The Manifesting Latina

Overcoming Challenges and Inspiring Confidence: A Conversation with Sylvia Brands

July 11, 2023 Norma Reyes, PhD. Season 3 Episode 96
The Manifesting Latina
Overcoming Challenges and Inspiring Confidence: A Conversation with Sylvia Brands
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Listen to this week's episode as we have an authentic conversation with the ever-inspiring Sylvia Brands, a self-trust and confidence coach. Sylvia opens up about her journey, from her humble beginnings in a Latinx household in Phoenix to the challenges she faced in high school and college. Listen as she reveals how culture shock at a predominantly white high school shaped her identity and how conflicting expectations, both academically and culturally, carved her path into adulthood.

Strap in as Sylvia recounts a high-stakes legal battle with her employers, a daunting experience that became a fierce lesson in self-reliance. Listen to how it ignited a spark in her to take the reins of her career and the resounding impact it had on her life. Her story is a testament to the power of resilience and determination, a stirring reminder that our most formidable challenges often lead to profound breakthroughs.

As the conversation unfolds, Sylvia divulges her transition from a speech therapist assistant to a self-trust and confidence coach. She discusses the significant role her husband played in her career change and how she constructed her business from scratch. Get an insightful glimpse into her coaching process, her unique approach to helping women bolster their self-trust and confidence, and the invaluable insights she brings to her clients. So, tune in and get inspired by Sylvia's enrapturing journey and the pearls of wisdom she has to share.

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Speaker 1:

Are you ready to stop feeling stuck, lost or confused about what to do next in your career? Then the Manifest Your Career Podcast is just right for you. With me, your host, dr Norma Reyes, The Manifest Your Career Podcast offers you career advice that integrates your mind, body and spirit. It's time you start listening to your own inner guidance. Join in each week to learn how to combine your intuition, strategy and logic so that you can manifest a career of your dreams. Hey everyone, welcome back. This is episode 96 and I have another guest for you guys. You guys are going to love her journey and what she offers Women who are looking to build their confidence and self-trust within themselves. So today's guest is Sylvia Brands. She is the founder and owner of Confidence at Todomadre Podcast and Self-Trust in Confidence Coaching. She is your real talk, no BS, life coach and worthiness mentor. Sylvia coaches ambitious and creative women as they reclaim and rebuild their self-trust in order to exude confidence in all areas of their life. Sylvia is a self-trust and confidence coach, always encouraging you to live at Todomadre. I can't wait for you guys to hear her career journey and how she has transformed her struggles and is now running and owning her own business. What's so great to have you here, sylvia. The first question I love to ask everyone is tell me about your family background. Where did you grow up and whom did you live with?

Speaker 2:

Okay, thanks for having me. I just want to start off with that. But okay, juicy question. So my parents are both from Mexico. My mom is an educator, so she studied, went to school to be a teacher and continued to pursue that even when they moved out here to the US Phoenix to be really specific. And my dad has some college under his belt no degree, but did pursue studying And it's so interesting how he studied because he's like, oh, i'm going to take a leap forward education, but through seminary. That was the only way he would get help to get. His education was through seminary. So it's interesting because my dad and I can really bond over that a lot in a very normal way And not a religious person. But then my parents ventured out when my brother was around one year old here to Phoenix And I was born here. So I've always only known Phoenix. I am what they call a real Phoenician, which there's not a lot of us here. I know that's something I really take pride in And that is just like a little bit about my background. And I grew up here in Phoenix, more specifically South Phoenix, and it's funny because here in Phoenix were kind of caught up into like little small cities and towns. So I grew up very much where the barrio was or is, currently is. And it's so funny because Scott'sdale is considered so fancy and it's predominantly white and people with a lot of money live there. And so when I proudly say, oh yeah, i'm from South Phoenix, i get a lot of looks And that has just always been a reaction I get. But something that I've always been so proud of, like I've always said like hey, where are you from? I'm from South Phoenix. So I lived with my mom, dad and my brother.

Speaker 1:

Thank you And thanks for the history lesson. I always like to learn the dynamics of cities because people don't talk about that enough. I don't talk about it enough either about San Antonio, but I won't go there. It's just, san Antonio is an interesting city. People call it diverse, but just because it's like 90% brown, maybe like 80. It doesn't make it diverse, i believe it Okay. So when you were young and people asked you what you wanted to be when you grew up, what do you recall telling them?

Speaker 2:

Okay, i'm going to be really honest and share, just like the really honest rock truth, that the answers my parents would hear. Guys, i'm not going to lie, i wanted to be Christina Yamaguchi and she is a professional ice skater and I would follow her and guys at the book fairs that we would have at school. I would buy those books that were like Christina Yamaguchi and stuff, and she was on cereal boxes. Again, you might have to Google her and that's totally fine. but I wanted to be a figure skater And my parents would very kind of nicely be like sis, we live in the desert, there's not a lot of resources out here for that And we don't live close to a rink. So, like at first, they were very subtle about like Hey, this might not happen for you. but then the next one came and I was like I'm going to be an actress or I'm going to be a singer. And that was my first time when I received scarcity mindset answer and my dad and I we can openly talk about it to this day. but my dad said there was a more than an day you're going to die of hunger if you pursue singing and acting. And I remember that was the first time that I felt like my parents don't agree. They would not be proud of me if I chose that. So I need to find something that they'll support, that they'll like and that they'll be proud of me. And that was like my instant, like hardwiring of like. this is a belief.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, that's so interesting. Yeah, my seven year old says he's going to be a singer. He also says he's not going to college And I think I forgot what he said why he's not going which, by the way, guys, i'm okay with him not going to college If that's his decision, because college isn't for everyone and college isn't everything either. But, yeah, so I. Because he says he wants to be a singer, right, and I'm like, but he doesn't even sing. I was just like, oh, okay, okay, cool. And then he says a singer, a video gamer. Then he says YouTube, and then he added two other ones yesterday when we were talking about it, but I can't remember what they were. I think they were a little more practical. But I'm just kind of like you know doing my boss and not you know squit. I'm like, hey, you never know. You know, he may be a late bloomer singer or something. I don't know Absolutely. But yeah, i guess we'll see. I was like I'm not going to say he's not going to be because I never know. but he's the same child that said he's going to be a billionaire.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, he's very creative about making games, like making games up for us to play with. It's very interesting. I made his own little card game recently, just like okay, not that we can legibly understand anything that the card thing has to explain everything to us, but there's still a lot of thought into it.

Speaker 2:

I love it And like steps and like rules, so that's really awesome Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Which is like you need to write them down, is what we always tell them because we're like we can't follow along. You just get, always tell us something. But he's very fair in his like, like he's. It's not like he's always winning or anything in his.

Speaker 2:

Okay, That was going to be my next question, where he's going to be like mom, you know. but no, that's good.

Speaker 1:

He keeps it fair because I was like does he always win? Yeah, you know, yeah, No, no, he doesn't. Okay. So who do you recall some of your earliest career role models that you imagine yourself being like? I left right the ride and they do that, and right went to see. I'd even come back and did some pretty great stuff, but it was a long time ago, when you were Ken.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so you're gonna laugh at this answer, which is totally fine. So I have a mix Shakira, but like first album, don De Estal Los Ladrones, that one where she's like the full blown dreads and she's like la, la, la, like super unapologetic. I really looked up to that because I was like wow, like my mom would never let me wear that or my mom would never let me have my hair that way. So for me, shakira, i was like wow, she like doesn't care, like I bet you, she like. And she has that song like Diaz de Escalzos. And I remember, like I was like wow, this girl can walk around her house with no shoes on, and like she's not gonna get sick, like I again, i just remember she was such a symbol of like wow, i bet Shakira does everything the opposite of what her mom told her to do. And that's one of the things I really wanna bring home and solidify to you guys, especially once you continue to hear my story, is that I grew up text book Mexican. Like I was raised with guilt shame. I was raised to be a people pleaser. I was raised to do everything right, calle that there was must bonita, like all of those phrases. I was raised to be those And so, and then later on, as I kept moving, there were specific teachers in school that I really really looked up to. That made me feel safe to pursue the way that I thought. But then at the same time it was really confusing, because parent-teacher conferences would come around and then they would say, well, Sylvia is very social, or Sylvia, she just like can't stop talking. And one of the things too that I think was kind of like, i mean, good and bad, i understand where the teacher was coming from where they would say like, okay, well, i'm gonna separate you, sylvia, but that didn't work for me because then I would just talk to the next person Like it wasn't, like I would stop talking. You know what I mean. And so it was just like oh, and so I was kind of always looking for role models that weren't scared to like color outside the lines, and so I cannot think of one of our oh, jenn and Napolitano. This might get pretty controversial, but at one point she was a mayor here in Arizona And I really liked her because, again, she was always doing everything that pissed everybody off. And again, another thing that's really controversial in the here in Phoenix is that we had SB 1070 and that's when Joe Arpaio was here, and it was just like long story short. It was lots of laws against just brown people, to the point where social profiling and like cultural profiling was like A-okay, and it was a really hard couple of years in this state And there was just like, oh, just so much pressure and tension. And I just remember saying, like I really look up to the people who aren't afraid to make people mad or who aren't afraid to say the wrong thing And they might apologize for it later, but still, you're not scared to do it, they're still not scared to act on it, which is like the biggest thing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, i like that. I'm not afraid to ruffle some feathers And for standing for what they believe in. it sounds like Okay. so now tell us about your educational background. Did you attend college immediately after high school Or did you start later?

Speaker 2:

No, guys, i was the textbook Latina of like, again, seeking that validation from my parents because I wanted to make them proud so badly One of the things about me too. But I was also a I hate saying the word goal getter, but I was one of those because, again, i wanted to be a high achiever, right. So I pursued college during high school through a program that was in our high school district, through the community colleges, and so I and those, the people who ran that program her name is Rosa Cota, like, we're still friends to this day She was, she ran the program and she's one of those people who, like, really believed in the fact that, like BIPOC, kids can run the world but they need to be given that leverage, they need to be given the first step on the ladder. And so I pursued college during high school and I was like on my track, on my track, on my track. And it's so funny because I went to a predominantly white high school, which was my first taste of culture. Shock because, funny story my parents purposely sent me to that school because they didn't want to send me to the one that I was in district downs, because they knew I would fight Jokes on them. Because they sent me to the predominantly white high school. I experienced culture shock like no other, and that was fighting, because everybody was calling me a wet bag and everybody was calling me every name in the book. And I'll never no, i'm not a girl I'll never forget the first day of my freshman year when somebody called me a wet bag. I was so confused because I was like, and I was looking around, i was like who are they talking to? I don't see anybody who has a wet t-shirt on. And I remember one of my girlfriends being like Sylvia, they're talking to you. And she was black. What could I remember? my girl to Hera? She was like girl, they're talking to you. She was like do you know what that is? And I was like no, and she was like have you been around white people? And I was like, honestly, not that much. And she proceeded to tell me what it was And I will never forget my dad picked me up from school that day And he just saw that I just had this face of distraught, like what's going on, and then, of course, proceeded to have that conversation. So again, i was at that high school and I was just fighting for my identity the entire time, all four years, but also wanted to continue to keep making my parents proud. But then I'll be very honest, i was struggling with having this facade and this lie going on right But then doing really well, pursuing college during high school, at the community college, where I was like excelling because I was surrounded by people who looked like me, but I was barely passing by in high school because I was just fighting for my life every single day, which then I literally almost didn't graduate high school. But it didn't make sense because I was just a credit away from getting my associates degree. And I remember the day where my parents sent me down and they were like, what the hell are you doing? And I was like I literally didn't have an answer because I was like, i know this looks terrible, but I swear, look at me, i'm about to get my associates degree right. And it was such a big disconnect for me and a big like red flag in which I was like Sylvia, you have to start telling the truth about what you're experiencing and what you're going through. But I still didn't learn that lesson. It wasn't time for me to learn that lesson, so made it through high school, When I continued on to the community college, i got my associates degree. And then my parents were like, since you already have your associates degree, you have to make it at Arizona State University. Go Devils, actually, jk. You have to get your degree in two years, like straight up forced whatever. And I speak, i'm just blasting everything which is now a hee-hee-ha-ha. My brother went to college for like five or six years And so it's already the double standard of, like the boy can do whatever and the female has to like get it done right first, try, et cetera. Typical Latina home. And I cried. I was so stressed out. I again was in a major that is predominantly white and nobody gave a shit. Nobody gave an absolute shit as long as you gave your money and passed. Here's your fucking degree And don't fucking worry about it. Like you better figure it out. And again it was just this feeling of, okay, i'm doing everything right, but I don't feel a sense of like I know what I'm doing. And I went to school for being a speech therapist And I'm an S by degree, i'm an SLPA. I'm not a speech pathologist. A speech pathologist is you have to go to master to like, get your masters for that. And my parents automatically were like okay, so your next step is going to get you. And that's where I was like na na, na, na na. We not pursuing our masters, like SIS made it through the degree for the bachelor's, like that's it. You guys can't tell me anymore. And that was the beginning of again what I do now, which is hilarious. But I went, got my degree, started practicing speech therapy, which again, i'm not gonna lie to you, is my heart for the kids, absolutely. Am I a fucking awesome SLPA? Yes, yes, i can tell you that with my whole chest I'm an incredible therapist. But was my heart in it every day? No, why? Because I pursued something the entire fucking way that my parents wanted.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that sounds so tough From finishing college, which sounds super difficult and stressful. can you share how your career unfolded right after?

Speaker 2:

Totally So. oh my gosh, remember I'm giving you like a story that I've never really shared with anybody. So, yes, i graduated, got my first big girl job, right. I was like going on interviews to different clinic settings because I decided I wanted to start at the clinic setting and then I would eventually go into the schools. When I had a family, i told myself. So I started out in a clinic setting and I was working and working. I worked a couple of years and I became really good friends with the owner of their clinic place here in Arizona And I was like working and working, doing a great job. My schedule was full, making money, et cetera. And then I all of a sudden got an offer from the owner and was like, hey, we see you do great work. We have two special needs kids of our own. This is gonna be kind of awkward And I want you to know they're white And I want you to know like this isn't meant to be offensive, but we wanna talk to you. And I was like, oh my God, what could they talk to me about? And guys, again, people, please, or me. I was like I knew it, i did too many copies at the copy machine, right, i was going for all the yeah, i was going for all the bullshit. And then I walk into this meeting and they are like we wanna extend an offer to you, kind of like a promotion. That's literally what they said. I'll never fucking forget. Oh, don't mind, i'm sorry if I'm saying bad words.

Speaker 1:

That's okay. Did you say cut words? I don't even know.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I say so many bad words heads up producer And I walk into this meeting and they're like this is kind of a promotion, okay. And I was like okay. And they were like we'd like to extend an offer to be our nanny because you do such exceptional work with the kids. And I was like I thought you said promotion. And they were like yes, this is a promotion, like you'd be working for us directly with our kids, but like as a nanny. And I was like, huh, okay, weird, yes, okay, so you were already seeing the red flags. I did not see the red flags yet. I go home and I tell my parents about this And my mom is like, oh, my gosh, you should do it. They live in Scottsdale, they're gonna pay you all this money, right Again. Typical family like status, status, status symbol, symbol symbol, money, money, money, right Okay. And my dad was like don't fucking do it, don't fucking do it, don't fucking do it. And I was like, oh, no, but again, people, please are me, guilt me, shame me. How am I gonna say no, i didn't. I worked for them for two years And from one day to the next, they decided to change their mind And then they said, okay, we need the soap notes for the last two years. What? And I said soap notes. Soap notes are what I did as, like a speech therapist, and they were like well, no, honey, we hired you through an extension of where I worked, so you now need to scrounge up two years of soap notes. Long story short, norma, it was the beginning of the end for me, because they decided to sue me for everything my license, my degree, my standing with the board, all of it because they decided to pay me out of the clinic money versus them paying me out of pocket. But I had no idea, because I just trusted the fact and believed them. And again, i was just trusting what somebody had told me. And that was the beginning of the end, because shit got so terrible court, et cetera, all of the things And I landed in such a deep and heavy depression that it was the beginning of me going to therapy and doing the self-work and being like Sylvia. This is what people pleasing gets you, this is what guilt gets you, this is what needing external validation gets you. Are you done yet? Are you done yet. And so those are the lessons that, again, God and the universe had to be like. I'm gonna break you rock bottom so that you learn it and you can begin to rebuild. And that's the conversation. I don't think anybody wants to talk about that. Sometimes it takes something that terrible to be like oh shit, it's time to pick me, so yeah. So then, yeah, i got out of that situation, thank goodness, and it was really terrible. I'm minimizing it absolutely But then I proceeded to work at other clinics and other systems And again I was starting to live life on my own terms. But one of the biggest things that I remember growing up is I always told my dad you know what? I'm gonna call my own shots one day, i'm gonna run my own business, i'm gonna do this, this and this. But I kept putting myself in situations where I was working for other people and other people were telling me what to do. Fast forward to what was last year, 2022?, may 2022?. Yeah, I was working under the school system and I had a supervisor use a racial slur on me at the very end of the school year And Drake was like honey, you've been coaching, just sleep. And I was like no, like you know, like this is my income, this is the study thing. And I saw that my tax stuff from my business next to what I made at school. I made more in my business And she called me that racial slur and that was the day Like I remember. I barked at her and I was like I'm done, i'm done, and I gave her the most colorful cussing out of a lifetime not my finest moment, but I'll never forget. She used a racial slur on me and I was like I'm out, out And again. The career trajectory is complete 360.

Speaker 1:

Yeah Well, first back to getting sued by these people who like who does that? I'm gonna pay you out of the business and then, oh my God, they sound crazy. Yeah, i went through that, thank you. And then you know, it's unfortunate that I don't know. You know that's. I guess here, like I said, here in San Antonio, there's so many minorities, or I'd say, brown people because, it's not very diverse, But because of that, you don't see a lot of racism in the same way. It's definitely a lot more discrimination or prejudice because of different things, And racial slurs aren't something that we encounter definitely in the workplace, more like microaggressions. But I can't even imagine. Yeah, And all these years fueling. Well, I feel like I'm like I need a breath after all of this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I know, But I, I was. That's why I'm so excited to come on this podcast, Because I was like manifest your career, This is the space to say like you can change at any time. And I mean, Nordam, that's one of the things you and I, I think, really drive with is that we're just like if you want to flip it, let's do it, Let's pivot you know.

Speaker 1:

So, yeah, definitely, definitely. So I want you to share what has been your most influential experience in your career so far.

Speaker 2:

I think getting sued I know that people would be like, wow, so many, like that's so much trauma. But being in the platform that I stand on and how I like run my business and like our mission, getting sued at 24 had to be a part of my story And I know that a lot of people would be like no, like, don't talk about that. That's such a sad time for you. Like I don't know how it was, like chunks of my hair were falling out at a time, but because that happened, like the worst fucking happened, like the IRS was coming to get me, like everything, guys, everything, and I didn't die, i'm gonna be okay, i'm gonna be okay. Like that really was a moment of I really learned how to trust myself, me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, that's amazing. That's amazing At 24, i don't know what I mean. I'm sure you had a lot of emotions running through you Just thinking about it. I felt like I would just fall apart. Oh which is you know, totally, and that did happen. So, oh, okay, and now, what has been some of the best career advice that you've received?

Speaker 2:

My favorite is don't use I don't know as an answer, because a lot of times we use like I don't know as an excuse. And it's so nice because, like, we've really beautified I don't know. Because, like, we'll just say like, oh, i don't know how to do that yet. Or like, oh, i don't know, it's not the right time. Or oh, i don't know, my ducks aren't in a row. And now when people say that we're like, oh, okay, and we're just like, oh, yeah, that's totally a good excuse. Like, yeah, absolutely. And we even say oh, valid, okay, yeah, sure. And in real life, i don't know, just need some fucking scared.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, i don't wanna take the time to figure it out, i'd rather be stuck in this confusion. Yeah, okay. Well now, what has been the worst career advice you've received?

Speaker 2:

It was a phrase given to me in Spanish by a coworker that was like oh mi hita, mi ha que le te aquí. And it means to just like stay, just stay there, just. And she really sent it in a way of just like, just be complacent, it's good, you know, like. And again, it was in a space that was predominantly white And she was just really trying to tell me like, don't rock the boat, it's good. Like, be happy, they made a space for you at the table, even though I had to like bring a little step stool to sit on like. You know what I mean. But like, she really really tried to convince me of like no, it's good, it's okay. And I remember going home and being like is it really okay? Like do, am I just supposed to like accept the breadcrumbs? And I remember it took me a couple of weeks of like okay, like, i'll just play it safe then, i guess. And then I started getting really bored. I was like okay, that is not gonna work, it's not.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah. How do we say that? what people tell you is the advice they wish they heard. So you know, maybe there's something she wish she had learned sooner, perhaps. Yeah, So that she wouldn't feel like she was always fighting an uphill battle about things. Yeah, Now what career advice do you wanna share with my audience? I?

Speaker 2:

think that and this speaks volumes of who Norma is and the kind of just resources she brings learn to trust yourself, because the options and opportunities will always present themselves. The job description will say like did it, did it, did it. Like this is what it is, did it, did it, did it, did it, did it, did it. But if you don't trust yourself, you won't even put your name into the hat, you won't even click submit, you won't even hit apply if you don't trust yourself. And I feel like again this week's volumes of you, norema, that you're all about just Manifest this. Like you're equipped, it's in there. but again, you have to trust yourself. And it's in those moments where you're like, oh, this shit is dicey, that then you're like trust me, and then that's where confidence comes later.

Speaker 1:

Right, it's about believing in yourself Totally, And confidence and believing in yourself are two different things. Yeah, and both take work Totally. Now tell us more about your business, Like how did you even start up with the idea you're working as a speech therapist assistant? So how do you go from that to coaching?

Speaker 2:

Okay, i love this. Oh, Norma, this has been such an expansive conversation, so thank you again, okay. so yes, as you guys knew, again, i pursued my degree just solely to make my parents proud. Do I enjoy working with children? Are they the light of my life? Absolutely. Do I have a special place for special needs And I have a gift for it? Yes, but there's a difference between, like, you have gifts and then you answering your purpose and your call, and I think that, like again, norma can speak volumes to that. But when I had just gotten married, my husband was a partner. I've never been one of those people who was like, oh, this is my other half. No, i'm a full-ass person, i don't need my husband to be my other half. But Drake, my husband, was a great not the rapper guys was a great example. I know Was a great example of somebody that is such a great add-on. Like he just amplified who I was. He didn't take away from it And when I told him I said, hey, i have this feeling that I'm not supposed to be doing speech therapy for the rest of my life And he was like I don't know what to do with that, but I'm going to tell you to be curious about it, and I support you Again. General male answer of like I'm super not in touch with my feelings, but I got you, it was cool, you pursued that, and so I was like OK. And so in that space I was like, ok, i'm going to do a little blog. I want to motivate and inspire people. That's where I was the superficial level of my life, right, and because I had gone to therapy and had done the self-work because of that deep depression I was in earlier, i was like I want to inspire people for the people who just are hitting rock bottom. And so I knew I was speaking to those people And, of course, people of color, like the BIPOC community, were like yo, this is dope, like I can see where you're going with this. And so I was like OK. And then I was like how do I make this like a business or like something sustainable? So then I started an online clothing store because I believed when you look good, you feel good, which is hilarious, because the other day I posted something on how that's complete bullshit. But that's where I was again, superficial part of my journey. And then I went that when I realized that I hated. Going to the post office I was like that, this shit is not for me. I'm going to slain bracelets. So I decided to make bracelets, gem bracelets. Ok, norma, like a bitch, was not scared to fail OK. And then after that I was like I want to start a podcast with, like a friend. But again it was just lots of like, here and there, here and there, peaks and valleys. And then I was like, ok, this is not working, i need to figure this shit out. And then I found coaching. And then I went to Drake and I was like honey, i think I found my thing. I need to pursue it, i need to go to school, i need to get a certification for it. Here we go. And Drake was like, as long as you're really sure I'm super down, like you're going to pursue it, you're going to do it. Cool, i'm down. And I haven't looked back since. It was the thing that clicked. It was something that I wanted to pursue, because I wanted to pursue it, and it's what changed the game. And so now my business is called Confidenza a toda madre, and that's just what I really. This is my life's purpose, this is my calling.

Speaker 1:

I love them and I love the name Atua madre, And for anybody who doesn't speak Spanish, it's, I don't know, like a total badass, I guess.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's like a phrase.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and now tell us how people can work with you.

Speaker 2:

Oh, awesome. Thanks, Nordema, you can work with me one-on-one coaching. Again, i basis myself on building your self-trust in order to feel confidence. I am a self-trust and confidence coach And we do that through working together one-on-one for 90 days. So it is a weekly phone call for three months, just you and I working together to really build up that belief system, build that self-trust in order to exude confidence in all areas. And yeah, people can follow me at The Sylvia Brands on IG. I'm on YouTube and confidence at Atua madre is my podcast and YouTube.

Speaker 1:

That is so awesome. Is there anything else that you would like to share with us?

Speaker 2:

No, i just really want to say thank you for the space. Nordema, like again, i love your podcast, you're awesome. And again, this space, this conversation, really speaks volumes to your community and what you believe in. So thank you so much for the opportunity.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for sharing your journey and really just being so honest about it, because I'm sure there's many women out there that can relate to that same experience of just following what you were being told but also not even sharing what was going on. You get in trouble as a Latina growing up and it's your fault, like your parents don't even take your side and you're just going to like well, i know that I didn't do anything, but I'm in the wrong, because teachers are the authority.

Speaker 2:

Oof 100% A dating and all of it Duh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and in here another's own, like traditional upbringing Also, like I compare it to my own, and it's like you know, i had the traditional super strict dad, like I couldn't even paint my nails kind of strict, but at the same time they were also very empowering of me. They're very like you're independent, you don't depend on anyone, which was great for a lot of things. But I think that at the same time I was taught to be very muted, very conservative, don't speak you know my opinion unless somebody's asking and unless it's like in you know what is expected to come out of my mouth. And yeah, yeah, i'm just thinking about high school constantly being labeled a sassy, even though I hardly ever talked, but when I talked I guess it was spicy. Yeah, and this is still, you know, like 99% Latino, like school community. So it's not like race had a lot to do with it. I think sometimes, you know, you just get labeled a certain way And I think it was just because I spoke my mind, you know, and I and I did it whenever I felt like I wanted to. And maybe that was confusing for people. People wanted to keep me in a quiet, academic kind of box, but I didn't fit that box So that the label was then I was rebellious, even though I wasn't. I really wasn't. Yeah, no totally Yeah 100% So well. thank you again. I enjoyed hearing your story. I'm still shocked about you getting sued. I was like I can't even imagine. I'm glad all of that's behind you now. I'm sure that was a journey you never expected. I can't even imagine what your parents were thinking of that. They had something on that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, my mom wanted to go to their house and speak to them And my dad very much fear, i mean, and my parents are citizens of the US. But, like, my dad was like, no, if these people want to do bad, like what if they go to our jobs? What if they go to again, very, just, a very feared place? And don't get me wrong, like my dad is one to throw hands, like you know. But when my dad saw the gravity of how they wanted to come for blood, like they were coming for my degree, everything My dad was like these are people who'd come for our livelihood And if we? my nickname at home is Baulina And so they were like, so if we can't even provide the livelihood for Baulina when she's going through this, like because they've now affected our jobs, like what would we do in that situation? So it was. It was very difficult for them to witness, but also my parents saw the change in me after that.

Speaker 1:

That's amazing. Yeah, sounds like a transformational experience of course for everybody too, Yeah Not? just for you, i can't even imagine. Well, thank you again, and I don't think this would be the last time on the podcast either.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, girl, we got, we got conversations to have. but yes, Nodema, thank you so much, And to the community, thank you so much.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for listening to the Manifest Your Career podcast. Are you ready to take action today? Visit ManifestYourCareercom to get started and schedule a free discovery call with me and gain clarity today.

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