A Server's Journey

What Type of Leader Are You? (Part 2)

June 19, 2019
A Server's Journey
What Type of Leader Are You? (Part 2)
Chapters
A Server's Journey
What Type of Leader Are You? (Part 2)
Jun 19, 2019
Rocky DeStefano & Zach Davis
Show Notes Transcript

Join us for a continuation of last week's episode with Kyle Brown, graduate of UCF's Rosen College of Hospitality Management. Kyle talks his hands on experience with different kinds of leaders, and makes the point that different kinds of leadership styles lend themselves to various scenarios. What kind of leader are you? Listen here to find out. 

Speaker 1:
0:03
This is the surgery.
Speaker 2:
0:10
Welcome once again to us servers journey with rocky destefano. Thanks Larry. I as always, we meet here every week and we are on this path of leadership together and we are super excited and we hope that you are learning tons and tons from the show. And I'm Zack Davis, uh, you know, we're all on a leadership journey here and uh, everybody's leading something or someone. So we believe in leading the serving way and that's what the premise of the show is and that's why we call the show is servers journey. Fantastic. No, this is like a continuance of last week, right? We have, how can we do, how do we stretch this time like this? Well, you know, after the future or something or sometimes you have enough content to where you really do,
Speaker 3:
0:50
do need two shows, otherwise you end up, um, not quite, you know, flushing out all the theory and so forth. Someone's going to have to tell us what they want shows that are 30 minutes or they want them an hour. Yes. You know, who's got a commute to an hour anymore? Well, I remember anybody in La, Chicago. Yes. One night it took me four hours to get out of Chicago. So really? Wow. That was a fun night. I probably, if only we had the times, um, if you'll add yours. Yeah, we did saw the end game movies and we're not going to white. I guess by the time this airs we could, you really wouldn't be a spoiler, but we're not going to say anything. But a end game movie was pretty, pretty darn good. Oh really? Oh yeah. Very good. I thought it was very good. Okay, so Kyle's in the studio again today. Yes. Right. Okay. So let's do this because this is our
Speaker 1:
1:42
done
Speaker 2:
1:44
peak moments in leadership and
Speaker 3:
1:46
this is now we haven't had a bad or a, you know, epic, you know, bad, epic moment in a long time. But this comes to us from wired's expos a and it's really about the inner workings of Tesla. And last week we kind of talked a little bit about Elon Musk and his leadership style. And a lot of people are very attracted to him, um, and his ideas and his thoughts. But his leadership style actually hasn't always been great. In fact, um, this is, uh, he kind of comes across, he's been described as a combative leader with a combative leadership style and he's infamously material. He goes up and down like at a moment's notice. Um, in fact, they have titled Him, Dr Ilan and Mister Mister Musk. So that Dr Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, he's got two sides. And there is a story, uh, where MUSC allegedly berated and fired a young Tesla engineer who he believed and made a foolish mistake with these explosive words.
Speaker 3:
2:48
You're a effing idiot. Get the f out and don't come back. And that's been reported by many people on the leadership team, uh, at, at Tesla. And the crazy thing is, um, it's not the only story that's like that. What did he hire him back the next day? I, you know, I don't know that, but, and I will say this, Elon Musk is a tremendous leader in thinking outside the box and a creative genius and amazing engineer, um, may be not the best with people skills. No. See the guy that's putting the rockets up, I'm kind of confused. Okay. Yeah. Right. I think he's a guy that says we will, we could be living on Mars. Oh, Ethan, 10 or 20 years. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Like the world's going to go away in 12 years too. Yeah. Yeah. I don't believe that's hilarious.
Speaker 4:
3:38
And well, he does have some pretty awesome autonomous driving. Yeah. Yeah. He does awesome work. Right? Forget Tesla.
Speaker 3:
3:45
Well, no. Well, and you know, I, you know, this is an epic moment in a bad about leadership style, but it's not bad about the products they create somehow, even even in that environment, they're still able to put out a pretty darn good electric car. No. Okay. Does he have a website? Uh, no. I don't know if he does. We have a website. I think that's where you're going with this. Yes. Yes. Because I was going to say he could probably get ahold of acs, creative and acs creative would really help him and they would also maybe clean up his image a little bit like they did ours. Yeah. And they would say, we don't play games with your money either. Mr. Although he could probably, they could probably play games with his money. I think he's got a lot of it, a lot more than we do.
Speaker 3:
4:29
Maybe they need a new logo. Yes. They need a brochure. You know, any uh, direct mail campaign. Yeah. Or anything like that. The line call acs creating. Yeah. Tell Adb said hi, acs creative.call. All right. And our website is a server's journey.com and we'd love for you to go on there and, uh, give us content ideas. Tell us what you want to learn about maybe who has impacted you as a leader, whether it's an author or a Ted talk, or even just somebody that you have worked with in your everyday life. But please go to the website, give us ideas, tell us what we're doing well, what we're doing wrong. Um, and it's all we use, download, subscribe, and rate us on iTunes. Very good. I liked that. That was a good idea. So Zach, why don't you reintroduce Kyle and then I'm going to let you lead this conversation. I'm not going to stay out of this. Okay. No, you're not. Okay.
Speaker 4:
5:23
Yeah. At least at least give us some time in between our voice that we, yeah, we don't look as bad, you know. Um, so we got caught here again today. Um, Kyle is basically the Lebron James of our chick-fil-a. Aga would probably be like the Michael Jordan. Ooh. Yeah. Kyles Kyles like the Lebron. He's got like a Brian James. He's got like 18 grand openings, genders belt. There are the five biggest ones and the country. So He's, he's a pretty awesome guy. Um, he's got a, he's got a lot of uh, uh, accomplishments. He's got a bright future. Um, and he's definitely made an impact on me. Um, so that, that's brief introduction of Kyle. He's an awesome guy. So,
Speaker 3:
6:00
and I think today, you know, cause we had a chance to really hear some of that backstory and, um, some of what he's hoping to do with chick filet. And just as a side note, cause Kyle is a getting ready here to apply with Chick-Filet. Um, and just to kind of tell you it's insane. The odds of becoming a chick-fil-a owner operator. And in fact, last year they had 60, it was a record, 68,000 applications. So middle to become an owner operator. So Kyle stands at the precipice of something that is very, very hard to do, but it's so easy. Yes, yes. Very easy. No, but anyways, so if you're somebody who prays, pray for Kyle or else put up a good thought up into the sky, the great power. Higher power. Yeah. All right, let's get into leadership styles. Thank you guys. Hey you, and today we're going to talk more about this theory itself,
Speaker 4:
6:51
right? And like we said last time, so there are tons of theories about leadership and it's been a, it's been, uh, an aspect of our lives for thousands of years. Um, so there's a bunch of, there's a bunch of different theories out there. There's a bunch of different frameworks. The ones that we're looking at today is actually introduced by Lewin and the 1930 [inaudible] to late 1930s. Uh, is, is a theory in, uh, uh, the, he's, yeah. Um, it's also pretty related to what we've been talking about, Kyle. We talked about this a couple of years ago and I think that it's made a little bit of an impact on our leadership. So there's three different,
Speaker 3:
7:24
well, I know real quick though, Zack, I gotta I gotta tell you, I found a really interesting facts because you mentioned that, you know, leadership and the study of leadership has been around for years. And so the first known public book, first known book at all about leadership was I came out in 1532 and was called the prints. So think about that. We're talking about six, almost 600 years later. Um, and we're still trying to figure this out. So leadership is not an easy older than America. Yes. Who's got the copyright on that book? Uh, I dunno, but you know what it is? It's the print. It was called the prince. And that's if you don't include the Bible, it's right. Yeah. The Bible is going to be 2000. Yep. You trumped me. There are 2000 years old now.
Speaker 4:
8:09
Um, yeah. So this, this one specifically, there's three different styles. Kyle, do you want to talk about the three different styles? Yeah, yeah,
Speaker 5:
8:15
absolutely. So autocratic democratic and then the laissez faire. So this is something that I've learned all throughout school, a great school. I haven't been introduced to it. Uh, we talked about it more impactful for me and um, at the college level when I was at rose and attended ucs, Rosen, um, and then I got to really see it hands on and I would say a crashed horse setting with all these grand openings we had. Of course, you know, at rocky store as well, you kind of see it here and there, but it'd be grand openings. It's just so it's like an accelerated summer course, you know, you're training 40 to 80 people in a short time period, you know, you're getting the whole store ready to go from kind of just nothing. It's, everything's accelerated. It's not like you have one person and that's your, you know, you're training them for the shift.
Speaker 5:
9:00
You know, you have multiple people kind of getting plugged in, plugged out. So you really have to be, you had to have high emotional intelligence and kind of understand very quickly what kind of person they are, how they're going to be receptive to what kind of leadership style you want to teach them. And kind of everything in between. The really cool thing about this too though, is you're in school full time and you're also working almost full time, same time you're being in your leader. So you're able to take this school, uh, the things that you're learning in school, the theories and almost directly apply them. Yes. Yeah, yeah. You get a chance to really put them, you know, put them to the, you know, the fire right there, right. In a store. It's not like you're a teacher's assistant. You worked at Chick-fil-a. Yeah.
Speaker 5:
9:41
So a lot of people was asking me like, which one, what did you learn more? You know, the school side. There were actual ordering experience side. For me it was, it was really one process. It was, it was awesome to be able to read about things and kind of see it in the class setting. And then like you said, be able to really test it and actually see it hands on. So it was kind of like a, it's called going to be a politician. I would love to later in life. I think I've mentioned that to rocky. I would love to run for like local government later in life. I love everything happens in local government. Remember that deep change? Well we got to find you a home version. Yeah. Well you know what's amazing to me cause you're, you're hearing about the fact that there is different leadership styles and literally thousands and thousands of books on leadership.
Speaker 5:
10:25
I think it really speaks to the fact that there can't be a way to lead. There isn't, yeah. So there are other types of leadership and you have to decide, okay what fits best and so forth. Right. And even just these three, you know, these are just good guidelines. You know, everybody's a little different. You don't have to tweak it here and there and kind of really catered to that person. Cause you know, we are serving leaders and that's kind of what we do. Yeah. So let, let's talk about, let's talk about the autocratic a little bit calm. Do you want to what the definition of autocratic by the way is the dictator lays down the law and his or her group and expect individuals to perform without questioning his or her authority. Yeah. So like right off the top of my head, um, this is for me when I've experienced this, this is a new market.
Speaker 5:
11:11
So for example, uh, one of my first openings I mentioned the previous show was in la. So at the time it was a new market. The nearest store was probably an hour and a half away. So what that means for us is we're hiring about 80 to 120 employees that have no clue what chick filet is. No clue what we're about. No clue what we stand for, what our beliefs are, anything like that. Yeah. And if they have an idea, it may be a negative one because of a media bias and so forth. Things that they've heard or seen protestors. Right? Right. So what that kind of means for us is there's absolutely no prior experiences. Uh, it could be a little more, a little more scary, a little more intimidating for those people. So going into that kind of situation, you don't want to be democratics and kind of say, hey, you know, what do you think?
Speaker 5:
11:57
Or how do you feel about this? Because they don't know. They don't, they probably don't want that either. They want somebody that can show them and guide them the right direction. So you kind of want to be a little more black and white, more direct. Um, and it was time. Situations you don't have, you know, a very experienced team to fall back on. You can't take a couple seconds and say, hmm, let me think about this. You need quick decision making. You need to be ready to go spring into action. Everything's, you know, there's, it's you, there's no support. It, it is you, you are the sole team that starting this, the story or this, you know, the store in that city. So there's, this isn't always a negative. Not a lot of people want. That's an awesome point. There are a lot of people think this is a negative. A lot of times, uh, for me, honestly, this is not going to be in but like my, my most used, uh, by any means. But in certain situations it is very, very, very, very, very, very beneficial. And those kinds of situations usually require, you know, like I said, a lack of experience team. That's usually the biggest one. If you have a lack of experience team, that team is going to seek extra leadership. They're really going to think that that team needs to be led in a different way than somebody who's seasoned. Yeah, absolutely.
Speaker 4:
13:09
Yeah. And when you're talking about a grand opening, we're talking thousands and thousands of dollars in sales. Like if you can compare to any quick service in that, that area, I don't know if they've got some similar numbers to that cause that's a lot.
Speaker 5:
13:21
Yeah. And another good, another good, um, path that you'd maybe want to use autocratic leadership towards is anything that really, that kind of deals with something that could be a little dangerous as well. So we don't always think about that in the restaurant, but you know, maybe deep cleaning, uh, an open fry or just the pressure Fryer, you don't really want to be jokey, jokey, you want to make sure that they know this is serious. You know, you don't want to like, you can hurt yourself. You don't want to put anybody else in danger or anything like that. You kind of have to be very black and white, very direct. So for your safety, for their safety. Um, so that's kind of another interesting path that you kind of look at.
Speaker 4:
14:02
Rocky, you've talked about this actually many times, and I don't even know if you were thinking about this theory or framework. You've said many times that our restaurant, and forgive me if I'm misquoting you or paraphrasing it, uh, you said in, in, in some situations you just got to make the decision. Yeah. And I remember one specifically, we had a team member a few years ago actually hit the reset button on the met. What was it? Chick-Fil-A? Yeah, it was cow appreciation day. Yes, it was insane. Oh my gosh. It was insane. No orders on screen when you said it, you can't recall anything. Yes. So basically we lost every order that every customer had a place and you know, you lose a that kind of information for three to five minutes and you're talking about like probably a hundred customers. So it's nothing easy to overcome. But in that situation we didn't have time sit there and form a,
Speaker 3:
14:52
you know, focus group and you know, I mean listen, people have to be led and sometimes then I've always said this, it's great to lead them in the right direction, but I'll take any direction over no direction. In the case of an emergency. Absolutely. Yeah. Auto autocratic is the perfect nine one one definition of what leadership kind of, we're going to go and I have an awesome story. Um, probably gives a little bit of nightmares to rocky when I mentioned it, but I think it's about two years ago. Do you remember getting a phone call from me pry around seven o'clock at night and forming you that there was a car that caught on fire at her window in the drive through and I actually kind of thought that he was joking. I was like, I was like come on and smoking. Right. Thankfully I was right across the street at, at a, another restaurant at a meeting.
Speaker 3:
15:37
So I, you know, real literally just talked to my car and went right across the street and it was literally on fire. Yeah. Disclaimer, the engine burned and melted to the ground. So Debbie, a little bit of visual, how engulfed this car was slowed the drive through. Yeah, we actually, a rare time we actually had to close down and you know, the great thing about it is I was trying, like he was saying, I think we need to close down. And I was like, no, come on. It's just smoking. Like my, you know, my mind, I was thinking, pushed the car out of the way, don't close, you know, we need those registers ringing. But he made the right choice and, and he was honestly at that point, probably the only person willing to make it, it was the right choice. Yeah. And that's kind of the path that was going at for example.
Speaker 3:
16:19
So and this and this and this situation, it was an emergency please. That rocky didn't know the full extent of what it was. Right. If I try to gather too many opinions at that point, I already evacuated the building. If I try to gather too many opinions, you know, now we're talking about instead of getting people to safety. So right then and there I saw a car, we went out there to, you know, they said the car wasn't moving them out there to push the car out of dry through. We saw a little bit of flame and the grill we went to get inside to get the fire extinguisher. By the time we came out, it wasn't, wasn't golf. It's the fire department job with the baby in the backseat, in the car seat and the woman a little bit dazed and confused and you know, wasn't rushing to get the baby out of the car at one point.
Speaker 3:
16:59
We thought the car might explode. Yeah. And Oh wow. Soon as I saw that it was an immediate, we got to get out of here. It's, yeah. Safety's first. Good idea. Thank you very much. What a great, what a great example of that as a good example. Thank you. All right, well let's go to the next one though. What's the other style? Yeah, so democratic, um, definition democratic would be a capitalize on the people's skills and talents by letting them share their views rather than simply expecting them to conform. So this is something that I think we deal with a lot of our store because we have a lot of very talented and very, uh, experienced theaters. Um, and this is again, a lot of, uh, sometimes egos and a lot of, of course, of course. Oh, it comes with it. Um, and going back to the, kind of my grand openings, uh, side of things, this is something that's very, very, very big
Speaker 5:
17:50
for us. Does, I know we talked about in the last episode, there's so many egos and everybody's, you know, general managers, everyone, the highest directors at their store. Um, and I, like I said, there's always a role at grand openings that's called the lead. So you're right, you're responsible for every trainer, you're the main die. And that's a very hard task. It's lot harder than it seems because again, we have to deal with these egos head on. Um, and the Democratic Democratic leadership style is usually the best to approach that. So kind of go with diamond into a little bit, just as an example. So, you know, here I am, I'm in charge of 20 of these other, you know, talented, awesome leaders, but they're not, and it's not necessarily a, there have a bad, you know, bad trade or anything. They're just not used to taking that role.
Speaker 5:
18:37
Now it used to having that role they used to just doing, instead of having to, you know, talk about things. And really kind of form opinions based off of other people's. And so how do you approach them at that point? So the most important thing I found is you never want to force anything on anybody. So what I mean by that is if I know this is the idea that I want to put forward, I know it's going to work. I'm not going to say, hey guys, we're going to do this. And they go up to everybody and say, hey guys, I have an idea. What do you guys think about this? So now that leaves the door open for them to kind of Springer on their experience and their knowledge that they've gained their situations. Um, and for one it kind of gives them the sense of they're involved.
Speaker 5:
19:18
Somebody is not going to be able to commit unless they feel like their voice has been heard. And I think that's very, very, very important for the situation. You have to be able to allow everybody to voice their opinions and feel like they've been heard. Once they feel like they've been heard, even if they disagree with it, they're much more likely to actually commit to it though because they've absolutely feel like they're part of the team and they've been a part of decision making. Um, so from there, like I said, I always leave it open ended and you know, you kind of surprised of how much, you know, it is an experienced team and they'll really genuinely probably are gonna better. Whatever idea you had, whether it's just small tweaks, you wouldn't have thought of shit. It always ends up a lot better. Yeah.
Speaker 4:
20:01
Yeah. And, and, and the thing is, I think a great example of this is in our store we have a review system and it is continuously getting better, thank the Lord because when it first started, it was a, it was a tough grind, but we're getting better. I think one thing that we did really, really well here was taking consensus as much as we could to make sure that the review system was working well for everybody and the final product at the end of the day, all opinions shared. It's a pretty good system.
Speaker 6:
20:30
Yeah. Well, you know, we always, we, you know, kind of a term that we say, or a sentence that we say is anytime you have a group of leaders, you have, you know, the chance to kind of borrow their brains too. So, um, caught what Kyle brings up is a really big point and it's, it's, uh, it's probably that I struggle with as a young leader more than than any other than any other thing is that normally, you know, kind of the direction that you should go and you know it because you've thought about it and you've thought about it and you thought about it. And so I'll go days, sometimes I won't make a decision because it's a decision that doesn't have to be made right away. So I'll think through all the scenarios and I'll kind of know this is it, and then I want a ramrod it down everybody else's throats and it just doesn't work. I mean, people don't feel good about that. And so you have to actually slow it down. And like you said, you have to kind of, you know, talk to them, get their feedback and build a consensus from your leadership team that this is the direction and then you get buy in.
Speaker 4:
21:31
Okay. My autocratic side says, wait a minute. This has taken too much time. Yes, yes. I say that all the time. Yes, there is. There are downsides to using a democratic and, and, and, and it's great to have democratic style in the right situation, right? Or at times when using a democratic leadership style is not, especially when you're having an emergency situation that I'm one ones and it's really a tough, it's a tough leadership style to implement because as a leader, you have to take more time. And if you're not a time, if you're not patient, you can, you know, it, it can really drive you nuts. It drives me nuts getting consistent consensus sometime. It just really does. But honestly, if you're looking for the best results as sometimes having a d a democratic leadership style, if not most times having a democratic leadership stock and really benefit your team, there can be more creative, uh, creative energy stifled there. Everybody feels heard. Everybody. It's more of a family culture, family atmosphere. And that's what you're looking for. There are disadvantages though. And the disadvantages are it takes a little bit of time. It's kind of tough.
Speaker 6:
22:36
Yeah. Yeah. Well, and, and you know, the crazy thing is, um, I think sometimes we let our insecurities lead us. In fact, we know right now having two different stores and seeing leadership styles from two different teams. Right now we have a little bit of an issue with, with one leader who is trying to lead from their insecurities. And so they're not asking for advice and thoughts and they're trying to just say, no, this is what we're gonna do. And He, you know, keeps bumping his head against the wall because he keeps hitting, you know, reaching roadblocks because he's never bought, he's ever got the buy in yet first. And you know, you have to, as a leader, you have to feel very secure in your own ability to lead and to gain a consensus. And normally, as Kyle said, people process things differently. So sometimes when we take take people's thoughts or feedback as defensive, it's not, it's just that they process differently and they need to ask questions and they need to understand the minute details. And for somebody like me who's, I'm not a patient person, it's maddening sometimes, but if I take the effort and the time to kind of get the buy in, it almost always works better.
Speaker 5:
23:57
Yeah. Which brings us actually to our third leadership style of laissez faire and calm LNG if you want to do the definition on that one. Yeah, of course. It's very little guidance from leaders, complete freedom for followers to make decisions. Leaders provide the tools and resources needed. Group members are expected to solve the problems on their own. So yeah.
Speaker 6:
24:19
What type of leadership group with this one tend to work the best in?
Speaker 5:
24:23
It seems it is this kind of like, I don't know, maybe you can shed light. Is this a little bit of the operators style kind of, well I think it's, it's my operator style. Yeah. Right. Yeah. So for me, this screams third party. Okay. So what I mean by that third party, so, uh, let's say I'm at an opening and I'm the backhouse lead. So what that entails is I'm responsible for everything in the back house trainers, the team members, anything that goes on operation wise. Um, but there also have what they call it prep lead. So prep is still in the back of house, so I technically overlooked them, but they have the lead that kind of very specifically make sure as the small tasks and day to day like t's are being crossed and i's are being dotted for the prep. So for me, I'm not going to be there at all really.
Speaker 5:
25:07
I'm not going to be there very often on basically kind of checking in on them. So for me that means I want to go over there and just kind of be a resource. So I'm gonna go over there and say, you know, kind of asked, hey, how's it going? You know, what does it look like for you? What problems are you facing? How can I better those problems? How can I make your job easier? It's very, very, very, I kind of want to say like I'm the leader, just use me as a resource. Yeah, that makes any sense.
Speaker 6:
25:32
Yeah. And you know, it's weird. I find myself in that category right now and I've been telling people that the hardest thing about having two stores is understanding what my role is and how I can help. And so I'm having to use a style and it's probably not one that is my go to. I like, I like to get into the details. I like to get into the trenches, but I can't, I just can't. And that's what you know, Kyle is talking about when you're running the entire operation of a grand opening, that mine too, you know, $80,000 a day, you can't worry about whether or not they're cupping Cole slaw. You have to, you have to, you know, put your faith in a leader, give them the ability to make decisions and so forth. But you still have to go back there and check and say, Hey, what can I do? What do you need from me? Are there tools? Are there, you know, influence more labor. So you're kind of checking in, but you're, you really do have a lot of faith in that person.
Speaker 5:
26:27
Yeah. Yeah. I think you probably have an unique to Spanish with this in the sense of we've gone through so many, obviously with this new, the new store being built and then we had a recent remodel. The old store. Yeah. You interacting with the construction team. Yes. You probably don't know anything about it. You don't want to be too involved and telling them what to
Speaker 3:
26:44
do on the small things, but you still want your store to be your store. Yeah. Right. So you've got to have to give those guidelines and paint the picture of what you want, but still
Speaker 4:
26:53
even more in a democratic kind of setting, allow them to do what they do best. Yeah, that's a great example too. And the GM, what did you s kind of, or kind of would that be? Yeah, that's a similar leadership thing there too because he's helping and you guys don't want to kind of step on each other's toes. I know, Kyle, you gave me an example to use this a few months back. We've got a, we've got a quality team, uh, and, and, and in our store we're a multiunit, there's a guy that oversees quality for both stores. As a shared director position, I came to Casa kind of, I want to make sure I respect this guy as much as I can. I don't want to step on his toes. And that's when kind offered to do a lot that, you know, this kind of laws a fair, you're not trying to, you're not trying to, you know, Lord over him. You're not trying to, you know, he's not going to be there all the time, but you do want to respect them and kind of give guidelines because it is, it is our store. Yeah. At the end of the day, we want to have really quality product in our store. We have kind of a little bit of the final say.
Speaker 3:
27:49
Yeah, it's a perfect example because kind of like what you're saying, your job is to make sure hammock ridge is quality is perfect, right? Right. Ties job was to make sure that the quality from Hancock and Hammock is consistent, right? To end goals and you guys have to intertwine. And that is the best situation that you could kind of, or I guess the best path you take for that situation. And so now and then my role, because I can now I'm thinking about the organization of Chick-fil-a, Claremont, whether it's two stores or three or who knows what the future holds. So what do I care about? So that's like my learning curve is, okay. So Zach is worried about hammock. Ty is worried about consistency between the two. And so where, where I come in and in fact yesterday we did this in, in, in real life, you know, you know, real world experience. I sat down with Kyle and to other leaders and we talked about, hey, where are we not being consistent? So we like identified one area. And so I'm, my list today is to talk to that shared director and say, Hey, we really need you to focus in on these two stores because we're slipping here a little bit. Right? And you've got to step in and get that consistency backup. Hmm,
Speaker 4:
29:02
absolutely. So in conclusion, there's three different leadership styles that we discussed today. There's hundreds out there. A guarantee you could find a book that has, I mean, when we looking this up, we found 10, I'm just about this very specific topic. Um, but there's a bunch out there. There's different uses for all of these. There's advantages and disadvantages for all of them, right? Um, and it's really, it's really discernment when the use this leadership style, how do you, and it goes back to kind of would, why is it, you know, uh, how, how do we get the best results, the best relationships? How do we, how do we figure this out? And this is a really good way to do it. It's
Speaker 5:
29:42
not 100%, uh, it is a theory. Um, but it has helped Alanna Alanna situations in our store note between Tal and I. It's helped us a lot, um, with going on grand openings, leading stores, doing all that kind of stuff. It's good to know this kind of stuff. And I like using this, these three because it's kind of been familiarized with a lot of people. You kind of hear about it in grade school and it's very, it's very familiar. I just wonder where you heard about it. Grade School. I was going to say, I didn't hear about it in school, but you guys do [inaudible] to think what class Florida education. See, it's good. It's better than what we think is really used to better. You know,
Speaker 6:
30:17
you know, the thing too to me is, um, you kind of want to have a leadership team. Chick-Fil-A used to have this saying that they would rather restrain a wild stallion than kick a donkey. And so what they meant by that is they don't want people that are afraid to make decisions because those people don't move the company forward. And they know that if they hire wild stallions, sometimes they're going to have to pull those reins and say, cool down buddy can't do that. But they'd rather do that because the, the, these people are trying to pull us forward. And so what I've tried to do is surround myself with those kinds of people who are wild stallions. And every once in awhile I have to say, hey, we can't do that, but I'd rather have that than not, you know, having improvements. And that's like the secret of our success has been, not just me, but tons of people always thinking, how do we make this better? But it takes a awful, awful good leader to lead that in. Like Kyle and J and a j and Zach and all these people there, they're becoming great leaders because you know, they're okay with it too. They're able to interest and let people run.
Speaker 2:
31:33
Well, you know, what a lesson has, this has been today. I really enjoyed it because I'm getting educated. Uh, you know, I'm not going to let you out of here again without doing a little of this or that. Okay. So there's a second part to this or that. All right, so here we go. And no, wait a minute. Since you have rocky, haven't seen it or Zach, maybe the three of you can kind of play along here. All right. Okay. This is this for that is, yes. That's the way I do things around here. It's just I make them up as we go along. Okay. Here you go. The two things.
Speaker 5:
32:10
Netflix or Amazon prime, this or that. Netflix for sure. Netflix. Wow. I was not expecting, I was not either. I thought we were on the same page or like this is an easy decision. We're going to Amazon. I can tell you why afterwards, but you know, so I guess your decision or your choice would be Amazon. Yeah, so if it was Netflix maybe three or so years ago, I'd probably go with it. But I do feel like there's been a little bit of like they lost some content. Amazon prime is just to clutch. Well
Speaker 4:
32:40
I think, I think if you, if working, pairing the platforms just specifically on videos and movies, right? I think Netflix is, Netflix is still has the edge right now. Amazon prime is coming like monster behind Netflix.
Speaker 3:
32:57
Yeah, no doubt they are. But you know what, what kills me about Amazon prime is they have content and it'll cost you 14 Netflix is all free and I am somebody who actually likes the development of their own shows. And so I think Netflix has better independent shows. Netflix cost you $13 a month, right? It was on prime cost you $99 a year. Yeah. But if I eat it up, but you get the whole package of expedited shipping and free shipping and so forth.
Speaker 4:
33:27
Well, Amazon prime does do music too. Yeah. And I guess I don't think Netflix does that. No. Netflix doesn't do that. Who Does the uh, uh, not to get too carried away. Who does one with Spotify?
Speaker 3:
33:38
Yes, they do. Yeah. Okay. No, I've got to ask the younger, the young ones in the house here. Yes. There we have Netflix. We have Amazon, but now we're going to have, Disney is going to have their own platform. This is a generous becoming. So is that something you guys are looking forward to or could care less? So I think when you, when you first think Disney, you're like, oh yeah, that's an a, B budget kitty things. But when you really look into how much Disney owns, and especially in the recent, you know, recently you're assessed star wars. Yeah, they bought Fox. So that's, that's a lot of content. It's absolutely a lot of content. That's a great time. All of the marvel movies and talking about all the, you know, the Mc Mcu, TV shows that they have, you know, they're going to be broadcasting on there.
Speaker 3:
34:20
I have a couple of shows that I like that or you mean completely exact opposite of what you'd expect. Disney kind of adult content shows that are fought there. Now they've been pulled off of Hulu and pulled off of Netflix or RBS basically being waited to be put onto this new platform. Yeah. Okay. So you're willing to pay another fee for another platform? Well, I think what'll happen is somebody won't survive. Yeah. So over the next five years, we'll see. Is it Netflix? Is it Hulu? Is it, you know, who's not going to make, where did Netflix come from? Little history, boys and girls. Netflix actually tried to sell their technology. They tried to sell their platform to blockbuster and blockbuster refused. It's probably the biggest single mistake, uh, anybody's ever made because blockbuster four years later was completely gone as a company. I mean, they, because they didn't read the tea leaves correctly and see where the, where America and where the world was going, which was on demand. And they foolishly thought our system works. It will never go out. And they're focused on their product store and get a video. Yes. Okay. Another, this or that question. T mobile or veraison.
Speaker 4:
35:31
Okay. That's an easy one. Verizon and I, and I'll tell you why, because everywhere I go, I got bars.
Speaker 3:
35:39
I made the NC, so I'm a little IMTS show. I do think Ryan's, what I've heard is probably even better. Yeah. And I'll be, uh, a democratic leader and trust Zach's opinion on this one.
Speaker 4:
35:50
Well, I'll tell you this yet. We got a phone for $700 off, gone to Verizon. We pay less than where we're at att. And I'm not trying to, you know, Verizon, I fricking love it right now. A days. Got No service in the office. Yep.
Speaker 3:
36:02
About to lose two, uh, two customers at and t get your game up. Wow. Okay. Paleo. All right, one more question for you. This one is a really tough one and maybe you don't even know the answer to this chess or checkers. Yeah, no, you don't play that while you can play it on video, but it's a board game. You're supposed to say chess because it makes you sound intelligent. I'm sorry, check. Yeah. Chess actually. But to be honest with you, I'm not the, I love strategy and if you like, say design a football play that works, I'm going to geek out on that forever. But, but I have trouble with the strategy of chess.
Speaker 4:
36:42
Yeah. Jess. Jess is more of like an algorithm gangs, right? It's a really big, and so if you're playing somebody that knows the algorithm
Speaker 3:
36:48
and where to go and what to do, it's not even fun. I mean, right? Yes. It's that it's not always a challenge. So to me it's less of sport and more a study in knowing the correct moves. I'm a guy that spends kind of got, like you said, I love algorithms. I will sit on a computer and mess around with excel sheets for hours on end. So I'm a chess guy. I love the strategy behind it. I love the kind of the, what are the possibilities there? Everything comes with it.
Speaker 4:
37:15
I'm going to say no to both and say, what do you mean?
Speaker 2:
37:18
I think you're a connect four. No connect for, well it's time to wrap this up. Thank you guys for playing this or that here on a server shirt. And we want to thank Kyle for coming on the show. These last two episodes. Take randomly. Thanks Kyle. Thank you. Until next time, next week. Hey, don't forget to uh, what login, what radars. Radars. Yeah, all those things. All the big FiveStars. Really appreciate it. Until then, I'm a Larry the K and I'm dazzled Davis. See it keeps changing. Last week it was Zach Dazzle and now it's dad's old mind. Get back. Does that, this work? I like it. I like it better. Right. And I am working on it. So what do I have to have a name too? I'm going to call myself big, tasty, a rocky desk to final here. And as always, uh, everybody's leading. Are you somebody worth following?
Speaker 7:
38:14
[inaudible].