Breaking Free Of Emotional Bondage

Breaking Free of Emotional Bondage Episode #2

February 18, 2018 Season 1 Episode 2
Breaking Free Of Emotional Bondage
Breaking Free of Emotional Bondage Episode #2
Chapters
Breaking Free Of Emotional Bondage
Breaking Free of Emotional Bondage Episode #2
Feb 18, 2018 Season 1 Episode 2
Gaylen Beardsley
A brief summary of several Social Anxiety Disorders that people may be dealing with
Show Notes Transcript
In this episode I cover several of the many types of Social Anxiety Disorders. Giving some of the symptoms and effects not only on the emotions, but on the physical as well.
Speaker 1:
0:00
Breaking free of emotional bondage. Episode two brought to you by the center for emotional freedom,
Speaker 2:
0:20
provide entertaining, educational and encouraging content that will make a difference.
Speaker 2:
0:29
Hello everyone and welcome to this episode of breaking free of emotional bond. I'm your host Galen Beardsley and this is the podcast about the effects of negative emotions on your life and how you can break free of their hold on youth. We will be here every week to help you find the answer to question you may have about emotional Monday, what it is and how you can get free from that bondage and move into a pool and uninhibitedly life. If at any time during this program you begin to have thoughts of suicide, please turn off this podcast and immediately dialed nine one one for health.
Speaker 3:
1:17
Yeah.
Speaker 2:
1:20
Hello everyone. You are here. All right, play it the right time. Today we're going to talk about sign that may give, give
Speaker 4:
1:27
you some indication as to whether you are dealing with an anxiety disorder of one type or another. Now, let me say this, I am a certified emotional therapist with my own practice, but I am not a doctor. This is not intended to be a medical diagnosis of your symptoms. This is an informative self-help podcast about anxiety and the types of emotional disorders that people face every day. Now, if you wish to further information, you can contact me by going to www.beemotionallyfree.com and send me a personal contact request. While we have lots of information to cover today. So let's dive right in. So tell me something you'd get worried about things periodically. Are you worried about something right now? Do you get nervous once in a while? Has someone said something to you like you worry too much and maybe they say that fairly often? Are you personally afraid that you have an anxiety disorder?
Speaker 4:
2:33
Would you experience every day or quite often may seem normal to you, but that doesn't mean it's a healthy normal. The distinction between the anxiety disorders and normal anxiety isn't always clear. When we're talking about emotions. We need to be careful that we don't classify or view an emotion that may be negative at the moment as automatically being bad or chronic. When we're speaking about being nervous or anxious, we need to clarify a couple of things as we consider the emotion and its impact on us longterm. Now everybody gets a little nervous or anxious at one time or another. We may feel a little nervous or anxious before we get up to speak in front of a group of people or how about when you're going through financially difficult crisis? I know that I would be a little anxious during times like that. That seems to always make people a little nervous.
Speaker 4:
3:32
Those types of things can be considered to be on the normal side, but what really counts and should be one of the first considerations is the frequency and the strength of the emotion that you're experiencing. So you're asking how much is too much. It's not really easy to tell what you feel on a day to day basis is bad enough that it falls into the disorder category. Remember this little formula, strength and frequency, the strength of the emotion and the frequency that you repeat that emotion. You can self check using that type of an equation. Nine, anxiety shoved its way into our lives and a lot of different ways. Some people have severe panic attacks, others just have mild episodes. Others have a phobia of one kind or another that jumps up and causes them grief. Now, now, even just mild social anxiety, these are just a small sampling of emotional disorders.
Speaker 4:
4:36
Trying to draw a line to the distinction concerning any of these can be a difficult task, but let's talk about a few symptoms and then you can decide if you should at least talk to someone you trust or even your doctor. Let's start with just plain old fashion worry or unique sets, a worrier, an earmark or indicator that you might have Gad or generalized anxiety disorder is when your worry too much about everything. Okay, so now you're asking me Galen, what's too much? When you're talking about Gad, you might ask yourself, am I having persistent anxious thoughts on practically every day of the week for six months or longer? Another question would have to be this is my anxiety's so bad that it's getting in the way of my daily life. Is that stopping me from doing the things I need to be doing properly and timely?
Speaker 4:
5:39
Here is another noticeable factor. Fatigue. Sally Winston is a doctor of psychiatry and code director of the anxiety and stress disorder is to do it in Maryland. She says this, the distinction between an anxiety disorder and just having normal anxiety is whether your emotions are causing a lot of suffering and dysfunction. Well, how about your sleep habits? Are you sleeping okay? Do you have trouble falling asleep or do you get to sleep but you just can't stay asleep and get a good night's rest? This particular problem is associated with a wide range of health conditions, both physical and psychological, but let me interject right here that tossing and turning with anticipation on the night before a big interview, a big speech or some other big exciting occasion is not a neutral. Trust me, if you're young boy can't get to sleep the night before he gets to go out on his first large fishing trip, he's probably isn't suffering from an anxiety disorder.
Speaker 4:
6:48
But if you lay there awake, worried and agitated about a specific problem or maybe just worrying about nothing at all, that may be an indication of anxiety disorder. In some journals, they estimate that fully half of all people with general anxiety disorder have a sleep disorder as well. There's one more thing that may give you a clue and that is that you wake up feeling wired, your mind is racing and you just can't seem to calm yourself down. Okay? You might want to check those things out. How body irrational fears, irrational fears, our anxieties that aren't generalized at all, but they're attached to a very specific thing like being in the middle of crowds. This is called the Gore phobia or how about the fear of animals called zoo phobia or the fear of flying, which is called Arrow phobia. If a fear becomes disruptive, overwhelming or way out of proportion to the risk involved while doing it, that's a telltale sign of what is called a phobia and that is an anxiety disorder.
Speaker 4:
8:04
We'll cover it. The most prevalent phobias in future podcasts. I want to tell you a couple of stories that we'll explain in real life terms, what I just described as a phobia. Let's start with a story that has to do with the fear of snakes or Ophia phobia. The Donner have a good friend of mine lived in southern Georgia and at the time I lived in Missouri around Kansas City. She had a terrible fear or phobia about snakes at that time. Their son was just a small boy and she was afraid that if he ever got too far from the house and in the position where there was a dangerous snake in the area, she wouldn't be able to help her baby to safety. Then my friend was, uh, headed down from further north to pick her up for a visit and after mentioning her fair to me, I suggested that he drop on by on their way back and let's talk for a while while the small little guy was in the loving care of my wife and his grandpa.
Speaker 4:
9:10
I took the mom to my office and we sat down for a short therapy session using a certain technique. I was able to determine that her fear of snakes was a 10 out of 10. You kind of know it's a 10 when tears show up. After about 30 minutes and another testing. I determined that we had greatly reduced turf here at snakes, at least enough for her not to be so worried for the time be about three weeks later, I guess I got a text message from her on my phone and she just said, you'll never guess where I am. Well, of course I went for the bay big time and I said, I just couldn't. Where are you? Her reply back to me was just this one statement. I am in the reptile cage at a very large zoo. I have absolutely no fear at all.
Speaker 4:
10:01
Thank you so very much. Well, you can imagine how good that felt and I have to tell you it's proof positive to me that phobias like that can be handled in a short time if handled right. The second story is about a young lady in her middle twenties we'll call her Wednesday for now. I had been asked to give Wendy a ride to a doctor's appointment she had, we were casually talking during the ride and in the conversation she said that she hadn't seen the grandpa in a long time. When they asked her why. She told me that she was normally afraid to go out of her apartment for anything except emergencies or a doctor's appointments. This young lady in her twenties had the Gore phobia, which is the fear of crowds or groups of people. I told her I could help her and after the doctor's appointment we sat in front of her house for about 20 minutes.
Speaker 4:
11:01
After some time of therapy she tested a much lower resistance idea of being in a group. When she got out of the car she said, I need to go call my grandpa. I asked her what she was going to talk about and she said she was going to ask him to meet her at the mall for a cup of coffee and dessert. Her fear of being in public had been dispelled enough that she was going to venture out and spend some time with her grandfather. These are just two examples where the fear of a specific thing got in the way of normal life and continually caused anxiety. These are two very good examples of how certain types of conventional therapy or unconventional therapy then is can bring almost immediate relief of anxiety. Phobias are not obvious at all times though they usually serve with. When you're presented with a situation and you find out you can't overcome the fear.
Speaker 4:
12:01
Okay. Now some physical effects come up when you have an anxiety. I'm going to talk about one right here and ask you, do you have chronic indigestion? You know, anxiety may start in the mind, but it often manifests itself in the body through physical symptoms like chronic digestive problems. The Vegas nerve directly connects the stomach to the brain, irritable bowel syndrome or IBS, a condition characterized by stomach aches, cramping, bloating, gas, constipation and or diarrhea is basically an anxiety in the injector digestive track. Ibs isn't always related to anxiety, but the two often occurred together and can help each other get worse. Our gut is very sensitive to psychological stress and vice versa. The physical and the social discomfort of chronic digestive problems can make a person feel even more ancient or you self conscious. This is the feelings of being negatively judged and evaluated and as a result leads to avoidance.
Speaker 4:
13:13
Social anxiety disorder doesn't always involve speaking to a crowd or being the center of attention. In most cases, the anxiety is provoked by everyday situations such as making one on one conversation at a party or eating and drinking in front of even a small number of people. In these situations, people with social anxiety disorder tend to feel like all eyes are on them and they often experience blushing, trembling, nausea, profuse sweating or difficulty talking. These symptoms can be so disruptive that they make it hard to meet new people, maintain relationships and advance at school or work. Now, I'm sure you've heard people talk about having a panic attack. When I was a teenager, we had a common saying that was simply, well, don't have a panic attack about it. Well, panic attacks or nothing to joke about a panic attack is a sudden attack of overwhelming anxiety or fear.
Speaker 4:
14:24
Panic attacks can be terrifying. Picture a sudden gripping feeling of fear and helplessness that can last for several minutes accompanied by scary physical symptoms such as breathing problems, a pounding or racing heart tingling. You're numb. Hands sweating, weakness or dizziness, chest pain, stomach pain and feeling hot or cold. What do you do if you experience those types of things? Well, you may have panic attacks and you need some help. Like I said, they're nothing to joke about. Now, not everyone who has a panic attack has an anxiety disorder, but people who experienced them repeatedly may big nose may be diagnosed. That is with panic disorder. People with panic disorder live in fear about when, where, and why their next attack might happen and they tend to avoid places where attacks have occurred in the past. Hey, you out there. Are you a perfectionist? Well, perfectionism goes hand in hand with anxiety disorders. If you're constantly judging yourself or you have a lot of anxiety about making mistakes are falling short of your own standards, then you're probably have an anxiety disorder. Perfectionism is especially common in obsessive compulsive disorder or OCD, which like PTSD has long been viewed as an anxiety disorder. OCD can happen suddenly, like in the case of somebody who just can't get out of the house for three hours because their makeup has to be absolutely just right and they have to keep starting over.
Speaker 4:
16:18
Speaking of PSD, let's talk about flashbacks now. Reliving a disturbing or traumatic event of violent encounter, the sudden tragic death of a loved one that's a hallmark of post traumatic stress disorder, which shares some features with things [inaudible] disorder. In fact, until very recently, like I said, PTSD was seen as a type of anxiety disorder rather than a standalone condition as it is now, but flashbacks may occur with other types of anxieties as well. Now let's talk about just one more thing that is prevalent, much more prevalent than one might imagine, and that would be compulsive behaviors. In order to be diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder, a person's obsessiveness and intrusive thoughts must be accompanied by compulsive behavior. Whether it's mental, like telling yourself it'll be all right over and over again or physical like constant handwashing are constantly straightening things up in the house. How about counting the swallows?
Speaker 4:
17:34
One takes when drinking from a bottle or glass. Obsessive thinking and compulsive behavior become a full blown disorder when the need to complete the behaviors. Also known as rituals begin to drive your life. If you like your radio ad volume level three for example, and it breaks and get stuck on volume level four would you be in a total panic until you could get it fixed? If you have OCD, the likely hood to be in a panic over your broken radio would be really high. Well, okay. That's it for today. I want to thank you for tuning in. I hope you've got kind of an idea of what is going on out there. In a world where over 40 million Americans are dealing with things, it disorders of one kind or another, that 40 million folks, 40 million people have anxiety disorder of one kind or another. Just United States.
Speaker 4:
18:38
If you are one of those 40 million, I want to say this to you. There is hope for you to get set free from the type of anxiety disorder you may be dealing with. From my point of view, I personally suggest working with someone like myself that use a form of energy therapy or energy psychology. Energy therapy has been shown itself to be extremely effective and in many cases, much quicker and more effective than talk therapy. I personally use two different energy modalities to work with my clients. This is to ensure I'm covering the problem from two different aspects. Using these to energy healing techniques. You can see the entire script for this podcast@wwwdotbeemotionallyfree.com or visit my Facebook page at center for emotional freedom. I want to thank you again for coming to listen and to be on the watch out for our next podcast, which will be published next week. Okay. You have a really good day.
Speaker 3:
19:48
[inaudible].
×

Listen to this podcast on