Job Search SOS

Communication

April 08, 2021 Chris & Nancy Pinto Season 1 Episode 5
Job Search SOS
Communication
Chapters
Job Search SOS
Communication
Apr 08, 2021 Season 1 Episode 5
Chris & Nancy Pinto

Communication is a vital part of our lives, and crucial for a successful job search.  In this episode, we cover best practices for communicating via phone, email, and text.  

Pinto Employment Search LLC - Logistics & Supply Chain Recruiters
Chris & Nancy Pinto, Owners
Website: 
https://www.pintoemployment.com/

Nancy Pinto
Phone: 201-988-2293
Email: 
[email protected] 
www.linkedin.com/in/nancypinto



Show Notes Transcript

Communication is a vital part of our lives, and crucial for a successful job search.  In this episode, we cover best practices for communicating via phone, email, and text.  

Pinto Employment Search LLC - Logistics & Supply Chain Recruiters
Chris & Nancy Pinto, Owners
Website: 
https://www.pintoemployment.com/

Nancy Pinto
Phone: 201-988-2293
Email: 
[email protected] 
www.linkedin.com/in/nancypinto



NANCY:   Whether you asked for a job transition or not, searching for a new position can be scary, frustrating and disheartening.  Times and technologies change quickly, and there’s a lot to organize!  But the journey can just as easily be exciting, fruitful and rewarding.  I’m Nancy Pinto. 

CHRIS:  And I’m Chris Pinto.  Together we own Pinto Employment Search, an executive recruiting firm specializing in the supply chain and logistics industry.  Our combined experience in transportation jobs and recruiting is over 50 years!  We’re here to help you navigate the world of resume writing, job applications, interviews, negotiating compensation, and everything in between - to help you land the job you want!  Once a week, we will also release an episode where we announce current job openings we’re working on.  

NANCY:  Welcome to the Job Search SOS Podcast!  Today we’re gonna COMMUNICATE our thoughts on COMMUNICATION!  It’s one of the greatest capabilities of our species, and yet, something at which we all sometimes suck.   

CHRIS:  Having good communication skills is super important for a job search.  The way we email recruiters or Human Resource managers, the way we handle phone conversations, and how we present ourselves on video all influence whether or not we get a chance at that face-to-face interview.  As mentioned in episode 4, Searching and Applying, an ill-addressed “Dear Sir” to a female hiring manager can lead to instant disqualification.  

NANCY:  So let’s start with email etiquette.  As language evolves, there are still some solid rules to follow that won’t go out of style.  

CHRIS:  Do address all emails in a neutral way - for example, To Whom it May Concern, Dear Hiring Manager, Attention Human Resources - if you don’t know the specific person in charge.   Sometimes companies have general emails you can use to contact them (for example, Pinto Employment Search has set up  [email protected] for general inquiries).   

NANCY:  Start with a greeting such as hi or good afternoon.  Maybe say you hope they’re having a good day, or had a nice holiday, or whatever.  It doesn’t have to be long and flowery, just polite.  Then get into the reason you’re writing.  Remember to check for correct spelling and grammar before sending.  And if you need to ask something of them, say please and thank you.   Just like your momma taught you.   

CHRIS:   When you’re job searching, check your emails regularly.  At least every hour.  You don’t want to miss an invitation to interview, or an offer, or any information related to your search.  Check your spam folder often as well, and mark trusted contacts as safe with your email provider.  

NANCY:  Respond promptly to HR managers and recruiters.  We work really hard to get you in front of the department managers, and get really, really sad when we reach out and don’t hear back.  Even if you’ve changed your mind for any reason, that’s okay, we would rather know so we can move on and stop bugging you.  We know life happens!

CHRIS:  If you’re going through an interview process, and are waiting for updates, it’s definitely ok, and encouraged, to follow up if it’s been a few days since you’ve heard anything.  Just be polite and friendly, and offer to provide more information, such as references, if needed.  And remember, use lowercase letters, and when asking a question, ONE question mark is sufficient.  Don’t be afraid to ask someone you trust to proofread any emails you intend to send, just to make sure you’re getting across the tone you want.  

NANCY:   If you’re listening and you’re a hiring company, we understand you’re busy - after all, you’re probably short-staffed!  But candidates in the pipeline under serious consideration really appreciate periodic updates so they know where they stand.  If a good recruiter took the time to screen and present a candidate, then in all likelihood it’s worth at least a phone interview.  If circumstances change, a quick email to a candidate or recruiter would be really helpful, and leaves everyone feeling good, not ghosted. 

CHRIS:  Sometimes it’s necessary to text if something is urgent, like an interview request on short notice.  While this is generally a less formal way to communicate, professionalism is still in order.  

NANCY:   I like to say hi, identify myself, briefly state the issue, and end it with something like “thanks” and “regards.”   Stay on top of your text messages, and respond as soon as you can.  And unless specifically requested, don’t assume that this should be the new mode of communication.  Stick with email. 

CHRIS:  Continuing with phone communication!  We’d like to share some tips to help you navigate job search-related phone calls.  

NANCY:  Make sure your voice mailbox is cleared out, and your personalized voicemail greeting is friendly, professional and brief.  If you’re unable to take an incoming call, it’s okay to let it go to voicemail.  But check your messages frequently, and return calls as soon as you can the same day.  If you get THEIR voicemail, leave a brief message and the best time you can be reached.     

CHRIS:  By now everyone has received a bunch of calls about an auto warranty, laptop repair, or audit from the IRS.   If you decide to take the call, even without knowing who it is, answer in a friendly manner.  It could be a recruiter or hiring manager on the other end.  

NANCY:  Put on a confident smile and remember, it’s just two humans having a nice conversation.   

CHRIS:  Find a quiet, private place where you can focus and talk freely for at least a half hour.  The interviewer should not hear you ordering soup or picking up your dry cleaning.  

NANCY:   If you need to, ask for an overview of the job they’re calling about. But if it’s a recruiter, don’t ask them for the name of the hiring company (in other words, their client) right off the bat.  We’re not trying to be coy and evasive, or waste anyone’s time.  We’ll be happy to share all details when the time is appropriate.    

CHRIS:   Express yourself professionally, and find a diplomatic way to explain anything negative.  We don’t need to speak the Queen’s English, but refrain from cursing, complaining and bad-mouthing employers.  

NANCY:   Do talk about your accomplishments proudly.  The interviewer is rooting for you!  At the same time, try to refrain from continuously asking the recruiter or HR manager if they know what you’re talking about.  Assume we do.  We’ll ask for clarification if we don’t understand something.   

CHRIS:  Feel free to ask questions about the opportunity as well.  A recruiter or HR manager may not have all the details, but it shows interest and knowledge.  Some things will be best discussed in an interview with the department head.  

NANCY:  When the conversation starts to wrap up, make sure to understand the next steps in the process, and when you might hear back.  Make a note in your calendar to follow up if you haven’t heard anything in about a week.  Things get crazy for everyone, so a little patience goes a long way.  

CHRIS:  When you do get a follow up call, email, or text from the recruiter or  hiring manager, make sure to respond promptly, whether it’s an invitation to interview, a request for references, or some other matter.  Companies assume that you’re interested when you apply and start the interview process, so ghosting just looks unprofessional and burns bridges.  Life happens and things change - people are more understanding than you might believe - but again, communication from all parties is extremely important. 

NANCY:   We hope you found these tips and reminders helpful!  If you have any suggestions on how to make communication smoother, we’d love to hear them!  

CHRIS: Next time, we’ll start to dissect THE RESUME.  Please refer to episode 2 for a general overview of resume writing.  For the next few weeks, we’re going to take a deeper dive into the various components of a resume, as well as different formatting choices and styles, depending on what you’re going for. 

NANCY:  We’ll also drop bonus episodes announcing the hottest logistics jobs we’re working on.  Our website and contact info will be in the show notes of every episode, so please feel free to share with anyone you know, and reach out with comments, questions, or just to say hello!

CHRIS: Thank you for listening to the Job Search SOS Podcast!  
Please visit www.pintoemployment.com and feel free to reach out to us.  See you next time! 

Pinto Employment Search LLC - Logistics & Supply Chain Recruiters
Chris & Nancy Pinto, Owners
Website:  https://www.pintoemployment.com/

Chris Pinto: 
Phone: 908-578-5814
Email:  [email protected]
www.linkedin.com/in/chrispintoemployment

Nancy Pinto
Phone: 201-988-2293
Email:  [email protected]  
www.linkedin.com/in/nancypinto