Restart Recharge Podcast

218 - The Walking Coach

October 25, 2022 Forward Edge Season 2 Episode 18
Restart Recharge Podcast
218 - The Walking Coach
Show Notes Transcript

There are several ways that a coach, whether a veteran or new to a district, can support teachers. But sometimes, finding those right tricks to getting teachers excited and wanting to work with you can be difficult. Luckily, Adam Juarez and Katherine Goyette have a compilation of great coaching strategies to make you the “Walking Coach.” We’ll explore these strategies with Adam and Katherine today and you’ll leave excited and ready to hit the ground walking to better support your teachers!

Follow Adam on Twitter!

Follow Katherine on Twitter!

Podcast Team

Hosts- Katie  Ritter & Justin Thomas

Editing Team- Michael Roush, Justin Thomas 

Social Media/ Promo Team- Annamarie Rinehart, Lisa Kuhn, Maggie Harris

Creative/Content Team- Justin Thomas

Producers- Justin Thomas

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Calling all instructional coaches join forward edge for coaches camp and summer of 2023. Coaches campus packed with high quality professional development exclusively for you. Attendees will work with like minded coaches on creating strategies for building teacher relationships, executing coaching cycles and building a culture of coaching and tech integration within their school district. There are two opportunities to attend coaches camp in the summer of 2023. You can either join us virtually June 12 through the 14th or come visit Cincinnati on July 27, and 28th please visit forward hyphen edge dotnet slash coach camp to reserve your spot today.

Katie Ritter:

Aloha I'm Katie Ritter.

Justin Thomas:

And I'm Justin Thomas. And this is the restart recharge podcast a podcast by coaches for coaches. We bring in the tips and tricks to help you in everyday work as an instructional coach or whatever they call you in your school district.

Katie Ritter:

So hopefully you're gonna leave this episode today feeling just a little bit less on your own coaching Island.

Justin Thomas:

Well, there are several ways that he coach whether he veteran or new to a district can support teachers but sometimes finding those right tricks to getting teachers excited and wanting to know with and work with you can be very difficult. Luckily Adam Morris and Catherine go yet have a compilation of great coaching strategies to make you the walking coach. So we'll explore these strategies with Adam and Catherine today and you'll leave excited and ready to hit the ground walking to better support your teachers. So I will go ahead and introduce Adam here. Adam is a technology integration specialist and a consultant for advocate edtech consulting. He supports teachers to individualize coaching demo lessons and professional development. Adam is a Google Certified Trainer and innovator ACU board member Leroy Finkel fellowship finalist, co founder of hashtag CV Tech Talk 2020 30k through 12. It influencers worth a follow from Ed Tech magazine and co author of the complete ed tech coach, a organic approach to supporting digital learning. So welcome in Adam.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, we're glad to have you here, Adam, and congratulations. I think the cube board membership that is is that was that a recent election to the board?

Adam Juarez:

That just happened. My attention began in beginning of July so very recently, yeah, well,

Katie Ritter:

congratulations. And I have the pleasure of introducing Katherine boy yet. So Katherine is an educational consultant for technology and integrated studies for Tulare County Office of Education. She designs and implements professional learning sessions conducts in class coaching, authored articles and book blogs and inspires educators via speaking engagements. Katherine's certifications include Google Certified Trainer and innovator Newsela, certified educator, Apple teacher, Microsoft Innovative Educator, a 2022 ISTE featured speaker and PBS Learning Media digital innovator, captained professional exploitation and passions include pedagogically sound at tech integration in the classroom for grades K 12, computer science, education, project based learning, interdisciplinary learning, universal design for learning and social emotional learning. Formerly, Katherine was an administrator coach in classroom teacher and in her free time she agrees to go on podcasts. So we are so glad to have you as well.

Katherine Goyette:

Thank you glad to be here.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, so Okay, guys. So I've had really, truly I mean, at the pleasure of having an opportunity to kind of hear you guys speak and work with you, when sdcl had the PLN and the Ed Tech coaches PLN, you guys did a webinar kind of on this topic. A handful of years ago now, on the walking coach, I've seen you do presentations, and you guys are just truly captivating. And I think that you just have such wonderful ideas. So I am incredibly excited for our podcast listeners to get to hear it firsthand, from you guys on today's episode. So before we kind of dive in to kind of The Walking coach and what that is all about, we might just take a little bit of time and tell us a little bit more about how what was kind of your journey to get into coaching and sort of how you two have come together and all of these things that you do together. Now what kind of what did that path look like to get you here?

Adam Juarez:

Okay, well, um I kind of fell, you know, my rear end backwards into coaching. I had been a soccer coach for two decades before I got into this and a lot of what I do in the soccer field as coaching the sport, kind of kind of apply that to coaching but it was it was at a district level meeting after a after a board meeting and we were having the part of the stakeholders talk about how we're going to plan the budget and I got put into a breakout group with the assistant superintendent. And she loved my ideas. And she had heard that, you know, with with, with whatever technology I've had available to me, I did some pretty creative things. And she called me the next week and said, Hey, we're worried we have this new tech coach job, let's think you'd be great for it. So I applied I got it and, and I just ran with it, they really, really didn't know what that was. And we're still trying to define this, this role, which is relatively new in education and kind of just gave it my own flair. And I've tried to do my best to, to define the role. The way I see fit, and is through that. I learned. I, the first thing they said, you know, Adam, we're going Google, it's gonna be your first, your first mission. So learning,

Katie Ritter:

they gave you one a small mission at first.

Adam Juarez:

Just learn everything you can to come back and train all the teachers and kids want to go all right. No, hundreds of 1000s Awesome Chromebooks. So that was kind of a no pressure there. So I, I like to think that I went to probably above and beyond what their expectations were it is, I did learn everything. And now people are learning it for me. So I think I've done a pretty good job with that. But, you know, I just tried to just dive headfirst into whatever challenge I'm giving in and try to make it my own. So there was no real plan for this, I didn't work my way up, it just kind of happened organically, which is a word we use a lot in our book.

Katherine Goyette:

Love it. Yeah. So for me, thanks for sharing that. Um, for me, I became, I was teaching for a few years, and I wanted to make a larger impact and affect more students. And so I decided, Oh, I think I'll, what's the next step, I don't know, I'll try to go into leadership and support teachers, because I had some administrators and coaches that really supported me. And so ultimately, that's what I wanted to do. And so my first step was to be what was called the curriculum support provider, which was kinda like an academic coach who also had administrative responsibilities. thing. And when you're at a single school site, you end up doing a lot of stuff. But what I really loved about that role was the coaching part, and working with teachers and making an impact that way. And so I wasn't necessarily an edtech. Coach at the time, but I gravitated toward technology in ways to help support student engagement and make life easier for teachers etc. And so then a job opened up as a technology consultant at the county office. And so I applied not really knowing what it was. And basically, now that's, that's what I've been doing for the past nearly a decade. And so that's also how I met Adam was through this ad tech coaching journey. And we essentially, along this journey, because we ad tech coaching was relatively new at the time, at least in our area. And so we kind of wrote the book that we wish we had had when we started because we had a lot of struggles and learned by failing in a lot of ways. And so that's kind of how we got into the coaching realm. And we work with a lot of instructional coaches in other content areas, too. So we learn a lot from them, and try to see how it all works together. As far as a system,

Katie Ritter:

I love it. And I'm, I'm glad you touched on that cap, because I wanted to ask you with your book, I want you guys to share the title again, because I want to make sure our listeners know so they can go and listen to it. But we really like for our this podcast and other work that we do here we we buy trade our tech coaches as well. But we do a lot of support. And we have a lot of listeners of the podcast that are not just tech coaches. So insert whatever you're coaching on. So I wanted to ask you in regards to your book, is it do you feel like it is something that is most specific to tech coaches are what other coaches benefit from the book as well?

Katherine Goyette:

It's a great question. So the I have learned that there are other content coaches that have benefited from it quite a bit as well, because technology can support everyone. And so we don't want technology to feel like one more thing. It technology is not so much content as it is the house. So if you're an academic coach, that's coaching and ELA, that's the what and technology can help you with the how. And so we have found that there are content coaches that have been very thankful for our book. It's called the complete edtech coach, an organic approach to supporting digital learning. And it is I'm available on Amazon and Barnes and noble.com and such. But yes, it's definitely something that is designed not to teach kids how to use technology, but to use technology in a way that will accelerate learning towards content standards. So absolutely, it's something that is for everyone.

Katie Ritter:

Awesome, thanks. I just want to make sure we got a good plug in for you guys on that. So we'll be sure to link it in the show notes, too.

Justin Thomas:

All right. So let's go ahead and get right to it. So what is a walking coach? Like? What are some of the kind of strategies you have been involved with what it is to be a walking coach, if you don't mind sharing?

Adam Juarez:

Well, what are the kinds of tiles we use a lot often is boots on the ground. Actually, I would kind of kind of borrow that term when I was for when I was following the second Iraq war, they said they had boots on the ground. And I had a lot of friends who were veterans who served in whenever they said they were going to get deployed as a boots on the ground. And so that kind of stuck with me, and then kind of applied that to what my job was here. Early on, in my, in my career doing this job. I was so excited to do it. And I knew I had this cool skill set to stitch on people's cool stuff. Oh, my phone never rings. I didn't get emails. And so one day, you know, kind of feeling a little sorry for myself, I said, you know, I'm gonna do a little test. I'm going to lock myself in my office, turn the lights off, I'm gonna watch YouTube all day, we'll see if anybody knows I'm gone. Lo Behold, I watched YouTube all day and don't even care. It's, it's crazy to admit it.

Katie Ritter:

I'm curious. I'm curious. At what point did you admit that story?

Adam Juarez:

I've told that story to a lot of people. It's not It's, I need to figure out why why is my phone not ringing? Why are people are not reaching out. And I said, You know what I need to make the resolve to be in as many classrooms as possible, yes, I'm gonna get that deer in the headlights look once in a while, but I need to make it where it becomes a normal thing where they're used to seeing me. And it was by doing that, that people started getting comfortable with me coming in. And the more comfortable they got, the more often they would actually reach out instead of me, the other doing the other thing. So we set a goal for ourselves. It's not always attainable, but we try to set the goal to be in classrooms, at least 80% of the day. Again, we're shooting for the moon there. But you know, if we kill these get anywhere near that you have a successful day. And you're gonna see, like we like to say teach to learning in its natural habitat, it can't just be remote stuff. So that's kind of where we got the idea for the walk and coach for as far as the size, kind of just using your master key and forcing your way and we some of the tricks we have about getting invited back. But we say one of our stories, we talked about how be forgetful yet unforgettable, so be forgetful. I'm naturally absent minded. I have a photographic memory. But I'm absent minded. So go Go figure.

Katie Ritter:

I love that expression.

Adam Juarez:

So what I've done often is I'm usually walking in I'll have a seat, I don't want to bring my laptop sometimes. Because that can put some readers off a little scary. So usually, obviously on a tablet or my phone, I usually have my you know, with me my sunglasses and my coffee mug, and I'm just sitting down just, you know, writing writing little sticky notes and leaving some positive feedback. But while we're going we always want to leave a gift. And so many times I would forget either my glasses or my or my coffee mug, just being absent minded. And you know, an hour later the phone rings, hey, you left your something here. If you want to come back and get a shirt and return some organic coaching happens. So when actually they asked questions or I was able to give them some more feedback beyond the sticky note on my Hey, you know, I should do this on purpose. Now. I'm getting invited back a lot more often. Behold, it was a very kind of a silly success, but we definitely have it's, it's worth to in my experience. Yeah.

Katie Ritter:

Now I'm curious Adam, did you also use that strategy when dating to toss this question to Cat

Katherine Goyette:

Yes, he left his wallet in my car, I think is what it was. And and then I jokingly said did you just do this so that you would see me again so that I can drop it off? You know, and and that's what I made the connection that hey, we could do this in coaching.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, so I love it. I love it. Yeah, I

Katherine Goyette:

don't know if it was on purpose or not.

Justin Thomas:

And Adam I actually because I saw your SD session, the the virtual one, the first virtual one, but I was like, I just had left my phone like earlier that week and a teacher's room. And she like came back and like brought me my phone. I actually had no idea I even left it there but then she started asking me a couple other questions. I was like, Oh, I this just happened to me. So it was one of those cool like, Oh, I'm like doing something right here looks like so that's That's always good.

Katie Ritter:

And I'm curious, what advice do you guys have? You know, because I feel like that, you know, I don't know if you would be a self proclaimed extrovert, but You both seem very comfortable walking into situations and with people that you're not familiar with. I know, that's how I am myself as well. So what advice would you guys give to maybe the coaches out there who are maybe a little bit more introverted and kind of nervous about just kind of like, Hey, I'm coming in and, you know, leaving something behind, come back again? How would you kind of, like, encourage someone to, like, get out there and, and get after it like that? Yeah, a

Adam Juarez:

lot of times, the people who are, in my experience have been a little apprehensive about doing that. And that's definitely I had some apprehension in the beginning. You know, other than just ripping off the band aid. We'd like to say, start, start with start with kind of build your cult following First, start with those people that you have relationships with, and you know, build that buzz. And if you can start with them, then the word starts to spread. When we say we're talking about what's the vn forget, be forgetful, but unforgettable. So once you start filling that void, how do you do that. So if you're working with those teachers that are comfortable that you know, already, and you walk in there, and you need to do something that's going to jazz those kids up, because when the kids start enjoying what you're doing, if you don't have a demo lesson, they enjoy your presence. Teachers can say no to you very easily, but they have a hard time saying no to the students, we always say the fastest way to Ephesians hearts to the students. So once I started kind of building my cult following knights came to see me on campus, can they would say, Hey, can can you come to this other class and do that and do that trick with us? I'm like asking a teacher. Yeah. Then those teachers who you know, you maybe you don't know, too well, you may feel intimidated by they, they're more than likely to come at you because those kids are building the buds. So definitely start you know, Coach, those innovators. First those those people who are not afraid to try things, build that cult following, and then slowly but surely, it's, it's gonna bleed out into into the rest of the teachers that you surround again, there's, there's never 100% is always going to be some that that just aren't going to be unwilling. That's unfortunate. But you know, start with that cult following is probably my my best advice.

Katie Ritter:

I like the way you termed it the following. I'd like to think I once had a call.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah, everyone coming in. Now, you did kind of mention there's some of those teachers that are outside of that call following and they just flat out don't want you into the room. Is there any kind of ways you feel that you can kind of combat that? I mean, you kind of mentioned that you got to work it with through the students. But is there any kind of other ideas that you have? For some coaches that might be a little apprehensive of the teacher like that?

Adam Juarez:

Yeah, we talked about in the book, and we've done sessions on working with hesitant teachers. And definitely, you need to lead with empathy, because he, we we've all before we got into coaching, and we were, we were clashing teachers full time. And think of what when I was a classroom teacher full time, what pain points that I have. So anything you can do to ease pain points, and sometimes you're the tech coach, remember, I'm not it I'm not there to fix your printer, your Wi Fi. But you know what, sometimes to build that relationship, you might if you have the skill, the ability, maybe if you do a few of those things in the events, they can you cover me for five minutes and go the restroom. It's not my job. But you know what, you do those little solids for those kinds of teachers. Then you start they become much more opening open to coaching. I can think of a student teacher when I first started that he did, he wanted to be like the plague did not like me in there. And then I did a few little solids here and there. I happen to be walking by one day and he saw me as like, Oh, hey, my projector is not working, can you fix it? See what I can do? And I fixed it. And after that the relationship was built. And that simple little, little interaction now looks to him like now he comes to me all the time wanting to learn something new, man. He's like the king of Flipgrid or and it's flipped out. Yeah. Yeah, he loves that. And yeah, he's so it's the that's definitely one of my favorite hesitant to teachers. I love it.

Katie Ritter:

I know. Great tips. So we are going to take a quick break from our sponsor, and we will be right back.

Justin Thomas:

The Google educator bootcamp is a 13 week comprehensive series that will prepare educators to complete the Google for Education Level One for two certification. This series provides teachers with professional development on their own time to complete tasks that are built around showcasing their proficiency and understanding of the Google workspace for education tools. For more information on the Google educator bootcamp, visit Ford hyphen, edge.teachable.com and begin earning your Google certification. Calling on instructional technology coaches for Dash has launched a new hub for coaches to find strategies and resources to use for their coaching. The edu coach Network provides a lays for instructional coaches to come together for Coach specific professional development, building a community and finding mentorship moving through the school year. The Network provides a place to casually seek resources or joining with book clubs, Twitter chats, webinars and workshops, along with much more, join the edu coach network by going to EDU Coach network.com and join the coach community today.

Katie Ritter:

Welcome back to the restart recharge podcast. We are here Katie Ritter and Justin Thomas, your hosts. We are here with Adam Moria, Juarez and Catherine Goya yet talking about the walking coach and so many great tips to get coaches in the classrooms with teachers and students too. So next question for you guys. With all the changes over the past couple of years, is there anything that maybe you because I mentioned at the very beginning, like I had this, you know, a great opportunity to hear you guys speak about the walking coach, you know, a few years ago, sort of pre pandemic, we know that so much has changed now, now that we're kind of on sort of this, this other side of things. And so what if anything, have maybe you taken away from the remote teaching experience that that maybe has modified or improved or maybe you've rethought now, kind of your idea of the walking coach has Have there been any big like aha moments from remote teaching remote coaching that you've kind of walked away with.

Katherine Goyette:

So I think that with the distance learning with the remote teaching, we certainly learned how to, we couldn't walk into a classroom, but we could be in digital classrooms. And so that was helpful, but what we learned when we came back was that students and teachers alike really struggled to get back to speaking and being face to face and such. And that's something that we learned by walking into classrooms again. And so I think it's important that we not forget that that's how I think it's even more important now than ever before that we be a walking coach, and that we be present with those we serve. So that we can be in their environment and help them with what they are. See what they're actually doing and offer suggestions. As such, there was also a lot of momentum built with technologies, for example, in remote learning, but now we need to make sure that that's leveraged in a way that works. And that there's not a lot of pushback. And and there's a lot of people anti tech right now. Because remote learning, let's be honest, wasn't that great. And so we want to be walking into those classrooms and showing this is how it looks in the classroom. Yes, you can use technology in a physical classroom and still have kids talking,

Adam Juarez:

it was also talked a bit about because they have this whole new skill set now. So like what, what they what they didn't know how to use it, you know, face to face. So a lot of things that I've talked about trying to work with teachers is that you're going to teach a lot of things asynchronously in a synchronous manner. And what that does, it allows for organic, natural differentiation of instruction. It helps you with if you're if you're into UDL, they help with that, and allows you to really personalize the learning. So they have these asynchronous skills. So let's let's apply them to a synchronous environment. I like

Katherine Goyette:

that. I don't think that I don't that I've had just today actually, I have some teachers that were feeling like, does it have to be all or nothing all technology or no technology. And so if we're in the classroom walking into the classroom, we can show what that looks like.

Justin Thomas:

Awesome. Well, thank you guys. We'd like to finish our restart recharge podcast here with our top three tips from our guests. So what would be both of your top three tips in terms of the walking coach and just getting out there and really, as you've kind of mentioned before, throughout this entire episode, just getting out there and getting to see the amazing things done in the classroom.

Katherine Goyette:

I'm gonna start out because I have to actually walk into a classroom here.

Katie Ritter:

There we go. She's living it.

Katherine Goyette:

I am I working with teachers today. But so I think that my first tip would be start with those that are comfortable with you. let the teacher know that you have some rapport with I'm going to try this. I'm going to try walking in classrooms being more present. I'm not going to be evaluating you. I'm just visiting. I want to see what's happening. That's my first tip and then word will start to spread. The next tip is make sure that you leave some thing for the teachers to do leave a little piece of candy if you want but I love to lead leave got feedback in the form of postings. And I like to have a posted that perhaps says, I like something I liked. And then I wonder rather than a suggestion, I say, I wonder if it would be effective to, you know, such and such. So, that would be my second tip. And my third tip is just to be sure that you take good notes, I take notes on Google Keep, but whatever your note taking method is, you want to remember what you saw, and what conversations you had in those classrooms?

Katie Ritter:

Well, Katherine, thank you so much for I know, you've got to hop on to actually walk into a classroom. So thank you so much for coming on. We really appreciate you and all of your insights. So thank you. Thank you. And Adam, your top three tips for us,

Adam Juarez:

I would say I would say definitely set yourself that lofty goal for us, we try to say 80%. Try to be in as many classrooms as often as possible, even if you don't reach that goal. Set a goal for yourself and try to hold yourself to it as best as best as you can. As I alluded to earlier, you want to be free, be forgetful. That's, that's done wonders for my, my coaching career here. And then be unforgettable. Because when you're forgettable, and the kids are asking for what you're doing, and they haven't, like I said, their teachers have a much harder time saying no to the kids than they do say no to you. I

Katie Ritter:

love that. And I am I would love to I'm going off script here a little bit and the question, but I'm wondering kind of building on the idea of tips I have been hearing from so many coaches, and so many administrators across the country with the teacher shortage right now, having to put coaches back into classrooms. And like discussion around this, I'm just wondering, I'm just kind of wondering what your thoughts are what tip you might give to coaches who might be trying to, you know, I guess we first and foremost, you have to have people in the classrooms with students, I understand that. But I'm just wondering, my fear is like down the road, will we put them back in a coaching role? So I'm just kind of curious if if maybe you've been seeing that, maybe if you've been having conversations around that. And if there's maybe just any kind of tips or anything that you would throw out to coaches who are in those positions on how they might think about approaching advocating to get them back into a coaching role, or keep them in a coaching role or get them back like as quickly as possible.

Katherine Goyette:

Okay, I'm gonna answer this real quick, Adam before I because I've got like a minute. And then and then you can, of course, go on as well. But I would say you have to and we talked a bit about this in our book, you have to advocate for your role, you're always you have to prove that you are making a difference. And so what I like to do is take pictures of what I'm doing with teachers and what I'm doing with, with students, and send that to your administrators, maybe just see, see them, just let her know, Hey, just wanted to share all the great stuff that's happening. The other thing is, make yourself busy. Oh, I'm sorry, I can't serve, I have a lesson that I'm modeling, I can't stop, I have a planning session that I'm doing. So making sure that you have things scheduled, and that you show your value and your worth is super, super important. And I'm gonna go show my value by stepping into classrooms now, because I have two minutes to get there. So thank you and Adams gonna have some great tips as well. Thanks so much to both of

Katie Ritter:

you. Yeah, thanks for adding that little nugget.

Adam Juarez:

Yeah, I'll build on that. She said, you know, showing your value. We talked to the book about building your, your edtech coaching vehicle, which is because one day you're gonna come to that time where you have to kind of fight for your job, and they're not sure what, why are we paying you to do this. So again, you want to your coaching vehicle can be simpler as a website or blog. It could be a place where you curate the learning, the learning that's been done as a result of your coaching, what are the students producing, and so it'd be pictures over the shoulder pictures of what the kids are working on. Maybe if they have any digital artifacts that you're you're going to curate them. And what I did for was my Google innovator project, I would curate a lot of the digital things that kids have produced as a result of my coaching. I did it by grade level and by the searcher by grade level, you can search by subject matter, so they can see hey, man, look across the board. This is the value that your the coaches has added to our school. So again, create that vehicle to curate the learning that's done as a result of your coaching.

Katie Ritter:

I love that yeah, and sorry, sorry to take us off. I just figured that you guys might have some great ideas for this very relevant kind of problem in the coaching world right now. So sorry listeners. We did not end on the happy to talk through tips. But anyway, just want to give one more plug For Adam and Catherine's book, the complete ad tech coach, an organic approach to supporting digital learning, with lots of non ad tech coaches, just instructional coaches, finding a lot of benefit from it to sell.

Justin Thomas:

Oh, yeah. And are you guys going to

Adam Juarez:

be at any conferences that are upcoming? We'll walk you through it up in about a month. So that's the next one we're at. So, okay. There's obviously Q in the spring and then St. And those are the kind of three go to ones for us. But as things pop up, smaller regional ones will will be there as well.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah. Well, Adam, where can everybody find you guys on social media and just kind of out there in the Internet? In case they're not going to one of those conferences or in between

Adam Juarez:

on social you could find me at Tech Coach, what is my website tech coach? was.com is where I house all my all my stuff for Katherine is wander explore learn.com And she is Cat underscore go yet on social media.

Katie Ritter:

Great. Well, thank you. And we'll link all of that in the show notes as well too. For folks. So

Justin Thomas:

yes, and I got one final question for you. Adam is a fellow SOCCER GUY myself who is your who's your go to soccer team.

Adam Juarez:

I am going to sign up right now and catch the Midway to the second half of Manchester United right now so I'm gonna Oh, okay. It's no no right now. They started off pretty horrible, but they're starting to show some life so that's yeah, I can wear my jersey again.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah, get back to the glory days here. Soon enough. I'm a Chelsea man myself. So we'll have to just stay on that but rough time for Chelsea right. Yeah, it is well, to see if if Potter is going to change things around. But Adam, it was great to have both you and Katherine on thank you again so much for joining us and talking a little more about your walking coach. Thank you for having me. It's great. Now next time we have another great episode, we're coming down to the end of season two here. So we're gonna actually have just two more episodes coming your way. So make sure that you tune in for those to close out season two.

Katie Ritter:

So be sure to subscribe to the restart recharge podcast wherever you listen to podcasts and follow us on twitter instagram and facebook at our our coach cast and also

Justin Thomas:

tick tock because I'm ridiculous videos out there and tick tock so if you want to make fun of me, feel free to follow the TIC tock. I

Katie Ritter:

don't know how I forgot the TIC tock.

Justin Thomas:

I don't either. I'm trying to get more more people to join. Maybe you should be featured on tick tock.

Katie Ritter:

Maybe just the next slide. Okay, well,

Justin Thomas:

we'll see we'll see. But as always, you can feel free to reach out to us on any of those social media channels to let us know if there's any topics that you want to discuss because we want to make sure that we are hitting topics that are relevant to you and to all instructional coaches out there. So if there's anything that's on your mind, feel free to drop us a line. So press the restart button recharges your coaching batteries and leave feeling equipped and inspired to coach fearlessly with the restart recharge podcast

Katie Ritter:

at Tech coach collective