TheBLAST Podcast

042.3 – Put the Phone Down! [PART 3]

March 25, 2019 Season 5 Episode 6
TheBLAST Podcast
042.3 – Put the Phone Down! [PART 3]
Chapters
00:00:00
Intro/Previously Heard on TheBLAST Podcast
00:00:40
Real-World Consequences of Smartphone Addiction
00:02:56
Smartphones Make Us More Depressed
00:09:36
Smartphones Reprogram Our Brains
00:14:06
Support us at Patreon.com
00:15:00
Value of Books Written Before TV
00:16:37
Smartphones Kill Our Memory Capacity
00:20:03
Smartphones Stress You Out
00:22:14
Smartphones Mess Up Your Sleep
00:29:19
On the next episode of TheBLAST Podcast
TheBLAST Podcast
042.3 – Put the Phone Down! [PART 3]
Mar 25, 2019 Season 5 Episode 6
TheBLAST Podcast
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

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Welcome back to the third part of this episode where we launch off by taking a look at some of the real-world negative effects of smartphone addiction, which include:

Join us next week for the final portion of the conversation about taking dominion over your smartphone. The topic next week: strategies for winning the battle of smartphone addiction.

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Narrator:
0:00
Previously heard on TheBLAST Podcast.:
Adam Dragoon:
0:02
Every preacher knows what it's like to look out of his congregation and constantly be going insane by watching people scroll their Facebook feed while you are trying to deliver to them words of life, words that you know that if they would hear them, that their lives could be transformed. But there they are. What is their attention being given to? Social media in the middle of church.:
Narrator:
0:22
On this episode of TheBLAST Podcast, Pastor Adam Dragoon and Mr. David Smale are blasting across the interwebs, digging deeper into the practical application of God's word for our lives. Snow flakes beware, we're blasting off on this edition of TheBLAST Podcast.:
Adam Dragoon:
0:40
Okay, so this is the problem that we've, that we've looked at this, these are the reasons why you need to pay attention to this. Let's talk about the fallout. What are the, what are the, the, the things that we're seeing as a result of smartphone addiction? What is happening to us as a result of these smartphones being in our lives, right? And us being so addicted to them,:
David Smale:
1:01
Right? Because we can say, well, you know, you're addicted to your smartphone, but then you could say,:
Adam Dragoon:
1:05
what's the big deal?:
David Smale:
1:05
What's the big deal? Right? There's, there's no, there's no bad effect.:
Adam Dragoon:
1:09
Oh yes, there is. Okay. Number one, uh, number one is what we were just kinda talking about it a little bit there is, is that it's simply a waste of time. So God has called us to be good stewards, right?:
David Smale:
1:22
Yes.:
Adam Dragoon:
1:22
Stewards of our money, stewards of our resources, stewards of our talents and abilities, stewards of all of these things. God has called us to me, managers of his kingdom. So don't you also suppose that your attention is something that we need to steward? Your time, your attention, know we're, we are glory of God.:
David Smale:
1:45
I believe the Bible says we need to be redeeming the time:
Adam Dragoon:
1:48
Redeeming our time. And so, um, just the fact that I am, you know, on my phone, I have a six hours of average usage per day on my smartphone. I can guarantee that not all of the six hours was reading my Bible App. And if you're honest, you know that that's true for your life. And so, um, yeah, if, if you spent six hours a day doing anything, you would be an expert. If he's right six hours a day practicing the flute, you could join the concerto in three months. You know what I'm saying?:
David Smale:
2:22
Yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
2:22
If you spend six hours a day, um, you know, reading the Bible, good Lord, we'd have the whole thing memorized in a year. If you spend six hours hours a day in prayer, what would, how different would this world look like if God's people would, would spend that kind of time doing anything that really has value for the kingdom. And so that just gives you an idea of, of why the time factor alone is a great, uh, reason that we should think about this.:
David Smale:
2:52
Yeah. Well, the next one is depression.:
Adam Dragoon:
2:57
Yeah. So I'm, there's an that came out of the Atlantic. I will include a link to this. Um, the, um, the quote that comes out of the article, it's not an exaggeration to describe the I-Gen. I-Gen means anyone who is born after the gen x, I believe. So that's people who are born in the early nineties and beyond.:
David Smale:
3:24
Right, right.:
Adam Dragoon:
3:25
Calling up the I-gen.:
David Smale:
3:26
Yeah. I thought, you know, there was like gen x and Gen y and now there's, I,:
Adam Dragoon:
3:31
yeah, you might be right. Yeah, there's one in between. So I'm, I'm on the tail end of Gen x that usually they put that in 1980, 1981 82 something like that. And then a Gen y comes after that,:
David Smale:
3:41
which is the millennials?:
Adam Dragoon:
3:43
No, no, no. Millennials are similar to th I-Gen, I think. Okay. Anyways, whoever they are, it is not, and it's an exaggeration to describe I-gen as being on the brink of the worst mental health crisis in decades. Much of this deterioration can be traced to their smartphones, and in this article, it graphs out, um, uh, certain characteristics that were very, very interesting to me. Things like teen suicide, which pretty much held steady from 1970 all the way through 2000. And then it, it shows a line on the graph where 2007, the release of the first smartphone,:
David Smale:
4:26
the first, the first iPhone, I think. Yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
4:28
Well we're really, that's there. They were trying before that, but not really doing a good job. But after 2007 in, in every one of these graphs, there's just an amazing uptick. You just see the mental health graph goes through the roof and it's a, it's a very, very concerning.:
David Smale:
4:48
Yeah. How, how much cyber bullying have you heard of now?:
Adam Dragoon:
4:51
Oh yeah. It's insane.:
David Smale:
4:52
Every, every other day it seems like I'm, I'm seeing an article where another child, you know, 10, 11 years old committed suicide because of cyber bullying and, you know, and it's, and it's not, you know, they were on their computer. It was, um, there were on their phone.:
Adam Dragoon:
5:07
Yup.:
David Smale:
5:07
And some, some, uh, you know, a bunch of kids on Twitter or something started bullying them on Twitter and they couldn't handle it.:
Adam Dragoon:
5:15
Oh yeah. That's when your whole life is there on the smartphone, then, you know, that, that makes sense.:
David Smale:
5:20
Absolutely.:
Adam Dragoon:
5:21
Okay. Uh, here's a couple of other examples. This graph is, um, times per week. Teenagers go out without their parents. Okay. So this is teenagers who hang out, uh, apart from their parents with other teenagers. So I'm looking at this graph. There's a black line kind of zigs and zags up and down, up and down from 1976 all the way through 2005. Then there's a line 2007, the iPhone is released and there's a drop off times per week. Teenagers go. So for all those 30 years plus, it's, it's around 2.5 2.7 times per week. Teenagers go out each week without their parents. So that sounds about right. Two or three times a week, two times a week you would go out with your friends. That's what I remember from my childhood. And then 2007, the iPhone was released and it's a dropoff. It's a dropoff. Teenagers that do not hang out with their friends. It's amazing. Um, uh, no rush to drive. Percentage of 12th graders who drive, it's a drop off after 2007.:
David Smale:
6:23
Sure. Cause guess what? You can do now with that smartphone,:
Adam Dragoon:
6:25
Uber! Dating. How about dating? Romance is dying because of smartphones.:
David Smale:
6:31
Yup.:
Adam Dragoon:
6:31
Um, so it's got a, it's got a line and it says percentage of teenagers who ever go out on dates. 80% 80% of 12th graders for from 1976 all the way through 2005 it's pretty steady and it's maybe going declining a bit declining a little bit. 70 maybe over 30 years I phone is released, Bam drop off again and now it's down below 60 60 within 10 years. Okay. No wonder there's fewer marriages in our world today.:
David Smale:
7:00
Well this is a good one. More likely to feel lonely.:
Adam Dragoon:
7:03
Percentage of 12th graders who agree or mostly agree with the statement. I often feel left out of things or a lot of times I feel lonely a lot of times I feel lonely.:
David Smale:
7:16
Now what's interesting about this is you know it, there wasn't really a good, you know, it was between 26 and 30% you know from 1991 until about 2006 and then there was like a drop off. There was a drop off, like less people were feeling lonely and that's good. And that's good. And then the iPhone was released:
Adam Dragoon:
7:41
2007, there's a line and then it skyrockets. Skyrockets through the roof. So in the last, uh, 12, yeah, 12 years since then it's gone from 24% all the way up to 34% likely to feel lonely. Amazing. Oh, and this is a good one.:
David Smale:
7:59
Yeah. Good one here.:
Adam Dragoon:
8:00
Less likely to get enough sleep. So typical teenager, uh, needs at least seven, eight hours of sleep per night just to keep their brain, you know, from, uh, from decomposing.:
David Smale:
8:13
Yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
8:13
Um, and so, um, the question is percentage of 12th graders who get less than seven hours of sleep most nights. So this line is actually going up through the nineties. From 25%. It gets in 2000 to about 35%. Then it levels out 2007 from 2007. Then there's a skyrocket again of the 12th graders who are not getting seven hours of sleep. Now it's up over 40%.:
David Smale:
8:39
Yeah. And more specifically because you noticed the phone was released about 2007 and it didn't move for a few years, about 2013 or so.:
Adam Dragoon:
8:51
And that's when the iPhone was, are getting smarter.:
David Smale:
8:53
And that is about the time that we started seeing things like Facebook show up. Because remember Facebook didn't come out at the same time, the iPhone,:
Adam Dragoon:
9:01
but it wasn't influential.:
David Smale:
9:03
Right. It was like it was just a college site. He was a college website. It didn't really get introduced and really, you know, uh, uh, um, uh, made really a useful on smartphones until 2011, 2012. Yes. So smartphones weren't smart enough.:
Adam Dragoon:
9:21
So we can say conclusively that smartphones are contributing to the problem of depression.:
David Smale:
9:26
Yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
9:27
In young people and definitely beyond. Okay. Let's also talk about um, uh, how this smartphone reprograms our brains.:
David Smale:
9:36
Yup.:
Adam Dragoon:
9:37
Cause this is interesting.:
David Smale:
9:38
Yeah. So when now have you noticed that you have trouble focusing now that you are constantly distracted by your phone so you're now unable to do a deep dive on anything?:
Adam Dragoon:
9:58
Yeah,:
David Smale:
9:58
because you are in, I love this phrase, you are in an intensely focused state of distraction. Think about that for a minute. You're, you're intensely focused in a state of distraction.:
Adam Dragoon:
10:14
Yeah. So let's illustrate that. I can remember when I first started picking up the guitar and uh, I loved planning guitars like the summer of 69 played until my fingers bled. You know, that was exactly, some are fixed.:
David Smale:
10:29
Wow.:
Adam Dragoon:
10:30
And for probably a whole year, I would practice every single day I would practice, I had the little cord book and I just figured it out and I would spend at least half an hour, an hour every day just playing and figuring out songs and, and yeah, after I spent a year practicing like that doing, doing, uh, that focused activity, then no wonder that I got better at it. Right. And if you spent three or four hours every day practicing you, you might be able to accomplish something as well because you're doing a deep dive.:
David Smale:
10:58
We're doing a deep dive.:
Adam Dragoon:
10:59
So, but the thing is that when you are concentrated on your phone and yes, there is a certain level of concentration required to keep your eyes on that screen.:
David Smale:
11:08
Oh yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
11:08
But it is not the same as what I was doing on that guitar. When you are focused on that screen on the smart phone, this is not hours spent in concentrated thought. This is not a deep dive. Instead what we're doing is we're picking up the phones for a few minutes or a few seconds and we're looking at a website for a few minutes or a few seconds and even when we're on them for a long stretch, it's not one activity. We're constantly scrolling back and forth, up and down, all around swiping between this app and that APP and playing a game and watching a youtube and there's a news alert that pops up and Donald Trump tweeted something. Oh my gosh, good. Yeah, Facebook about it and every it's it's constant motion. And we, we used to, I remember back in the 90's, you know, when ren and Stimpy came out, all the parents were all upset because these, this style of cartoon was that constant image flashing every second. It can't stay the same. And we were seeing the effects of the television, that kind of program on a kid's brain that it causes their attention span to breakdown. And uh, if you don't believe me, go back and watch a movie from 1965.:
David Smale:
12:17
Yeah, this is really interesting. If you watch old movies, you'll notice that the scenes in a movie, there will be a lot of dialogue and there won't be any cut in the camera. Like it'll just be a man and a woman speaking and they'll go back and forth, back and forth in dialogue with the camera sitting still. And sometimes it will be three to five minutes of dialogue. That's why old actors were much better actors. They had to memorize all lot of dialogue, so they would just go back and forth. Now you watch a movie from now and if they tried to recreate that same scene, it would be cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut. And you know, close up of his face, close up of her face, you know, and, and they would, you know, they wouldn't even speak a full sentence before they are cutting to the other person's face. Right.:
Adam Dragoon:
13:10
And so now, now that it's, it's so fast, it's moving so quickly and, and we're, we're demanding this instant gratification. And what is, what would you say, Dave, is the result of our brain? How are we training our brain to react in life?:
David Smale:
13:24
Well, it's anything that I can't do or I can't look at or think about in three seconds or less, I move on.:
Adam Dragoon:
13:35
Yep. So we are completely inadequate at doing these deep dives. That's why prayer is such a struggle for people.:
David Smale:
13:45
Oh yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
13:46
To, to sit down and pray for even five or 10 minutes is such a stink in struggle for some people. Um, because it's not, it's not this experience of something flashing every, every three seconds and you really have to deep dive with God. Sometimes you have to,:
David Smale:
14:01
you have to allow your brain to think.:
Adam Dragoon:
14:07
Patreon is, it's a place where people like us who are doing putting a lot of hours in Labor into a work that doesn't, doesn't offer monetary benefits. Uh, it, it's a way for us to be able to cover the expense of our time and also of any equipment that we need, which we, we do have a need for them. So do a patreon is a place that you can go at our web address. There is patreon that's spelled p a t r e o n.com and then forward slash the blast podcast, which comes after that. And uh, it's a way for our listeners to give something back. Uh, we hope that, uh, that you've gained something of value by listening to these podcasts and if it does have a true intrinsic value for your life, then we would ask you to share some of that value back to us.:
Adam Dragoon:
14:59
We recently had a revival with Tony Chase and um, uh, so he, he mentioned something in passing to me. He said that he, he really only likes to read books from before the 1950s before television. Right.:
David Smale:
15:14
yeah.:
Adam Dragoon:
15:15
Um, and he said the reason was because these men back in those times, they spent years, years and years at a time doing a deep dive in the word of God and they had some real revelation. Yeah. Yeah. And that's something that modern authors do not have. Yeah. I mean, you just, I mean, not every author, I'm sure there's some out there that, that, that practice this as well. But, but it's true. What he said. I mean, these guys who wrote these books, you know, long time ago, if you think about some of these preachers, ch Spurgeon, you know, um, and that's exactly what they would do. They would, they would sit and they would contemplate and think and meditate on the word of God. We don't have that skill in 2019 we are that intensely focused state of distraction.:
David Smale:
16:03
Yeah. Yeah. I mean, just read a commentary from Matthew Henry.:
Adam Dragoon:
16:07
Oh yeah. And every word there, and he's got three paragraphs to explain it. Right. It's incredible. I spent the time, he gave his attention to that:
David Smale:
16:18
increase Mather, uh, he used to spend 18 hours a day in his study and he would recite his, you know, our long sermons from memory, which by the way, guess what else it does.:
Adam Dragoon:
16:33
It's our next point.:
David Smale:
16:35
It kills your memory muscles.:
Adam Dragoon:
16:37
For those of you old enough to remember a before smartphones, how many phone, 10 digit phone numbers did you have memorized in your brain?:
David Smale:
16:47
I had quite a few, you know, because, you know, I, I had to know all of my friends' phone numbers because, you know, we didn't have, you know, a contact list in our pocket.:
Adam Dragoon:
16:59
Well, the little black book, yeah.:
David Smale:
17:00
You could have a little black book. Sure. But, but, uh,:
Adam Dragoon:
17:03
I'm sure younger generation doesn't even know what that is, but, but he, you know, even when I was a Rolodex, yeah.:
David Smale:
17:11
But you didn't carry one around with you on, so you ended up having to memorize a lot of your friends phone numbers and stuff because if you wanted to call them, you had to stop at this thing where you had to put a coin in. It's called a pay phone.:
Adam Dragoon:
17:24
That's right.:
David Smale:
17:25
And um, yeah, and you had to:
Adam Dragoon:
17:26
That was big technology man.:
David Smale:
17:28
You had to remember their phone number. So not, now,:
Adam Dragoon:
17:32
no, no. So, um, I, I dare you to try to memorize 10 digits in a row, but the way that you did back then, I mean, you could probably memorize it within a day, within a few minutes and have it in your brain. Um, but not anymore. So the, the, the smartphone is literally making us,:
David Smale:
17:50
yeah, cause there's a lot of things besides phone numbers that we just don't have to remember anymore. We don't have to remember data. Well we can do is we can just say, okay Google, what's the answer to this question, that question, and we can pull it up, get the answer we need, and then we basically just throw it away and move on with our day.:
Adam Dragoon:
18:10
uh, listen to this quote again, I'm quoting from the book how to break up with your smartphone. Um, and the author says this,:
Catherine Price:
18:19
everything about smartphones overloads our working memories. The apps, the emails, the news feeds, the headlines, even the home screen itself—a smartphone is a virtual avalanche of information. The result, short term, is mental fatigue and difficulty concentrating. The long-term consequences are even scarier. As we’ve talked about, when we train our attention on our phones, we miss out on everything else going on around us—and if you don’t have an experience to begin with, then it goes without saying that you’re not going to remember it later. What’s more, when we overload our working memories, we make it harder for our brains to transfer new information to our long-term memories. This in turn makes it less likely that we’ll remember the experiences (and information) that we did manage to pay attention to. Lastly, when our working memories are overloaded and our cognitive loads are too great, our brains don’t have the resources necessary to connect new information and experiences to our preexisting schemas. Not only does this reduce the likelihood of those memories becoming permanent, but the weaker our schemas become, the less likely we are to have insights and ideas. We lose our capacity for deep thought.:
David Smale:
19:36
Wow. Losing our capacity for deep thought.:
Adam Dragoon:
19:42
I think that's like the banner of this current generation and yeah, no wonder we're slipping into socialism. Good Lord.:
David Smale:
19:51
Right. Oh, okay.:
Adam Dragoon:
19:54
Okay. So I mean there's a lot more that we could say, but we need to move through this and so we can finish this out for you tonight.:
David Smale:
20:00
Next thing, is it stressing you out?:
Adam Dragoon:
20:03
Of course it is. It stores it as, okay. Imagine you are a, um, a counselor and somebody has come to you for a counseling session and a, they sat down on your couch and use a, you said, so how you've been feeling everything good. And they say, well, listen, in the last 24 hours, I have felt happy. I felt sad. I felt excited. I felt anxious. I felt curious. I felt frustrated. I felt ignored. I felt important. I felt lonely. I felt joyful. I felt depressed and I felt exuberant. Within the space of the last 24 hours. Yes. W what diagnosis would you give to this person?:
David Smale:
20:45
I'd say you're, I think the term today was bipolar, right?:
Adam Dragoon:
20:50
Well, I mean there's a, there's a problem. You can't just go through all those emotions in a short span of time and not have an effect on your, on your mental capacity. Right. It's stressing us out. And yet that is what we are getting every time we're on the smartphone.:
David Smale:
21:05
Yeah. Now, now if you said, you know, in the last 24 hours I've felt this, the, you know, the psychologist might say, wow, that's a wide range of feelings in 24 hours. Now if you sat down and said, I felt all of that in the last five minutes. Yeah, okay. There's a, Oh, you must've been surfing Twitter.:
Adam Dragoon:
21:30
He's certifiably insane that, that's exactly what it is. And so all we go through this range of emotions every time we're on. And, uh, you know, you're reacting to the news, you're reacting to somebody's Stupid comment. You are, uh, you're excited about some upcoming event. And all of this happening in rapid succession and it's no wonder then that because we get so stressed out by this that it is destroying our sleep patterns. Let's talk about sleep for a second. Favorite topics. The older you get, the morning you appreciate your sleep, right? But, um, your sleep is important. I just want you to know, like God created human beings with this circadian rhythm, right? At nighttime we start to get tired. The melatonin starts affecting our brains and it causes us to feel sleepy and we should go to bed when that happens, right?:
David Smale:
22:27
Yes.:
Adam Dragoon:
22:28
And then, you know, Sun comes up, our body is rested, our brain is in a healthier place and we can wake up and we can be productive for the day. What happens to person who is sleep deprived? It's interesting. Um, I did some, uh, some study on this. Let's say, um, let's say you spend an entire week getting only six hours of sleep per night.:
David Smale:
22:57
Okay?:
Adam Dragoon:
22:57
Okay. So you got the picture. So the doctors tell us that you should at least have at least seven hours of sleep per night in order to your body to do fully be rested and ready for the next day. So let's just take that number seven and we make it six and for 10 days in a row you sleep six hours instead of seven hours. What is the result of your body after 10 days of doing that?:
David Smale:
23:23
Just just thinking about it. You would think, well it wouldn't be much. It's just, it's just one less hour,:
Adam Dragoon:
23:29
one less hour per day, per day for 10 days in a row. Okay. Okay. So doctors who have performed this experiment on people, they have deduced that the impairment caused by the lack of sleep that builds up over 10 days is equivalent to having a blood alcohol level of 0.10% that is beyond which is beyond legal limit for most states in the United States.:
David Smale.:
24:01
Yup, sure is 0.08 is usually the legal and,:
Adam Dragoon:
24:04
So, so you are walking around if you're only getting six hours of sleep per night, you are walking around with the same level of brain impairment as if you had been drinking all night and that affects everything that you do. And um,:
David Smale:
24:19
it makes me want to go home and go to sleep right now.:
Adam Dragoon:
24:23
And if you're thinking right now, oh, this doesn't apply to me, then keep in mind the more sleep deprived people are, the more vigor vigorously that they insist that they're not. and be because of this. You do your ability to judge your own mental state has been impaired. Wow.:
David Smale:
24:43
Hmm.:
Adam Dragoon:
24:43
Okay. So does your smartphone affect your sleep? Absolutely.:
David Smale:
24:47
Sure.:
Adam Dragoon:
24:47
Absolutely it does. Especially, I mean, you're looking at that screen and it's been proven time and time again that the LCD or the OLED screen, whatever you got it, it produces light that is a, that contains a blue hue to it. Now that they've done a lot to, you know, to change that and wiggle that a little bit, but still when that light is going into your eye and hitting your retinas, it's stopping that Melatonin process in your brain. It's telling the Melatonin no, it's still daytime. So, um, it is, it is causing your sleep patterns to be changed. So, um, yeah,:
David Smale:
25:24
I've actually experienced this myself. Um, uh, if you sit up in bed and, and you know, watch videos or read or whatever on, on your phone and you turn and you're thinking, okay, well I'm going to fall asleep, you know, uh, and you find yourself still awake at one, two o'clock in the morning, so you put your phone down. You say okay, I've got to get to sleep. And you close your eyes, you find that you still can't fall asleep even after you've put the fire because you don't feel tired and, and it takes a long time, for your body to say, oh, okay. And he wants to sleep.:
Adam Dragoon:
26:05
He wants to sleep now.:
David Smale:
26:07
And you actually, I've, I've actually looked into it a little bit. What do I need to do? They tell you to go into a different room other than your bedroom and, uh, sit down, maybe on the couch, turn the lights on, dim and read a book.:
Adam Dragoon:
26:23
Oh, I wonder which book I,:
David Smale:
26:28
Pastor Campbell says that people will be up all till 3:00 AM on youtube, but you give them a bible and they're out in five minutes. Oh my gosh. All right. So we need to move on. But um, the next thing that this, uh, that this will do is an early demise. And here's what we mean. In 2016, alone, 3,450 people were killed. 391,000 were injured in motor vehicle accidents involving distracted drivers and, and you know what the distraction is.:
Adam Dragoon:
27:08
That's right.:
David Smale:
27:09
Texting and driving.:
Adam Dragoon:
27:10
It was, it was one of the questions in that survey at the beginning, right? How many of you find yourself emailing, texting, uh, oh, I just got an email.:
David Smale:
27:20
What do you know?:
Adam Dragoon:
27:21
It's not important. Um, but doing that while doing something important, like driving now,:
David Smale:
27:27
now you might say, okay, well that's, that's a lot of that. That's a lot of accidents. That's a lot of, you know, that's a lot of deaths and honoring, but surely there's a lot more than that. How, how much of a percentage of all accidents is that one and four?:
Adam Dragoon:
27:42
Wow. That is incredible.:
David Smale:
27:44
One in four.:
Adam Dragoon:
27:45
So every accident that you see, 25% of them were caused by distracted driving. That means somebody who's looking at Facebook, Twitter, texting on the phone, one out of every, yeah. So remember what we said before that your attention, your attention can only be given to one thing at a time. And you might think that you're the master of the universe here. You might think that you can do this and drive, but you can't. It's the same idea that, um, uh, that you can only have one thought in your brain at a time. It's true when you're driving too. So, uh, I heard that in Virginia, this, this, uh, they're currently in the state legislature passing laws. I heard that they were going to try to pass a law, uh, against, uh, that would make it illegal to even have a smartphone in your hand while you were driving.:
David Smale:
28:35
Yeah,:
Adam Dragoon:
28:36
I think that's what I mean. They're seeing it. The, the state troopers, they're seeing what we're seeing, what we're talking about here at 25% of all motor vehicle accidents from distracted driving. So as much as I hate the idea, it's probably a good one.:
David Smale:
28:52
Yeah. Yeah. You know, because you know, you could argue, well, how much intrusion or are we going to allow into our lives from the government will look, this is obviously a problem. This, this may be one of those things where it's like, hey, you know, this is something that they do need to, to manage because it's such a threat to public safety.:
Adam Dragoon:
29:14
Absolutely.:
Narrator:
29:16
On the next episode of TheBLAST Podcast,:
Adam Dragoon:
29:18
as long as you are experiencing addictive behavior in your life, there is a lack of freedom happening, true freedom that Christ has for us. Now, we, we recognize this in almost every area of our lives. If you see somebody who's addicted to cocaine, you can say to them, Jesus Christ will set you free, right? If you see somebody's addicted to gambling, Jesus Christ can heal you and he can set you free. Uh, if addicted to pornography, Jesus Christ is the way, the truth and the life, you shall know the truth, that's Jesus and the truth will make you free. And do we not also apply this to the arena of smartphone addiction?:
Narrator:
29:57
Thanks for listening to TheBLAST Podcast. If you like what you heard, please leave us a review on iTunes and share with someone who will love. If you don't like what you've heard, forget we said anything. Sign up to receive new episodes or listen to previous ones on our website, the blast.org until next time, live for God. Use your brain. Read Your Bible, Love Your family. Listen to your pastor. Pay Your tithe and don't be stupid.:
Real-World Consequences of Smartphone Addiction
Smartphones Reprogram Our Brains
Value of Books Written Before TV
Smartphones Kill Our Memory Capacity
Smartphones Stress You Out
Smartphones Mess Up Your Sleep
On the next episode of TheBLAST Podcast
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