Restart Recharge Podcast

202 - A Look Into a Student-Centered Coaching Program

February 01, 2022 Forward Edge Season 2 Episode 2
Restart Recharge Podcast
202 - A Look Into a Student-Centered Coaching Program
Show Notes Transcript

If you’ve been in an instructional coaching role for any amount of time at all, you know that there are some teachers that are tougher to crack than others. Tune in to this episode to hear how Mark Gumm circumvents the outer shells of his educators by building relationships with students- ultimately transforming learning from the outside in. 

Links mentioned in the show:

Forward Edge Coaches Camp Registration

Follow Mark on Twitter


Podcast Team

Hosts- Katie  Ritter & Justin Thomas

Editing Team- Megan Whitacre, Michael Roush, Mark Gumm,

Social Media/ Promo Team- Annamarie Rinehart, Lisa Kuhn, Maggie Harris

Creative/Content Team- Brooke Conklin, Emily Cowan, Tracee Keough

Producers- Tyler Erwin & Katie Ritter

Coach Mentorship Program
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Justin Thomas:

Calling all technology coaches join for an edge this summer for a two day coaches camp packed with high quality professional development exclusively for you. Attendees will work with like minded coaches on creating strategies for teacher relationships, executing coaching cycles and building a culture of coaching and tech integration within their school district. There are two opportunities to attend coaches camp this summer. Join us either June 25, and 26th in New Orleans prior to iste 2022 or in Cincinnati on July 28, and 29 please visit foreign hyphen edge dotnet slash coach camp to reserve your spot today.

Katie Ritter:

Aloha everyone, I'm Katie Ritter.

Justin Thomas:

And I'm Justin Thomas. And this is the restart recharge podcast, a podcast by coaches for coaches, we bring the tips and tricks to help you in your everyday work as instructional design coach, or whatever they call you in your school district.

Katie Ritter:

So hopefully you're gonna leave this episode with us today just feeling a little bit less on your own coaching Island.

Justin Thomas:

And you would have heard the coach's camp. Introduction at the very beginning of this podcast. If that sparked your interest, we have a special promotion for you. You can get $50 off of your coach's camp registration by using the promo code our our podcast in all caps. And that will allow you to get the $50 off for registering for coaches camp. So make sure you head over to coaches camp and register for that. And once again, that's the information is all there at the beginning of our podcast. Now today we have a really great episode here. And this is going to be an awesome app. So we have Mark gum on and for any of you that's an instructional coaching role at any time at all, you know that there are some teachers that are tougher to crack than others. So Mark gum is going to be talking with us on how to circumvent the outer shells of the educators by building relationships with students ultimately Transforming Learning from the outside. And so to give you a little background about Mark Gumm, he is a total of seven years of teaching experience as an elementary school teacher in Georgia and in Ohio. He has earned his bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's degree in Educational Leadership. He currently he's pursuing his doctorate at Antioch University with a focus on critical pedagogy redefining masculinity and manhood in the lives of young adult men. Prior to being an instructional design coach at Ford, he worked as a school administrator at a charter school in Dayton. Mark also works for Wilberforce University as the adjunct psychology professor. He's happily married to Laura and as a father of three boys. So welcome in Mark who is has quite the family and quite the resume here.

Mark Gumm:

Thank you, we're glad to have ya. Yes, glad to be here. So glad to be here and excited to journey with you guys and to learn and to help others, you know, so we can learn more and more.

Justin Thomas:

Awesome. Well, Mark, let's dive right into this. So can you tell us a little bit about your background at your school that you were working with right now, and the work that you've done? Or been doing and give us some of those stories about those initial barriers and challenges that you've had and what your solutions were to getting around those challenges?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, so just to begin, you know, I worked for a school that is 99.1% ESL, English as a second language. So you know, having such a strong minority base, you know, the school kind of has a lot ahead of it, you know, there was a lot of challenges or quote unquote barriers some people argue it was a language barrier even just because you know, for some people people say English language is hard to learn. So coming in and you know, not speaking Spanish as Spanish was the predominant language was a barrier coming in new to the school new to the role of coach the curriculum integration coach, you know, that all of that stuff made it really challenging. So, you know, I had to definitely get my feet wet, and kind of come in ready to learn and just excited so I my goal, Justin was really to bring that energy so I didn't know you know, how else to start but to do that and but to be myself So, rule number one, always be yourself and I think that that is going to pull people in and start like, you know, getting to know you. So, yeah, step one, building relationships, be yourself always.

Justin Thomas:

I love that. You always have a high energy persona around you as you are entering any discussion that you have with all of us here?

Katie Ritter:

No. And Mark is we don't even really I mean, no one does it better than you and you just always have a smile on your face to the point that you don't even know this yet. But when we were getting ready to start recording the podcast in your computer froze and it kicked you out. Your your free screen was the best free screen I've ever seen. It was like like photo ready, big smile on your face. I took a picture that I'll send you after but I'm like my face has never once looked like that when the computer freezes on video chat. You're like primed, ready to go look like you're like getting ready for your glamour shot over there with your big smile on your face.

Mark Gumm:

You never know where your spirit is gonna go out you Oh.

Justin Thomas:

Oh, yeah. Now obviously, you had a challenge coming in, and especially with being an ESL school, how did you really start to set goals with administration to kind of figure out how to really tackle some of these, these barriers with the second language here?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, yeah, so the biggest thing was getting on the same page with administration. You know, I met with my principal early on, and even before it was kind of cool, because even before school started, even this idea of like remote learning started, which it ended up being, I was able to meet with the principal, and together, we sat down, talked about things like expectations, the coaching menu, different aspects of goals for the school, what does the school look like, you know, I mean, we, we have over 900 students, elementary students in the building, it is de la, like the third largest, you know, elementary school in the district. So, you know, coming in, I had to really kind of sit with him and just kind of get an understanding of what he expected. And I think that really helped me on the other curve, you know, even before getting to know everybody else in the building, all 55 teachers, you know, can starting with the principal was the way and so, you know, I kind of put on to the charm kind of gave him that idea of, you know, just hey, I'm here to work with you. And I'm here to be that guy on the side, that person that you guys have an ear for. And I think together, we just kind of started collaborating and real, like authentic collaboration, not just hey, I know you but more like, let's let's dig deep together, let's, let's really see what we can do. And he helped me find the right people, such as different educators, different kind of liaisons, different coordinators that the school has, the school I work for, is considered a community school. And, you know, coming in, I was like, well, what's the difference between that in a public school or, you know, a private or charter, you know, but a community school has the community that pushes and drives a lot of that. So that made it really cool to kind of have that leverage that you know, you there are a lot of people like me, that do different roles that we can connect. And I think that kind of helped that leverage, if you will.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah. And obviously, you have a situation where you can use that leverage to start to really market yourself as being someone that can absolutely help those teachers in every way and every possibility, as you mentioned, whether it's in person or virtually.

Mark Gumm:

Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. Now,

Justin Thomas:

what are some ways that you've been able to find a way to inspire some of the students here because you work a lot with the students directly as well in your school district?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, So Justin, that's a great question. I mean, I think, you know, coming in, you know, we talked about those barriers a little bit, it was challenging, I'm not gonna lie, you know, you have some teachers that keep that door closed, you have other teachers that keep a half open. And they had a teacher to just like, just like, really like, Hey, welcome in Good to see you, again. Your friendly neighborhood, Mark. You have that like that opportunity? So knowing which doors were opening versus which doors, weren't? I, you know, I couldn't help it. I couldn't just sit on the side and just say, Oh, maybe they'll let me in one day, you know, I, I wanted to be in there. I wanted to see what they were doing. I wanted to interact with them. And so I began to think about what kind of ways to kind of get that entry, you know, how do I gain access without being like, overbearing without being crazy without, without any of those like stipulations, but how do I get in the room? So I began to think about, well, what is it that we all have in common from the teachers, to the principals, to the students to, you know, the counselors, everybody has to work with students. And so my mindset was, what if I could figure out a cool way to take what I'm learning every day as a curriculum, integration coach, digital design coach, and bring in, you know, those ways, those avenues, those pathways to work with students. So that's how I began to do I started robbers Academy Kids Corner, which was just a kid's corner. And that kid's corner was just created for the idea of just literally having a moment to give teachers a break, so that I could come in and work with students and kind of model some of the cool tools that were out some of the new features that teachers may not have time to Google and to learn, I was able to kind of like, you know, use my platform as leverage to get in. And to kind of show and model, hey, this is how this works with students, hey, students, this is how you do this. And it became a cool way to kind of give teachers their time back, but they couldn't leave the room. So we ran out together and they were learning and they were like, oh, that's how you do that. Or oh, now that I've learned that you come back and show my next period class and a bell after that, the devel after that. So it became this kind of way for me to use my skills to hone in and wait for them to produce as well. So Yeah. Nice very Feaster.

Katie Ritter:

Oh, sorry, and that I just I kind of want to highlight for. I don't know if we clarified this enough for our listeners, but you did that, you know, your first year at the school was also like, it's it's been in the midst of the pandemic, right? Like you haven't been a coach at the school prior to COVID-19 school closures. So on top of just like the Yes, check a box that every coach knows that, you know, we've got teachers who want to work with us, we've got some who are like, Okay, if you really piqued my interest, and then we have some who run and hide, right, so you had all of those dynamics going on, on top of everyone just at like this all time high of overwhelm, and getting to know people remotely. And so I just, I just want to kind of highlight for our listeners, like how awesome that was when you implemented this kid's corner, because you were still trying to get to know some of these teachers, who were kind of just coming back to in person and in school and having kids there, and who were really, really maybe resistant as a result of sort of the environment on top of of some typical tech phobia. So I just want to kind of give you a shout out and some kudos specifically for that Kids Corner, because it was just such a unique way. Kind of the point of this episode, right? Like approach the students just like you said, like, why are we all here? It's because we wanted to impact kids. So you kind of refocus that as a coach to implement that kids corner to get into those classrooms. So anyway, I just wanted to kind of highlight that in case we have any listeners who are maybe still struggling with teachers who are feeling really overwhelmed. They don't want anything new from a tech standpoint, that that Kids Corner was super smart way to get in with them.

Mark Gumm:

No, thank you so much. And I mean, it was a cool way to tie in what I learned from the different tools and ways to kind of embed those pieces, get people in and just yeah, let it shine, man. So yeah, it was cool. It's, I still do it to this day. And it's kind of cool to have students now doing kids corners. It's like now the kids are actually modeling and doing some of those pieces that I began doing. So yeah, I'm just teaching what I know.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, absolutely. And I think you have one other kind of big thing that you also worked to get off the ground this year to get to the kids, correct?

Mark Gumm:

Correct. Correct. Correct. So that's been like, if you were like the bread and butter. I mean, I've I mean, it was almost a moment, Katie, where you, you wonder if things are gonna work, you just kind of throw it out there. And then you just see what happens is definitely was kind of a risky move, because it's comfortable, you know, working with teachers, because they're adults, you know, it's kind of hard working with students, because there's so many liabilities. But I said, Let's do it. Verizon pushes out this kind of idea of a digital design team. And they push the idea for they've instituted iPads, every student gets an iPad. And the whole point was for students to kind of monitor and to help kind of be a guy on the side for monitoring devices. But I wanted to, I met with the principal, and I wanted to change some of that to be more of No, it's not just that, that's going to help from a from a logistic standpoint of just computers and computer usage, or device usage. But that really doesn't get to well, how do we really build students, you know, and so I started thinking about ways to tie in some of that, you know, expectation, but then also another part. So I started a digital design team at the school, and we meet during their acceleration bill, so that during acceleration time they get to go up or down, if you will, with their academics. So it was a great way to pull them out of the room, not to just be out of the classroom and not have responsibility or accountability, but to go into classrooms and do a little bit of what I do. So these students are now showcasing some amazing leadership from going into rooms to mentor read to kindergarteners, you know, a great way to showcase some leadership and a really young ones, right? I mean, I love watching them, I take their pictures and you know, have their you know, photo release forms, of course, but I take their pictures and I disclaimer. I'm stunned because I'm like, You look like a little like leader doing amazing stuff, you know. So picture taking, and I'm just a facilitator at that point as they are reading with students collaborating with the teacher, raising their hands and gouging for kids who may not have to understand it. They are stepping into need. So that's just mentor reading, you know, they are also participating in leadership opportunities where they are actually using their voices to raise money for St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital. They are you know, getting on announcements making the announcements happen, which is kind of helping to principals and a lot of ways and some buy in there. They are you know, going around to teachers raising money asking for donations. So that piece, but then this other side of kind of being a kind of a junior curriculum coach, where they're actually going into classrooms. And the cool part is, I wasn't sure it is that part where you kind of let go, I wasn't sure if I can leave them in the room to do some of this leadership stuff. But I've actually was able to leave them in the room with the teacher and they are doing, you know, your complete, like jam board sessions, your kami session, that's amazing sessions. They are they're doing it. And I'm just like, Okay, I'll be back in like 10 minutes just to make sure everything is still intact. And I come back, and they're like, yeah, that went, well. You know what I was really nervous when I said this, or, you know, then I'm able to give them that feedback. And teachers are given feedback. So yeah, to make a long story short, a lot of stuff happening at school right now.

Katie Ritter:

That's amazing. You really did take that typical, like student digital team that works on break fix, or, you know, assists with computers. And really, Wow, I've never, I have not heard of a like student, digital team, or whatever you want to call it doing quite that much around the school and having that many leadership opportunities.

Justin Thomas:

And that's so much fun. Like you said, you're like excited about it, you know, you gotta get pictures and things, because they're out there working hard doing their own thing. And just, you know, your little brainchild is just taking off. It's awesome.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah. So Mark, obviously, you know, everybody has their strengths that come naturally to them. Yours is very clearly building relationships, as we joked about with, you know, if you don't know, Mark, you really truly no one around our office has ever seen Mark, I think not with that Big Freeze Frame smile on his face. It honestly to the point that Justin and I weren't sure for a second if the screen was actually frozen, because that's just generally market all time. Yeah. So right like that. This is your strengths. But for some folks who may be you know, and I think again, back to that point, like all educators are used to talking with kids, right, like, all all coaches, probably listening to this podcast have been in that teacher role in some way or another. But, you know, for those folks who are maybe starting at a new school this year, or, you know, maybe started during COVID. So they're still trying to work through getting to know everyone, depending on kind of what that teaching environment has looked like, over the past couple of school years now, what you know, go and when you transition to that coach role, unless you've actually been a teacher in that building for a long time, you may not know the students. And so that can be a little bit intimidating for some folks to come in. And, you know, we joke sometimes that as coaches, we have to, like, form relationships super quickly with our teachers. But what you're suggesting is to essentially what I'm hearing is like, hey, we have this whole other stakeholder group that as coaches we can use as a means to get to our teachers as well. Right. And let's not forget that they're our end goal, right is to help the students so you know it for the little time that we get as coaches with our students, because we are kind of serving through the backdoor with teachers typically. What kind of tips would you give, to build that trust and rapport with the students themselves? Directly?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, you know, that's such a good question. I, you know, as I think about that, you know, it's been, it's been interesting, you know, because you don't know the dynamic of the students and you, for a lot of teachers, they think of, like I mentioned, a photo release, there's this whole idea of those students don't know me, I don't really know them, how do I even build that relationship? I would say tip one is just, you know, be available, be available, because at any moment, I found that, you know, we noticed in teaching, students can have a great moment, and then a not so hot moment, you know, whether it's a behavior concern, or even just, you know, I'm in a hallway and I'm lost, you know, we had a kindergarten that was last last, the beginning of the school year, and it was just so funny, you know, I didn't know, okay, which room do you go to, you know, that, you know, the building so large, I'm looking like, Okay, are you okay, one kindergarten, first area or kindergarten, secondary, like trying to figure it all out, and then make a long story short, being able to hold that kid's hand and walk down the hallway, you're gonna build that rapport, you know, just putting a smile on your face when you're in the building. You know, being in the entryway, where there is traffic is probably the number one way to get, you know, that attention, if you will, and then you know, to just be there, because to kids, they're not so afraid of you as you are about. They're going to ask you randomly like, Hey, I'm lost, or this is my sister or, you know, just, yeah. That allow for that connection. And don't, don't, don't, you know, stray away from it. I would say for someone who's in what teaches like a higher grade, like high school, you know, that can bring a different element because they're not going to ask, like, if I'm lost, it may be something a little different, but I would just take those ears open, because they'll see your face and say, okay, that person seems like they're really nice because they're smiling or If that person, you know, seems like they're here, you know, find ways to introduce yourself to the classroom. You know, it would be Tip two, I literally just asked the teacher, if I could just step in for a second, you know, be be ready when they asked, Hey, I need a restroom break. I can't find anybody else. Be that restroom break person. You know, I've done that, you know, where it's like I did a restroom break, go ahead and tag in, they run right to the restroom. Now I'm in the room. And I may say something like, Hey, everybody, or Okay, yeah, you're really enjoying science over there. I see you're working hard, you know, and they may have their phone out or something, you know, there's ways to build that rapport with them, they will ask the teacher about you. And so, and some classes are Mr. Mann, and some black classes. I'm the tech guy. And one class, I'm specifically Mr. Mark, because they don't know my last name. So you know, all of that stuff is there and they don't know. So yeah, be be available and just find ways to, to create that spark, because they're going to want to do it. And if teachers, they may have their restrictions or their feelings or doubts about you, but students just want to know who you are. And they look at you like you could be a second or third teacher for now. So yeah,

Katie Ritter:

and Mark, I'm curious by something you said, actually a couple of things that you said. So like, you know, popping in letting teachers go the restroom, like the Kids Corner idea where you're kind of coming in and teaching, how are you finding? Or how have you found a balance in like getting in there to work side by side with teachers or even at times take a lead role with them? How do you find the balance so that they aren't leaning on you to just start covering their class? Right? Because that becomes a problem with coaches a lot, too. So how have you handled that?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, so scheduling the time, you know, if I know, like, there's, there's unscheduled time where I'm in the hallway, and you may need to use the restroom. But if it gets to a point where it's something I've had a teacher say, could you just watch my class again, because I've done it before. Those are moments where I'll say, You know what, I can't right now, because I'm going somewhere else. However, let's schedule a time where I can come in, you know, and by doing that, they respect the role. And I think that's something you know, early on, Katie, you know, drew your expectations of us, as coaches, you know, make sure that they respect your time, I think it's, you don't have to give up your time to do that. You're, you're saying I'm available when I'm able. But at the same time, you're also saying, hey, look, this is my time. Let's schedule time to do this. And I've literally had a lot of opportunities where students were the reason why it's time was scheduled. And that's something that's interesting. The teacher really didn't have a question, but she was like, my students have a question. Well, indirectly, you still have that question too. Because by the time I leave out of here, those students are going to come back to you, you know, so you can't, you can't avoid it. You can't avoid it. And I think that that's something that I've I've that I've had happen, so Yeah, awesome.

Katie Ritter:

Well, good. Well, hey Mark, hang on just a second our listeners, we are going to go ahead and cut to a quick break from our sponsor, and we will be back in just a minute.

Justin Thomas:

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Katie Ritter:

All right, welcome back to the restart recharge podcast, we are talking with Mark Gump today about his student centered coaching, and how Mark has really utilized embracing building relationships specifically with the students in order to get to the teachers and in particular, some of those tough to reach teachers at the beginning. So we are going to turn it over to Justin next here.

Justin Thomas:

Well, Mark, you've been talking about a lot of really awesome projects that you've had with the students and the teachers, such as your kids corner and your student digital design team. Do you have any other examples of some of the ways that you've been working with those classrooms, those teachers, those students that has really impacted what has come out from the classroom?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, so I'm mean one cool point, I'm thinking about a first grade classroom specifically, there was a teacher, she was literally struggling. And it wasn't that it was a struggle because of like character or any type of personality struggle and nothing like that. But it was a struggle with reaching students and seeing the potential that they have. She wanted students, her students, her goal was she wanted students to be able to really like demonstrate their academic focus, and reading and writing, she wanted them to be stronger readers and writers. And for first grade, there's this huge curve with the standard. So that struggle was in front of her, you know, she kind of was getting some backlash from Admin a little bit. And she came to me and said, Hey, I kind of need help with this. And so, you know, what I began to do was kind of first observe, I actually went into a room and just observed her teaching, observe some of the pieces that she had, what was going, well, what does she feel like wasn't going right. And we had a conversation, a one on one, no one else in the room, but me and her. And we had a conversation with how can we increase? How can we improve some of these things. And so she wrote down a couple of goals, I wrote down some goals. And together, we met again. And this time, we did it with the students. So we began to do a couple of lessons together with students. And what I found was, she thought she was using technology and wasn't using it at all. And so we're going to do is kind of just talk about, you know what, let's go slow. And what we did was we worked with jam board, we created a couple of jam board jams. And together, we just imported some images, and the kids and first grade were able to tie those images with the sight words, and improve on their learning. So it was one of those moments where, you know, I think you can't again, you can't leave out the students. And sometimes you'll want to hear goes from teachers. But don't be afraid to kind of step in and be that liaison between the teacher and the student right in the middle, that cushy, comfortable level to kind of help both worlds. Because I think teachers have it in their minds one way. And the students have in their minds completely different or may not have it in their minds at all. So how do we kind of bridge those worlds? Well be that liaison. So I was able to do that with her. And you know, the coolest part was, after a couple of like days, it was really a coaching cycle, if you will, but after a couple of days, watching her lead those sessions was where the Goosebumps came in. And I just was like, an all like, she did it when I started, but she just made this thing happen. And it was super cool to watch to watch her do that because she gained the confidence. And I saw the confidence, like, rise up in her as she continued to do it. And even now, we talked about it, you know, like last year, you remember how I struggled? I'm struggling? And I'm like, Yeah, you're killing it. You know, so they become like that cheerleader Katie, that rock star that one that's just pumping them up? Like, come on, you know? Yeah.

Justin Thomas:

Yeah. And I like I like being that liaison too. Because in more cases than not, the students are gonna vouch for for you what you're bringing to the table, right, they're going to enjoy using the tech. So it really is kind of bridging that gap is you said to get the teacher to see the look on their faces understand, okay, this is the route that I have to go to certainly get that student engagement.

Katie Ritter:

And I remember one of my it was, I think maybe my very first year coaching and I was working with the art I think she was actually teaching the particular class we're talking about was architecture but we were working together and I just remember her saying she had a fifth grader at the time this was a high school. But she had she had a fifth grade daughter and I just remember her saying something to me to the effect of like, I wasn't into using technology and then I saw what my daughter started bringing home from school last year and I realized like it's coming and I better get on board because by the time these kids that are in elementary school today get to high school we are not we're gonna have our work cut out for us if we don't start using this stuff now so anyway that just kind of stuck out to me to what you guys are saying about like the students are going to enjoy it if we can just like kind of connect with them you know to get it done and bridge the gap it's it's gonna you know, because they're expecting it and they're expecting right like

Justin Thomas:

yeah, texts are coming

Mark Gumm:

What's crazy is to that point to that point. Kids can do a lot of it you know, and I think sometimes as a coach you just think to yourself I'm the guru I'm the one and then you find out what some kid and decide with their shades on a head on really do. You're like, Okay, I see. Yeah, so just a moment you never know how equipped they are, you know?

Katie Ritter:

Absolutely. So Mark in case we you know, in case you haven't sold some of our listeners on you know, getting getting to teachers through the students especially if they're struggling to get to some teachers give us kind of you know, your your quick kind of last pitch like why should coaches consider really prioritizing relationships with students throughout their day, even though our main focus and our our students, if you are typically the teachers, why should we consider our K 12? Actual students?

Mark Gumm:

Yeah, I was just say, because, you know, again, it's kind of going back to the whole idea, like, you know, like you mentioned earlier, the stakeholders, their intricate part, you know, and the most, most mission mission and vision statements, highlights, student perspective, student roles, what students are doing, and it's supposed to be in student friendly language, everything you do. So just thinking about that, you know, why would you not in a sense, and, you know, I think that in regards, if you want to have a little fun, you know, I think sometimes, you know, we get in our rows, and we are like, you know, I can't break this teacher, or this teacher doesn't even want me here. And sometimes you can watch that same teacher laugh with the student, and it's like, you obviously have no problem. They're like, what is it that is, why am i No problem, and it could have been, you know, I, you brought coffee in my room, and I'm allergic or something, you know, you don't know what that little reason could be. But you want to be in the room. And I what I found is, you know, it is just about making those connections, you know, the small, the small victories that you can have, you know, I've been able to get in rooms that I thought, you know, I have written off completely, just because when I walked in a room and somebody said, Hey, there's Mr. Gump, you know, all of a sudden, that teacher changes their whole perspective. You know, I challenged coaches out there to just, you know, figure out which students quote unquote, like you, or which students want to do something with you, don't be afraid to collaborate with them. And I think that you'll be amazed to see what they can do.

Katie Ritter:

Yeah, and I just, I love the way that you put it, it's just, you know, we most of us entered education, because we wanted to make an impact with students. So even if we can't agree on using technology, or what that looks like, maybe we can find some common ground in like improving the experience for students. Absolutely. Mark, we

Justin Thomas:

in our podcast every time with your top three tips. So, Mark, what are your top tips for launching a student centered coaching program?

Mark Gumm:

Absolutely. Okay. So Tip one, you definitely want to be present, if you will. And I would definitely say just just be around, be in a moment, don't hide in your office. So Tip one, don't hide in a little room that gives you whatever tip one be available, be present be seen, would be like tip one tip to remember that, and this goes back to the ISTE standards and a couple of those things, remember that remember, to try to take the role of facilitator. I think, you know, a lot of times we want to be the director, the leader, you know, but if be with those students, once you get that team started, or once you you know, and just to just to say real quick, you don't have to have a team of 50. You know, I'm blessed to have 36, you know? Yeah, so it's like, okay, yes, you need a what, okay, so I'm all over. But, yeah, I would definitely say you know, be just, you know, have five of those students, but facilitated step, take a step back and reassured them, be there, but reassure them to showcase their leadership would be Tip two, and a Tip three, I would definitely say Always talk to your admin and have a great relationship with them, because they'll give you the leverage with the team that you need. So I would say those are the three tips to get how to get started. And, you know, Tip Four, just just do it. Just do it. Don't don't wait on anybody to tell you how there is no one set way to work with students. You know, you just kind of get out there and and listen to them and you hear what they what they're passionate about. But you can't hold it back. Love it.

Justin Thomas:

We got four tips from your listeners a bonus tip.

Mark Gumm:

Bruna possible.

Katie Ritter:

final push out of the nest.

Justin Thomas:

Those are your top three tips from your friendly neighborhood. And Mark. Yeah. Well, Mark, we've really enjoyed having you on today's podcast. And hopefully, you coaches out there kind of got an awesome sense of what Mark does for students centered, building relationships. Mark, thanks again for jumping on with us here.

Mark Gumm:

Thank you so much for having me. This has been fun. Yeah, thank you.

Justin Thomas:

Now our next episode is going to be February 15. And it's going to be a fun one because it is going to be a recap from our coaches, as we are going to be down at f e t c. So we are going to be checking out ft FTTC down in Orlando. And then we'll have kind of a recap of what all cool tips and tricks and things that we've learned and what we really liked about learning from other educators and presenting down there at FTTC. So that is going to be February 15 Is if UTC is last week of January.

Katie Ritter:

Yes. And don't forget from the very beginning of our podcast about our coach camp. If you are looking for a two day training, specifically one hunt 100% focused for you coaches, we will be offering that twice this summer, you can get more information and register at Bi T dot L y forward slash coach, Camp two, two. And of course don't forget Justin mentioned at the beginning that you can get $50 off is one of our podcast listeners. If you use the code, all caps are our pod cast. So space will be limited. So definitely be sure to go ahead and sign up if you are interested and we really hope to see you there. And with that, be sure to subscribe to restart recharge wherever you listen to podcast and follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at our our coach caste.

Justin Thomas:

And also feel free to reach out to us on social media accounts all those ones that we just listed there and let us know what topics you want us to discuss. So there's anything that's on your mind as you're going through the semester here please reach out to us and it will be something that we can definitely tackle on a future episode.

Katie Ritter:

So press the restart button recharging coaching

Justin Thomas:

batteries and leave feeling equipped and inspired to coach fearlessly with the restart recharge podcast

Katie Ritter:

a tech coach collective boys It was touching go there for a hot minute but we found a way to do it

Justin Thomas:

there was like everything like died here pretty much and we like looked over and you've got this big old smile