Restart Recharge Podcast

014 - Collecting Data as a Coach

August 24, 2021 Forward Edge Season 1 Episode 14
Restart Recharge Podcast
014 - Collecting Data as a Coach
Show Notes Transcript

Today on Restart Recharge, we will be talking to the founder of ConnectHub, a data collection platform for instructional coaches- Suzana Somers! We are going to talk with Suzana about what led her to create this powerful data-centric platform, how instructional coaches can collect data to inform their work, and how data can be used to make informed and transformative coaching decisions.

Links mentioned in the show:

Follow Suzana on Twitter

Follow Connecthub on Twitter

Connecthub Website
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Podcast Team

Hosts- Katie  Ritter & Justin Thomas

Editing Team- Megan Whitacre, Mallory Kessen, Michael Roush

Social Media/ Promo Team- Annamarie Rinehart, Lisa Kuhn, Molly Lutts

Creative/Content Team- Brooke Conklin, Emily Cowan, Tracee Keough

Research & Logistics Team- Mark Gumm, Tyler Erwin

Producers- Tyler Erwin & Katie Ritter

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Justin Thomas:

hit the restart button recharge those

Katie Ritter:

batteries Aloha everyone, I am Katie Ritter

Justin Thomas:

and I am Justin Thomas. And this is the restart recharge podcast, a podcast by coaches for coaches. We bring you the tips and tricks to help you in your everyday work as an instructional technology coach, or whatever they call you in your school district.

Katie Ritter:

And so hopefully you'll leave this episode with us today feeling a little bit less on your own coaching Island.

Justin Thomas:

And today on restart recharge we are going to be talking with the founder of Connect hub Susanna summers connect up is a data collection platform for instructional coaches. And we're going to talk with her about what led her to create this powerful data centric platform how instructional coaches came collect the data to inform their work, and how the data can be used to make informed and transformative coaching decisions. Yeah, and

Katie Ritter:

Susanna, we are so excited to have you on the episode with us today. So thank you so much for being here.

Suzana Somers:

Thanks for having me. I'm so excited to talk all things data and coaching. Yeah,

Justin Thomas:

awesome. A little bit more about Susanna. She's an edtech Coach and an admin in the greater Boston area and founder of connect hub.io After looking for ways to measure and scale the impact of instructional coaching, Susanna founded connect hub.io as a platform for instructional coaches to track coaching and make data informed decisions.

Katie Ritter:

And I feel the need to elaborate just a little bit I have the pleasure of knowing Susanna outside of Connect hub. Suzanna, we met at the LA innovator Academy when you're going through the program that was 2018 Is that correct?

Suzana Somers:

Yes, I can't believe it's been that long already.

Katie Ritter:

I know I know. And I just remember you're just such a bright light, just full of energy you could absolutely tell that you are going to do amazing things and my my first real like kind of impression of you was during the spark camp when you got up and you were leading a session on I believe it was Data Studio. And I remember I until that moment I considered myself fairly savvy with using data and spreadsheets. And I remember being like holy cow this girl is on fire. I have no idea what I'm doing and I thought I was on top of it and I am clearly not so that was my first Suzanna or my first impression of Susanna the data badass if you will. And then I saw you did not include in your bio. But how many Ironman competitions have you competed in?

Suzana Somers:

I've done two I did one in Texas and then one in Boulder.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, that is insane. If anyone isn't familiar with what an Ironman is, Suzanna, will you explain really quickly what an Ironman competition is so they can understand when when I call you a BA? I really mean it. So explain to the listeners what this isn't what is involved in this.

Suzana Somers:

It's a it's a triathlon, but one of those that you it's just so long, it's it's a 2.4 mile swim 112 mile bike ride, followed by a full marathon run.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, so I can't even wrap my head around that I've never even ran a 5k let alone three different activities put together at that level. So pretty incredible. And then one other thing that I want to give you a shout out for that's related, unrelated to what we're talking to today, but that is your viral account, the bachelor data and you can if anyone, if any of our listeners are into the bachelor or bachelorette Suzanna has this, I think that it started as an Instagram account. Is that how you started it?

Suzana Somers:

Sort of it's started. So bachelor data is the Instagram account. And I started around the time that we met when I was looking at Google Data Studio, I decided it was time for me to learn spreadsheets because I had just gotten this role where I was supporting all the teachers in my district with technology. And it kind of wraps into connect hub, but I decided to learn how to use spreadsheets. I tried watching all of these YouTube videos and they were so boring like any spreadsheet video, it's all just mono tone, and nothing fun. So I decided to start tracking data around the TV show The Bachelor, and it started on Reddit on the whole forum around the bachelor and it migrated to Instagram last year.

Katie Ritter:

Well and Instagram I think is such an awesome place for that platform because if you when you're done listening to this episode, you have to go over to Instagram and look up at bachelor day. dabb her data visually, visualizations that she takes from the information from the show are absolutely incredible. They will make anyone want to become a data analyst and a data visualization specialist. So they are beautiful displays of data. In the best way, not only are they pretty to look at, but you actually understand the point that you're trying to make by looking at the data, which is the whole point of the visualization piece. And is pretty awesome, because you have been interviewed, you've been in very popular publications. So I always love seeing you're seeing your name. And that even if even if they don't call you out, they call it bachelor data. So I feel a little pride that I know the woman behind the data there. So that's awesome. Okay, so we are going to actually, we're going to jump in and ask you some questions. And hopefully, this conversation about data and spreadsheets won't be so boring, because you make it fun and accessible. So tell us a little bit more about yourself, Susanna, and your background in the world of education and coaching.

Suzana Somers:

Yeah, so I started off as an elementary teacher, I have the pleasure of going back and teaching in Texas at the school, I grew up that. And I think one of the first things that I learned in education was how much education is focused on data, it was one of the first things I picked up on aside from just trying not to drown that first year of teaching. And, and then when I moved to Boston, I took a job as an instructional coach for a private school district and then migrated back to the public world of education. And now I'm in this tech instructional tech admin role, which does have a lot of tech coaching within it in the district. And yeah, I think the biggest theme throughout my career has been finding joy in data. As somebody who didn't enjoy data growing up. I mean, I mean, math class, I did math class, but it wasn't something that I enjoyed, but now seeing how important it is to have data to drive the work that we do. Throughout education. I feel like that's what's helped me propel my work and scale it to more educators.

Katie Ritter:

Oh, that's awesome. I can't even imagine a time when you didn't like data. Maybe later. Yeah, you're like the epitome of it now. So that is so interesting.

Justin Thomas:

Awesome. Well, Susanna, everyone on our team uses your platform connect up, but many of our listeners might be still unfamiliar with it. Could you give us a kind of explanation of what exactly is connected? And how might coaches use it?

Suzana Somers:

Yeah. So when I was in that first role as an instructional coach, I was overseeing 676 schools. And I was the only person in my role. And I quickly found that I needed to a track my work, because I couldn't remember anybody's names. That was my first one. Yeah, because then I'd have these great interactions, but then I forget who they were. It was, yeah, that was a mess. But then, then once I started to get settled, I was like, Okay, now that I'm here, who am I serving? And what impact is it having on their schools? Because, you know, we do this with kids, right? We look at so much data around instruction, and like, throw standardized testing out the door? Because that is that's a data point, yes. But we look at social emotional learning, we do surveys we do, we look at their grades, if it's Seigneurs based, or if it's, you know, on specific, you know, assessments or assignments, but, and then when it came to teachers, I was this weird middle position where I don't see their valuations. But I'm also not a teacher. So I'm this weird in between where I was like, okay, but there's no data on what I'm doing. And I'm here to help them. And we're just instead seeing their valuation data, which, you know, it's a thing that we do at the end of the year. And it it just didn't feel like a great metric. So the first thing that I tried to do was I tried to create a system to keep track of my work. So I tried Google forms that fed to a spreadsheet. And that became just a total mess. And then I tried to make my own spreadsheet, long story short, it was this big mess. And I realized that I needed to create a platform that would work for me, and not make me do the work to stay organized and get this data. So the platform, you keep track of your notes. That's it. And then when you do that, you get over 30 metrics on educators on coaching, and everything that you can imagine just by staying organized, which is the simple way of saying it, but essentially, as you're keeping track of those notes, you're saying, Okay, what type of meeting was this? Was it a meeting? Was it PD, was it an observation? Was it a coaching session, and then at the end, you can get more granular where you're like, we worked on SEL, we worked on this edtech tool, we worked on assessments, you know, different initiatives in our district. And by doing that to stay organized, you get this amazing data

Katie Ritter:

I love it. I love it. So you touched a little bit on it, mentioning like the Google Forms and the Google Sheets. But can you elaborate on that just a little bit more, because I know just just hearing you say that I can think back to my coaching days and going from multiple districts, multiple buildings and setting up Google Forms and trying to help my coaches set up Google forms that then they could share with me. So I could also see their data. And it was just, it was a nightmare of trying to keep track of it. So I'm just hoping that you might be able to elaborate on that just a little bit of what that process looked like for you that might resonate with some of our listeners who are maybe going into their first year coaching and thinking, Oh, this will be a great way to set it up.

Suzana Somers:

Yeah, I think I actually saw this idea SD, about using Google Forms to keep track of your coaching. And it makes sense, right? We all see Google Forms is this great analytical tool, because people fill out this form, and then it just builds out these graphs. But you know, and I set it up, I the first one was name, the next one was building. The next one, then I wanted to add, like grade level or department and it started getting more and more complex. And then I put my notes in and just like a free form response. And first off, the problem that I ran into was, I would leave a classroom and I wouldn't make it to where I needed to because somebody else had grabbed me to go into their classroom or ask me a question, I'd forget who I just worked with, I forget my follow up. So then I had an extra one for follow up tasks, because I wanted to make sure that if I needed to do an action item for them, that I wouldn't forget, until I went back to read my notes, because I'd forget to go back to read my notes because I'd be exhausted by like 10pm at night. So I had a follow up column in my spreadsheet where that form fed into, for me to make sure that if there was anything that I needed to do go there. So problem number one was spelling names the same way, because I wanted to figure out how many unique teachers I had worked with. So then I tried to tinker with formulas in my spreadsheet. And I found that if I wrote a name as Susannah summers with one in versus Susanna summers, a two ends, that would count as two different people. So that started to get messy, then I wasn't keeping track of all of my notes. Because a and I never went back to the spreadsheet, because that wasn't fun to go look in and work in. But then it was always on my computer. So then I tried to put it on my phone, like on an iPhone, you can save like a safari page as an icon. So I tried that. And at this point, I was like I'm spending more time creating a system, then using the system. And I was learning a lot through it. I mean, I was learning a lot about spreadsheets, so great. But I wasn't the system that I created was for an output. And it wasn't like a symbiotic, like, it wasn't helping me and helping me like stay organized and helping me get this data. It was like, I'm just doing this for the data, which wasn't helping me and making me want to use it.

Katie Ritter:

Oh, I can I can feel myself back in those moments.

Justin Thomas:

can relate a little bit today, can't you? I do want to say just talking about connect up in general, I do like that I can go in and you know, when you first meet a teacher, they might be you know, they might have a certain name. But then as you build the relationship, you realize that they don't really go by their like full name and that you can easily just go in there, change it. But that'd be something that I would totally do. If I was using the forms and things were just Oh, it's so and so and start typing in their, you know their short name and then I'll be like, I can't find all this data that I've been using with this person and then realize it's there under like three different names somehow. But so I really like how you can easily change that and edit that on, on connect up there. In education, we talk a lot about these data informed decisions. But typically, this conversation just centered around the teachers and the student learning in the classroom. So what might data informed decisions look like for instructional coaches? And we'll take a look at that. After we take a momentary break from our sponsor. Looking for a program that reaches all teachers and learning new tools to integrate in their lessons. And you badges is the answer and you as an anytime anywhere badging program that is designed to take bite sized tools for instruction and teach teachers how to use them. LG has received the SDC of alignment for Educator Standards, and each badge in our expanding library is aligned to the ISTE standards and the Samer model. Learn more about the program that teachers call addicting and for hyphen edge dotnet backslash and you badges. Instructional Coaches support teachers, students, administrators, and really everyone in the district. In fact, research shows instructional coaching is one of the most impactful forms of professional development that results in improved teacher instruction and student achievement. But who is supporting the coach Ford Edge provides multiple year long mentorship options recommended by the Google for Education certified to coach program to help you gain the valued support you need as an instructional coach, visit Ford hyphen edge dotnet to start getting PD to the ultimate PD providers. Welcome back, we have Susanna summers here, the founder of connect up. And we were talking a little bit about what happens when your data informed decisions are centered more around your instructional coaches as opposed to the teachers and student learning. So what are these data informed decisions looking like for instructional coaches? And how does that directly or indirectly affect teacher and student learning is an outcome?

Suzana Somers:

Yeah, I think it's a great question, right? We've looked at, we've looked at student data, right? We've looked at their SEL data and all these things. But if we really look at our coaching, step one is what is our coaching look like to the teacher? And then step two is what is the teacher learning then look like for that student? And I think a lot of times, whenever we're looking at data around educator growth, it just looks straight at the student results. So I think something that connects up does really well is it allows you to take a look at what's your data of you, as a coach, who are you serving, who are you not serving, if you're across multiple buildings is your time going to one place versus the other. So big picture data. The next thing that allows you to do is is look at where is your time going during those interactions with the teachers, and then being able to relate that to student growth. So having data on okay, I worked with educators this month, I'm gonna sit down with the principal. And I want to say, you know, here's my data at a high level, out of all of my interactions, your initiative this year social emotional learning, but only about 10% of my interactions are teachers wanting to really target that. Let's talk about some professional development on where we can really leverage some teachers and pull them in to get some more training around SEL, so they feel more confident wanting to implement this in the classroom. Alternatively, I could look at that as a coach. And I could say, this is a big initiative, we've had a very difficult last year and a half in education, how can I leverage my time better as a coach so that I can serve teachers around social emotional learning, because they're not seeking that out. And then also, as when you work from the tech side, just, you know, look at the tools, you know, be able to tag not just SEL, I mean, you can tag whatever you want, and however many things you want in these interactions, but we just purchased this new platform that I know is going to help teachers, and it's going to change their lives, it's going to change their students lives. And nobody's using it whenever I go to work with them. I think that's something that I can then improve and provide more professional development. So it's these things that I think we've in the past relied a lot on our gut. But when you just stay organized and track this stuff, you then get this data where you're like, oh, wow, I totally forgot about this, because I have so much on my plate that I forgot to think about this.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, I love those examples that you just gave about, like very tangible examples about how you're actually using that data to make some decisions, both like in conversations with the admin or for yourself with your coaching, to decide what professional development needs to be done. That's awesome. And I want to circle back for just a second, you know, when you touched on being able to like track what you're doing. For us, I think that is in by us, I mean, anyone who's serving in that coaching role, regardless of what comes in front of coach. I just think it's so important, because I see. So when we don't have that data to show our impact in some way. I've mentioned this before on the podcast, but unfortunately, the position kind of becomes this like luxury position in the eyes of some decision makers, if they don't actually have the data to translate, you know, to your point, we don't necessarily have data that ties and connects us directly to those student results. So it becomes it can become hard to justify, because typically, they're more expensive resources because they're not first year entry level positions. So can you talk a little bit more specifically about how you have found using data and connect hub and how that has helped you advocate for yourself or even maybe other stories from other coaches that you've heard and how that data has helped them advocate for themselves?

Suzana Somers:

Yeah, I think one of the first things that came out when we launched Kinect 720 19 was the people that were using it and getting these reports. They they came back and they said well my principal knew what I was doing, they have access to my calendar. But when you actually have numbers to sit in front of them and be like I've worked with 80% of You're building over the last semester. And here's what it's looked like. And really be able to quantify your work and your impact. Not only can you find these loopholes of Hey, okay, we need to do more s more professional development around SEL or whatever initiative you have. But it takes the guessing work out of your principal, if they really see this position as a luxury position. And they can see numbers on what you have been doing as, as a coach to support the teachers. The other thing that I am really excited to we're launching update next week. Yeah. Finally, this has been in the works for months now. And it's, we've been, we're really pushing the platform to a whole new level, especially around data and reporting, is really able to highlight bright spots, you know, those light towers in your district, the success stories, it's not necessarily, you know, your, like stellar teachers that they try, you know, they work hard, but it's the ones that you worked really hard with, that made a ton of progress that weren't the first and the easy ones to work with. In this next update, there's going to be a whole new teacher level report just for coaches not for principals, where you can filter if you have a tag called bright spot, or whatever you want to call it, where you can then see all of your notes from those sessions to find those bright spots in your instructional coaching. So be able to pair that with a principal meeting or, you know, building shout outs to talk about, hey, here's all that I've been doing. And here's different things that I can leverage for you. And then it's kind of like having like testimonials, it's like, here are great things that are happening to remind different people about the work that you're doing the impact depending on how you're telling that story to leverage, you know, your story,

Katie Ritter:

oh, my gosh, I love that so much. I can't wait to see that update, we actually we use the term bright spots on our team, as well. And, you know, often encourage our coaches to share those bright spots with the staff and their admin. And we actually recently so we have a, our team meets bi weekly, we come together at the end of the week, to do a lot of like growing and learning ourselves as coaches and supporting one another in the work that we're doing in our schools. And so we actually just started in those bi weekly meetings, there's a section now of bright spots. So I feel like that will make it really easy for the coaches to share, you know, their successes that they have had in the schools. So that's so exciting. I love it.

Justin Thomas:

That's awesome. Especially it's going to be a lot easier to cipher through and find those. You kind of talked a lot about what the data collection and how can we use to impact administrators in the coaches relationship. Was that something that you had in mind, specifically when you were creating connectome? Or was it something that just kind of came along with your data collection?

Suzana Somers:

Yeah, the so the position, the district that I was working in at the time, when I came up with Connect hub was a district that was going through so many cuts, because of failed overrides, or whatever local city, you know, attempts to increase different tax rates for the schools. And every position was questioned, it didn't matter how wonderful you were, every position was questioned in the district. And I think that that really came down to data informed decisions, you know, and I like, it's tough that that was my first, like, how can I use data to like, help my position survive. But you know, we just came out of the pandemic, and one of the most thriving positions in, you know, the private sector, we're data analysts, because data analysts can use data to figure out what is needed and what isn't needed. And while that sounds terribly depressing, you can also spend that too. We need data in our role to know What do teachers need, because our goal in education is to produce students who are capable of achieving the skills that they need to get out of school, right? You know, they there's different SEL skills, there's different academic skills are different, all the different human skills. And we need a way to quantify our work supporting the people who are trying to do that. And not having had that data other than a teacher evaluation on how you rate at the end of a school year, or at the middle of a school year, and after random observations and a very high intense environment of being stressed around this observation. And, you know, having that data is key for those conversations, not only for them, understanding your work and the importance of your work supporting the educators to be successful in in the school district. But it also then, once that has been established, then you can take that data to the next level of okay, here are my teacher needs, here's, hey, here's a population that I cannot get into. I cannot get into that sign. Steam? How can you connect me with that science team because I am trying to work with them and it's not working. But then just getting the data I mean, data around how much edtech tools you're using or data around instructional coaching cycles, being able to really measure your impact working long term with the teacher, and where were they when you started working together, and where were they at the end? There's so much data there that can help us better support educators to be more successful in our districts.

Justin Thomas:

I love that. Yeah, that's awesome, and even to a story for you, and for the listeners out there that are still wondering if they want to use Kinect or not. So I got hired in the middle of the school year. And I started off and at my district, I was there for two and a half months. And then we were all staying home for the pandemic. So I was I was tracking everything, all my interactions, everything on connect up. And then I got a Word reached out from the curriculum director, she wanted to see if there's any way that she could see what I was doing with the teachers, especially during the time when I was at home. So I talked to Katie, and she said, we can print off the administrator section, everything like that, and

Katie Ritter:

the principal account that principle account actually log in and see it. Yeah. And

Justin Thomas:

it was one of those where she looked at it, she's like, Whoa, he is doing a lot with the teachers right now, during this pandemic. And this is something that we definitely need. So extended even just my contract with being there. So I was originally going to be for two days a week, but then it bumped up to four days a week. And that's strictly from, you know, tracking the interactions and the work I do with teachers all through Connect hub.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, I think if coaches don't get anything else from this podcast Other than that, is that the importance I think is this nugget right here that you just touched on Susanna and Justin, you speaking to that, like no matter how you come to be, whether you're a district employed coach, whether you work for a county Educational Service Center, or whether you're a consultant, the work that we do is truly so important, and so impactful. But if we can't quantify and show that some way, it makes it really hard to justify the cost. So I just think we are constantly having to advocate for ourselves and the importance of ourselves. And I think that this tool helps that on top of making you an even better coach, by providing you with the data to make those informed decisions to better serve the teachers. So Oh, yeah.

Justin Thomas:

And I think I think connect up is an easier way to show that then you know, your forms and your sheets.

Katie Ritter:

Yes, it is. Okay, so Suzanna, I'm about to ask you, for your top three tips is just a little teaser. But is there anything else that you want? Because that will be our last question for you. But is there anything else that you want our listeners to know, around data collection for themselves as a coach working with admin connect hub in general, before we move into that last question,

Suzana Somers:

I think I think it is going to tie into the tips. But yeah, let's circle to the tips. Because I think that okay, only circle. Yeah.

Katie Ritter:

Perfect. Okay, so then final question for you. Maybe I say final question. And then sometimes your last thing makes me think of something. But so your top three tips for collecting and analyzing data, as an instructional coach. Okay,

Suzana Somers:

number one is Get Organized you have whatever system you use, if you're going to use connect up, if you're not going to use connect up, get organized and stay consistent with how you collect your data. And that's gonna morph especially as you start to think in a data in like a data driven way, you might have to tweak that system, but really get organized. And the second one is the most important one that I think, when it comes to data is tell a story with it. The data is nothing without a story. And assuming that people can just understand what you're trying to tell them by just showing them data won't actually do anything. And I think the best example, if we were to look at standardized testing, and if we're just see it over the years, well, I can tell you, if nobody knew that there was a pandemic, they'd be like, Wow, that was a horrible year. But you need the story, you need to understand the context of the data, and then how you're going to then leverage a motion or you know, something to be able to capture the audience that you're trying to share that data. And the last one is make it fun, make it colorful, make it engaging, make it happy for you to work in that place. Especially for me, I'm obsessed with colors. I was an elementary teacher. I like things being colorful, but being able to really also leverage colors as part of your story. Not only do colors, make things fun to be around, but you know, be able to really leverage colors to be able to tell that story. worry will really help you.

Justin Thomas:

I love it. Those are excellent tips are great, really great tip. Yeah, use these all right now. Amazing. All right. With having Suzanna on Suzanna is allowing us to use our F e coach, promo code for connect hub. So you can get 50% off your first year as a coach using connect up. So once again, that's our promo code F e coach, and you're getting 50%

Katie Ritter:

off your first year, and that is all lowercase, all lowercase.

Suzana Somers:

And to add a little thing in there connect hub is a platform by coaches for coaches. And as a result, we are also a platform that is accessible for coaches. So the platform is normally $9 a month. So with this discount code, it goes down to four and a half dollars a month. So it's something that you guys can do. Regardless if your district has to secure some grants to be able to make this work. So I really hope that, you know, we continue to rely on people spreading the good word about it, because we are a whole company that everybody works on it as a coach.

Katie Ritter:

Yes, and I will just add, Suzanna was kind enough to give us this. This discount code is a part of our mentorship offering that we can provide to our mentees. But I jumped on Connect hub as a department and continue to promote it we get no kickback from Suzanna or anyone at Kinect hub for promoting it for sharing the code. It is just truly because of that exact reason why I believe in it so much because you guys are coaches you know what the heck our needs are, you know how crazy it's been bookmarking a form of spreadsheet another form of this so that of this, use my calendar this you know, it's and things are in 12 different places to accomplish the one task that connect hub does so I truly just promote it and will shout it from the rooftops for any coach because I just purely believe in it for coaches that much.

Suzana Somers:

Well, thanks for having me. Yeah, you

Katie Ritter:

bet. It has been a joy to have you on.

Justin Thomas:

It's been awesome to have you on Susanna, we thank You again for jumping in with us to talk a little bit more about connect hub. Tune in next time as we're going to be starting a four part mini series focused on coaching cycles. So Tyler Irwin, if you remember him coming on, Tyler is going to be coming on and join us for each of those four part series. While some other people coming on into and talking about. Really, how do you get these coaching cycles started up in the beginning? How do you maintain effective coaching throughout the coaching cycles? And then how do you get those awesome end results?

Katie Ritter:

You can follow Suzanna? Personally, it is at Suzan a s o m e r s, so Suzanna just has one n in it, so you can follow her on Twitter and Instagram at Susana summers, one n and Susanna. You can follow connect up of course on Twitter and Instagram at connect hub io CONNECTHUB. Io. And of course for all of our Bachelor bachelorette fans to put some of those tips that Suzanna gave you in terms of making, telling a story and making them fun and colorful and beautiful visuals, follow her bachelor data account as well to at bachelor data. Oh, and then for us so be sure to subscribe to restart recharge wherever you listen to podcasts. And follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at our our coach cast.

Justin Thomas:

And as always we want to interact with you we want to know what's going on if there's any pressing concerns that you want us to cover here in the podcast. Please feel free to reach out and let us know what topics you want us to discuss.

Katie Ritter:

Absolutely. And of course we always love to see you subscribe, rate and review us if you want on podcast. And until next time, press the restart button

Justin Thomas:

recharge your coaching batteries and leave feeling equipped and inspired to coach fearlessly with the restart recharge podcast,

Katie Ritter:

a tech coach collective yay we did it

Suzana Somers:

was great. You guys do not seem like podcast newbies. Oh,

Katie Ritter:

well God loves you for that. Anytime I feel like anytime they have bloopers it's usually something I've said or done.