Restart Recharge Podcast

215 - Market Yourself!

September 13, 2022 Forward Edge Season 2 Episode 15
Restart Recharge Podcast
215 - Market Yourself!
Show Notes Transcript

As a coach in your district, you want to make sure that you are visible and building relationships. However, it is also important to market your offerings for the school teachers, admin, and students! We’ll explore ideas and strategies to use various edtech platforms to assist in creating wonderful graphics and visuals to display everything we can do to assist the school in edtech. We’ll dive in to how we can best market ourselves to work more efficiently with our school!

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Canva for Education

Podcast Team

Hosts- Katie  Ritter & Justin Thomas

Editing Team- Michael Roush, Justin Thomas 

Social Media/ Promo Team- Annamarie Rinehart, Lisa Kuhn, Maggie Harris

Creative/Content Team- Justin Thomas

Producers- Justin Thomas

Coach Mentorship Program
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Justin Thomas:

As the school year begins, don't forget to earn your badges with edu The website has a brand new look for the upcoming school year. navigate easily across the new interface to learn strategies for using your favorite edtech tools in your lessons, check out the new curated collections and climb the edgy leaderboard, visit the new look edgy, badges.com today.

Katie Ritter:

Aloha, I'm Katie Ritter.

Justin Thomas:

And I'm Justin Thomas. And this is the restart recharge podcast, a podcast by coaches for coaches, we bring the tips and tricks help you in your everyday work as an instructional coach or whatever they call you in your school district.

Katie Ritter:

So hopefully you're gonna leave this episode with us today feeling just a little bit less on your own coaching Island

Justin Thomas:

really fun episode here today because as a coach in your district, you want to make sure that you are visible and are building those relationships with the educators and administrators. And however, it can always be important to market your school offerings to your school teachers and men and students. So we're gonna explore ideas today ideas and strategies that are used for various ad tech platforms to assist in creating wonderful graphics and visuals to display everywhere in everything that we do to assist our school and at Tech. So we'll dive into how we can market ourselves to work more efficiently within our school.

Katie Ritter:

And we have a very first first timer on the pot here as a special guest on this episode, don't we just Yes,

Justin Thomas:

we do. I'll go and introduce her now. It is page greavy page is joined ford edge here in 2017. Upon graduation from college, she started as the marketing coordinator working alongside external marketing consultant to provide the day to day marketing needs across all departments in Ford Edge. She went on to earn her master's in business administration with a specialization in marketing from the University of Cincinnati, and is now the Marketing Manager for Ford Edge. She manages all marketing strategy, content creation, branding, digital marketing, campaigns, relationships with manufacturers trade show participation and advanced research and analytics. So welcome in page,

Katie Ritter:

welcome page. Hello, thank you for having me. Yeah, what your bio doesn't say as you make this place go round. So I'll just throw that in there for you. Okay, and then we have another special guest today that I have the pleasure of introducing, that is Anna Marie Reinhart. If you're a loyal listener, you've heard her on here a number of times before, but just as a reminder, Anna Marie taught is an intervention specialist prior to stepping into her current role as an instructional design coach here at forward edge. She worked with elementary, middle and high school students teaching all four content areas, core content areas, and working with a very wide variety of learners. She is now the instructional design coach and a pre K through eight building and one of the largest school districts in the state of Ohio. She was placed in the school after the building was awarded a grant for one to one iPad program for their fifth through eighth grade students. And now the entire building is one to one. And she is able to support all staff members and students in the building. She is also a Google certified educator, trainer and coach. And she serves as a proud mentor coach for both us here at forward Ed and the Verizon innovative learning schools program. So Anna Maria, thanks for joining us again, and welcome back.

Annamarie Rinehart:

Yeah, thanks for having me again.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah. So Paige, we are going to kick it off with you this topic is this is where you kind of eat, live and breathe and marketing. So we have been fortunate here on our coaching team to be able to pick your brain from time to time, but just provide a little bit more background just for folks who may not be as familiar with kind of what all is involved with marketing, just give us a little bit of background of kind of what you do here at forward edge.

Paige Greve:

I oversee the kind of complete marketing strategy and implementation here at Ford Edge. And that really ranges from, you know, anything to do with social media, websites, the analytics around all of those. And then you know, digital marketing campaigns, whether that's email campaigns, or really any sort of like Google ads, Google paid ads. And then really, a large chunk of what we're doing now is events and trade shows, we need to, you know, expand outside of this region. And so we're really trying to get in front of people and showcase who we are and what we do.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah, we're down the street, right? Yeah. Yeah. If

Katie Ritter:

you've, if you've ever gotten an email or seen an ad for forward, Ed, it's probably from page to page. What would just kind of curious, like, what was the biggest thing when you went into marketing? What was the biggest thing that kind of surprised you once you started working at forward edge, like, Oh, this is included in marketing?

Paige Greve:

I would say, all of the backend research and everything that goes into, you know, creating the content, you have all of you know the graphics and the creative side of things. But to get some of that content, you have to do the research you have to research like the types of grants that are out there, and how that can be used to benefit a school. And I think that was the most surprising and more. Not I guess surprising, but I didn't realize how much time you needed to put into that initial research and development to make sure that all the marketing that you're putting out there is one accurate, but also, you know, gets the message across to the audience of what they need to get out of it.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah. So your whole goal is really making sure people know forward edge know what we're offering know how to get a hold of us to get what they need. Yeah, creating

Paige Greve:

those, you know, that compelling content, and getting that out there in a variety of formats. Awesome.

Justin Thomas:

All right, Anna Marie, how do you use these visual elements to market your coaching support to your school, because as we kind of heard here from Paige, it's important to get your name out there in the school district. So how do you kind of do that?

Annamarie Rinehart:

Yeah, I would say this is super important in our role as a coach and something that maybe we don't spend a whole lot of time thinking about. But the work that we can, the work that we do with teachers can be intimidating to some, especially if you have the word tech in your title, that can immediately turn some people off. So I think that kind of marketing myself as a coach, and making fliers or email headers, or you know, social media, things that I can send out to my staff, if I can make them kind of fun, light hearted, comical, interesting to look at, there's a higher chance that a teacher maybe is going to want to work with me, or at the very least, they'll come and ask me how I made that, which immediately creates an opportunity to have some kind of conversation with that teacher.

Katie Ritter:

Oh, first of all, I love that is a good hook. But I also think, you know, I think a lot of times, you know, you said when you have tech in the name, it makes them nervous, which I wholeheartedly agree with. But I even just think for like any coach out there just like even clarifying and marketing, what you can even do for them. So so many teachers and principals aren't really even familiar with, like the work that a coach can do. Or on the flip side, they've had a coach before, who maybe only worked with people who were like not doing so well in their teaching jobs. So kind of like reframing that, too. So anyway, I just liked that you said that. But I love the hook part, especially to, it's always good to have teachers want to recreate something that you did. So anyway, we pulled these two together, because it's kind of this unique idea. Like Anna Marie said, it's not something that we always talk about unnecessarily for coaches, like a lot of the work like you really do have to market yourself, you know, and you really do kind of want to create, like this brand for yourself as a coach in order to essentially like drum up business. We don't always think of it that way as a coach, because we're a school and we don't necessarily think of like our teachers and students as business. But the reality is like coaches are not like third grade reading teachers, they can sometimes be like a luxury or seen as a luxury support position. And not always, not always able to be funded. Unfortunately, it's just like the reality of it. So if people don't know what we do, and how we how we can help them, then they might not be utilizing us. So anyway, that's why that's kind of why we're bringing this this session and pulling picking Paige's brain too, in terms of from a marketing perspective, but give us page especially like, give us a little bit more. Like when you think of creating a brand and making things visually appealing, like what what are some things that you are thinking about? For the people who are going to see this? And then I'm going to have a follow up question for Annamarie.

Paige Greve:

Yeah, I think the first key pieces, you know, know, your audience who's is going to who's is going to be positioned in front of, you know, it the way a, from a marketing perspective, the way a tech director looks at something versus a curriculum director or even a teacher is you know, completely different. So knowing your audience who's going to see that message and then using consistent design elements, whether that's, you know, we like to say using just sticking to two fonts, consistent colors, whether that's brand colors or just if you have a specific idea for a presentation, a theme that you want to go with staying within consistent colors throughout that presentation that way, it is cohesive, and it looks nice and you know, it is more compelling than having all these different colors flying everywhere. And then also just getting to the point right away. You want to hit them within the first two seconds. That's you About two to five seconds to really get somebody's attention. And if they don't know what they're supposed to get out of it in those first two to five seconds, you probably have already lost them. So really kind of hitting them upfront with what they're gonna get out of it.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, I feel like that's a super key piece of advice from a marketing perspective that I think as educators, we can all relate to like how many emails you're getting a day from parents, students, the staff. So anything that you can put out there, just how much limited time you have. So in summary, I, I mean, I'm kind of directing it to you, because from your perspective, you know, you are coaching, but either one of you feel free to chime in. But so why would a coach really want to make their work more visually appealing? Or? And? Or, like, how, how would you go about branding yourself as a coach within a larger school system?

Annamarie Rinehart:

Yeah, I can definitely speak to the the first part, I guess, branding myself, to be honest, I haven't really given that much thought to, I might have an ideas once I've finished answering the first part. But I actually saw I attended a session at this changing the story conference at UC earlier this summer. And it was about instructional design, and things that we should consider for students, when designing like an online course, for example. And so much of what this presenter said, are, are things that Paige has told all of us about our presentations, our designs, our marketing materials. And so one of those things is like, we want to decrease the cognitive load that we're putting on the person looking at whatever we're presenting. So what that would mean is, you know, keeping text to a minimum, not choosing like, a million different fonts and super bright colors, or you know, a bunch of different colors. And so I try and keep that in mind. Because again, we know teachers time is limited. So if I can give them something that they can quickly look at, and they're not going to have to spend 10 minutes reading over it in order to get a better understanding of what I do, how I can help them what a coaching cycle is, that is so much more impactful. And I think, honestly, if it's something you're printing out, that's less likely to end up in the trash. Just because like, you know, I've even I've used coaching menus before that, admittedly, I think they were maybe a little bit too text heavy. And so I know, on our team forward edge, we've had several iterations, several different versions of like, here are the services I offer as a coach. And I think, as we work on those, they're getting significantly less texty. They're they're becoming more, you know, colorful, and kind of brief. One of the things that comes to mind, for me, I created in Canva, this really small graphic, I think I use like an Instagram template. And it was like, What can I expect from coaching cycles with Anna Marie, and literally, it was my Bitmoji in the middle, and then like, six key words around me, and then a QR code on the back for them to sign up. And it was just like, in my mind, a way of making something that can seem like a pretty big undertaking, a little less scary, and like straightforward. This is what you can expect.

Paige Greve:

I think the key point that you brought up there was it's not about dumbing it down or you know, even keeping things high level, it's really getting to a concise message as quickly as possible. And when you're creating those graphics, whether it's sending it out in an email, putting it into their mailbox, it's meeting them where they are. And it's also delivering a message that is easily understandable. In a, you know, in a second, they know, they know what they're trying to get out of it.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, well. And I haven't really thought about this until hearing both of you kind of speak on that. But it really makes it like forces you as the individual to like, really understand what you're doing or what you're trying to share. And what are the most important pieces. So it like forces you to synthesize it and to then be able to better communicate that visually, which it seems like our like, people can digest much easier when it's more visual when you

Paige Greve:

being the content person. You know, the ins and outs of it, but they don't this is the first time they're potentially seeing what you're doing. And so you have to be clear and concise in your messaging. Otherwise, they you know, your main goal might get lost in the shuffle in all in all the craziness. So yeah.

Unknown:

And thinking

Justin Thomas:

yeah, yeah, it's definitely one of those things to where you you talk about it, but with the the Y two aspect like what what am I trying to get from this and have your teachers because you know, teachers have been in PD sessions where they are there for hours and they don't know what's going on. So if you can just hit it in that first two to five seconds, and they understand okay, It's Anna Marie, she's got these different options, I can explore more using the QR code. It's simple. It's right there. They're in, they can sign up with you and move along with that.

Annamarie Rinehart:

I'm thinking about that brand questions.

Katie Ritter:

I know, I am thinking about it more as we're talking to. And I'm just I'm thinking about like, here at forward edge, like anything we do. I always ask you guys, like, just make sure forward edge logos on it, right? Like, I want that to be like, our brand, not even from like a page branding guidelines standpoint. But just like, this is our brand. Like, this is our work. Like, I want people to know when it's like forward edge did this kind of a thing. And so it's just got me thinking to like, How could and I don't know, Paige, maybe I know, that's like, totally put you on the spot. But like, what are some ideas? Like how could a coach like actually branded their work? Whether you're a single coach on your own island, or a huge coaching team, like we know, like many schools in Texas have, right? Where there's 20 Plus coaches to this team? Like, how might they go about actually like branding their work? So anything they put out from something as small as like a tech tip email or a newsletter to like, the PD that they're doing? Like, how can they brand themselves.

Paige Greve:

So if you think about it from a forward edge perspective, our brand is not only encompassed, like, it's not only made up of our logo, our brand colors that our brand fonts, but also the way we talk, we're transitioning to this very conversational tone. Because we were such an, you know, open and collaborative group, that we want that to be portrayed in what we're doing as well. So I think having, you know, a specific tone, or, you know, a voice that is showing throughout your presentations throughout your emails is really key. Along with having, you know, maybe maybe you have two or three different colors that you use in a lot of your stuff, just to make sure that, you know, it's consistent across the board. And when people see those colors when they when they hear you or maybe it's even just adding your image in your, your photo into things. It's, they recognize it. They know what's coming, and yeah, hopefully it's a good good response. Yeah. Annamaria is that jogging?

Katie Ritter:

Any ideas like thinking about in the context of your day as a coach? Uh, yeah,

Annamarie Rinehart:

it is. I feel like, like, kind of what Paige is saying, too, is like, show your personality a little bit. Right. So I think that now I'm realizing I do this a little bit, but I could probably be a little bit more intentional. I try and keep things pretty funny. There's one coach that comes to mind I met her at one of the Verizon innovative learning schools conferences, her name is Vonda, nut and you TT and she is a hoot. And I mean, she takes the humor thing like to the umpteenth level, she dresses up in Harry Potter costume. She makes these videos for her. Like she's hysterical. And it seems so effortless. I'm definitely not volunteering to make like, comedy videos to send ultimate teachers. I don't think I'm brave enough for that yet. But like, I don't know, I think that also makes people if you can, if you can add in a sense of humor, or show your personality that makes people want to click on or view or read something that you're sending out to the staff. So I mean, I feel like I do that a little bit. But I could probably improve and be a little bit more intentional about that.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, well, and I wonder too, even like, I know, there's probably like a channel that you have to go to for approval on this. But like even creating a little logo, right? Like, even if you're a team of one, you know, you don't have to have a whole team of coaches but come up like what's your department name? What department do you fall under? Like, I don't know, come up with something and definitely go through the right channels to get it approved. But even slapping that bat boy on everything could be helpful. Okay, well, this is I'm like my mind's racing now on some things that we could be doing. But we are going to take a very quick break from our sponsor,

Justin Thomas:

instructional coaches support teachers, students, administrators, and really everyone in the district. In fact, research shows instructional coaching is one of the most impactful forms of professional development that results in improved teacher instruction and student achievement. But who is supporting the coach Ford Edge provides multiple year long mentorship options recommended by the Google for Education certified coach program to help you gain the valued support you need as an instructional coach, visit Ford hyphen edge dotnet to start giving PD to the ultimate PD providers. Looking for a program that reaches all teachers and learning new tools to integrate in their lessons and you badges is the answer and you as an anytime anywhere badging program that is designed to take bite sized tools for instruction and teach teachers how to use them. LG has received the is the seal of alignment for Educator Standards. And each patch in our expanding library is aligned to the ISTE standards and the Samer model. Learn more about the program that teachers call addicting and for how Ivan edge dotnet backslash and you badgers. All right. Welcome back. It's Justin Thomas. We have Dr. Katie Ritter, and we have Annamarie Reinhart and Paige greevey. Joining us talking about how you can market yourself and makes visually appealing materials for you to be able to market yourself in your school districts. Now, at our coaches camp page, Annamarie actually have a session on discussing how you can actually mark yourself more and create some of these awesome visual elements. Obviously, we are a podcast. So that makes things a little bit different. But Paige, what are some quick tips that you can audibly explain to us to make things more visually appealing as you are creating some of these materials?

Paige Greve:

Yeah, I think a few key things that come to mind are just embracing whitespace, you don't need to fill a slide to make it very compelling and visually appealing. You know, if you have an icon, instead of a bullet point, to kind of depict, you know, a certain key point you're trying to get across, you can use that icon and then a brief description underneath to really describe what that icon is trying to portray, it makes for a really easy to understand presentation, and you don't want your slides to have every single piece of information that you're going to say you want to kind of ad lib a little bit, because that's the point of a great presentation is that you're not just reading from the slides, you want to have it, you know, be consistent with what you're saying. But also kind of draw them in and make them really think about the story you're trying to get across. So I would say embrace whitespace. Using icons. We like to say imitate and recreate. If you find something that you like, a lot of it if you really look at a certain slides, you can see the basic shapes that are made making up, you know, a larger graphic, and you can really kind of do it yourself. It's simple in slides to use basic shapes, it's easier in Canva, especially if you have you know, icons that you can kind of pull in source from them. But it a lot of it is if you find something you like you need inspiration, I recommend turning to Google search and just kind of type in what you're thinking and then see if there's anything that just like sparks creativity, and really kind of just try and recreate it the best you can and not that you can't source things. But a lot of times without you know, correct rights and, or purchasing like an image, you can't really get the message across that you're trying to get. So recreating it is probably your best avenue in that. And then also, you know, ordering front to back layering shapes.

Annamarie Rinehart:

Yeah, I'm gonna chime in one of the one of the tips that Paige gave on our team is to kind of include, like, specifically related to a presentation, right, kind of like a Progress Tracker giving participants or attendees or whoever is supposed to be receiving this information, an idea of how much of it they've got left, right, it's kind of like, when you're taking a survey and there's a progress bar at the top and you're like, Okay, I'm almost to the end. And that could be using numbers and changing the colors that could be, you know, using icons, like Paige said, as your agenda and changing the color of the icons, like as you're going through presenting your information. I think everybody kind of appreciates having a gauge on, this is what we've covered. This is where we're going. And this is the end. I like that.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah, it's nice because it gives you kind of that, you know, you know where you're at in the presentation, even to if you need to go back on something you can remember is the third like bucket point that that was there. And I remember it because I had the graphic there that was you know, it's highlighted out. So that's, that's perfect. Any specific ideas on if you're kind of creating with using Is there any colors or ordering or anything that's kind of for the best look or feel of a presentation.

Paige Greve:

I am a big fan of not using outlines and instead using Drop Shadow if you're in Slides, or any sort of kind of drop shadow that you could get from a like in Canva if you do adding another shape behind the shape and adjusting the transparency. I think that is really, it looks nice. It kind of gets it from being 2d to a little bit of a 3d. It makes it you know, pop.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, I drop shadow everything.

Annamarie Rinehart:

Me too. Me too. I mean, I think another thing that you've spoken about before is you know high contrast. So if you're doing a dark background using light text, one of the like points of information or tips that pay Huge has given us that always kind of resonates with me is replaced the same with the same. So if you're going into Canva, and you're taking a template that's been designed by a professional, someone who does this for a living, like don't go totally rogue, and just like scrap it all right, like maybe find a font that looks similar to the one that you're replacing, or at least keep the color the same, like, these people have this job for a reason. So we should kind of take their lead.

Justin Thomas:

They know what they're doing. Like what they create,

Paige Greve:

also, with just slides or even, you know, graphics in general, creating a hierarchy. And using scale, to really scale and color to get your point across, you can have pops of color, that'll draw your eye in to a specific point that you want to make. making it bigger, obviously, is going to make people gravitate towards that first. And then you know, people always read left to right. So keep that in mind. When you're creating something,

Katie Ritter:

I feel like my I feel like I'm like slow on the response. Because my mind is going a little bit crazy with things I want to go back and do or maybe stop doing. So hopefully our listeners are getting all kinds of ideas too right now. But okay, so both of you, what are some of your favorite programs or resources to make marketing materials with?

Paige Greve:

Well, Canva that has been such a lifesaver. What would take, you know, our team hours potentially in Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop now takes like 10 to 15 minutes in Canva. It's really amazing. And it's so easy to use, and I know, education professionals.

Katie Ritter:

We know, we know what to mean. professional

Paige Greve:

educators get Canva Pro for free. Is that correct?

Katie Ritter:

That is correct. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, we can speak more to that.

Annamarie Rinehart:

Yeah, I would second that, for sure. Canvas the best. And I just like that there's so many template choices. Like, I always encourage teachers, if they're familiar with Canva, or they tried it out before. I'm like, we all love Google Slides. But we've all seen those themes a million times, and even some other websites that have a huge library of themes to choose from, like, you've kind of seen them, like Been there done that Canva has so many or, you know, business cards, I mean, for a coach, right? Like, you could design your own business cards, or maybe it's a card with your name, your role and a QR code that takes them somewhere else to you know, some other cool thing you've designed to, to better explain what you do. Or maybe it's a QR code that takes them to a video that better explains your role, something like that, like, I just think there's so much opportunity to create in Canva, you really can find a template for virtually anything you would ever need to make, especially as a coach.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, I feel like it's definitely taking over even like what I would have recommended things like a few years ago, it just increasingly I see more and more. Like, because I always would use like Google Slides, you know, because you can change the page size, right? So if you want to print an eight and a half by 11, you can change Google Slides. And it's a lot easier to manipulate than a Google Doc with adding images to it. But even that now I'm finding myself a lot of times I'll find myself like going to like design like a header or something if I want you know, but I'm almost always using Canva in some I mean, I brand even every Google Form I sent like i It's branded and I just use the in Canva the Google Classroom header template size and that's like the perfect size for a Google Form to upload it so I find myself doing very little that I haven't like touched Canva on so Canva if you're listening can sponsor this I think we set

Annamarie Rinehart:

it like 100 times

Justin Thomas:

oh yeah, and even too you can think of some of those things if you got a quick moment just some things you would send like an an email I mean you can easily create something in Canva for like data points on certain percentage of like students have been reached and proficiency or something it's gonna look a lot cooler with the drop shadow in a presentation than it is if it's just listed out and a number form so yeah drop shadow there and even to one one kind of crazy thing we had like it was like a little mini carnival thing that we were going to have at the school that I was at before COVID happened but we made actually use like the business card to make like their ticket to so like yeah, some some different ideas out there. But as we all know here on the restart recharge we like to finish our show with our top three tips. So I didn't get a drumroll that time I didn't know All right. All right. Here we go with our top three tips. Page and Anna Marie, what are your top three tips for marketing yourself for success?

Paige Greve:

Number one, I would say get to the point right away, you've got those two to five seconds to really draw somebody in to which I forgot to mention earlier, is you have potentially up to seven times, before people actually receive your message that you're putting out there. So if they don't answer your email, or if they aren't filling out the QR code that you've sent them, you know, keep trying, keep adjusting your message and keep trying different, you know, placements to get really the best, the best reception from them. So and then, using consistent design elements, you got to build your brand. And, you know, we talked about a couple of different options of what that looks like. But as a coach, I think the best thing you can do is just really put yourself out there, show who you are as a person and get them excited about what you can do for them. Love it.

Annamarie Rinehart:

All right, I would say keep it simple, some of these are gonna be very similar to pages. So keeping it simple, because keeping in mind that you have a limited amount of time, especially if we're talking about teachers admin, like we want them to be able to look at what you've created, and understand it quickly. And also kind of considering that cognitive load aspect, like, we don't want them to have to exercise a whole lot of effort to understand what you've what you've given them. I would say number two, show your personality. I think that goes a long way. And hopefully it will help people look forward to what you're sending out or giving them. And then third, kind of like what Paige said, I would say, you know, she talked about seven times potentially that people need to look at something to understand it. My version of that is like try different methods. So if sending out things via email isn't working, print something out and stick it in their mailboxes, maybe do both. If both of those aren't working, maybe hang stuff in the hallway, just like keep trying. Don't get discouraged. Just keep trying different things. Because chances are like we know about our students in the classroom, people learn in different ways. You may have teachers who would prefer to look at something and read it in paper form rather than looking at another email. So I would just say, keep trying, don't give up, try different things.

Justin Thomas:

Perfect. Those are great tips from both of you to kind of market yourself. And obviously this is going to air early in the school year. So you'll can start to use these ideas as you go through. Disclaimer, we got an awesome soundproof studio here. If you look at the soundproof side from our that's not so soundproof. From what we can control. We sound proofed it on everything on our side, but looks like we might be getting new neighbors in the building next to us. And that's right up where this is, so they're doing construction. So if you've heard beeping and drilling and banging, clanging sounds like an earthquake or something, there's a reason why we're hoping that that's not really going to come through and you're gonna think we're just making stuff up. But just in case, there's construction going on, right the other side of this wall, if you can hear that, so we did

Katie Ritter:

not bring the new neighbor's cookies yet. Maybe they're being extra loud until we bring them a welcome to the neighborhood get

Justin Thomas:

to the next time for another episode that we're gonna make this little two part series. This is the first part because the second part is gonna be ideas to market yourself using Canva. So we're actually going to have Jill Dubois back on and she'll be joined by Tisha Richmond, who is the Canva learning consultant to learn a little bit more how we can use Canva as both a coach and a teacher to create amazing material. So both Tisha and Joe also authors will take a look at how they've kind of used Canvas illustrations, and as well for sharing their ideas out there into the tech world.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, and we are super excited about that. Because as you can tell our team here at forward edge, not only our coaching deep but even our marketing team, like so with that, be sure to subscribe to restart recharge wherever you listen to podcasts. And we would love rating and review. If you have time to do that. For us that just subs subscribing rating and reviewing always helps other people find the podcast so if you find it helpful, we'd appreciate that. And then of course, be sure to follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Tiktok at our our coach

Justin Thomas:

caste, and feel free to reach out to us if there's any ideas or topics on your mind. Also, why not feel free to share any cool creations you've made to market yourself out in your school districts.

Katie Ritter:

So press the restart button

Justin Thomas:

recharges your coaching batteries and leaving the increment and inspire to coach fearlessly with the restart recharge podcast

Katie Ritter:

at Tech coach collective I was like, I don't do boring.

Annamarie Rinehart:

We could put a disclaimer so sorry.

Katie Ritter:

Before you say to be like We're sorry we tried to stop there's construction going on but

Annamarie Rinehart:

you're not losing your mind. There are beeps