Ham & Egg

Ep6 - The Ben Franklin Close

June 22, 2018 Season 1 Episode 6
Ham & Egg
Ep6 - The Ben Franklin Close
Chapters
Ham & Egg
Ep6 - The Ben Franklin Close
Jun 22, 2018 Season 1 Episode 6
Steve & JJ / Chad
Chad joins us in the studio to educate us on who he is and Sales 101.
Show Notes Transcript
Chad joins us in the studio to educate us on who he is and Sales 101.
Speaker 1:
0:01
It's Friday have two cocksuckers. I am so excited. It's June 22nd. I'm Robin Greco calendar all day long day long. That's good. I like this. I really I'm scared. We've got Chad Flesher.
Speaker 2:
0:17
Oh am I not allowed to use last name like Incognito it. Do you have a Twitter handle you'd like to promote. No. All right. I have to ask the question. Absolutely. We don't know what following what we're excited to do this. Absolutely yeah yeah yeah yeah. So salute the beautiful day.
Speaker 3:
0:42
Yes here in Boise Idaho which is typical this time of year from this point forward it should be beautiful. We have our occasional crappy weather but gorgeous today.
Speaker 4:
0:52
Yes a lot of steps today. We start our day lol tennis yeah. Running me around the court. What a great way to start the day though. Yeah. Sun was coming up. Chad what time do you get up this morning. 645 645 had already aced him to four times. Whoa dude.
Speaker 2:
1:12
Ok but what time did you clowns go to bed. Eleven thirty eight forty five. I went to. I was disgusted because the sun wasn't down. Well I'm sure you and a lot of other 90 year old women workers. But yeah I would bet at 130 last my choice kind of choice. Ok I just started watching TV. I knew I was 30 get away from you next class. What were you watching. I was watching a little Netflix. Yeah we watch it. Oh wait no I was watching Amazon last night.
Speaker 1:
1:48
I got caught up on season 2 of Goliath's. I mistakenly push play on the new header and so I started with Season 2 Episode 1 not Season 1 episode.
Speaker 5:
1:58
Well we're on the right show. No no season. Season 1 is significantly better than season already. Oh I've already watched season 2. Oh Jesus and you wait you watch season 2 before you watch season 1.
Speaker 6:
2:12
No I'm not JJ. I chronological order sequentially or whatever. It doesn't matter. I can count to 21 and keep my pants up so good.
Speaker 7:
2:23
I think we get to wrap up Fogdog shit all day. Work it. OK all right. Why.
Speaker 8:
2:32
Why are we here. Why are we here. Young JJ I don't know why we're here. We're here because Chad has a lifelong experience and say a bag carrier. Yeah I want to start with that term because I don't I don't know if I ever use that term with you and I know.
Speaker 9:
2:49
Youthful Loston has ever heard that term No Child does that term mean Dong's a bag carrier means that you are in the field and you are an individual contributor to the revenue of the organization you represent only good.
Speaker 2:
3:04
We respect that carriers you better. We are carriers yes.
Speaker 9:
3:08
Regardless of whatever role I've ever had within an organization no matter the title at the end of the day if you if you report in the sales department you are carrying a bag. Hell yeah I like that.
Speaker 8:
3:19
Yep. So we don't. We didn't have respect for managers became managers that were bad carriers. Yeah get a grind you get to learn from the beginning although not back to any position.
Speaker 10:
3:31
If you haven't been on the front line if you haven't answered the phones if you haven't talked to your customers. If you don't know what your business does day to day minute to minute how can you sit back as a manager and tell somebody what they're supposed to do.
Speaker 11:
3:43
Well I take that back. Carry one level further it's a quoted bag carrier right. So yeah I used to work adding working people that were business development people. Yeah I have a number. If you didn't have a number associated with said bag I your. I love you. Thank you only have your marketing person. No offense to mark marketeers out there. But I mean I'm sorry you're not a sales per. Look up their latest album. Didn't they break up back when your face was whatever trying to cross the chasm. Absolutely Crossing the Chasm. A book we were forced to we will get there. So let's start with that 92 93. Absolutely Chad.
Speaker 12:
4:26
So you you are from where I am from lovely beautiful Boise Idaho I grew up here.
Speaker 11:
4:33
High. He's already the line right out of the gate. That's a fucking liar out of the gate. Where were you born and you raised in the early.
Speaker 5:
4:40
Oh okay well I didn't know that we go back to that. No. I was born in Seattle and lived a little bit around throughout Washington and Montana but settled here.
Speaker 2:
4:52
At what age thickly settled settled and to call back people. Yeah I know I heard it was really you and three other people that love you. Yeah those of you that can't see this.
Speaker 6:
5:05
It was moderately less so over time. But yeah. And then we settle I think we settled here in 1977.
Speaker 5:
5:15
What is that date you age at that point. I was 11.
Speaker 8:
5:19
Okay and you moved around a little bit. Mr jeje over there and I had similar backgrounds of moving around a lot as young kids so which is where I wanted to start. I don't know if you heard the last episode where we were proudly mentioning we were apartment complex kids. How did that feel for you.
Speaker 5:
5:39
I have lived in an apartment complex when we lived in Montana. I was an apartment kid but most of my life I was a duplex kid.
Speaker 13:
5:49
Hey we are the route you know.
Speaker 6:
5:52
I don't mean to or I don't mean the big league you guys are by the. You just did. But yeah. I mean if you. You I mean at least I could hear one neighbor. I had to get through the level of that shit yeah awesome.
Speaker 14:
6:11
So Boise 11.
Speaker 11:
6:13
I grew up in this area and you attended local high school correct.
Speaker 9:
6:17
That is correct. I went to Capitol high school back when it was a handful of poor kids like myself and all of the orthodontist and dentists and doctors and lawyers.
Speaker 15:
6:25
Kids thought oh the demographics didn't change much from the time I was supposed to go to Capitol.
Speaker 1:
6:33
We lived in the apartment complex in point right there kind of behind Bay Hill the nice neighborhood right. He couldn't get in. No no. Yeah. They sent me to Eagle.
Speaker 16:
6:44
Right. Yeah that's better. Don't hold that against me.
Speaker 11:
6:47
Yeah all those people like none of you know what the hell we're talking about. But yeah. So your capitol high school. So what did you do there. Play sport.
Speaker 5:
6:57
I was I was I was I was Sportster. I was a Sportster. I was and I'm sure we're getting there. And I get anywhere. I anticipated. But yes I was. I played football and basketball and baseball when I was a Capitol.
Speaker 14:
7:16
Do you like which one you like the most.
Speaker 5:
7:20
I think by the time I graduated from high school I liked baseball the most. But when I started basketball was point guard. It's more when you play.
Speaker 8:
7:28
I played shooting guard shooting by shooting guard I've played against them several times. And I don't want to digress too far. Would you consider us rivals on the basketball court. Back in the day back in the Lavoie days yeah even even church ball.
Speaker 5:
7:43
Yeah church ball Cole elementary Sunday night pickup games. All that stuff.
Speaker 8:
7:48
OK. All right. He's good he's a good hero.
Speaker 1:
7:50
If he gets his feet so but he is white 11 and still has no other role how can anybody be an adversary of yours on the basketball court. Because you don't play defense. So Chad did you up while you. Yes.
Speaker 14:
8:00
So you're you're in high school. And what derailed you from basketball.
Speaker 5:
8:08
Let's just say that maybe I was a little more millennial than others were millennial and our coach was a little old school and maybe we didn't see eye to eye on things. Yeah.
Speaker 11:
8:19
Yeah. How the days. So football. You're playing football there. Do you have any accolades that are associated with that and is there anybody else that was drug into your accolade so to say that I played football.
Speaker 5:
8:36
Is saying is really stretching it loosely flight over. It's a slight overstatement. I will say that when. My sophomore year I did actually play football and played wide receiver. But by the time my junior year rolled around I was ready to hang up the old football career and move on. When they made me an offer to just come out and punt which is did. I mean you know I see you guys can practice for four hours. But the kickers and punters you guys can practice for 48 minutes it sounded pretty good. So I did it. So yeah that was that's what I did.
Speaker 17:
9:19
OK. So now we get to a kind of a segue to tie together. Who was your partner in crime while you were. Well you were said punter and don't sell yourself short. You were an Allstate punter.
Speaker 2:
9:35
J.D. why do you laugh at that. That's a fair. I don't want to get into the workings of how to punt a ball really well.
Speaker 5:
9:44
Yes. So young Austin Boston I want to get away from your that's copycat and youthful Austin. His father and I have been friends for a significantly long time since we were in high school and his dad and I were both he was the kicker and I was the punter. And when we used to go on road trips no one else could eat garbage and food because they actually had to play a football game.
Speaker 6:
10:08
Meanwhile Austin's dad and I would just be pounding Twinkies and Ding Dongs and tootsie pops. It was going to be like you know tomorrow sugar was going to be against the law.
Speaker 5:
10:18
Yeah so. Yes. Yes yes. And they both Rawle state.
Speaker 8:
10:24
So I mean both their credit is actually something I give you kudos to that as you walk through the hallowed grounds of Capitol high if you if you if you could dance to the right. You will see pictures of youthful very youthful Jeff and Chad and I giggled.
Speaker 18:
10:41
And I'm sorry because I'll be honest there's nothing more frustrating than a fucking punter that Shank's won in a crucial situation in the game or a kicker that misses wide left right.
Speaker 14:
10:50
He's good or else. No no. Get off the job.
Speaker 5:
10:52
I'm just saying. But in all seriousness though you win football games. No I didn't I never won a football game. Now Jeff won some football games. Now because let's just put it this way. Jeff was a way better kicker than I was a.
Speaker 6:
11:06
OK. I was basically an Allstate punter by default because I didn't think I was the only guy in the state who knew how to kick a spiral that take with you get away. You know I mean I were a punter. Number one number one was that number 16 when when the when your punter is number 57 and his play in 61 snaps at middle linebacker yeah probably not all that interested in a spiral. So that's fair. Let's say the competition level is yeah right.
Speaker 8:
11:35
So you have you've covered your glorious high school years and now we're we're we're off to college with good school the Boise State University. I like that yeah. JJ honk from there as well. But so talk to me about that. Easy right. You just do a university ownership for your punting. Or did you have to. Did you have to actually attend school.
Speaker 5:
11:59
I actually had to attend school. They were nice enough to call me though in the summer and ask me if I would be interested in walking on the Pontypridd football team. Pretty fucking cool but unfortunately being a duplex kid are you kidding them rub that in our face. The
Speaker 7:
12:12
rest this show. We're right here.
Speaker 5:
12:15
I mean I don't mean the big league everybody. But I am a duplex kid and being a duplex kid. We obviously were flush with cash and so unfortunately I had to sort of pay to go to school so it couldn't really be at football practice six days a week and still work and put myself through school. So I just became a student at Boise State University. Nice said Major. Who started out as a communications major. Yes and they were nice enough to have a class where they showed you how much communications majors made here.
Speaker 19:
12:50
And then I went oh you're a marketeer. I am a marketeer and my next album will be out tomorrow night.
Speaker 17:
13:01
Are a marketing major for Boise State University. This back then was Boise. It's a very different university now than then correct.
Speaker 9:
13:10
Yes that is correct. The only people who went to Boise State University back in the day were either people that were going back to school that were in their late 20s early 30s or kids that were too poor to go anywhere else and I fall into that second category.
Speaker 7:
13:22
My parents hit a nerve with all of us. All right.
Speaker 17:
13:29
So you graduate you put yourself through school and then you get your first job and you're fucking fired up. It's time to go put your marketing marketing degree to work. And where do you land.
Speaker 5:
13:42
Well since apparently on the there were no jobs available at all of the large advertising firms in Boise area like I dreamed of that I was going to be like I wasn't going to be the next Don Draper. Yeah. So I went to work for a small toy and novelty company called Russ Berry. Interesting interesting Roseberry is that were you first back then. I literally got my first bag and my first tackle box. And first trolled all and some pencil toppers. Yeah.
Speaker 6:
14:21
Yeah and buy bison ties. Oh I thought I got some business cards. You did. Oh I did. Are you kidding me. I was 22 year old with business cards and I was seeing people died waiting tables.
Speaker 2:
14:34
I got to visit 50 to 100 of those on you at all times. Business cards. Oh yeah you like everywhere. I stand on the street corner and I'm out. I know that feeling. Oh absolutely. Got my name. This is my mother's guide. Let's take one of these you should.
Speaker 14:
14:51
OK. So you rush to bury your Petland trolls. Right.
Speaker 5:
14:56
How long where we had a full featured gift and expressions line. Not just troll dolls. Sorry my bad is you have a binder that you'd walk people through the sales process like oh yes we had a binder. Yeah. Oh yeah. We would ask 50 to 100 close questions specific. And you were only allowed to have one maybe two scheduled appointments a day and then you were supposed to fill the rest of your day with just walk ins.
Speaker 17:
15:23
So why do I know that job.
Speaker 9:
15:25
Well Steve because on a faithful day back in 1992 you decided 1993 I think well was it December.
Speaker 17:
15:33
I know we went in January of 93 I moved here in September of 92 but it was the winter.
Speaker 2:
15:37
Yes it was the.
Speaker 8:
15:40
No no no. We went to Chicago but we did a ride with prior to that. You gave me. We did one ride with like it was either Randy made us go on a ride with prior to us getting on a plane I think or did we meet on the plane going to Chicago.
Speaker 10:
15:57
Neither here nor there.
Speaker 9:
15:58
No I believe we did a ride where in 1992 right before Christmas and then you came to work and the first thing that we did was like two days after the new year we flew to Chicago and stayed at that Hilton there and you know O'Hare because of one while because it snowed about.
Speaker 11:
16:17
So no no no. What was the reason for that convention. Yes. Oh OK so so national sales meeting national sales means everybody has an outside rep. We all live.
Speaker 17:
16:27
So I had just gotten the job and I can tell you what I got hired for I got hired for sixteen hundred dollars a month and I got 30 dollars a day per diem OK.
Speaker 7:
16:36
That had of been similar to what you got us like nobody likes a bragger. So I was peddling cars at the point so hey this was a good job for the big cars that a place that is now with Jackson's food store. Killed him apparently. Jackson I don't know what you're talking about. It's two pizzas. I'm sorry. Well that's an inside job sort of.
Speaker 8:
17:04
But that will kind of talk about that. It's a great segue because this convention was probably four or five hundred people from the U.S. give or take that money we took up the entire Aargau O'Hare's shirt or what. I don't know.
Speaker 9:
17:21
All I know is that there were three to five hundred sales people there. Not one single one of them was older than 28 years old.
Speaker 8:
17:29
So. So Chet there were two people that represented the territory. They wouldn't let one person sell both.
Speaker 11:
17:38
Chad was the it made it very clear he was the guy he was kind of cool because the guys were trolls were hot they were hotter and he was so many droll he was at the downward side of his hotness with an expression line. So we called them. You know what I do what my line was to flush. I was the floppy teddy bear. Now they were the plush lion fuckhead plush I was the plush guy. OK. So I was Teddy Bear and stuffed animals yet we were still commissioned after I put toothbrush displays and places. The grand I'm sorry the Grand Palace. I take that one back I did not need to put that name to display. Rupert. Rupert yeah they called too. So anyhow we were commission basically so every fucking podunk town in Idaho and eastern Oregon on very limited money as Chad mentioned.
Speaker 3:
18:31
It was basically a commission based job and you had a route. So every five weeks you basically if our calls about a five week maybe six week rotation where you had to see everybody in that rotation. So you had this territory and they gave you no cash and they expected you to work your ass off. So Chad and I became instant friends because on that plane flight to Chicago we quiz each other on every fucking sporting thing that you could. Who won the Heisman in 1984.
Speaker 20:
18:58
Shit had a drink tonic after Tom and tonic. So instant friends. And then.
Speaker 21:
19:06
Yeah. We're back commission sales guys and they tell you you're not allowed to travel with the other guy. You have to do your travel separately. It's a rule.
Speaker 2:
19:18
Loosely foresty around how the hell with their voice. They take it away.
Speaker 9:
19:25
I don't think anybody's going to the Longhorn to check it out.
Speaker 11:
19:29
So we've made all of those familiar with the third Idaho Boise. We took the drive in my Susu and we went from here and we stopped.
Speaker 20:
19:38
We were at Pendleton. We went Hermiston. Don't forget Hepner forgettin Hepner. That was a big stop. That was one of our bigger accounts and then union. No not union.
Speaker 8:
19:51
While our we had to do we'll now. Yeah. So we killed that area.
Speaker 1:
19:55
And for all you people wonder with the enterprise. Look at a map. Check it out. Literally like map dots. Yeah baby. Zoom in. Get caught.
Speaker 5:
20:04
Yeah I mean you have to get really close and we're talking about places that have 500 to 2200 people and the traffic stop is the is the grocery store slash like town meeting.
Speaker 17:
20:16
Oh yeah yeah. Yeah. So I'm going to do this because Marky Mark is not here and he gets this is the happiest he's ever been in his life is when he hears about me selling teddy bears. Like it brings great joy to him to know that I actually peddled teddy bear for it so his big story that I always keep honest counsel drug.
Speaker 8:
20:31
Can you talk about how we overloaded her stop it and stop about like take her not to buy stuff can you just elaborate please.
Speaker 5:
20:41
Yes. Yes that happened and it was so obvious that the only reason that she did it was because she felt sorry for the pathetic existence of. Oh my God we had because her husband who was the pharmacist there would. Just look out to us and to shake her head at her as she was just buying. Hoards of oh just words of things that if every person in the greater Boise County area came and bought one I'm not sure that's a county.
Speaker 22:
21:20
Oh it's not a youthful Austin you want to actually do something. Look up playing Ambridge Idaho. Yep it was Cambridge. That's right. Council drug but we had council we had that market cornered. Oh yeah I mean it's just a twenty five mile drive up the road you'd ride a lumberjack and once a bulldog and once a home a map the number that we have you have we coach to get. Well I did.
Speaker 23:
21:44
I coached against those guys in 8 man football Cambridge Cambridge was the Bulldogs. Council was the lumberjacks Absolutely and we were the savages. Or should I say it just.
Speaker 24:
21:56
Right. Well that sounds that's it for you.
Speaker 25:
22:03
Yeah I think yes. Washington County again like I said I mean all of those are going to need to play that back.
Speaker 6:
22:14
Pretty sure I started with Washington county and towns like I've been pretty much been verified.
Speaker 14:
22:19
You got hoodwinked there. OK. So yeah we oversold the poor old lady that was 95. But sorting your job too. It was. We were actually instructed like you had right.
Speaker 3:
22:31
With Randi obviously still this is all about the state.
Speaker 5:
22:34
Randi was our boss by the way for those of you. Yeah. And he was a big up and comer in the Russ Perry gift and expressions line. He moved here from Seattle. No. Oh yeah. He grew up in. Montana. He did. Actually Conrad Montana and then went to college in have had to move to the big city to go to college. And if any of you've ever been to Montana it's about 22 miles south of the Canadian border. I lived there when I was younger. I think the average duplex.
Speaker 13:
23:09
No I think we live in an apartment there for a while. I mean what you till you have duplex back then. Well no we accept house money back then.
Speaker 5:
23:17
We actually moved into a house one of the only houses that I lived in growing up and I will tell you right now that when you live in however and you and forty seven hundred of your closest friends apparently rent houses it's pretty cheap. So we're were able to really finagle Yeah.
Speaker 8:
23:34
So Randy was a he was instructed to teach us how to sell the Brent. Ben Franklin closed the pizza closed alternative closed the Ben Franklin closed chat. When you get to the close. You say.
Speaker 5:
23:48
You know what. When I come to big decisions like this I always like to harken back to one of the founders of our country Ben Franklin No way.
Speaker 26:
24:00
Go ahead.
Speaker 14:
24:05
No this is accurate we were taught this clothes were absolutely taught this close often don't look at me.
Speaker 7:
24:12
And for God's sake don't fucking listen to it. I don't want you hurt. I want to use this.
Speaker 12:
24:18
I always hearken back to one of the founders of our country Ben Franklin and the way Ben Franklin used to make big decisions that he used to pull out a piece of paper and he would put the pros and the cons of that said decision on that piece of paper. So what you do then with the client is that you pull out a pad of paper in front of them and you say well let's start listing the pros and cons so you get them to say what was it that you liked about it. And typically a client will say a thing or two and then you add on a couple of things as well. What about this we talked about that. And typically they're in a pretty agreeable mood.
Speaker 14:
24:51
So you usually get you actually write this shit down. Good to you. Anywhere between 3 and 6.
Speaker 5:
24:58
Rows on that I can see JDA brought his wife's notebook. For those of you that can't see it it's lime green. Surely they were out of all the boy colors but he liked it so much you went ahead and bought it. We don't judge here. Okay back to judging because this is how close finishes up and then you say well what are the cons for it.
Speaker 6:
25:19
And then you shut down and make them come up with it and then typically they can only come up with one or two and then you add them up at the bottom and it's 6 broken Dukat and I don't know what folder you go.
Speaker 11:
25:33
Full Tilt just sales 1 0 1. That's beautiful right.
Speaker 5:
25:36
So let's just say that I tried that a couple of times.
Speaker 27:
25:39
And yeah you're not proud of it are you.
Speaker 22:
25:44
No.
Speaker 15:
25:45
I turned out a lot like Andrew him so I made it a year with that company.
Speaker 8:
25:53
How long do you make it three years. Three plus years. Very impressive. OK so you went on to do what after that.
Speaker 12:
26:01
I sold general medical supplies to hospitals nursing homes and medical dealers.
Speaker 17:
26:07
Ok I see you started out I was trying to recall you started as a medical supply guide device guy correct.
Speaker 15:
26:13
If you consider shoe covers in my bag medical devices Steve. Yes. Yes perfect. Yes I do. Exactly exactly what I mean. Why did you ever get out your.
Speaker 25:
26:33
So that was like everything you sold everything hospitals at that point. Yes. Why the hell do you get out of that. Because I didn't make any money really because it sucked. So start your kind of professional man career.
Speaker 6:
26:49
Is that accurate.
Speaker 12:
26:51
When you become a sales hitman accurately I would say probably 2004 when I left my first technology job was probably when I began a little bit of a perpetual free agency in my career.
Speaker 8:
27:08
But you're still it always.
Speaker 26:
27:10
If you're listening who do you work for no real ideas.
Speaker 5:
27:13
I worked for a you don't have to use first I O T O K Company. We don't know what that means. Internet of Things can devotee of Mission poker machine to machine connectivity. Okay okay perfect. So I've been the technical one and Steven Nyes really.
Speaker 7:
27:33
Is not that way. So that's all I want to get to.
Speaker 3:
27:35
So we had mentioned that we work together when we were pushing plush and teddy bears and all that shit. So and we've been friends ever since but played softball together I forgot to touch upon the softball years. Shit we want a title together back in those days of Pi and the Pioneer League member that would Prosto. Yes we were called Kindl temps. Oh right that's right. And then we were called. Something else when we played with youthful Austin's.
Speaker 12:
28:03
Dad. Yes.
Speaker 21:
28:05
Correct. Yes roasters.
Speaker 8:
28:09
OK. Yes. For some is worse. OK. But anyhow we've known each other for years. And. You were working in a different industry at that point. I was working in a different industry. You're selling medical supplies. Where do you go after that. Then it became a form of rap. OK. So you're pushing drugs now versus devices. What's the difference. I don't think people know that. Why did people get out of that industry. I'm really curious. Well.
Speaker 16:
28:36
I think the misnomer is is that people make ungodly amounts of money as pharmaceutical reps. I think that what you make is at least in my world and the pharmaceutical it is a incredibly easy job once you understand the product that you sell because you really do what I like to call a milk run where you just call them the same physicians over and over like a one month or six week cycle.
Speaker 17:
29:00
Roseberry though you got that territory you're constantly in the same territory.
Speaker 5:
29:05
Correct. But I had a really really really fat expense account back then that was bad for all of us getting to the pharmaceutical legislation went down.
Speaker 12:
29:15
It kind of changed all that. But back in the days when I worked there it was kind of the Wild West of Hue. I mean just as an example the last national sales meeting I went to at the farm a company that I worked for. They flew 2700 salespeople to Japan for a week. Wow. And just to party the entire time.
Speaker 7:
29:35
No there were a lot of really high they thought to that phrase were in Tokyo where were you Tokyo and I don't know what to say.
Speaker 4:
29:48
You always had to do it that way. I don't know what to do. He says it's safe to go. I need to make him do it. Nagasaki.
Speaker 2:
29:59
So race yay. Is that enunciation or racism. I don't know. Call it what you want. Did reach a very clear racism. But I would say yes. So back in those days. I mean just to give you an example when I first started there in 1997 if you spent.
Speaker 28:
30:21
Less than 1300 dollars in a week for expenses you didn't even need a manager signature to get reimbursed for the expenses.
Speaker 5:
30:28
So what did you do. I mean what 40s maybe ten to two Tuesdays and Thursdays that's what I did. Steve scheduled the day is it Tuesday. If if you can get it. I've worked for this shit. Yeah. The reality is is that you don't you don't do a ton. The benefits are unbelievable. I mean at a company car one two trips to the Super Bowl. Oh yeah. You know what you're seeing responsible and I hate your guts for because don't want both of those. The Denver Broncos did yeah. You like the Broncos as much as I do right. That is correct. He just buys them and I did not like John Elway but I got to watch him hoist the Vince Lombardi trophy two years in a row singly responsible. But I did get to spend an all expense paid weekend in San Diego and Miami to see the Super Bowl. And no regrets. I have no regrets. So guess so that's what I did.
Speaker 29:
31:25
So I was a farmer rep and actually it was kind of interesting because we had a sales meeting and it was actually over Halloween and I was irritated beyond all belief that I had missed being able to spend Halloween with my then two young children because I had to be at a sales meeting over a weekend. So I called. I just happened to touch bases with Steve and he was looking for a sales guy at that point. Nice.
Speaker 8:
31:50
Yes. So I was back.
Speaker 3:
31:52
We've talked about back and to some days when I was a we may or may not have actually I was the sales manager there blah blah blah. I thought it was time you know check kind of Southern. I think you know he didn't speak for him with the writing on the wall that the father was a changed and like you mentioned and high tech was booming. We were looking for good well people I could trust and I want to say this without any hesitation that Chad is a professional salesperson. If not the best salesperson I've worked with. One of the best and I mean that wholeheartedly like you actually used to be. I know you're not just stop winkin a day.
Speaker 8:
32:28
He used to be like when I hired him at those systems. There's no question I didn't hire we hired him but. He was the number one guy and the one guy could count on to get shit done and when months were I mean we were we were under the gun every quarter to hit numbers right. Chet how was that different from from Farma.
Speaker 9:
32:53
It's different in the regard that since we were building a new marketplace. You kind of throw a number at the wall and you have to go get it and figure out creative ways to do it. When I was a farmer rep the market was so mature that a 1 or 2 percent increase in market share in your market was you know was astronomical. So they'd give you a number and really all you have to do is grow the business you know six to eight percent year over year and you'd be a rockstar. But here you were going from zero to. Whatever number make it. We made up. Yeah you know I mean you got so that's like as a startup you've got a specific number that you kind of need to pay the bills.
Speaker 12:
33:33
And we were in that but we were lucky enough to be at extended be in a company that had a couple of other divisions that could float us while we were trying to get our feet under us.
Speaker 18:
33:43
So I want to create the correlation. So big pharma or whatever you had this established mature you know sales number or whatever quota you've been in other technology sales jobs right. I reckon back to the people in Spokane that we worked with you on right. So do you think there's a generational change in the way sales people attack it today especially with like this subscription service the web design that sort of shit the mobile apps up. I feel like there's not true salespeople that fucking exists in these new startup worlds but I could be completely wrong. What do you see out there.
Speaker 12:
34:21
It's interesting. I think you see you see two types of people and I think that people that are Stephens's age at 50. Yeah and in Steve's case 52 older you find people that didn't really weren't able to live the high life of the late 90s and the dot com bubble. So they going to have to do with the old fashioned way and work at it. So you find two different people you find the folks that are. 60 or 50 plus or 55 plus years old that still think that all they need to do is pick up the telephone and the fax.
Speaker 5:
34:59
They still think fax machine. Oliver Yeah. And then the deals will come in and then unfortunately you have know millennials which I've managed and worked with in the past.
Speaker 9:
35:10
And you know and I see it even with my own children to some degree that there's a level of expectation for what the world owes them. So staying at the Longhorn and splitting it with your sales partner because you only had a 30 dollar premium and you wanted to spend eight dollars on a pack of beer.
Speaker 6:
35:29
Seems completely foreign to them.
Speaker 14:
35:32
We get so fucked up. It wasn't just beer market. That was a splurge right. Well we didn't want to watch our black and white 1980s. But we did have hot coffee.
Speaker 6:
35:47
Did any of those that remember showering in junior high back that are our age. That was our shower the one that sounded that felt like a thousand needles piercing. I felt like you were getting a tattoo all over your body the entire time. Yeah the loud scene.
Speaker 26:
36:01
Yeah no offense.
Speaker 8:
36:08
I don't think that's up for debate. So we passed by which I wanted to keep on the east side the culture we came into it was for all of us it was kind of a new culture we were building something. I ended up leaving and then Chad when the job became sales manager kind of carried on the tradition.
Speaker 17:
36:29
But you said you became a hit man after that and I'm curious why. Why. And how long were you. Yes I forget. Why did you become a hit man after that was it. What was.
Speaker 12:
36:41
So it was easy for four years a year and a half as a sales guy and two and a half years as a sales manager. It was a great run. I left because the people in senior management had changed and it was putting a big change in the culture of the organization. And I think that's why the people at least that worked for me and in my group that's why they were there.
Speaker 6:
37:07
So I left. Plus I just got money whipped to death on Monday.
Speaker 8:
37:12
And that's when you went to a major phone company Nokia right.
Speaker 5:
37:16
Yeah that's when I went to work at Ericsson. Or are they. And at that point I moved to Dallas and yeah I mean it was it was in my mind at that point it was an opportunity to take the experience that I'd gained at extended systems and take it to a bigger state.
Speaker 10:
37:34
Yeah that's a huge move for your family and for you.
Speaker 17:
37:37
I mean that's that's big at that point did you feel like the high tech cause I know you were. Yes. Trepidation of getting out of the Farmville world and getting into high tech high tech guy and I told you don't fucking worry about you make it up that's what I do. You'll be fine. Fine buzzwords I'll call you your salesperson you'll figure it out. And you did. I mean very easily. I mean you didn't know shit about technology and then all of a sudden your technology but because you're a smart guy. Not a sell shit. Do you look at that movie like beneficial now or do you like it. Like I should have fucking stick around and then for over.
Speaker 9:
38:13
I don't I don't look back at pharmaceutical pharmaceutical sales and say I think I should have stayed there. I have friends that are still in it and the culture and the way that that's done now is so much different than what I did you know 20 years ago that I would never go back there.
Speaker 29:
38:29
Plus after looking back and seeing the way we did business and the way business is done in that industry and what their objectives are yeah just from a moral standpoint it would be very difficult for me to go back into that at that point. Back when I was twenty nine thirty years old and I was doing that I truly believe at the end of the day when I got home that I was really helping people out.
Speaker 12:
38:51
But now that I look back at it you know just not pharmaceutical companies are about making money and it's a lot. You make a lot more money treating disease than curing disease. And that's just one of my political rants.
Speaker 5:
39:06
I won't get into that one. But I think that that's why I would never go back into it. I mean to you know I enjoy technology it's OK. It's paid the bills. It's you know fed my family. So yeah I mean I would never go back and get into the medical field.
Speaker 17:
39:24
Have you ever worked at a company that had that culture that we had for that short term.
Speaker 30:
39:29
No. And why was it different.
Speaker 9:
39:33
It was different in the regard that everybody was accountable and somehow some way we policed each other and that is something that you don't see very often anymore. The reality is is that you don't need to show up at work at 7 0 5 very many times and have people tell you good afternoon before you realize that maybe you could just get there 10 minutes earlier.
Speaker 5:
39:57
So yeah I just think that at that point it was just you if you're lucky enough to work around a group of people that you trust and you believe in and they believe in you then you're willing to and don't have an agenda. And I think that last one is the hardest is to find people that don't really have a long term agenda and they're not trying to manipulate you to get to their next place. And at when we were to extend it systems it wasn't like that for the first couple three years that we were there towards the end it really became. But when Pam went away it did. Yeah. Yeah. So we lost our insulation from all the bullshit.
Speaker 29:
40:37
So yes that's why and then when you work in a big company it just it takes so many signatures and different things to get stuff done that it's just it really you go from being what gets it done to. You know we need to make sure that Bill and Bob and Stan sign this thing. So in case it goes you know the wrong direction. Everybody's got air cover.
Speaker 5:
40:59
And so yeah it's hard. So yeah I think that that's that that's what makes the difference and it's it's hard in today's world to find people that are that committed to a single goal. And not only that but then you have to have managers that you trust and believe in that will have your back if something goes wrong and a lot of times in today's world that's not the case because everybody's for the most part out trying to cover their own ass.
Speaker 3:
41:24
What's crazy about this is that that's exactly how we used to do things and I've always been very proud of those years actually. You know we were talking about Mandela one of the other previous broadcasts and those guys with the engineering geek so no other sales brother in that group. But still those days of the Esai you know that we're all still friends and because the engineers were obviously just as big as part of everybody so we were a team as good we lost Austin.
Speaker 1:
41:50
I said I'm on a beer and you get a beer. Yeah yeah yeah.
Speaker 17:
41:54
Youthful lost him. Yeah he does have a purpose. And so it's interesting that he's not on Mike so you know as you've known this guy since he was born. Right. That is correct. And we're training a newbie to be like he's never been in sales and run.
Speaker 2:
42:14
You're the worst part is he's already he's already caught it though.
Speaker 3:
42:18
Got the bug. Yeah well I heard him talking about the bug here on a previous broadcast and it felt to me like he was just.
Speaker 12:
42:25
Like low like faking it pandering.
Speaker 3:
42:30
It feels that way at time he has to still he's still young and we haven't done his review.
Speaker 19:
42:35
That's true isn't it.
Speaker 26:
42:38
So I understand.
Speaker 8:
42:42
But I find it cool like not to get too sentimental.
Speaker 2:
42:46
But it's cool to let it go and wipe the tears away from your eyes on your radio radio.
Speaker 8:
42:54
No but just take it another generation and die. I don't know why they want to be a salesperson and be part of this. But J.D. it was similar I guess the age difference you know wanting to get into this world of where you're accountable. And you said it in that last part where accountability. Nobody wants to be fucking accountable anymore. And it's a big thing we deal with. Our company keeps getting better and better with accountability. Salespeople everybody like everybody be accountable.
Speaker 10:
43:24
Absolutely. But also from from top down holding people accountable setting expectations so that they know what they're accountable to right. Having those clear light you know I mean you reference Pat as being one of the leaders right. Like that's a trickle down. It's got to start somewhere. People aren't going to show up and say hey I'm going to be accountable to this. This organization is gold it's great and lofty right. They're not going to get there on their own. It takes fucking somebody saying hey this is what we're doing this is where we're going. Getting where you fit in and let's fucking do this right.
Speaker 11:
43:51
Yeah. Can you communicate that to the team more. I'm going to be going take some time off.
Speaker 5:
43:58
Well I think that I mean I do think that that's important. And I mean I you know people talk about most people say they get into sales because they want to make money. Right. And I think everybody wants to make money and I can say at 50 years old and you know for kids into this thing that there's never enough money. I've had eight years and I've had not great years and I've been unemployed and I've been all over the map and there's never quite enough money regardless of how much you have. Yeah. But what you can't have is you can have an environment that you feel good and energized about going into on a day to day basis and you know to start going back to Pat. And when I first started working at extended systems things were a little tight financially when I was ready to go back to the farm world. Gosh probably 60 75 days after I started ATSI nothing to do with anybody ATSI or anything that anyone had promised me but it was getting difficult to pay the bills. And I remember Pat pulled me aside in the hall and he said what's this nonsense I hear about. Actually I think he said Bullshit this is bullshit I hear that you're thinking about leaving. And I said you know it's nothing personal I just I'm having a tough time making ends meet and I put my family in a tough situation here financially and he goes well.
Speaker 6:
45:16
We fucking lose and.
Speaker 9:
45:18
And that's exactly what he said he goes you We need you to be here and he said you know what we're going to take to keep you here. And we sat down and I got a raise. But I mean it wasn't like I went from Macon. Yeah you know it wasn't like I got a 200 percent raise. We get a little Bomp and we figured it out.
Speaker 3:
45:35
Pat Pat wouldn't do that. Our biggest fight was me trying to get a 10 percent bump from Pat. We got put in the grill of the group Wikipedias I did it right there on the spot.
Speaker 31:
45:45
What are very good. I was making a lot of money.
Speaker 5:
45:51
Pat didn't like to do reviews. Yes. No I did not do what he did review.
Speaker 17:
45:55
If he would avoid your review for as long and he finally said Dude I can't fucking get a bump till we do my review and then we go to the grill room and he'd say and you know you have a body or body building now.
Speaker 7:
46:07
Yeah but I don't know ugh. Right exactly. That's exactly what the growers with these little pony.
Speaker 8:
46:15
I mean it's what we would talk to vendors. We'd also could do our interviews in there and they were about three feet by.
Speaker 2:
46:21
I mean they were really small derogated you know conference room about half the size of a prison cell. Yes. Honestly one small window yeah.
Speaker 22:
46:31
Windows you had a window with a window.
Speaker 19:
46:34
The window was in the door. People could look in and see whether there was blood letting.
Speaker 24:
46:41
So we go to the group and he fucking lost his shit on me and I just looked at it that fucking period.
Speaker 8:
46:49
So he just hated to lose. It was more of the losing thing he had could care less about which we made. I got that out of as he was dying of cancer.
Speaker 7:
46:57
The story everybody. Not a fun one either.
Speaker 8:
47:02
They are some pretty funny shit in there. There's a good story or two of them that I'm going to get to at some point. I want to have you on the show. Yeah there's some really incredible stuff there. But yes go ahead.
Speaker 29:
47:14
No I was just going to say so and you just don't see that very often in today's world. You don't see somebody pulling you aside and recognizing that they've got your back and it wasn't just me it wasn't like I was some special talented unicorn that extended systems and you know the company was just going to shut her up if I somehow went back to peddling drugs it was more about the type of person that I want on my team and there's the people around here that are like you. And you know we're not going to lose. You know it wasn't you it was more of an indication of the type of person that we want around here and done the same thing for any of the others that we had at that point.
Speaker 1:
47:49
Yeah you're a fucking punter. Except for Doug.
Speaker 17:
47:55
Then we went to Dallas and got hammered and called on media that the three of us you and I went to Dallas.
Speaker 5:
48:03
Yes I do remember that and that was probably the last time we went out with that was that was the last time I went out on the road with Pat.
Speaker 3:
48:12
Yeah it was at that point he was getting sick.
Speaker 16:
48:14
But no we had a great time and it was it was a good send off and yeah and then we went and visited edX and yeah this is how dense I was when I got into technology. We used to get a lead list every day. We had a good marketing department back in the good old days and we turned out mailers and people would respond to them. And then every day we would do that here usted you fucking knock on doors. Yeah we would get a lead list but would that lead less came the mandate that you had to make at least 50 out bounds a day. That was my mandate. Yeah.
Speaker 17:
48:47
Stephen Nass yeah 250 calls a week you had to make 250 outbound phone calls a week in that metric proved to be successful.
Speaker 29:
48:54
Right. And the people that were successful were doing three fifty four 20. I think the first few weeks months I was there I was doing 350 to 400 outbound Henry when the phones just hammering it. Well the reality is is that if once you get started you're going to leave seven voicemails for every human you're talked to. But we get on the call and I get somebody and you know I'm on the phone with somebody and Steven on his desk right next to each other and it was a fairly open work environment. I'm like I get off and I look at Steve and I had been there that long maybe two or three weeks and I'm like wow that was a really good call and he's like well who was that with. And you know I'm like yes.
Speaker 6:
49:31
She's like he's completely freaking out. I had no idea. I mean E.T. as BD as a good in a matter I wouldn't imagine. I mean I thought they were you know a nonprofit or something. I mean I had no idea that the largest systems. I'm like yeah I have a meeting and we're supposed to go to Indianapolis here in a couple of weeks. Like what. That's awesome. Let's take our business Viña business development. We've made up titles all this year so that's why we took.
Speaker 2:
50:00
That mirror. Now it's another entrepreneur here in the valley. No not no hard.
Speaker 8:
50:09
Tartaro. Yeah you took Tartaro on one of those trips.
Speaker 5:
50:14
I've been there a month. You think I could tell you couldn't go. Oh yeah this is your nemesis.
Speaker 14:
50:20
He was one of them. Yeah yeah he was a sellout too.
Speaker 17:
50:25
This is the type of guy that would he he would tell you what his GPA was in college to a prospect to qualify himself because he had to overcome his dyslexia and all those other fucking shit that he went through on his own. I know I'm serious. So it was just he's a smart guy. He is a smart guy. But he's a conniving backstabbing son of a bitch. If you're out there hard and that's all he has to say he got he got ran out. That's a whole other story. I'm going to if we can ever get our other. We never get Brad on here. He would. That's a wonderful story for a high tech kind of a weird sort of fuckin story. Yeah a lot of shit went down and he was a backstabbing bastard all right. So those are the politics that go on it that corporate get because we went from private to public. It was in the high tech stage. We went from four dollars and twenty five cents one day to sell for a hundred and forty seven dollars.
Speaker 2:
51:19
And then again then again that was the most not crazy time in the world.
Speaker 5:
51:25
All my options were underwater.
Speaker 7:
51:27
Boy my dirty stuff. So they were a daughter too. There are some people that are still living in their houses from those days. Oh yeah yeah. My old partner am.
Speaker 19:
51:41
And I.
Speaker 17:
51:42
Yeah I know you just missed it but I mean I get mine got shat onto but needless to say it was an interesting time chasing that we became a partner with Microsoft and we were happy. I mean we're going to be bought out by Paul.
Speaker 23:
51:56
There are all these fucking crazy time. So we were all involved in that and it was a wonderful weird time. But the one thing I want to keep on the most talked about was the culture in the team in the. How different that was and to it. I don't know to Donald Horne here but the same thing we're trying to create here. Definitely. But you know I mean obviously are likely to change much. JJ is kind of obviously taking his own slant to it. But I mean accountability but with honesty like you know we get to pull somebody aside and say you don't lose and yet we're going to do the same kind of fucking thing the Pat. That's our goal Yeah. So I'm glad you brought that stuff up.
Speaker 5:
52:35
No I think you guys brought something up in a previous podcast that I listened to when I became your 11th listener. Hell yeah. Thank you. Yeah. It's just that the ability to separate business from the personal aspects of your relationship because it's tough to do because when you get into a relationship with people that you're close to and it was actually one of the funny things when Steve and I began the dialogue about me potentially going to work for him.
Speaker 9:
52:59
People knowing our personalities. There's just no way in hell you guys are going to be able to work for each other and it was funny because I don't think you and I ever had any concerns about that that was the furthest from you know I don't worry about smart people good people and working together.
Speaker 5:
53:14
Yeah I just I always not that if you know somebody and you respect them you're not going to want to be that guy. You know you're not going to want to make them look stupid. Yes. So and I was so I was hot there was a little bit more pressure. To live up to the expectations and there was. But.
Speaker 28:
53:30
I think my point is is that I just think that you when you're in that environment you have to be able to to vent about business and you have to be able to make business separate from your personal things and I remember being in yelling and screaming matches with people at Extended Systems. And even after Steven Pat were gone I still had people that. Worked for me after they left that still you know covered being able to be in that environment where you could feel like you could trust yourself to go in and basically tell your boss to fuck himself.
Speaker 5:
54:04
Yeah yeah.
Speaker 9:
54:05
Yeah I don't I don't agree with you order or or to be or to be transparent enough with your salespeople to walk into a whiteboard and go Hey we got a deal and I need you you and you to come in here and let's do this thing and figure it out and it might not be somebody it may not be that person's deal but those guys wanted to be a part of it or these gals wanted to be a part of it. And and as a manager you expose yourself to say I don't have all the answers right. And most managers don't ever do that.
Speaker 14:
54:34
So. So that's huge young youthful lost.
Speaker 3:
54:37
So I think I saw J.J. and I go out each other for the first time just yesterday just yesterday.
Speaker 7:
54:42
But I mean it wasn't a huge one no.
Speaker 14:
54:44
But we don't do it very often but I mean by that I mean it was we had the same thing the patent life to go through were just a little fuck yourself go fuck yourself fuck you too and walked away with the. Yeah it was pretty classy and then I think ten minutes later we walked over and Steve Steve say fucking word about it.
Speaker 17:
55:10
So and I learned that from back because Pat and I would yell at each other at the top of our lungs and as soon as that that door shut. Let's go get a beer.
Speaker 18:
55:18
What's fucked up is that that's how I grew up so that's like what marriage is like.
Speaker 32:
55:22
Because that's how my parents like. It doesn't really translate this way. What did you get into that sort of relationship. Just just for everybody out there.
Speaker 26:
55:31
Let a good take.
Speaker 14:
55:35
I hear you though. But it's so comfortable for me in the business setting. Like I don't know any of the way. Like we're very honest and raw and it hurts us sometimes. We've driven people out. People who are employed that don't know how we interact with each other and what they see mom and dad yelling at each other they don't panic fuck yeah it's weird.
Speaker 18:
55:56
Millennials straight up give us feedback like our yelling or arguing in a conference room that they can hear through the walls and they don't know how to respond themselves when it's not even about them it's not directed towards them but it was eye opening for me to get that feedback. It was that we're better off without them but we do. We did try to make some changes. Yeah.
Speaker 28:
56:17
Yeah I think the only way you can run a company especially if it's a smaller company. I'm like you guys have here is you. I mean you you have to live you've got to walk it. Yeah like you talk and if you start to make concessions for others then you're not going to the right people working for you and you'll end up with an ally and ultimately it doesn't work out. So that's I mean for the most part the reason that I became nomadic is a technology salesperson is you know was coincidence and circumstance but really the reality is just trying to chase the right opportunity to get into the right environment. Yeah and it's been tough. You're still chasing.
Speaker 17:
56:55
Well you got to feed family and he got a right. There's a lot of things going on in this market doesn't necessarily. You're a heavy hitter now. I said it in all due respect. Like you command a certain amount of money and this market doesn't bear that money all the time.
Speaker 28:
57:12
That is correct. If you want to work in Boise Idaho and live here which we made the concerted effort I mentioned that we moved away to Dallas and we lived in Dallas for 6 7 years and then we moved to Cincinnati and lived there for three or four years and then moved back here about five years ago. You have to become incredibly familiar with the remote parking lot at the Boise airport to go out and visit your clients because there aren't places here within the community that wages here are not where other parts of the country. It's just that simple. But yeah I think you know overall finding guys that you can work for and that you can trust and you can deal with on a day in and day out basis and don't feel like you have to bite your tongue or you have to. The worst part about working for a place is a green with something that you know. Isn't going to work or you've done it before and it doesn't have traction. But since you're in the position that you are and you're really relegated to having to agree and well it's the say that's tough for me.
Speaker 5:
58:18
We have that same issue as companies.
Speaker 28:
58:20
So you spend a lot of time spend a lot of time bite my tongue and you know unfortunately I've gotten to the point where you know I'm I'm do or I'm just feeding my family at this point and doing it I feel pretty good about worrying now. I worked for a really good guy and that's been great so far. Nice and they seemed to be.
Speaker 17:
58:42
Seemed to be in it for the long haul and that's something guys my gals country still working that angle.
Speaker 28:
58:49
Well I mean I've only been there for 3 months.
Speaker 26:
58:51
That's why I like.
Speaker 14:
58:55
Can we just be I there.
Speaker 13:
58:56
He was our sales person had two different jobs over the line and the last time he put his quota he gave me his catalog.
Speaker 14:
59:06
I was like I said So who's taking your place. Could you give me their contact info. So we started the conversation. In full transparency.
Speaker 15:
59:18
I actually had coffee with the guy who were there interviewing the opposition on Tuesday.
Speaker 8:
59:27
I tell you listed on the cell six or seven of you I have been a reference for this man standing for the last 50. Well yeah. After yes I have.
Speaker 11:
59:38
I can't tell you how many references I've given and I shower clean myself after everyone I got the things I say. No of course I'd hire back.
Speaker 14:
59:47
He is a go getter. No of course you want a guy that's going to go out there and knock. He is that guy. And I said. Well not now with a lot like confidence but I do. I love you as a friend. You get the gig but you get that hearty more.
Speaker 33:
60:06
I would say no more.
Speaker 6:
60:19
I would say that some of the cold call you back being stuff gets a wee bit old 50 years old.
Speaker 1:
60:27
Steve's tell me every fucking day. Like that's his line in the sand right. Yeah. You just done he's thrown his hands up there right. No guy. I'm not chasing these little I don't take phone calls.
Speaker 14:
60:38
That's not true.
Speaker 28:
60:39
You know I don't find that stuff to be earmuffs.
Speaker 7:
60:45
You did. He's supposed to knock on doors dude.
Speaker 5:
60:49
No I mean knocking on doors. I think we all have to learn their Karabagh in what you guys do. It's a little more day to day because I mean you guys are relatively not to diminish but I mean your transactional guy opens up a restaurant up in restaurant he's going to need a POS.
Speaker 8:
61:05
Chet so bleeding edge back in our day right. Bleeding Yeah.
Speaker 7:
61:09
Yeah. How's that. Remember that term. No I do remember that it was like you had to.
Speaker 8:
61:14
You had to. You had to teach. Like do most of the sales cycle you were explaining why your product was going to be good for him as it would do what we do now which is commodities right. You need a point of sale system. You have to live with the point of sale system. So it's like I'll take monetized over bleeding edge all day.
Speaker 34:
61:34
I don't get to call it sea level anymore obviously unless you're talking about cooks or chefs. Apparently the standard for good is gone.
Speaker 9:
61:47
But yeah and it is interesting because you know the place that I'm at now we work at the sea level. And I mean we're CEO CFO. And listen I don't know if you know this or not but no one is sitting around at their desk right now.
Speaker 19:
62:03
God damn I can't wait till this is not happening.
Speaker 1:
62:08
And I had a question on the sea level stuff.
Speaker 5:
62:12
Have you ever heard of a chief business officer or a CBO that seems to be a title that's been thrown around a little bit.
Speaker 7:
62:19
Yeah really.
Speaker 1:
62:20
I thought that was completed the most a made up sea level title you've ever directly interacted with.
Speaker 11:
62:25
Did you one of your last two or three employers come up with the best of them. No names mentioned but an old ex worker of ours worked for him and he's having fireside chats. I can't do that. I mean you I did. What's his title. What is it.
Speaker 3:
62:44
You worked for them for a couple of months. Like maybe like a couple of months they were off the ego road.
Speaker 22:
62:51
And that he has a he has a new title now what he would do in a fireside chat. Oh God yeah. No. No. But what was the title. What titles did they have.
Speaker 17:
63:03
On the right like ambassadors like all sorts or Yeah I don't remember.
Speaker 5:
63:10
I know it was a shirt torn.
Speaker 35:
63:12
Yeah I don't blocking that moment. That's fair.
Speaker 5:
63:19
But yes I mean you were starting to see things like Chief Business Officer Chief Revenue Officer Chief Revenue Officer that's new. Give be next to brew there. That's the that's the new title for V.P. of sales they like to be the chief revenue officer. OK. Yes. No no that's that's why I'm asking the question because like that's the new millennial hip thing to do is make of these type of a chief revenue officer in the company that I currently.
Speaker 3:
63:49
Love. I'm so out of date.
Speaker 16:
63:51
Yeah. No and it doesn't. I mean it really. No I mean I think you know working in technology you begin to understand.
Speaker 36:
64:00
There's just so many coaches. You touched on it though that there's a definite when you're on the bleeding edge. There's a definite educational component to it and.
Speaker 12:
64:15
That leads to a long long sales cycle and then you throw in you know dollar totals of the you know six eight hundred thousand million million and a half two million dollars. What your biggest sale ever. I did a ten million dollar services and services and rip out of wireless equipment for regional Gaucher. Back when I was in the Midwest yeah nice. Would you knock down after they screwed you over. Would
Speaker 36:
64:45
you get a few dollars.
Speaker 14:
64:50
No you do well on a deal like that. They try to fuck you.
Speaker 9:
64:52
No it wasn't. No no one tried it you know. No one tried to screw me over on the deal. It was just one of those deals where a lot of the when you're moving steel the margins are horrible especially when you're reselling. I mean it was a Motorola resell. So and you only get paid on the margin. So you know and you only get paid when it ships right and it gets shipped over a six month period of time. So you know you're making four grand here and six grand there. It's stuff like that I mean it's not it's not insignificant money.
Speaker 14:
65:22
No no no of course not.
Speaker 5:
65:23
No but it just it's always interesting when you have 10 million around as far as the revenue dollars is like oh yeah I mean it's top line revenue and you know I mean you're looking at a 10 million dollar deal that probably netted one point three million dollars. Wow. The bottom line is gross.
Speaker 8:
65:36
Yeah. Yeah. Wow. Love it. That's cool. OK. You're here. You've done all that. J What do you got it. You got any questions for this young man.
Speaker 1:
65:49
Yes so I want to I want to go before we get to our question and answer session. Yeah I want to go just a little bit personal. There's a culinary. Oh yeah. Well it's easy it's softballs but. I have now had my second child and I think I'm done. And hydrogenation thinks I'm two beautiful little girls I love it but I keep threatening to my wife that I want a vasectomy. And I told her you are going to be on the podcast and she happens to remember your vasectomy story so I'd love for you to just tell me you know what it's like to be like and what was wrong or right with yours.
Speaker 7:
66:24
So do you want to hear my vasectomy story or my reverse the whole me know mostly the chat and I got a two for one with Doc Jones that his to be strong.
Speaker 5:
66:36
So so yes I did. So I'll take it. I have four children right. I have four children and they are 24 21. And then I have identical 12 year old boys. Oh OK. So that's why they're twins.
Speaker 26:
66:58
No they're not. That's why Aha.
Speaker 19:
67:01
Well they have two separate mothers looking exactly like me.
Speaker 14:
67:04
The audience was asking what is there. Thank you.
Speaker 5:
67:09
OK. So you may we so Steve flipped the switch on your hot dog is that you kicked it off. But anyway so. Much like you J.J. we had always talked about having two kids and I have a daughter and I had a son. And at that point it seemed perfect. You know we're shutting down the baby factory and we're good we're going to live life. And ironically enough that was back when I was a farmer rep. So I went into Spokane and I had my little vasectomy right after my son was born there. And the guy wouldn't take my money so I got it for free.
Speaker 19:
67:50
Oh which is good to have that call back because I'm going to need that money later revealed. So I got a free vasectomy and that's pretty easy takes about 17 minutes.
Speaker 7:
68:08
You've got to feed it. Yep it's ok all the time folks get so 13 be like Sprague.
Speaker 13:
68:19
It's the new show.
Speaker 14:
68:22
It was out in the valley Spokane Valley. Yeah.
Speaker 5:
68:26
Oh and for those we didn't really talk about this but I lived in Spokane for a very short period of time and I got into the farm industry best way and that is when we had my oldest son. And that's why I had my vasectomy in Spokane.
Speaker 2:
68:41
I did much of your oldest son. You should watch him. I thought he was a good kid. Yeah.
Speaker 21:
68:45
We love you. All this said.
Speaker 19:
68:47
I didn't drive up there for my vasectomy. Not bury the lead.
Speaker 5:
68:53
So anyway so I had that done and then then we and my wife after about a couple of years was really interested in having additional children.
Speaker 7:
69:04
And I rebuffed brother go out and look for some Seawright fight.
Speaker 6:
69:10
I said you can have as many as you want. They just can't live. So we when we moved to Dallas and I told you that we got money I mean you know Daddy Warbucks. So I mean what a better way to share your newfound wealth by having additional children. So while Steve bought Stubb's with that he cashed out all of his stock options. Thankfully enough when I left CSI the stock had gone up a little bit. So I made a little bit of money which I then parlayed into what we'd like to classify as a vasectomy reversal.
Speaker 11:
69:50
Not for you not nearly as clean as the vasectomy.
Speaker 5:
69:54
It's a tad bit more of a procedure and this is no reflection on size but apparently it's a microsurgery good flavor. But anyway yes. This just in insurance doesn't pay for any of it. Oh yeah. So yeah so I paid a significant amount of money to say around seventeen thousand dollars and then said I did like 17 grand to have a vasectomy reversal and you serious. Yeah. And the procedure took nine hours.
Speaker 8:
70:33
What is a microbe vasectomy.
Speaker 7:
70:37
Yeah it gets jerked around how they look at around half of what's going on down there. Well they went through six to eight pepper shakers.
Speaker 5:
70:50
And waiting after that and then after that I had to wait around another hour and a half for the second one to drop. But after that the pain was over. No the ball.
Speaker 6:
71:03
But anyway we digress. But yes. So I had that done. And yeah.
Speaker 1:
71:10
So you guys you reverse it and the intention was to have one child.
Speaker 15:
71:15
Well I don't think anybody ever goes into a go on they want to have two children. I'm good but I think that I'm like Oh is that explosion like that.
Speaker 5:
71:29
I'm not that good. Yes. Anyway when we were then of course you spend this money and you have to sign a trillion documents that say there's no guarantee that it's going to work for 17000 and hard hardscrabble from scratch. So we. Achieved my girls listen to this. Right. But we went. Yeah and then about you know you go in and you have tests and other things to make sure it's all work. And they warn you. About what will what happened to the twins. Was that a disclaimer was that one of the documents you had designed read or was it like I'm so good at this.
Speaker 7:
72:11
Why do you keep going back to that random thing. I don't know if you're so good at it. I'm not saying it's a skill I'm talking about two or three times. I'm talking about the surgeon.
Speaker 35:
72:22
He's so good at it. Yeah yeah. So it is truly surgical. There was no light. Well I mean the reality of wrestling going on between you and the gal to get that taken care of right.
Speaker 26:
72:36
I mean if memory serves me right.
Speaker 5:
72:46
Hopefully there's no way she ever listens. Though she doesn't really listen anyway. So yes I don't know probably eight months later she comes in and announces that she's pregnant and I am. Oh my God. 37 38 and I was actually I'd come back home to Boise and told Steve that we're going to have another child.
Speaker 6:
73:07
And he looked at me like at 19 heads and he did it TRUSTe fashion for anybody who knows and looked at me with that incredulous look like a crazy shit. And then quickly replied and he goes I'm happy for you.
Speaker 15:
73:24
That's what you want to look at it is like oh my god seriously. So I kicked him out of the golf cart.
Speaker 6:
73:36
Deservedly so anyway so yeah. So ultimately it worked out. And at that point it was working at Erixon so I worked in an office.
Speaker 5:
73:45
And gosh you guys have to talk to the guys that I worked with. So I had a couple of pretty good friends there. And and he goes we're going to have the first ultrasound and I wasn't sure we could afford one more good.
Speaker 15:
74:04
And they're like two in there.
Speaker 1:
74:10
And the filter in the ultrasound room in general right with one kid go in and do it. Just everything there you know are we like is this going to be good right. Happy healthy is everything in place right. Like that's nerve wracking third time probably not so much but like you're still you're still sort of on edge. Right. And then there's two.
Speaker 5:
74:31
Yeah. And at that point it was yeah I mean obviously it's worked out. Absolutely. It's worked out. That's awesome. Yeah back then I was like cause I had to do. I never considered myself the greatest dad of babies. You know what I mean. You know. Yeah. And your Lisa was much much better. I mean she had that stuff. You know all Diane and weird maternal instinct. Yeah I just I just. Listen to directions and did it. But. Yes. Anyway so we ultimately have the twins and. Yeah so it worked really really good. And now they're 12 and yeah they'll be in seventh grade this year and they still look exactly alike and we cover that right. They're twins identical and.
Speaker 6:
75:20
Yeah and they're good. And it's funny because the more we thought about it you know we started to get older.
Speaker 9:
75:25
The reality is is that if there would have just been one of us one of them they would have been constantly hounding our older sister.
Speaker 19:
75:34
Yeah I mean I don't they don't need me to play kick me to shoot hoops.
Speaker 5:
75:38
They don't you know they going to do their thing on their own. And it's pretty cool and it's totally fun to watch to watch twins grow up. I mean they're still the best of friends they spend every waking moment together. They rarely fight. So yeah it's been it's been pretty cool. Like who that is. Did you go back in for a vasectomy now. Right like negative negative did they. Is that even on the tape like is that a negative ghost rider blanks. No one of the one of the three vasectomy reversal discussions that we had was that when not a lot of people have those that they might act like it was a state of the like.
Speaker 14:
76:22
I don't think that conversation happens also have a good.
Speaker 6:
76:27
You are correct. Unless you're my neurologist friend that I have here in town Dr. Jones.
Speaker 35:
76:34
Did my vasectomy.
Speaker 6:
76:35
Yeah he starts the conversation when he introduces me to people this is chat he used to be my pharmaceutical rep 20 years ago. And by the way he had a vasectomy reversal. I mean it's sort of like it should be your business guide if you. I mean seriously. But yeah I no.
Speaker 12:
76:52
So the reality was that before I had the vasectomy reversal I said I'm not going to have another vasectomy when we get done. You're going to have to do something from a more permanent standpoint. Plus that shit up. So the reality is is that we had the twins via c section which was planned and they just did a tubal. There you go. When they were in there I actually they didn't really do a tubal reachin then.
Speaker 19:
77:14
Do you think you're going to need this again for. You don't have video.
Speaker 15:
77:20
They pulled out a piece of fallopian tube you got their surgical back from my surgical days I actually recognized it.
Speaker 8:
77:34
All right. It's under a Q and A. I'm gonna start with my new Q and A. Then you've got your list right. All right. So my first question is.
Speaker 17:
77:44
What did you post. Guilty Pleasure. As far as a TV show and J.J. was wary about this because I am a snob so I'm going to lead with everything's on the table. Everything's on the table. I'm going to share with you and listen you know that I'm a closeted Andrew Zimmern fan. I don't know why I watch his shit and I don't know why. It's like travel channel crap and it's mindless and I watch it and then I shared with JaDine in complete confidence. I don't know if you'll put this on the airwaves. I used to do law and order and binge watched like on a Sunday if nothing else was on.
Speaker 6:
78:18
It was like a winter day and I have no TV shame so I will I know I am way too old to give a damn what you think about it.
Speaker 19:
78:27
None whatsoever. There's no one there.
Speaker 5:
78:29
I've got a handful of them so let's see. Right now my guilty bench is a show that I'm sure none of you have ever heard of. It's called below deck Mediterranean. Exactly. I'm not even 100 percent sure what channel it is on. I think it might be on Bravo. I just have it on the DVR season. And so it tapes them and I watch them. I actually watched them last night. I guess it is a super yacht in the Mediterranean. Yeah scantily clad ladies. Nah not really. It's more about the show it's more it's a soap opera. It's not really a soap opera it's a reality show. It's a soap opera. Yeah there's basically. A crew on there and it just follows them around this day on this boat as they cater to these uber rich people that can afford these things. Just to give you an example of how rich these people are the typical tip for the crew after a two or three day tour John Gilligan's able to bring you back three hours.
Speaker 5:
79:36
Three day three hour or three hour tour. Didn't work out well. Anyway I digress. But the reality is is that pun intended is that they make about 15 to 20 thousand dollars that they separate between the crew for a. So it's one of those seasonal jobs that you do to make money. And of course it's all mixed in with you know they get you to do other seasonal jobs to not make money. I think so. Like building homes in Honduras. Well that's philanthropic. I don't I would never accuse him of ever doing anything Dabic or mowing lawns in Minnesota in December. I don't think that you can make a lot of money doing that.
Speaker 3:
80:18
No business no plowing. Jesus christ I just got a look at youthful philosophy. Find out what the business plan is.
Speaker 5:
80:24
So for the most part yes. So right now that is my that is my guilty pleasure show. OK. And I watch America's Got Talent with my twins.
Speaker 11:
80:33
He had to give one with those fine. All right what he got.
Speaker 1:
80:37
I have a list. We open with this one. Mark. Do you cheat at board games or have you. I mostly want to know currently with his kids.
Speaker 23:
80:49
Negative. No I've never cheated the twins out on monopoly or Nick.
Speaker 5:
80:53
Look at you you're you're pondering cookie.
Speaker 31:
80:55
No no no I'm pondering whether to even on a board game.
Speaker 6:
81:01
All right. Honestly I don't think we own a board game.
Speaker 8:
81:03
I mean OK but let's go back to youthful time. This is a competitive fuck. Did you ever cheat at games like clue or Monopoly with your siblings. Did you ever think about it Chad more than likely I did.
Speaker 5:
81:15
Yeah but I'm obviously way past the guilt. All right JJ continue your.
Speaker 2:
81:25
Favorite toy growing up. Yeah I like this quote from the duplex days.
Speaker 5:
81:30
Actually this was actually when I lived in a house in Halver. Please don't rub it in the big league. Yeah Havre Montana. It was back in the evil Knievel day. Oh what did they tell you my favorite toy what we had. I had the wind up evil Knievel and that thing would jump like a motherfucker dude.
Speaker 14:
81:51
I told him I told Jj confidence getting confidence that that was my favorite toy. It's like I could do that Ripcord Evel Knievel and that fucker would jump Oh yeah dude.
Speaker 5:
82:00
He was the best he would go through a shitload of stuff and he had good hair good Daul hair. He did have good down here the expensive guy and you know the funny thing the well I don't know if it's funny I'll let you guys be the judge of that. But the reality is is that you know evil Knievel was from Montana. So and I lived in Montana.
Speaker 17:
82:18
I can get somebody on the show that has a direct relative of evil Knievel and my dad got his autograph for me one time you met him in a bar and Butte.
Speaker 5:
82:26
So I thought I was big hot shit but yes that and then the rock him Sock'em Robots are my two people gonna love rock them sock.
Speaker 17:
82:33
How about battle tops your flip battle tops like that was one of my favorites too. Noone remembers. Battle tops.
Speaker 12:
82:38
I don't remember battle tops as much I think. I think they just handed that out to the apartment kids.
Speaker 7:
82:44
Oh that's right. You were Duplay. Yeah I forgot. That's good. Good call back the audience is why we love it. Yes. Yeah. He'll never come back. Wonderful out there and your listeners thankful.
Speaker 11:
82:58
JJ continue. All right.
Speaker 18:
83:00
Favorite or ideal dream vacation destination Australia.
Speaker 8:
83:05
Australia why you know like 13 of the most deadliest species live on that continent. It's not. It's not like a kosher place to go hang out.
Speaker 5:
83:15
I wasn't planning on going to that part of Australia.
Speaker 8:
83:18
They're everywhere they go out because it's kosher like where snakes are. Be very clear please. We have Jewish listening audience.
Speaker 2:
83:28
I don't even know what it was kosher. Steve likes to bust my balls. Sometimes it derails the conversation. Well I just wanted everything that was paying attention to the conversation.
Speaker 9:
83:40
What do you do in Australia and sit on the beach and I'm going to go to the Sydney whatever the hell that's cool.
Speaker 13:
83:48
Sure.
Speaker 19:
83:49
The orchestra Symphony the Sydney Symphony. Yeah you pop a.
Speaker 5:
83:56
I hope you get a check that off your list. I know and it's actually Lisa's dream destination as well so at some point one day if I live that long we won't have kids at our house.
Speaker 7:
84:12
They go through with their kids.
Speaker 1:
84:14
The last one we didn't get into siblings but did you ever have to wear Hami down.
Speaker 3:
84:19
Oh great question. He's the oldest.
Speaker 5:
84:21
I am the oldest. So I did not have to work hand me downs. Your brother did right. Oh yeah. Yeah my brother definitely had hand me nants although I don't think he wore a ton of hand me downs because he was young and he was so much younger than I was that by that time you're just like let's just give it to the goodwill because I don't want to wait around another two years till he fits into it. Everybody wants those corduroys were hot. Did you have to wear bell bottoms. Was that your. Yes it was. Yeah that was 6 7th grade. Had some sweet hash genes with some gigantic bell bottoms. Yeah yeah they were dynamite.
Speaker 17:
84:57
Wallingham chords were the best though right. I couldn't afford chords but I got hammered out of court and I hope those were pretty cool.
Speaker 5:
85:03
Yeah I definitely want chords but it wasn't. My parents were never more excited than when fiber ones became popular again because they were nineteen ninety nine and you could get those butterflies and god damn those things would last for ever.
Speaker 3:
85:18
Yeah.
Speaker 32:
85:18
Well Garanimals you never had Garanimals or do I get what you do. What the fuck I'm talking about.
Speaker 5:
85:28
So you go to Syria and you find a pair of pants and they have an elephant on.
Speaker 8:
85:36
But they had extra iPad. Yeah like they had knee patches within the.
Speaker 7:
85:42
Chances but you're kind of burying the lead because then you would have to go over and find a shirt with the elephant on it because that meant animal because that meant match was this year's product. It was completely out of business.
Speaker 19:
85:57
Yeah I mean they bought and.
Speaker 7:
86:01
Oh god I was. Have you asked that question.
Speaker 6:
86:04
Yes. Garanimals were and then tough skin to do some tough skin.
Speaker 5:
86:08
My mom was so pumped and Tuscans came out again because I could wear it for two to three years despite whether they were too short or too tight and those definitely had the knee patches and absolutely Yep knee patches. Maybe I'm getting those in my Garanimals mixed up. But yeah those definitely had him and they were big ones too because they would keep you from yet basically tearing out your jeans in the first week and two days yeah yeah yeah.
Speaker 17:
86:33
Chad it's been wonderful. Do you have anything to ask us or are we comfortable here and in this conversation because you've done tremendously and we appreciate your time.
Speaker 5:
86:43
I'm not sure that I've done tremendously but it has been fun.
Speaker 12:
86:48
No I think it's great. I think it's great that you guys have this and you talk about culture and certain things like that I know that you guys have worked very diligently to to create the kind of culture that we had and extended systems and I wish more people. Realized how important culture is when building an organization whether youre a large fortune 500. Or whether youre a small 10 or 12 person organization.
Speaker 9:
87:15
So I commend both of you for that. Steve Ive always admired the fact that youve been willing to stand by your beliefs in the way things should be run and were never never averse to taking risks. I mean even whether it was Stubb's or starting here cammo so no I appreciate it.
Speaker 12:
87:31
And I guess I didn't realize that JJ worked at Stubb's.
Speaker 8:
87:35
Oh yeah. Part manager you know I had only had 19 for me and I didn't mind my manager. I don't hire people I don't deal with. What's her name. Yes. So we're at the point where we just said well people that aren't going to pay for the like I don't want to sell people out unnecessarily. Well I don't think you're selling her out for hiring Jane. Well look look what he's become. There's a dick Isela.
Speaker 37:
88:04
No he he just turned 32 yesterday two days ago. Can you believe that. So I've known him for 13 years. We hired him when he turned 19 and it's been 13 solid years.
Speaker 12:
88:17
I was 32 when I went to work to extend system.
Speaker 2:
88:20
Yeah. Holy shit yeah. Let's turn the dial source on some shit. Love it.
Speaker 38:
88:25
Hey it's a great point to probably stop. Wrap it up wrap it up. Always welcome back. Yeah. We will have you back.
Speaker 1:
88:33
Most definitely want to know wouldn't.
Speaker 17:
88:37
Well look at the ratings. We'll see how many subscribers you might want to spread the word like if drop us a couple of subscribers or whatever that's cool.
Speaker 5:
88:44
Well if we've gone from 7 to 14 I've given you a 100 percent increase so I don't know why I wouldn't be back.
Speaker 1:
88:49
Look at him that drop in the numbers real quick before we get out of here Steve. We got to our ad placement even though we don't get paid for ad revenue right. What do you make for dinner last time.
Speaker 38:
88:58
Thank you for asking. I had the best but your box ground beef did you to do. Not really pasta. No I go with the chickpea Elbow's because I don't do pasta anymore because I'm watching my way.
Speaker 2:
89:11
Absolutely. Because you know you've got a date coming up. Absolutely. Big day. But now we're. There's no other day it's a trip with your gal I don't want to put the illusion that you're going on a date with some other gal. Yeah she does.
Speaker 11:
89:25
Yeah I'm trying to get some help for my trip. Yes. Yeah but your box did it for sure.
Speaker 1:
89:31
Never. Please try. Tried but your box. Come over to Steve's house so cooking up something. It's top notch.
Speaker 17:
89:38
It's not really house I live in an apartment.
Speaker 13:
89:40
The basement really funny I coveted an apartment now. That's why I would yearn for an apartment right now.
Speaker 2:
89:48
Did you go put your box last night. No. We had time to write the first day over at my sister's house. That's right. I wasn't sure.
Speaker 39:
89:55
Oh great. All right.
Speaker 20:
90:03
Have you read it. He's.
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