal, and a lot of customers already use PodScribe anyway. So this just excels the partnership and brings new measurement to new advertisers.

Sam Sethi:

Peter, thank you very much. Glad to meet you, Ross. As ever, good to see you again from my friend and look forward to catching up with you soon. Take care.

Ross Adams:

Thanks.

James Cridland:

Sam Cheers Ross and Peter from Acast and from PodScribe and great to hear from both of those and of course, lizzie Pollitt is speaking at Pod News Live next Wednesday along with a bunch of other people. There's also been other movement in the whole brand safety, contextual targeting analytics and all of that kind of stuff going on Adlarge, flightpath and Sounder announcing an integration to offer a mega package to their customers, and NPR, who've renewed a brand lift measurement solution with Veritonic as well.

Sam Sethi:

So James moving on, then Sony. Now this is not good news. Sony's announced significant layoffs in their podcast division. What's been happening?

James Cridland:

Well, yes, sony haven't announced them, but they have sort of come out through a couple of leaked emails and everything else. And all we really know so far and actually Carmen has done a very good job of doing, you know, of reporting on this All that we really know so far is that there is a very large, seemingly amount of people who are being made redundant from Sony music podcasts. So the piece talks about a significant percentage of the division. According to a Sony spokesperson that Ashley spoke to, the company wasn't more specific. She says which is worthwhile spotting. So I'm not quite sure how many people are going. They're also getting rid of a podcast as well. Hi Lo with Emily Rattachowsky. How do I pronounce that, rattachowsky? She's a model and author, sam, and I bet you know her. So how do I pronounce her? Sam Rattachowsky? Oh, there you go, yes, well, anyway, they do a podcast with her and they're getting rid of it. And this is brilliant. This is US Myopia encapsulated in one sentence.

James Cridland:

The program attracted a large segment of listeners internationally, but struggled to sell advertising because brands primarily wanted to reach US consumers. So a brilliant. Apparently, no one outside of the US buys anything. Sam, we don't buy a thing. Yeah, that's fine. We don't need any advertising. It's pointless advertising to us. And the fact that they have people tuning into that program from other parts of the world, obviously there's no way of making money out of that at all. It's impossible. So just so myopic. But anyway, there you go. So I'm looking forward to learning a little bit more about what is going on when they actually say something, and that would be nice to know.

Sam Sethi:

Well, maybe they can't say anything because they're advertising for an account direct to do, to do global podcasting, and they're going to be based in London, so maybe that's why they can't say anything. Whoever that new person is, maybe the spokesperson in the future?

James Cridland:

Well, yes, I mean, maybe that is the case. Yes, podnewsnet slash jobs actually has that particular job which is currently available. So you do kind of ask yourself, well, what's going on there then? But I'm sure that I'm sure that there's a plan.

Sam Sethi:

Just don't necessarily know what that plan is. Talking of companies that don't tell you what their plans are. It looks like podcasts are growing globally on YouTube. What's happening, james?

James Cridland:

Well, yes, so I was tipped off that if I searched for a podcast here in Australia then I would find it, and in fact, it's not just here in Australia. I got the VPN out, sam. So far, I found podcasts now in the YouTube Music app in Australia, new Zealand, cambodia, india, indonesia, japan, malaysia, the Philippines, south Korea, singapore and Thailand, and probably quite a lot of other countries as well Not Hong Kong, nowhere in Europe, not South Africa, but in quite a lot of other places. So, yes, that is interesting. They're only available at the moment if you search for them, so they don't appear otherwise in the UX, but I guess it's the first step in making podcasts available everywhere in that app. And of course, I'm using the word podcast with inverted commas because they're nothing to do with RSS feeds.

Sam Sethi:

Now talking of RSS and podcasting not being the same thing. On YouTube I saw this announcement. It was in obviously Pod News Daily. You had one of the Pod News readers, Katie, Send to a picture from the London Underground of Audible's new podcast series with Steve Coogan from the Oath House and I thought hang on a minute. Okay, that's great. So I'll go and find the RSS and I'll ingest that. So I went to podcast index, typed it out Nope, nothing there, Not Audible, Nope. So again, why are they allowed to call it a podcast when it has no RSS feed? It's the same as YouTube, but we never give Audible, aka Amazon, any hard time in the same way we do YouTube, I suppose.

James Cridland:

No, and I think of that as an absolutely fair enough comment. So this is the season three of Steve Huckins podcast from the Oast House, which is a building in southern England designed to dry hops, the chief ingredient of beer. And yes, and we never really pick them up for calling it a podcast. It isn't a podcast, it's just a piece of audio that you can pick up within the Audible app and that is it. At some point it might be released everywhere else. It took, I think, four years for West Cork, which was an Audible exclusive, to be released everywhere else, but it's a great podcast. You want to go and have a listen to that one. So yeah, we should be a little bit stronger in terms of that.

James Cridland:

I have to say Pod News doesn't cover new shows ordinarily from Audible, because we can't link to them, because we can't do anything with them, we can't get the artwork or anything else. I have, I think, asked the PR people who I talked to five times now please could you put me in touch with somebody at Audible where I can actually get some form of API into your directory, and that has never gone any further than I'll see what I can do. So yes, it's a bit of a strange one, but yes, I don't normally cover these things. It was in there because it was a photograph that Katie, who's on holiday from Canada, had taken on the on the Tube in London of an advert for this particular show. And there is a little feature in the Pod News newsletter, which is podcast promotion in the wild. Given that 58% of people don't listen to podcasts in the US, it's probably a good idea that we don't just advertise podcasts on podcasts and we actually advertise them elsewhere as well, and so that's kind of the point of that.

Sam Sethi:

Now, in my best Tom Cruise impersonation, James, show me the money. That's really bad actually, but I'd like to know where four million dollars went to. So James, tell me why cast media's four million dollars has gone walkabout.

James Cridland:

Yes, that was quite a thing, wasn't it? So, yes, there's quite a lot of money seems to have gone missing from cast media. Now, of course, we have covered this in the past in terms of that, but, yeah, there was a really interesting and really good piece of reporting that was put together by a man called Coffeezilla, who put together a really good video which was explaining what had gone on with cast media and where all of the money went. He spoke to Dustin Knouse, who is somebody who actually worked for the company a while ago, and Dustin had his own theory for where the money was going.

Speaker 6:

I would say that, honestly, most of the money probably went to the minimum guarantees of other talent instead of to the people that it was supposed to go to.

James Cridland:

So basically he's saying that there was lots of minimum guarantees and they just were given out to other people and basically robbing Peter to pay Paul and that sort of thing. But then he did a little bit more digging around Colin Thompson, and Colin Thompson essentially managed to sell his house to a trust, which is a very strange thing. Why would you do that, said Coffeezilla? Why would you do that if you knew that you were going bankrupt?

Speaker 6:

Right about the time he was talking about declaring bankruptcy, he moved that house into a trust where the trustee was a white oming LLC, he said, which, from where I stood, looked a lot like hiding assets from a bankruptcy right before a bankruptcy.

James Cridland:

It's a really good piece of reporting it's well worth a look at. You'll find it on YouTube, of course, and lots of people have ended up seeing that. So, yeah, that was quite a thing, hmm.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, moving your assets out isn't a very good sign of you trying to do the right thing. Anyway, I'll leave that with the law courts in America, I'm sure.

James Cridland:

Yes, yes indeed, and from what I know, I am aware of at least another podcast network who's done exactly the same thing and is currently unable to pay their creators on time. My difficulty is that I don't have enough contacts to be able to back that story up and to make the allegation. And then, of course, we have reported on Odyssey both cancelling their minimum guarantee with APM and Tenderfoot TV's agreement with Cadence 13, which is owned by Odyssey, where Tenderfoot TV claimed that they haven't been paid by Odyssey and claim that Odyssey have basically scrunched up their minimum guarantee contracts as well. So this is not a one-off thing. It's not just Colin Thompson being a dreadful man if indeed he is. It's rather more than that, and so I suspect that we're going to find out a little bit more about this in the future.

Sam Sethi:

Now moving on, james, around the world, let's have a little look. In Canada, triton Digital unveiled its Canada podcast trends report. What was the outcome?

James Cridland:

Yes, they ended up saying that Canadians are listening to lots of podcasts. Three hours of podcasts on average per week Always good to see total time spent listened. Figures coming out of this kind of thing more, please. Three hours of podcasts on average per week is nice. Imagine if we were able to bump that up to four. That would mean potentially 25% more revenue into podcasts if you're charging your podcasts out by cost per thousand, because you can fit 25% more ads in. So that would be a good thing. They also found out that True Crime is the most popular category. Of course, in Canada, I think the number one podcast there is NBC's Dateline, which is essentially a true crime show. So that's a good thing.

James Cridland:

And there was data around podcasting in Kenya, from Spotify or Kenya, if you prefer it. Better that way If you're as old as my dad is and that ranks podcasts by total hours of listening again, rather than total audience. And of course, spotify knows exactly to the second how long people are listening to a podcast. So the number one show. Well, now, as I look at it right now, all of the numbers have been taken out of the release that I linked to, so it did have full numbers in terms of, you know, thousands of listening for the number one show, which is it's related, I promise, and it actually published all of those numbers in there and all of a sudden, all of those numbers have disappeared. So maybe Spotify has gone. What on earth are you doing, publishing those numbers that we gave you, which is what they've done to me in the past? So find out. Find out what's going on there. That'll be a trip to the archive later, but there we go.

Sam Sethi:

And back in your hometown it says that Monolith is an Australian horror film about podcasting which has got a cinematic release on the October 26. So I assume you're going to go and see that film then, James.

James Cridland:

Too bloody, right, mate? No, I'm not going to go and see that. But yes, an Australian horror film about podcasting. It was premiered at the Adelaide Film Festival last year and was at South by Southwest earlier this year as well. So a horror film about podcasting presumably it's got. It's got some really bad edits in it and it's got a little clip of Joe Rogan. I'm imagining that that's the horror. What do you think?

Sam Sethi:

That would. That would be about right. Yes, I think so, yeah.

James Cridland:

I think so. And then, finally, edison Research is releasing the Latino podcast listener reports 2023 on October the 5th. It's an excellent piece of of reportage, an excellent piece of data, so looking forward to hearing from that as well. Let's take a look at some jobs, and Audio Hook has announced David Krulwich or DK to his friends as the company's chief revenue officer. Presumably he's taken the idea of calling himself initials after LP from from Acast. I'm just guessing. Any west of Elts, the founder of the critical frequency podcast network, has received a fancy journalist of the year award from Covering Climate Now, which is a journalism collaboration. Nielsen has a new CEO, but there again, they've just been making tons of people redundant. How do I pronounce his name Sam? Is it Karthik or Karthik?

Sam Sethi:

Oh, I'm going to go with Karthik, yes.

James Cridland:

Karthik Karthik Rao, who has replaced David Kenny, who becomes executive chairman. So worthwhile keeping an eye on that. I put in, slightly sarcastically, that the company was purchased by Private Equity last year and has since had two rounds of redundancy, because that's that's what Private Equity does, doesn't it Tighten?

Sam Sethi:

the ship, cut the costs.

James Cridland:

Yes, indeed, and yes. So there's a bunch of all of that stuff going on. And if you're looking for a job, pod News has podcasting jobs across the industry and across the world on podcasting's largest jobs board, except no substitute. They're free to post as well. It'll just take two minutes to add a new role at podnewsnet slash jobs, the tech stuff On the Pod News Weekly Review.

James Cridland:

Yes, it's the stuff you'll find every Monday in the Pod News newsletter. Here's where we do all of the tech talk the podcasting 2.0 Music Top 100. That was an excellent thing. It now updates hourly. There's also different feeds of that via OPML and via a remote item RSS playlist.

Sam Sethi:

So, james, it sounds very exciting that it's done this the remote item RSS playlist. And now I'm going to ask you what is a remote item RSS playlist?

James Cridland:

Well, yes, because there are two in the world. There's this one, and that's the one that Pod News runs. The new podcast trailers podcast is also available as a remote item RSS playlist. What it's basically saying is, instead of downloading the audio and uploading it to your own podcast host and then that's bad because you're essentially copying other people's work just link to that individual item directly. So there is this thing called a remote item, and very few podcast apps actually understand it so far, but the technology behind the remote item is also the technology behind wallet switching technology, which is how music gets paid for in music value for value podcasts. So it's a really helpful piece of tech, which actually exists there, but, yes, I would imagine that not very many people are using it right now. The good thing, though, is that it contains all of the data, all of the information, that you need to do a music show for yourself, because it's got all of the right numbers and IDs and everything else.

Sam Sethi:

So, as I learned not so long ago, Now the reason why I'm putting my app hat on here. So thank you very much. Yes, it doesn't quite fit yet, but I'm trying. The pod role was one of the things we did. A few months back it came out and that was the idea of a podcast creator being able to say right, using the remote item feed, I can say this podcast, this podcast and this podcast are three that I recommend and I can add that to my RSS feed, and many of the podcast and two to O apps began to support that and I know where to place that.

Sam Sethi:

That's, james has got a pod role and so we can share all of his episodes in one tab and his pod role in another tab. But when I looked at this playlist that you've got, I was like where do I present that? How do I present that? Because it's a series of, I suppose, remote episodes. So am I now supposed to put the pod role and your playlists in your podcast page, because it's you who's created it? This is we support user generated playlists and they go in the user's profile, which is the logical place. So is this a creators playlist?

James Cridland:

Yeah, it's kind of that. It's, I mean, it's really instead of so I mean, the new podcast trailers podcast is a good is a good case in point In that if you look at the standard RSS for that, then you will see a lot of things that look as if they are audio files on my server. Now, in fact, they're not, because I'm redirecting them, but they look as if they're audio files on my server. That's a bad thing if you want to properly link, including all of the payment information and the you know chapter information and everything else. If you just want to link to someone else's show or someone else's episode, and so what the remote item RSS playlist basically says is okay, go and have a look at this RSS feed and use this episode from it.

James Cridland:

So you're actually getting. It's a bookmark, it's a shortcut, if you like, or an alias, I guess, if you like. So you're getting a direct link to that, to that episode, and if the creator then wants to edit the audio or perhaps delete it or whatever, it will automatically get taken away from everywhere else as well. So it's kind of a bit like shortcuts, but if you were going to show that remote item RSS playlist, it would just look like a normal podcast in pod fans. It would be just a list of a list of episodes, and those episodes happen to be coming from somebody else's RSS feeds, the thing that we're doing is we already sport playlists.

Sam Sethi:

We're now going to allow you to export them as a remote item playlist. So that's what we'll do. We're going to have to test whether we can import remote item playlists and then present them in the right manner. So there's a lot of work to be done there.

James Cridland:

Yeah, yeah, indeed, and it comes back to the conversation that we were having two or three weeks ago around pod fans, saying that you're supporting version 2.06 of the RSS, of podcasting RSS, and actually it's easy, it's worth your while to sit and support remote item RSS playlists when there are two in the world and where, frankly, there is no benefit in you supporting them right now. No, you know, there is absolutely no point in you supporting it for the new podcast trailers. The only reason that there is a remote item RSS playlist there is because I could make one. They're quite literally so there's no point in supporting it there and arguably there's no point in supporting it really in the music top 100 either.

Sam Sethi:

No, but I do think there is a point where we have playlists, that we let users within our own pod fans sort of click on episodes and then name them and save them into their profile. But actually on the share out we're just doing a link to that page. But actually on the share out we could do a remote item playlist and then of course that's in a standard structure. The question is then will anyone ever use that file? I mean, it'll be a case of other pod find as other podcast apps being able to ingest it. I guess you could start somewhere, but what was confusing me was when you did it as a creator, where would I stick that as a podcast? That's what was confusing me.

James Cridland:

Anyway, yeah, and I think it would just come up as a podcast the same as any other podcast. That's the way that I would personally do it. But yes, and I get, because it was interesting actually using the remote item RSS playlist of the top 100, because that had all of the information that I needed to be able to put together a random, another random show thing, another random music show thing. So I did the top 10 countdown for the for the top 10 last week and rather enjoy doing it. My microphone sounds awful.

James Cridland:

I need to work out how to make the microphone sound better, but accepting that was great, fun to do and much, much easier the second time to put together, because I learned two things. I learned, firstly, that the opml contains all of the information that I need for the, for linking through to the individual tracks, to make sure that everybody gets paid, and then, secondly, hindenburg, which is my audio editor, has a thing called a music report I've never seen in the past, but the music report essentially outputs a very dumb looking text file which shows you what, which music tracks you played when you started and how long and how long they were, which is exactly the information that is required in the in the RSS feed. So actually it made life an awful lot easier. Putting that RSS fees together.

James Cridland:

The only one thing that I would say is I haven't bothered with chapters, because chapters is hard and that does mean that certainly on fountain there's no artwork and I'm kind of sitting there and going surely the artwork should be. I mean, if you're playing a remote item and there's no chapter going on, then surely the artwork should automatically come from that remote item. You would have thought, wouldn't you? But maybe that's not correct.

Sam Sethi:

Well, I'm looking at it because I did look at your show and, yeah, there is no chapter artwork in there, and that's. Although basically it's going back to what we said right at the beginning with Apple it's fundamentally episode artwork and then going down that one layer to chapter artwork. But if there's no information in there as to how to get that specific data, then, yeah, we can't display it either.

James Cridland:

Yeah, but there again, of course, you've got all of that information because you've got the remote item which links through to all of the information of that particular track. So maybe there is a way of doing this so that you don't need to. You know, if there aren't any chapters, then actually it just pulls that information from the remote items in there. That would make sense, so maybe there's a plan. Anyway, that was exciting, wasn't it? What's for me to talk about you, but what's for me? There are a couple of other things going on in the world of platforms. Castos is now offering free podcast transcripts for all shows. There is a but there, and the but is that they're not yet supporting the podcasting 2.0 transcript tag. So they're offering free podcast transcripts, but they'll just appear within Castos, which is not particularly great, but Craig tells me that he is going to be adding it as a feature in the next couple of weeks.

James Cridland:

Blueberry is doing something which is very cool, so they have a product which is called podcast mirror, which is a RSS feed mirroring platform, so a bit like Feedburner, if you remember that you used to use that to mirror your blog RSS feed, and in the same way, this is exactly the same sort of thing but for podcasts.

James Cridland:

But what Todd and the Blueberry team have added is support, at least at the channel level, for many different podcasting 2.0 features. So everything from you know value for value, payments, the host tag, you know all kinds of other you know pod paying, all of that will work. So a whole host of other ideas in there. So if you are hosting with somebody that doesn't support the new podcasting namespace, then podcast mirror is your savior, because podcast mirror can essentially layer on all of those particular features for you. So if you're with megaphone or somebody cool, just use podcast mirror, point people to that version of your RSS feed and, hey Presto, you can get all of the new podcasting 2.0 goodness. So that's a very cool, quite niche but very cool thing that Todd and the Blueberry team have put together. So quite a smart thing, I think.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah, I was reading about all of that yesterday and it reminds me of sovereign feeds basically, where, you know, stephen Bell, you can go in and take an RSS feed and then enhance it and then save it and then export it out, so it looks like you know podcast mirrors exactly the same thing, but on a more commercial basis.

James Cridland:

Yeah, yeah. Now I think it's a very good and very smart thing. Finally, alitu has jumped on the AI bandwagon, has launched a thing called the Alitu show planner, which auto generates an entire podcast action plan for free, has a podcast name generator and an auto generated scripts for the show's initial trailer. So if you lack any of the talents required to put a podcast together, then hooray. Now you can just follow what the AI tells you to do, and that's a wonderful thing. Colin does some really good, good tools at Alitu not necessarily convinced about this one, but nevertheless it's a good thing to see him try new things Now.

Sam Sethi:

Rode you use, sure, don't you feel, mike, and I use Rode. But they've said that the new MacOS Sonoma, which went live yesterday, they've said do not upgrade if you're using an Intel Mac. So thankfully I'm not, I'm on an M1.

James Cridland:

Oh, only an M1.

Sam Sethi:

Hey, I'm not moneybags like you.

James Cridland:

Yes, yes, so it was actually. It actually comes out on Tuesday September the 26th, so the day before Pod News Live. I wouldn't necessarily install it then. But yes, if you're running an Intel Mac, then Rode is saying don't upgrade. And in fact it's not just Rode products, it's basically quite a lot of other products as well where apparently they've messed something up. Rode have told Apple time and time again that there's a problem here and Apple haven't necessarily fixed it. So that is going to catch an awful lot of people out. So I have deliberately not gone anywhere near the new MacOS and will be waiting until at least until I'm home again from the UK to upgrade. But yeah, that's a concern. Not quite sure what happens. Whether or not it works at all is one thing. It seems to be something to do with the USB connection, so don't fully understand that. But yeah, that's going to catch an awful lot of people out if we're not careful.

Sam Sethi:

Yeah well, I am using a Sonoma on the beta, the final beta, and I am using a roadcaster pro 2, so happy days.

James Cridland:

Well, yes, well, that's a good thing. So, yes, as long as it works, then that's all that matters.

Sam Sethi:

James, you came up with something really interesting. You came up with a simple, straightforward way to promote your podcast by embedding your audio in an email, which I thought was quite fascinating. So tell me more. What is it and how did you find it?

James Cridland:

Well, so it turns out that 58% of people, astonishingly, use Apple Mail to open emails either Apple Mail on iPhones, on iPad or on desktop, or they're using something which is using Apple's webkit under the hood. So I use a great mail program called MimeStream, which is brilliant, which integrates perfectly with Gmail, and, yeah, and so all of these people are all using Apple Mail in some way, shape or form. Now, apple Mail is interesting because it supports and, by the way, no one else does, but it supports the audio tag, so the standard audio HTML tag in email. So you can basically embed an audio tag in your HTML email. It'll give you a little player within your email that appears if it's supported, and you can press the play button and it goes off and downloads your podcast and plays it back to you as if it was a normal podcast app. So a really easy, straightforward way of getting people to hear a podcast that you have shown off.

James Cridland:

So I thought, well, I wonder what would happen if I was to give that a test. Send it out to the 29,300 people that get the podcast daily newsletter every single day and see whether or not the bots go crazy, whether or not it does anything for our deliverability, etc. Etc. And everything just works perfectly. So, yeah, it's a really good way. If you want to promote your show maybe you've really got a newsletter, maybe you've really got something else then embed that HTML audio tag. If it works, you'll see a play button and if you hit that play button, it will appear in your podcast analytics as a normal download, because it is it's a normal download and you can even keep listening to it as you go through the rest of your email. It won't actually stop until you, until you go and stop it directly. So it's a really good way of sharing audio from the podcast that you actually have works with DAI and everything else. So, yes, really interesting. There's a full report on that at the pod newsletter. Podnewsnet. Slash articles is where to find that.

Sam Sethi:

There was. I thought it was really interesting. Only on the basis that I can imagine someone using soundbites and then being able to put that soundbite in the email. Would you recommend, though, putting your full podcast? I mean, I suppose you could, because you just said it would count as a play, but we had Brian of London saying, well, how are you going to get your micropayments to that? And I said, well, I don't know, so probably just put soundbites or clips would be the only thing I do.

James Cridland:

Yes, or indeed, if you were wanting to promote a new, a new season or something, maybe you might put a trailer in there, and you know. So there's all kinds of different things. So my theory is, when I'm brave enough to do the coding, my theory is the bit at the bottom of the pod news newsletter where it has all of the new shows which are now available for you to go and have a listen to. My theory is to put a play button next to all of those so that you can actually have a listen if you want to, That'll be pretty cool.

James Cridland:

Yeah, and I reckon I can do that in a way that pressing the play button will actually appear as a play on the original podcast's analytics. So that would be quite a nice thing if it's possible to end up doing so. Yeah, so I think that there's an awful lot of interesting things. I think Todd Cochran's Blueberry runs a thing called subscribe by email, where you can actually subscribe to a podcast via email if you want to get an email when a new episode comes out. So again, what he could do there is he could actually embed the audio directly into the email. It's two lines of code. It's really really easy. So, yeah, there's all kinds of things you could do with that. Nice Like it. Good find James. Good find Two other things.

James Cridland:

Just to round up the tech stuff Open AI's whisper, which is the speech recognition software. There's a new update of that, the first update for a while. That includes improvements to word timestamp accuracy. So it's particularly good if you're doing those fancy. Jason, you know karaoke style things. I know it's not properly karaoke, but you know what I mean and so you can download that. Now. The good news is that it also better supports the podcast namespace as well in there as well. So there's all kinds of things that you can add to the command line to make it spit out the correct versions of that. If you want to see what the output of that looks like, then you will find that in the podcast which uses whisper as its speech recognition in there. So that is nice.

James Cridland:

And PodPage has released PodPage Elite, which is a premium subscription for creators which offers all kinds of entertaining things, including episode deep linking, link tracking, seo analysis and stuff like that. If you are producing a podcast and you don't have the time or the skills to produce a website for it, then PodPage is a smart thing. To go and use PodPageco no, it's PodPagecom slash PodNews will, I think, get you a special deal, I think, if my memory serves that right. Anyway, podpagecom slash PodNews, I think, is where to go for that, but it's a very cool thing. Brendan, who puts the thing together, is a very bright chap. Also understands an awful lot about crypto and NFTs. So one would assume that at some point there might be a bit of Albi integration. He'd be mad not to, I don't think.

Sam Sethi:

He would be. If you understand it, get ahead of the curve. That's all I'd say. Anyway, events, james, what's coming up?

James Cridland:

Well, of course it's International Podcast Day on September 30th. I've been involved in a few articles which are coming out on that date on different websites and stuff. It is, of course, podnews Live next Wednesday in London in West 12. Podnewsnet slash Live is where to get tickets and stuff. That seems to be going quite swimmingly, sam, so far as I can see.

Sam Sethi:

It's going really well. I am sending out all of the agendas to the speakers and bits and pieces. The numbers of people that are there are great. I think you'll be a really good event. We're going to go for drinks afterwards. Our friends at ACAS have said they're going to sponsor those drinks, so drink up is all I'd say. The night before James, we might even have a little drink ourselves. So there you go.

James Cridland:

Yes, that would be nice. I will treat you to a hoppy excitement and a beer as well. The British Podcast was, of course, the day after, which will be a marvellous event. The International Journalism Federation is having a conference in Athens on the Friday where I'm speaking. I have no idea what I'm speaking about, but I have a call, I think, later on today, so I can find out a little bit more about what it is that I'm supposed to be talking about. I think so far I've seen that I'm one of three people and they're basically saying the bottom has fallen out of podcasting, it's all going to hell in a handbasket and what on earth are you doing, still involved in podcasting? So I think I will be arguing from the other side as well. But there are more events, both paid for and free, at Pod News virtual events or events in a place with people, and if you are organising something, tell the world about it. It's free to be listed. Podnewsnet slash events. Boostergram corner corner corner on the Pod News Weekly Review.

James Cridland:

Oh, yes, it's our favourite time of the week. Boostergram Corner. If you have a podcast app that has a boost button, press it, see what happens. Go on, put a large number in and work out what's going on there. Sam, what have we got?

Sam Sethi:

Well, gene Bean sent us a row of ducks 2222 and he said I think something is wrong with your chapter art. I don't see Sam's graphs or any others. Haven't seen any art in a couple of shows actually. I also checked in Podverse. Yeah, okay, hand up, gene, it was my birthday and I am trying to get Podfans out. So, snacker, yeah, exactly, it was down to me. No, it wasn't a technical problem.

James Cridland:

You had one job Settie Apart from organizing PodNews.

Sam Sethi:

Yes, and trying to get this Podfans out and no nothing else, and trying to entertain myself for a birthday because no one else was going to do it for me, right? And all of that meant yes, sorry, gene, but I did update it. So then I got another row of ducks from him 2222, saying not sure what changed, but both apps have chapter art in that. So few, I actually got my job done, james.

James Cridland:

Well, there you go. That's a nice thing. Dave Jones sent us 5150sats and he says whoa Sam ends the show with a sick burn on James. What was that about? I've completely forgotten that.

Sam Sethi:

When you said you weren't a proper journalist, and then at the end of the show, when you said something, I said yeah, you're not a proper journalist. Yeah, that's right. Yes, but then again, nor am I. So it's okay, it's fine.

James Cridland:

Yes, and Dave also pointing out that there is a JSON, opml and RSS format version of the top 100 chart data. Thank you, dave. You see this is how you get feature requests into the podcast index. You just mentioned it on the show and again you get that done. Silas on Linux should be coming to the Pod News Live get together, but he can't. He says, really annoyed, that I'm in London now until the 17th and I don't have any more vacation days at work. Normally I listen from Germany. Cheers Silas. Well, cheers Silas. I hope you've been enjoying some good British beer with all of the additives that are illegal in Germany. So I hope that you've been enjoying that anyway.

Sam Sethi:

And then mere mortals. Our friend Kieran sent us another row of ducks two, two, two. It seems to be the flavor this week. He said did you end up going to the Brissy podcast meetup, james? I think that's aimed at you. Rigi Digi, I would say, means authentic, whereas Fair Dinkum is more of an expression to be used for miles. Surprise, there will be translation with this episode Australian is an option.

James Cridland:

If you want it Now, kieran, I think you're wrong. I think Rigi Digi is straight and above board, and I think Fair Dinkum is similarly straight and above board, but a bit less so.

Sam Sethi:

I think you both talk the Queens English and stop making up words.

James Cridland:

It would be really easier, but anyway, I didn't end up going to the Brisbane podcast meetup. The Brisbane podcast meetup wanted $25 to go. I was there thinking I'm not sure that that's for me, so I didn't end up going. But I did end up listening to Kieran doing his show live, because Fountain told me that his value for value show was live and that happened to be at 10 in the morning on Wednesday and so therefore I had to listen to it and it was rather fun having listened to it live. He does an awful lot of singing Prior to him actually going live. He's there going.

James Cridland:

It's very, very strange, but still, there you go. Did he watch the Swedish Muppets? Still, he's great. Hootie, hootie, hootie. Too soon If you get value from what we do. The Pod News Weekly Review is separate from Pod News, sam, and I share everything from it. It goes into paying for things like Pod News Live. Frankly, we really appreciate your support, though, that we can continue making this show. You can become a power supporter with your visa or Mastercard or your American Express or your weird Chinese one with the funny colors on it. Weeklypodnewsnet is the place to go Weeklypodnewsnet with that. Or you can support us with Sats by hitting the boost button or indeed just streaming, as quite a lot of the money comes from. If you don't have one, podnewsnet slash, new podcast apps will help you find a new app. So there was a mystery person at the door about half an hour ago, sam, in a piece of the podcast that we have since edited out. What else has happened for you this week?

Sam Sethi:

Power Cuzz at four in the morning. No, that was fun. We've thankfully finished the mobile PWA for Pod Fan, so, as of Monday, we will officially be a beta product. Oh, that's very exciting. Yes, so Manifest is being uploaded as we speak today. On Friday, and then over the weekend, we'll just do a little bit of checking and then, as of Monday, yes, we'll open the doors, remove the wait list, and yet it will be a full, proper beta.

James Cridland:

Excellent. Well, that'll be very exciting. Have you bumped into? I think this time last week you were telling me all of the important people who you live next to and everything else. Is there anybody else in your village that we should know about?

Sam Sethi:

Well, we're trying to get him out of the village now. Yes, Russell Brand lives in our village as well.

James Cridland:

You are joking, no.

Sam Sethi:

I'm not. I've got Chris Evans, chris Tarant, I've got Ricky Gervais and Russell Brand, yeah, so I hope he gets his hands to himself. Yeah, no, my daughters are now not going out, no, anyway. Yes, so Russell is persona non grata in the village at the moment.

James Cridland:

Yes, yes, he denies all allegations. Indeed, he does, which I should point out. He denied all of the allegations without actually knowing what the allegations were, which is always a good one.

Sam Sethi:

But I would say, on a more serious note, and I'm sure that Adam will probably cover it on the Friday show he has had, he's been cancelled basically off many platforms and, unless I'm wrong, the law used to be innocent until proven guilty, as opposed to guilty on social media and then de-platform.

James Cridland:

Yes, I think I mean he's been. So what? He hasn't necessarily been de-platformed, but what's gone on is YouTube music. So in case you don't know, he's been. He's a comedian in Universal Commerce in the UK and he's been accused of a number of quite serious sexual allegations, and my understanding is that YouTube has demonetized him, although Todd and Rob were very or at least Rob was very keen in suggesting that he may have been demonetized because the advertisers didn't want to be advertising next to his content. So it might not have been YouTube actually making that decision, it might have been the advertisers who basically said no, he's no longer brand safe. But in any case, he's been demonetized from his YouTube channel, where he had 6. Something million people. So that's quite a thing.

James Cridland:

A few shows have been taken off iPlayer and whatever the Channel 4 app is called these days I think it's just called Channel 4, isn't it? But whatever it, however, it works. A couple of episodes have been pulled off there. I know that the BBC have been sniffing around BBC News, which is journalistically independent from the rest of the BBC. I know that they've been sniffing around the podcast companies wondering whether the podcast platforms are taking down Russell Brand content. So I have been helping them with their inquiries. But, yeah, it's a very strange conversation and, as you say, he's not been convicted of anything, although, I mean, the evidence is relatively strong, evidence which he denies, but nevertheless, and so you are there going. Well, you know there is a limit, I think, in terms of how far you go. But yeah, I mean, I have to say I was listening to the news agents a couple of days ago and they started with a clip of Russell Brand talking to Jimmy Savile.

James Cridland:

Oh yeah, that was just a dreadful, dreadful thing. If you don't know who Jimmy Savile is, wikipedia him.

Pete Birsinger:

Don't, don't, we're not we're not going to go to that.

James Cridland:

But anyway, yes, so Russell Brand lives in your village. There's a thing, there's a thing, Not for long. Well, he wasn't, he was supposed to be here in Australia in a week's time performing at a comedy festival, and he's been. Well, I was going to say he's been cancelled. He and the festival have agreed that they will, that he will no longer be available on the festival. So, yes, I think. I think all of a sudden he won't be very busy for a bit.

Sam Sethi:

Oh well, I've got a long to cut. Maybe I'll ask him Now James, what's happened for you?

James Cridland:

I've had a relatively quiet week. I have to tell you, it is sweltering here. It's early spring but for some reason we've got a heat wave right up the east coast of Australia and so the temperature here went up to 33 today. So it's been it's been a properly hot, humid Brisbane spring day, and I'm not quite ready for that. So you know, I had to get out the shorts and everything else. I know, imagine, imagine it.

Sam Sethi:

I'm trying not to no. No, you bring those to.

James Cridland:

London, are you Certainly? I'm not.

Sam Sethi:

With your digital.

James Cridland:

Well, I don't know actually, because I'm going to Greece straight afterwards, so who knows, maybe I will, but yes, that was, that was quite a thing. So, yes, so that's so. That's been fun. But no, apart from that, I'm just busy playing around with the RSS feed for the main pod, news daily podcast, so that I can give people who are using Apple podcasts a slightly different experience. That looks as good as I can make it for that platform. And yeah, that's basically been all I've been doing this week.

Sam Sethi:

Are we getting another show? You know another DJ show from you.

James Cridland:

No, I don't think. I don't think we're going to get another DJ show for some for some time. I did enjoy doing it, but yes, and I have to say, if I sounded that good when I was doing so, you'll find this show it's called James's Random Music Show thing and you'll find it in any podcasting 2.0 compliant app. And I have to say, if, if I sounded as good as that when I was actually doing a chart countdown and getting paid for it then it, then I probably still be doing it, but I got very lazy, so stop doing all of that. And, of course, we didn't have such a thing as the Internet when I was actually on the air, so I was being able to look up, you know, the people who I was playing and find out more information about. It was actually really hard. So, yeah, so people have it so easy these days.

Sam Sethi:

Oh, these DJs don't know how good they is, do they yeah?

James Cridland:

exactly, and that is it for this week.

Sam Sethi:

Yes, you can give feedback to James and I by using email at weekly at podnewsnet, we prefer send us a boost to Graham. If your podcast app doesn't support boost, what are you using it for then? Then grab a new app from podnewsnet. Forward slash a new podcast apps Now.

James Cridland:

This time next week we will, of course, have just finished podnews live, and I suppose the question is are we actually going to have a show next week, Sam?

Sam Sethi:

Depends if you're in Greece and I'm still on stage cleaning up after your mess? No, I don't know.

James Cridland:

So there is a possibility that we do a slightly truncated version, maybe record that on Thursday morning. There is also a possibility that there may not be one, and in which case we may see you back in two weeks, but we will see how we go. I think we are written down to do 50 shows a year, so perhaps this is one of our two weeks that we can take off, who knows? Although there again, you know, I'm sure that we can very quickly put something out. Our music, by the way, is from Studio Dragonfly. Our voiceover is Sheila Dee. We use clean feed for our main audio and we're hosted and sponsored by podnews live and by Buzzsprout podcast hosting made easy, and we'll see you in London next week, indeed. Get updated every day. Subscribe to our newsletter at podnewsnet.

James Cridland:

Tell your friends and grow the show.

Pete Birsinger:

And support us and support us the Pod News Weekly Review will return next week. Keep listening.

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