The Business 360 Podcast with Rushab Kamdar

#10: Podcasting 101 | Billy Thorpe

March 18, 2021 Rushab Kamdar Season 1 Episode 10
The Business 360 Podcast with Rushab Kamdar
#10: Podcasting 101 | Billy Thorpe
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Podcasting has become mainstream and a great platform for entrepreneurs and thought leaders to share their message. On Episode 10 of the Business 360 Podcast, we talk with Billy Thorpe, founder of Copilot Studios to discuss everything anyone should know about Podcasting. 

Billy's company provides advisory services to entrepreneurs who are interested in setting up a Podcast to amplify their brand and service offerings.

Billy's experience in Podcasting comes from having founded three of his own podcasts, including his first one which he sold.

In this episode, you will learn about:

  • Podcasting Strategies
  • How to Start a Podcast
  • Podcast Monetization
  • Podcast Topics
  • Podcasting Mistakes
  • Types of Podcasts

For more information, visit www.ThinkBusiness360.com

Billy Thorpe:

Yeah, I do hear this a lot. Everybody has a podcast. Why would I start one? Everybody has a heart. Everybody has a brain. Everybody has arms and legs. And you know, somebody asked me that, "Billy there's a thousand podcasts about podcasting, why would you start another one?" And I'm like, because I have a perspective. I have an experience that's much different than anyone else's and there's millions of people doing it, but there's not one of you doing it. I'm the difference in my podcast. You're the difference in your podcast. There's a dime a dozen business podcasts, right? But there's no Rushab anywhere else in the world doing this podcast.

Rushab Kamdar:

Welcome to The Business 360 Podcast where we will take a 360- degree view of all things business in under 30 minutes. I'm Rushab Kamdar I recently discovered the benefits of journaling every day, specifically for entrepreneurs. And I want to highlight, it's not a diary. What's going on, Business Heroes? Welcome to episode 10, we did it. We hit double digits and to celebrate the 10th episode of The Business 360 Podcast, we're going to talk about podcasting. So let's get to it On today's podcast, we're welcoming Billy Thorpe. Billy is the founder of Copilot Studio, which helps others setup and master their podcasting. Billy's superpower is helping people and businesses discover what their message is to their audience through podcasting and live streaming. We all have something to say and podcasting is helping us fill that void, whether we're doing prerecorded podcasting, like the one that I do or live streaming. And also, regardless if it's just audio or video, it's becoming a great way for entrepreneurs to become the subject matter authority. So let's talk to Billy and learn more about podcasting and how it could help entrepreneurs. Welcome to The Business 360 Podcast, Billy.

Billy Thorpe:

Hey, Rushab. Thanks for having me, man. Really, really appreciate the invite to the show.

Rushab Kamdar:

Absolutely, man, I'm so glad that you're here. So you know, what I want to do is I want to really get into letting our audience know a lot about the podcast side. You know, this is a new podcast that I've started. This is I think episode 10. And, I want people to understand from someone that is a podcast professionals such as yourself. So you are podcaster, you're a podcast consultant. So explain what that specifically is. And, you know, what you do to help others who are podcasting.

Billy Thorpe:

Yeah, man, absolutely. Well kind of a little back, you know, not too much of a backstory, but my bread and butter has been the t-shirt printing business, apparel, different things like that. So I really was podcasting about three years ago, just as a hobby. So I started a fishing podcast, built it up, sold my half of it, started another business podcast. Similar to what you're doing. And then I did another fishing podcast and then the pandemic hit and everybody was like, "Hey man, can you help me start a podcast?" Like I got a ton of questions about this like live streams, podcasts. I'm like, man, I think there's something to it. And our business took a hit. And so that was really where the coaching consulting came in and it's still a really, you know, to be real transparent, like a really new for me to do that. I've been helping people, you know, probably helped start over a dozen podcasts already, just in the last, you know, eight months or so. But yeah, yeah, so it's really, it's a really interesting thing and I'm just really passionate about having people find their message and get it out. Because I just feel like people's messages, if that's like a burning desire for them to share, it is like a key to really help other people unlock destiny or, you know, mindset or, or, you know, just give people permission to live and do what they want to do. And so I feel like so many people have a message. And so that's what I do, man. I just really coach people like, you know, first of all, you've got to plan your podcast, really plan it, backwards, engineer, this thing, like where do you want it to be? And what's the objective of your podcast? So we go from that planning to launching it. There's a whole launch strategy behind, you know, getting more episodes out early on to get your audience built up on a trailer episode. I mean, we could dive into all of this kind of stuff. And then growth, like how do you grow your podcasts? How do you get it in front of more people? Your target audience. How do you find your audience? And then the last thing that I really love is monetization. Cause we've been fortunate enough to take a really hyper niche podcast and monetize it early on within six episodes and we're getting ready to launch our 50th episode next week. But we've been cashing checks since episode number six on a, on a fishing podcast that I co-host on.

Rushab Kamdar:

So what do you say to the people right now? Maybe you heard this where there's a saying out there everyone has a podcast. And so is it getting over-saturated or do you just find podcasting basically another means to create content and share a message?

Billy Thorpe:

I, I love this. I do hear this a lot. Everybody has a podcast. Why would I start one? Everybody has a heart. Everybody has a brain. Everybody has arms and legs and they have a life. And it's just different, man. It's different for everyone and everyone's geared differently. So there could be a thousand podcasts about podcasting. You know, someone asked me that, "Billy there's a thousand podcasts about podcasting, why, why would you start another one?" And I'm like, because I have a perspective. I have an experience that's much different than anyone else's. I mean, look at all the books, man, YouTube, books, like all this other content creation, there's millions of people doing it. But there's not one of you doing it or one of somebody or one of your watchers or your listeners doing it. And so that's the difference. It's, it's, I'm the difference in my podcast. You're the difference in your podcast. There's a dime a dozen business podcasts, right? But there's no Rushab anywhere else in the world doing this podcast. And so I think that's what, you know, really, I kinda get on my soap box as I just did, because I'm like, dude, don't get discouraged by what everyone else is doing. I mean, there's a million, everything out there, accountants, teachers, doctors. We're all needed, we all have a place. And so it's just finding your place and finding your tribe and your audience, and really serving them.

Rushab Kamdar:

For those that are starting off in podcasting and are getting dejected or deterred with maybe not as many downloads and things of that nature, what would you say to them?

Billy Thorpe:

Oh, man, this is an interesting question, you know, cause I had to answer it myself as I did a business podcast so it's really, you know, churn through some interviews and really loved it, man. I was interviewing other entrepreneurs, local businesses, and really enjoyed that. And then, you know, I got to a certain point about 30 episodes or so, and it was not doing what I wanted it to, and I really just had to step back and go, why am I doing this? You know, like, what am I trying to accomplish? Am I trying to inspire people? Am I trying to help people launch businesses? And really in that business podcast, in particular, it was more of a selfish move. It was more like, I wanted to just be in relationship with certain people. And so, and that did benefit me and that did benefit my business and it did benefit some people that were on the podcast, but it wasn't really my objective, like my life mission to help people directly. And so I think if people are struggling, they're going, man, I'm like. First of all, if you only have 10 downloads, if you only have 10 people listening, and put it in this perspective. Imagine 10 people walked into your room, or right now, wherever you're sitting and listening to this podcast or watching it. And they walked in, 10 people, and said, "Hey, tell us about X, Y, Z." Dude you'd be stoked, right? I mean, I'd be like, "Whoa, hold on a second. I've got a crowd here." Let's, you know, let's work this thing. Let's go. So I think it's, it's long game. It's a slow burn and it's really just finding your why, because your why is going to fuel the podcast. It's going to fuel doing content research and, you know, figuring out what your audience really wants to know and needs to know. And then sitting down at your microphone and hitting the record button. So it's more, yeah, it's more of like, why are you doing it? And I know there's people out there who create podcasts every day. They don't get paid. They have no objective to get paid. They have no, that's not a goal at all. And they make amazing content cause they just want to help people.

Rushab Kamdar:

So let's take it a step towards the entrepreneurial side. For those that are entrepreneurs or have businesses, should they do podcasts? What's your honest opinion on that?

Billy Thorpe:

Well, I guess here's the thing, man. I love podcasting so much. It's kind of like, if you ask somebody who surfs like, "Hey, should I try surfing?" And they're like, yeah, dude, they jump up on it. You know, same, same with you and I we're entrepreneurs. We think it's the greatest thing in the world. But it's not the greatest thing for everyone. So what I would recommend is if you own a business or people are, you know, like, whatever they're doing like if they think they want to do a podcast, go be a guest on a podcast. Go be a guest on 25, 30 podcasts. See if you like that experience of doing that of recording audio because it takes all, it takes like all the work out of it. Like me sitting here talking to you, you got the workload after this episode, not me. And so I'm enjoying myself. So I think if you do that and you enjoy yourself and you're like, man, okay. I really feel like I've brought some value and this is something I can do then absolutely. I mean, why not start a podcast? Like it, it gives you better engagement. It makes, you know, it creates a space for you to be an authority in your topic. Maybe it helps you serve your customers. Or maybe if you have a big business and you're the CEO and you got 300 people working for you and you can't connect personally with all those people, and that's what, now, especially nowadays it's what people want. So create a podcast, talk to them every week, you know, talk to your staff, talk to your team, shoot episodes, just for certain departments. I mean, there's so many ways to connect, you know, with audio.

Rushab Kamdar:

So you talked about monetizing, right? And I think that's an important conversation to have. You mentioned also that there are people who do a podcast every day and they don't make money from it. And there's a lot of people who get into podcasting maybe without having a clear understanding of monetization. Whether that is a goal, an end goal, not a goal. What's your overall thought process on monetization on podcasting?

Billy Thorpe:

Man, I'm an entrepreneur so I always like to make money. Like if I'm spending time doing something, I want to get compensated for it. Just to be pretty honest, like brutally honest. And so I, I put it into the structure of my podcast. Like when I started this fishing podcast, I knew, hey, I needed to narrow down my audiences. It needs to be super niche. And it needs to be something that I can go present to a local tackle shop, boating company, and whatever. Hey, this is a hyper niche audience. We're super focused on this region and we want you to help us grow the community. And so, I'm always about figuring out how to make money. Now there's a lot of ways to make money, right? So you have, you can go to sponsor route and that's, it's a whole, you know, sales process and relationship building. And it's a little more hands-on. You could do the affiliate marketing route where if you're using your software, like I use Ecamm and I'm gonna fill it with the Ecamms. If you click on my Ecamm link and you buy the software, I'm going to get a little commission off of it. It doesn't cost you anymore, you know. Amazon has a phenomenal, you know, Amazon Associates Program as well. You can create your own products. Like, are you, you know, digital goods, or are you doing online courses? Are you doing a book? You're doing e-books? Are you doing apparel? You know, are you doing hard goods stuff like cups and mugs. And like, for instance, for my other company, this is a logo branded tumbler that I'm holding, and it just has my logo all over it. So, I can sell those if I have my podcast audience. So I think there's too many low- hanging fruit ways to monetize. So not to monetize or Billy's try to in some form or fashion, just seems, you know, like, why wouldn't you? Like, if at least you can just, if you could sell a t-shirt a month and cover the cost of your hosting platform, like, why wouldn't you do that? You know.

Rushab Kamdar:

You know, when we connected offline, you know, I had asked you a question about what we read about monetization, which is, you know, 10,000 downloads and you'll get $25 or something like that. Something really small. And you debunk that real quickly. So maybe you can let our audience know your viewpoint on that.

Billy Thorpe:

Yeah, man. This is one of my favorite myths to debunk. I mean, and you can go the CPM route. So there's a cost per click essentially, or a cost per thousand. That's what it is, cost per thousand. And so that basically says, "Hey, if I have 10,000 downloads then I can charge 25 bucks per 1000." I think that's the average 21, 25, something like that. So basically if you have 10,000 downloads per episode and charge somebody $25 to be on there. So maybe if you have, you know, five or four sponsors, you make a hundred bucks an episode. Well, what we did and what, you know, and here's the thing, man, sponsorships within the podcasting world are so new. But I thought, okay, hold on. I'm putting someone's ad in my show. It's going to be there forever. And the, the behavior of a podcasters to go back and listen to back catalog stuff. So it's going to be there forever. So you're really buying a forever ad. It's not a shelf life like a newspaper or a website banner or pod, like a Facebook ad or Instagram ad. Like those all have shelf life, but my podcast doesn't have a shelf life. So my audience as it grows, you're going to be exposed to more because the behavior of the podcast listener is to go back and listen to those back catalogs. And so I framed it up that way. I framed it up as one, we're building a community and here's our community, here's our goal, here's our mission. And now, I have a course that I just launched with Travis Brown over at Pod Decks. You can check it out at podsumo.com. And it's all about four ways to monetize your podcast and really break it down and break down the media kit, the contract, my opening conversation, all these different things. And, you know, as one of my favorite things like when people are like, well, you don't have enough downloads. I'm like, dude, I was, I was making $200 an episode from episode number six. Every time I sit down, I make 2 like 200 bucks and it's all from framing up the conversation of, "Hey, we're building a community. Here's our goals. It's a forever ad." And we just like, kind of built it up that way. And there's like a whole strategy behind that I won't get into. But yeah, man, I could go on for a day talking about. And we've signed some big, I mean, we just signed academysports.com and then somebody called. And here's what happens? You start getting one sponsor or two sponsor and then people start calling you. And now we had another person this week, call us, say, I didn't even negotiate anything. I didn't even say anything I sent them our media kit. And they said, they texted me back, "Hey, Billy, this is great. We're going to do 16 episodes. I'll write you a check. It'll be there tomorrow." And I'm like, wow, this is phenomenal, man. We just made 1500 bucks and I didn't even answer, I didn't even call anybody or anything. So that's kind of the beauty of it and for people getting into it, especially if you have a business, I have a friend of mine who has a surf podcast, we're producing and he has two companies. And so he puts those as ad spaces in that ,those podcasts, just to get his audience familiar with what that feels like, what that sounds like. And then the overall mission is to bring on people in the surf industry to sponsor his podcasts. So yeah, a lot of, a lot of opportunities there to make a little bit of money for sure.

Rushab Kamdar:

Okay. So now let's say I'm new to podcasting. How easy or difficult is it to get started?

Billy Thorpe:

It's pretty easy. Just take out your phone, open up your voice memo app, go walk in your closet and start talking into your microphone and recording that voice memo or get a Podbean account and go live and start talking into your phone. You know, I hate, you do want to do a good job. You are trying to build an audience, but really nothing you do when you first start is going to be that great, right? Like when we have a two year old or two and a half year old, and when he first started walking, he was horrible at it, right? But I didn't put him in the corner and say, "Hey, don't ever try that again." Like, until you learn how to walk, you know, doesn't make any sense, same thing with talking or whatever. We think people are going to judge us cause we stutter or we, you know, I stutter all the time. I say "so" all the time I got more "ums" and "ahs" than you can even imagine in my podcast episodes, but no one has ever sent me an email and said, "Hey man, like stop doing that. I'm not gonna listen to your podcast until you do it, until you figure it out." And you know, I don't do that with my two year old either. I don't put him in the corner and say, when you can learn how to talk. Then you can start talking to adults again, like you can start talking to the professional communicators. Actually I say words that he says more often than I'd say words that are actually real. so yeah, man, just get started. Like just hit that record button. There's so many ways now. And Rushab, you know this too, man, just so many. I mean, you can literally go buy a microphone for, you know, between sixty to a hundred dollars, plug it into your computer and open up, I got a Mac so I can open up GarageBand, hit the record button and go for it. You know, and, and just get started. I have a friend of mine who has a coaching business and he literally drives in his car and talks on his, through his AirPods, live on Podbean. Does it everyday, has 15,000 downloads an episode. It's just, you'll find your audience, you'll find your people. And now if you're doing, you know, if you want to do the crime thing or whatever, you want to tell stories, that takes a lot more production. But if you just want to share your story, then just go share your story and figure it out along the way. That's how I did it. I mean, I have a studio now, but when I first started, man, I was just talking into whatever would capture my voice and putting it out on the internet.

Rushab Kamdar:

What are some of the biggest mistakes that people make when it comes to podcasts now?

Billy Thorpe:

The biggest mistake is not hitting the record button. Like literally. If I could go back and do it all over again, I would just, every time, I would just hit the record button. And then the other biggest mistake is not planning very well. You know, I think sometimes we get inspired and, we, we start a podcast. We do all the work, we do the artwork, we do all the RSS feed and then we put one episode out and then we're like, oh, this is. You know, not going to wait. And then we put another one and then we put four or five and then we get bored. We get tired. But if you really plan your content and I'm doing this all the time, I'm on Clubhouse, I'm listening to people's questions. Cause I make a podcasts about podcasting. So I'm listening to people's questions. I'm on Amazon. I'm looking at books that other people have written about podcasting. I'm reading comments to figure out what do people like about this book? What do they not like about this book? I'm in Facebook groups all the time, writing down questions. And so I just have a list because I want to help people. So I'm like, okay, if a hundred people asked the same question, I want to provide an answer, you know, for these people, not only on that Facebook page, but also on my podcast. So I think there's a lot of ways that people don't set themselves up for success because they don't have really a game plan to do that. And it's like, dude, don't make it so hard on yourself. Like go, just say, I'm going to record and batch record too, like batch record four or five episodes at a time. And you know, people will go, "Oh, well, I don't want to do that because I'm going to get better over time." You're not going to get super better over four or five episodes. Like you're going to get a little bit better as being an interviewer or a podcaster. But don't worry about that. Get to a hundred episodes and then say, "Oh, okay, now I've gotten, you know, quite a bit better."

Rushab Kamdar:

And then there's different ways, right? Of how someone does a podcast. There's the route of having a guest on, or there's the solo episodes where the, the podcast host will just speak on a specific topic. Do you find pros and cons on any of those or is it just to the podcaster or whatever works for them?

Billy Thorpe:

I think it's really kind of, I recommend both. I love both. Like I love when people do solo shows, you know, I listen to podcasts host in people's podcasts because of the host. I don't listen to him because of the guest, because the guests are there and then they're gone. They're here for 30. I'm going to be on your show for 30 minutes and then I'm gone, but your audience keeps coming back because of you. And so I think it's really good practice to, you know, if you really enjoy interviewing and that's really what your show's all about then great. But at every once in a while, put out a little micro episode, four or five minutes just, "Hey guys, you know, just looking forward to doing the next 50 episodes or whatever. Really appreciate you supporting us." And, you know, just have that communication with your audience cause they're coming back for you every time. And so, you know, the strategies doesn't really matter. I love podcasting. It's kind of like the Wild West right now and there's no rules. So if I want to do 15 interviews in a row and then I want to do 15 solid podcasts in a row. I don't think it really matters. Like I don't think people are going, "Oh man, why is he not interviewing?" As long as you're bringing good quality content consistently, then people are going to show up and listen to you.

Rushab Kamdar:

Let's talk about podcasting strategies and hacks. You talked about micro episodes, which could be five, six minutes. My claim and my tagline is you have a 360- degree view of business in under 30 minutes. My podcast I've ranged between 12 minutes to 25 minutes. And you know, I'm a big fan of having listening to shorter episodes. Is there a formula out there that you think works best when it comes to podcasting or is it just, you know, it's still too new to figure out what, what is the best strategy?

Billy Thorpe:

I mean, I, you know, I think you're right. You've got people like Joe Rogan who are like three, four hours, you know, whatever. And then you have people like me who, you know, probably 13 minutes is maybe the longest podcast I've recorded maybe 20 minutes. Once again, I don't, I don't think there's any rules to this. Like I think as long as the content is good, like that's what you want. So say what you got to say and be done. You know, and, and a lot of times, if you're like me, I get a little scatterbrained, little squirrely and some talking way too much. And, I love to talk obviously I'm a podcast guy. I love it. But I think like, get in there, say what you need to say and leave your audience wanting more than, you know, the morning last. I'm, I'm always less is more kind of guy. And so I've, we've all listened to this podcast where we're like, "Man, this is, I just wish this guy would keep talking." And then we've also listened to those ones like, "Okay. What did this guy, like, he could have said that in five minutes it took him 25 minutes." So find your groove. Find, you know, find who you are and, yeah, rock and roll man. Like who cares? Do two minute episode if that's what it takes or do 25 hours, I don't care. Whatever it takes to get your point across.

Rushab Kamdar:

Is there a best time to post, meaning a specific day of the week that is the ideal time to post?

Billy Thorpe:

Not that I have really messed with, man. I'm not really, you know, I'm not super focused on like analytics and all that kind of stuff. I'm really focused on bringing value to my audience. And so I post on my platform at like 3:00 AM on Monday morning just cause I want it to be syndicated out by the time everybody wakes up on the East coast. So that's, that's kind of my strategy and I'm just, I don't even know why I did that. I think it just picked a day. Like, so one podcast, my personal podcast is Monday morning while my fishing podcast is Tuesday morning. So I, I don't think it really matters. I mean, it's really just about building that audience and I'm sure there's some gurus in the marketing space that are like, no, you're wrong. Like you should do this, this and this. I haven't really seen it. And I have tried it. I have posted different times of the week, different different days. And I haven't really seen like a big spike. I mean, yeah, not that I can think of. It's all pretty consistent.

Rushab Kamdar:

Is distributing your podcasts weekly advisable, or does it not matter? You know, some people can do two, three weeks in a row and then take a three month break and then they come back. So what's your thoughts on that?

Billy Thorpe:

Yeah, man. First of all, it's, my advice is like, whatever commitment that you make to your audience, be sure to do that. So if you show up and you're like, "I'm starting this podcast, we'll be here every day, seven days a week." and then you're there seven days the first week, four days, the next week like you're not going to build consistency if your audience is expecting you to be there seven days a week. So do whatever your frequency is. I know people who run podcasts every week like I'm every week. I want to be there. I would be there more like I love podcasting. So I'd be there two times a week if I could if I had the timeframe and the capacity to do it. But then I know a lady who runs once a month and has a phenomenal podcast. I have another friend of mine who does, he does eight episodes a season and he takes two months off and then does two, you know. And he has a phenomenal audience. But the thing is, it's always just communicating to your audience. And we've all been there, like TV shows or YouTube videos or whatever. You know, especially TV shows, I'm a binge TV show watcher. And I love, I love when I know like the show's coming on. I can put it on my calendar. I can plan for it and I can sit down and watch it. But if I sit down and that show's not on there, and we got some kind of interruption from the news station, I'm just ticked off, dude. I'm like, "you got to be kidding me." so yeah, it's we consume content the same way as video, audio, all that kind of stuff. It's like set the expectation and show up because they're, you know, it's your audience, man. That's your, that's your tribe. So do what you say you're gonna do.

Rushab Kamdar:

And if those who want to be guest on a podcast, what is your advice on best way to do that?

Billy Thorpe:

Man, there's a lot of good tools out there. If you want to be a guest, I use potted.net, as a good place. And they, this guys over there are awesome. Brett and his team are about to launch a, pitch page. It's pitchpage.pro. And this is, this is amazing. This is going to change it. I'll, I'll actually shoot you a link so you can check it out. It's not live yet. I'm in beta testing groups, so we're just beta testing. But it makes it super easy to have those conversations into apply to be on people's shows and vice versa. I think right now they are, if you wanted me to be a guest on your show, I can just send you my link. You can fill it out. And then we can take the conversation in chat within their software. And there's no, like sign up. There's no friction, you know, any of that stuff. And then they're working on the podcaster side where it'll be available for us to, you know, as, as guests to go in and you can say, "Hey, I want you to come on my show and then I can go, you know, I can apply to be on that show or whatever." So there's going to be a lot of well, cool stuff they're rolling out. But yeah, that's pitchpage.pro. I think there's a bunch of others like I think. I can't remember the podmat, maybe podmatch is another one. It's good to get on Clubhouse. Clubhouse is a good way to, to build relationships, Instagram, DMS, and I really think it's more about just engaging with people first. So if you see a podcast you really want to be on, it's probably not, or a guest that you really want to have on your show, it's probably not, this is a good idea to start spamming them with messages, right? So like we want to engage with their content. For on Clubhouse, we want to be in their rooms, we want to be on their stages. I'm going to be asking them questions. If we're on Instagram, we want to be liking their photos. We want to be asking questions in the comments or engaging with questions. Nobody likes cold call. I get those emails and I'm sure you do too, because you have a podcast. All day, like, "Hey, I got this guy, Mark, you know, Marky, Mark. And he is the mastermind of 15 different groups. And he would be amazing on your podcast." I'm like, I don't even have a podcast about that. Like, why are you emailing me? And so it's so annoying, but, but build relationship. Podcast community is so tight and it's, it's huge. But it's also very tight niche or, you know, it's like, I mean, people will like so supportive, so encouraging of the process and will help you along the way. And so just be respectful of people and their time and, and be a human and engage with them. And then go in for the kill and ask them to consider you being on their show. But definitely get like a, a pitch page or a, you know, a one sheet or something to share. And have all your stuff available. Make it easy. I think this is the biggest thing is less friction on, if you're a podcast or trying to get a guest or a guest trying to be on a podcast, the less friction possible cause everyone's busy. No one wants to spend time doing a bunch of stuff. Like make it really simple. Super simple. So that'd be my advice on, I probably answered too many questions there, but yeah, on two sides of it.

Rushab Kamdar:

No, that was great. I think, I think we touched on a holistic approach to podcasting from creation to monetization to how to even produce. And so with that, I want to thank you, Billy, for being a guest on The Business 360 Podcast. I think this is tremendous, amazing, valuable advice. And I look forward to staying in touch. Before we get off, how can people reach you?

Billy Thorpe:

Man, the best way right now is just check out my Instagram. It's @thorpecreative. And that's just my last name, creative, all one word. And that's, that's the best way to connect. Love connecting with people on Instagram. So really appreciate that.

Rushab Kamdar:

Awesome. Thank you again. Appreciate that. And, looking forward to, Billy. Thank you.

Billy Thorpe:

Thank you so much, Rushab. Have a great day.

Rushab Kamdar:

You too. Thank you for joining us on The Business 360 Podcast. To learn more about our guest, go to thinkbusiness360.com. In life, I follow two things that keep me grounded. Number one, if you only listen to someone's successes and not their failures, you've only heard half the story and number two, compete with yourself and help everyone else. You stay classy, Business Heroes.

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