A Server's Journey

Are You A Micromanager?

August 15, 2018
A Server's Journey
Are You A Micromanager?
Chapters
A Server's Journey
Are You A Micromanager?
Aug 15, 2018
Rocky DeStefano
Rocky shares more of his leadership journey and the motivation behind A Server's Journey Podcast.
Show Notes Transcript

Can being a server be anything but self-serving? Join us on this versatile episode of The Server’s Journey to grapple with the motivations behind servant leadership, share in finding love in the small things, and discover the truths associated with micromanagement in the workplace. Rocky shares a story about his relationship with his father, dives into the success of top UK business EasyJet, and more. 

Speaker 1:
0:11
Welcome to this edition of a survivor's journey with rocky destefano. The premise of the show is that everyone is leading something or someone, whether you're a apparent leading, a family, a coach, leading a team, a team member, leading a few or a CEO leading an organization. We're all on this path of being a leader. Thus the title of the program is a server's journey. Thanks Larry. I hope that everyone listening will be able to walk this journey of leadership with us and I understand today that you have a little bit of a popery show for us today, Larry. We it threw the balls up in the air and a lot of stuff came down and I said, let's put a show together. It's Kinda like a buffet, you know, I, I like buffets, so we're. Okay. So today we have a guest in the studio.
Speaker 1:
0:54
I. Debbie, yes. I wanted to share one of my stories with you that's going to be very transparent. You will judge me and you will wonder if I'm a snowflake, but I'm going to read a story for you. Fantastic. We want to share more about a servers moments more about the servers, radio network, and we have a question from a listener that we're going to answer. Fantastic. You know, before we go on any further, I think it's kind of apropos that we bring up the fact that chick fillet is now the number one. Are you fast food quick serve? We are. We are fast casual, fast casual. Yeah. And you know we have to say step aside, the big macs and the whoppers, the people have spoken and they want to eat more chicken. Larry, that is fantastic. That third year in a row, that chick filet has been named America's top fast food restaurant according to the American customer satisfaction index and some lengthy title.
Speaker 1:
1:51
Did they come in and ask you or now they do not ask me. I'm not worthy of a question I get that is fantastic because he must go around the country. Yeah. And you've got fewer units and all of these people yet? We do, but I think we're starting to become more of a national and even looking at international and you know, the chain it received are the satisfaction score was 87 out of 100, which was easily beat a or which easily beat Panera bread. Who is in second place at 82 and Papa John's Pizza Hut and subway who all tied for third at 80. The weird thing is I don't like, I don't think, well I guess we're gonna offend some potential advertisers, but I don't think Papa John's Pizza Hut for service. Crazy, you know? Well, well, Hey, what do I know? Okay. Well I'm amazed at my.
Speaker 1:
2:48
My Mcdonald's friends are so low. I know. Yeah. But you know, I think some of that's just a, it's easy to beat up on the big guy sometimes. You know, a long time ago I used to work with Mcdonald's. Yeah. It seemed like they had some of the same principles that I'm hearing at chick filet. So you know, here's an. You've heard from our story that I also worked at Mcdonald's and I, I did feel the training was good at and I felt like they were not that different than chick filet. I think what hurts them is they refuse to pay. And remember we talked about how people have to have the minimums at least covered. They don't have to make hundreds of thousands, but they have to have their minimums covered and I think chick filet and maybe a few of these other places do a better job of that. Anyways, thank you and welcome to chick filet. Congratulations. Congratulations Chick filet. You guys do a good job. Thank you very much. Thank you. I will accept that for the entire chain. You're welcome.
Speaker 1:
3:50
Accepting for. Hello? Yes. Yes. Um, you know, I know several people have said to me that you're actually a good writer and I'm telling me again Larry, pardon? I know some people have told me that you're a good writer and you've written some stories. I know you shared a couple of years ago and we've recorded them. And so I know we want to share one of your stories today. So what's it called? Yeah, and this one is probably my favorite. It's definitely the one that hits me. In fact, when I tried to record it, there was a lot of pausing to compose myself, but this one is called shaving and it's about a. One of my last experiences with my father. I quickly pulled the razor across skin, being careful to shave at close. My mind flickered here in there as it had been doing recently. It seems lately it had gotten difficult to settle my mind and one thought, especially when I perform tasks like this, a task I had performed so many times before as I shaved my mind, jumped around. I was 42, but I was also seven and I remembered a long ago day in Cleveland. I stood there next to my father. My Plastic Fisher price shaver
Speaker 2:
5:13
clapped in my hand while I struggled to learn the art of the shave. Nice and slow. Rocco. My Dad said, keeping a watchful eye on me. You need to be careful not to cut yourself, but you have to get the face clean like a baby's face. He said, as he smiled, the lady's like a clean shaven man. He said, as he winked at me, there'll be were father and son sharing a shave and a secret. I remember how I soaked it all in at seven. My father was still my hero, the center of my little universe that I called home. Whatever he said to me was, law here, let me help you. He said, as he took my razor long and straight lines up and down, Rico said to is wrapped pupil there I was learning to shave from a veritable barbershop Ninja, or at least that's what I remember thinking and then I was 42 again, as I quickly continued to shave as I shaved, lost in my thoughts, I decided that overall he was a good father, not perfect, but a better one.
Speaker 2:
6:17
As he aged. I remembered the other lessons he taught me as a lathered in shaved, making sure to get the face clean. Just as he taught me 35 years before I was 42 but 10 and I had gotten caught in a lie. It was embarrassing to me and I was upset about losing face in front of my friends. I was caught in a stupid and useless lie. I remember the statement he told me that day as clear as if it was yesterday, the mouth is a beautiful instrument, Rocco, you just don't know how to play it yet. How stupid I thought, but now I realized how right he was. I was 42 but 16 and the suffering of my first hard breakup. It was a longterm relationship. I think it was three months and had just gone sour. I didn't know how I would go on.
Speaker 2:
7:07
You don't understand that I screamed. I think she was the one. She's not the one. He said simply. Sometimes you have a really old and soft t shirt that you love and then it rips and you miss it, but then you get a new shirt and life is all sunshine again. I remember he said that with a smile, not making light of my predicament, but knowing that I would survive, what the heck does that even mean? I screamed, but my heart mended and I started another bit of wisdom in my mind to be used later. My Dad was like, that is simple truths form the doctrine of an immigrant philosopher and I was unwillingly becoming a born again, convert to the gospel of Rico. I used to jokingly call his oratory texts, the Kerv version of the Bible, the King Rico version, but instead of these endows, the sentences were connected with Italian cursewords.
Speaker 2:
8:03
His parables were both helpful and hilarious like the time he told me a parable of when he saw Jesus in the garden. When I expressed surprise, he said, no shit. Rock. I swear it, and he failed to see why that made me laugh. To this day, that story still makes me smile. I was 42 and 22 and going into surgery on my knee. It was a relatively simple surgery, but he refused to leave my room and finally he was the last one in my room and we were alone. Don't worry, son. He said more to himself than to me. You've got a lot still to do in life and God wouldn't take you yet. I laughed and I told him it was just a knee operation. By then, the crust is silly. Italian pride had started to be worn down with age and he was better at showing emotion.
Speaker 2:
8:54
I'm proud of you, Rocco. He whispered into the quiet room. I paused not having a lot of experience with this side of him, a man from who compliments had come haltingly as I grew up. Thanks Dad. I whispered back. I'm proud of you too. That having been the first time I'd ever heard him say that to me, my mind snap back to the present and I continue to shave my shaking hands, making sure not to injure with the blade. I was careful not to cut, but trying to get the face clean like a baby. Just like he taught me so long ago. The lady's like a clean shaven man. I said in the empty hospice room through tears. I shaved long and straight up and down with quick and efficient movements. I slowed down as I relished the touch of his face. By then he was struggling with his reading and I knew he wouldn't make it much longer.
Speaker 2:
9:51
I was 42 and age seven seemed like an eternity ago. He looked up at me having difficulty talking but conveying much with his eyes. Yes, I will take care of mom and the girls. Yes, you were a great dad. You really found your groove the last 20 years of your life. Yes. I know you love us. I screened this dialogue internally trying to answer the questions I felt were going through his mind and then I shaved the last stroke. All done that I said to him, washing his face off with a hot washcloth, nice and smooth. Trying to sound upbeat as if the Shay was for a big day on the town and not perhaps his last day on earth. He classed my hand and for a moment our eyes met. I tried to be a good father. He struggled to say I wasn't born here, so I made mistakes. You were a great dad. I choked out. I hope I can be as good as you. I am proud of you and in that moment I was 42, but I wish with all my heart that I was seven or 10 or 16 or 22 and he age where the roles can be different again.
Speaker 1:
11:17
No, it's great that your dad allowed you to serve him at a time like that. Yeah. You know, he had served me his entire life. In fact, I think, you know, any parent, our lives are serving our kids and it was a joy and it was special to be able to serve him at the very end. Fantastic. Thank you for taking time to read that story for us. I really, you know, it's really exciting because a server's moment is catching on. Yeah. And you know, again, servers moments there. It could be a variety of people. It could. We may surprise you actually at some point. It may even be listeners, but it's a different voice and it's a quick start on a Tuesday morning and the idea is really to just give you that injection, that energy as you're driving to work to get ready to serve other people, and if you have any ideas for us, let us know and we can contact you and hopefully you can share one of your motivating moments to us. That's a fantastic idea. Would love to have more thought of that, Larry. Uh, well, you know, I think it's also exciting that you've started this server's radio network, right? Yes. We are excited about that and what we're hoping to do is, uh, have other podcasts that are either hit on this topic or come close to it or can add a benefit, um, to people in their daily lives. Joining us here in the studio today is Debbie Jordan the host of love out of the blue on the servers radio network. Debbie, welcome to studio.
Speaker 3:
12:51
Thank you. It's great to be here. So, Debbie, I'm going to ask you a couple of questions. First of all, where did love out of the blue come from? Wow, that's a good question. I know it is a deep question and I've, I've, um, I've actually really tried to narrow it down, uh, you know, to try to explain that people ask me that. But really where it came from was a place through, um, you know, some, some life changing events that I went through that took me to a place where I just felt really sad and I was end by nature. I'm not a sad person. So, you know, it caught my friends off guard to see me this way and I started realizing that I'm a, yeah, I was fighting it all the time and, and, and then at a certain point I started to see a little moments that would show up in my life that made me happier and, or began to remind me that the one thing that I felt was keeping me from feeling happy again or, and to get me out of that blue feeling was, was love. And I started seeing these little hearts show up. It just in very random places. And I, you know, I started photographing them, uh, so the love out of the blue idea, if you will, came from the fact that my son said to me, you know, you should do something with this. You should, you know, put it somewhere so that you can see it. I think other people, you know, would, uh, uh, enjoy seeing that too. So that's how it began.
Speaker 1:
14:27
Yeah. I think you're safe to say that if, if you were dealing with this, you're probably not alone. I'm sure there's plenty of people that find themselves in those spots. Yes. Life can be a
Speaker 3:
14:40
you down a little bit for sure. It can have its challenges from time to time in. The funny thing is, is that it doesn't matter what the challenge is, the actual feeling that comes out of it seems to be similar and watching other people, um, since that time for me, go through that. And then seeing that moment when they come out of it for the first time or they start to smile again or uh, you know, and realize that, you know, life is, oh, okay. And love is still very real and those moments show up. I think, you know, you're, you're helping people because you have to, it's almost like an exercise. You have to remind yourself that there is happiness even in the midst of things you're going through. Yes. I have to ask, where do you find the pictures and the comments that you put on social media?
Speaker 3:
15:27
Because I, I've been following you on instagram and I, I love yourself, but talk to us. How do you find these? You know, I, I, I don't necessarily look for them. It seems to be that, um, you know, with the advantage of carrying around a, a cell phone now with the camera. Yeah. Um, it just through my day to day life now I, wherever I am, whatever it is that I'm doing, I, when I recognize that moment where all of a sudden I see that I'm, I feel different. I'm, I'm real happy in that moment. Or I see something that grabs my attention and I go, oh, there it is. There it is today. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And I, you know, pull out the camera, take the picture now the know what I, um, put the comments on or how I label them.
Speaker 3:
16:16
That's another process because that sort of comes through the photo, you know, as I sit and look at the photo and I'm uh, you know, remember what that felt like the words begin to come and you know, and I also also hope that whatever I've heard during that day or if I happened to speak to someone who maybe was going through a tough time, sometimes those things connect as well. That's kind of Nice, you know, to be able to serve that way. Okay. So now this is a, and I have trouble with this too, can you, what is your show about? Because know it definitely evolves and changes as we evolve and change the, you know, the core of it. The core of it is, is sharing that one situation of my life that are not necessarily the details of what happened, but just the understanding that, that the common thread that runs through us is that there are challenges that go on.
Speaker 3:
17:10
There are times when it feels like love is not anywhere around and it feels, it can feel very lonely. And I found that when I'm by sharing, uh, how those moments show up for me, that other people started saying, you know what, I just saw this and I needed this today, or I, you know, this showed up and then they began sending them to me and go and look what happened. And I realized that the connection between us was the sharing of the story that you're not alone. And I think it's important as you find yourself in one of those moments and it's great to have whatever it is, a picture or a phrase that kind of helps you realize it's bad or rough right now, but that's still a lot to be thankful for. And what's really interesting too, is that they don't necessarily.
Speaker 3:
18:00
Moments don't show up. Um, uh, you know, when you expect them often or even how you expect them, right? You know, you might be looking for somebody to come to rescue you situation and instead you, you know, you're standing outside all by yourself and here comes a big fluffy white cloud that looks like a heart and you go, oh, thanks. Thanks. I needed that today for that moment. I was, I was driving home last night. My mother fell and had to actually, she broke her back home. I had to have pretty rough surgery and you know, she's not as young as, you know, I mean, she's definitely getting up there, but as I was driving home last night and I was kind of focusing on all the negative or all the concerns, this amazing sunset and I literally snapped a picture because I wanted to remind myself that, hey, there is good things still.
Speaker 3:
18:53
That's right. There is hope. There is hope. And so when is your show on top? I'm very, I'm every Tuesday. Um, I, you know, when the podcast comes on a, I also have been trying to attach some of the podcasts onto the individual photos was something that I've been speaking to. And you know which scene it gives people an opportunity to listen to it at their leisure. It's not as specific, you know, um, but every Tuesday we try to, you know, add another one onto the network. And that's awesome. We appreciate it and we love the positivity. We need that in today's. Thank you so much.
Speaker 1:
19:32
Moments in leadership know leadership time today. We have a good story to tell and we liked that. I liked telling good stories. Yes. And so I'm going to struggle through this name, but we're going to do a good job with it and regardless of whether it's right or wrong, it's going to be right for our show. So, um, we're going to talk about Sir Stelios Hodge. Yellowness know that name was kind of like meet saying stets to Phonto yeah, yeah, yeah. It's a tough one to get, but you know, he was in the right place at the right time and he set up a company called easy jet in 1995. And honestly, there's no really no other airline in the history of modern passenger aviation that has had a bigger effect, especially in the UK, around flights holiday and the travel industry. You know, how did it start?
Speaker 1:
20:28
So of course they started small, but they grew and grew and grew and they're still growing. Even to this day. Where was I with 1996 is when they really started. Yeah. And really few could have, could have predicted how far that they would go back in 1996. They leased their first aircraft that year and against odds they continue to grow. And then two years later in 1998 something happened that would completely change the business. What was that? So easy jet.com started using the internet on their website and they began to take bookings online. Online bookings. Who would've thought? Yeah. And it seems like 1998 isn't that, to me it seems like it's not very long ago, but they were really the first ones to do bookings online. That is incredible. Yeah. No, isn't it true that chick a is doing bookings online now? Right? We've talked about chick fil a because I guess we're late to the late to the court here in 2018, but yeah, we are doing our own one app where you can do online ordering and it's increasing and growing at a rapid pace.
Speaker 1:
21:35
Wow. But everybody has a lot to add to thank easy jet.com. And here's the deal there. Now among the top 10 ecommerce retailers in the UK, they're number one on Google if you search for travel in the UK and they have over one point 3 million bookings made each month on their website each month. Yeah. And that generates 10,010, sorry, 10 million pounds per day in revenue, which is equal to about $12 million US dollar. Wow. So, um, that's a pretty incredible. They've got about 12,000 visitors on their website at any given time. So it's good to be at the right place at the right time. Yeah. And it's good to have some intelligent thought of what the future could look like. Well that's what we're doing here at a survivor's journey. We're trying to think ahead. Well, yes we are. So everyone leads, so what kind of a leader are you going to be? Are you going to be a thinker or a doer?
Speaker 1:
22:40
What before we go onto the next segment, we have a segment called this one or that one. And in this segment, you know, you ask people who their favorite person is and you ask why. You know, what's that? Well, a listener raised a very good question and here it is. This came to me. The question is just listened to service journey podcasts. You might might've listened to mark Miller or Tom Rossi yet. And in the question session, mark chose Steve Jobs because of its simplicity. And Tom Chose Bill Gates because he figured out his job was not his legacy. What rocky said, everyone's picked Bill Gates. He missed if that's right or wrong, I can't remember who picks what, but what he's really worried about the question is, if you're serving, are you self serving? Is that your legacy? Ah, yeah. This is a tough question. So first of all, for the first part about, um, my saying that everyone picked Bill Gates, I'm going to let you in on secret that only
Speaker 2:
23:46
misty the studio dog knows, but we record these sometimes a little bit out of order. So up to that point everybody had chosen Bill Gates, but then we had mark Miller who made me look like a liar and picked steve jobs. Um, but onto the second question, um, you know, the issue of being is serving self serving and you know, that's a great question. In fact, it stumped me a little bit. So I've done a lot of thinking about it. Probably too much thinking and I even involved the smartest person I know who is my wife, Trisha. I was just going to say behind every good man is a woman and you know, we talked a little bit about can service to others ever be anything but self serving. And so here's where I'm at with it. Uh, and you can quote me on this and I don't know if it will answer fully, but I feel pretty good about the answer.
Speaker 2:
24:42
Number one, it doesn't really matter about your intentions, even if you have bad intentions and you're serving people to be self serving in the end, the people are still served and normally people with bad intentions, they kind of get smoked out by their own bad deeds. So I think if you're doing it for bad intentions, eventually people will catch on and in the interim, they're still being served, which is better than being in a vacuum of joy. Second, I think that, you know, and this will sound narcissistic, but I think I'm at a point where most of the time I'm actually able to serve with true unselfishness. I'm not always, again, people w, you know, it's hard to look past our own self satisfaction, but I do think that as I've grown and as I've aged and as I've realized that my legacy is really the people I serve, that it, it has helped me to maybe 80 percent of the time be truly serving for the right intentions.
Speaker 2:
25:51
And sometimes you reap benefits from it. Um, and that could look like you're being self serving or right. And then here's the third thing to, and my wife actually, she did not know if this were true and we haven't discussed this last part, but I do think it is possible to truly be purely motivated and serve others. There's this great verse in the Bible, it's in John Fifteen, 13, and it says basically there's no greater love than this, that someone would lay down their life for their, for their friends. So you hear those stories and mostly in war, but also in sometimes in a, in a criminal situation where somebody jumps in front of a bullet or dives on a grenade and they know they're going to be killed most, most
Speaker 1:
26:44
of the time they're going to die and they still do it. So I think in those situations it is possible to be 100 percent purely service. Yeah. So I don't know if that helps, but it made me feel a little better. At least it's good to think about. Yeah, it's a great question. And again, you know, the, the whole thing is if we're trying to do it with the purest of motives, most of the time the intentions create great and results for the people that we work with and we serve and that may be enough. So I hope that helps. Yeah. So do you go home and pat yourself on the back or now? You know, now, most times like it, I think for me, I think more about the times that I couldn't serve and I think there's a certain amount of guilt there, um, that you can't be all things to everybody.
Speaker 1:
27:44
Um, so I don't know that it's a whole lot of pat myself on the back. Just a good question. Great question. And we thank you for your questions. By the way, if you have any other questions or comments, you can let us know on the website at the bottom, there's a place to put it in your, your heck. I'll even give you my phone number. You can text me the question if you want. Sure. We want to do that. Couldn't use a. by the way, if you give me your phone number, can you send an order out to um, yeah, I want fries with that order. You can have fries with that or not.
Speaker 1:
28:27
Listen, a couple of shows ago. I can't remember how many were, you know, sometimes he shows her kind of running together. Yeah. But it's good. We learned that people aren't leaving jobs because of their job. They're really leaving the job because of the manager. Right. When you know what Larry to us, workers are quitting at the fastest rate since the internet boom. Seventeen years ago. Wow. And that's coming from the Wall Street Journal and part of that is because of a strong economy. There's other jobs and there's record low unemployment. Well, right now. Yeah, right now. But, but there's also other things at work here that caused people to quit so quickly. Well, and micromanagement is one of those things. Yeah. And now I have been, been accused of being a micromanager. Believe that not, not Larry. Oh yeah. You say you were a demanding manager and if he were micromanaged. Okay. Well, uh, I was, I was sitting in internet at suite with an editor and she was probably a very good editor since she worked for one of those big ABC companies and she's quit micromanaging me. Okay. So maybe she's right. So talk about micromanaging, learning. Well, there's some things that can cause, can damage be an effects on
Speaker 2:
29:42
people if you're over managed, you know? Yeah. Let's let, let's talk about something like decreased productivity. Yeah. You know, when a manager is constantly looking over the employee shoulder, it can lead to a lot of second guessing and honestly some paranoia and ultimately it will lead to dependent employees, which I can tell you that the worst kind if an employee is constantly having to look to you for answers, it takes up a lot of time. Yeah. Well, and how about reduced to innovation, right? So employees when they feel like their ideas are invalid or they live in constant fear of criticism, eventually it's going to take a toll on their creativity. They'll just, even those stop trying, you know, lower morale. Okay. Employees, uh, they want to feel autonomy as at least a certain sense of autonomy and it, if employees cannot make decisions at all without a manager's input, at some point they're going to feel suffocated and, uh, employees that are constantly made to fill that they can't do anything right.
Speaker 2:
30:43
They may try harder for awhile, but eventually what happens is they stop crying at all. And the effect of this will be evident in falling employee engagement levels, which we've talked about. The more engaged employee employees, the better it is for the company or higher turnover. Yes, absolutely. Yeah. High higher turnover. Here's the one we fear. Again, most people don't take well to being micromanaged and eventually they're going to leave, which means it's a loss of trust, right? Yeah. You don't, you know, we talked about this before. Most team members, most employees want to be able to trust their boss and they want to feel safe. Um, and once that micromanagement, you know, eventually what's going to happen is it leads to a massive breakdown of trust. And we, we know there's a war on talent. So you need, you really need to keep the, keep the brightest people with you.
Speaker 2:
31:36
What does Steve Jobs have to say? So, you know, he's one of the smartest guys for sure, and he, this is a quote from as it says, it doesn't make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do. We hire smart people so that they can tell us what to do. You know, the amazing thing is the stuff that I've read about Steve Jobs. Yeah, I kind of thought he was a micromanager, micromanager, and even sometimes it seemed like he was a narcissist, but it doesn't, it can't be true if this was what his hiring practices were because it takes a bit of ego. You have to push your ego down to be okay with not being the smartest guy in the room or gal in the room. But if you get to that point, that's where it's amazing the amount of output and productivity that can happen. Um, you know, that you really want to be the smartest person in the room. I think you want to be surrounded by people that are brighter than you, at least in certain aspects of whatever you do, and I think you have to be willing and able to say, run with this because he, you know, a lot more than I do about it.
Speaker 1:
32:43
Well, sometimes the best ideas and advancements are the result of empowering, empowering the right people.
Speaker 2:
32:50
Yeah, absolutely. You know, I see this everyday, Larry at chick filet, I had these 16, 17, 18 year old kids really, and then I've got 20 year olds and 21 and all that. And they, the reality is they serve customers all the time, every day and so they know that that job better than I do. And so if I didn't listen to them for ways to make it more efficient, ways to streamline ways to make it more profitable or productive or ways to just make their job easier, um, or satisfy the customer, we would not be able to move ahead. The, have a hard time doing that. Um, I think there's a transition of a progression that happens. Um, and at first it feels weird. I think I started my career as a micromanager, like, like most people do. Um, and that works when you're a very small operation, um, it may not make your employees feel good, but for a while you may be able to do it and still get by, get by as your business grows. If you can't make a transition from a micromanager to somebody who empowers their people, then it's going to kill you. Either physically, the stress is gonna, you know, cause a heart attack, or it's going to cap out your growth, especially because it's not just that of people quit. The smartest people quit it. The smartest people will leave a micromanager and you've got to have those smart people to get ahead. So it's a bad tactic.
Speaker 1:
34:29
Well, I want to thank everybody for joining with us today and talked about micromanaging rocky. You shared a story. Thank you very much, Debbie. Thank you for being with us. And we want to remind everybody that they can hear a love out of the blue also here, unserviced radio. It's great. I would encourage you to listen to it. So again, thank you. Remember, please subscribe if you haven't yet to the podcasts, you're going to hear all of what rocky wants to share and some of the people that we've interviewed are fantastic and you'll be learning more and learning to lead by serving. So subscribe and be a part of it. Also, if you subscribe, you get the uh, servers moments, right? So tell a friend, call a friend, tell a friend what does that old Dave Letterman used to say? Call a friend, kick the dog, whatever. I don't know. Alright. Um, I even, I don't know that reference. Oh, okay. I'm sorry. So rocky. Until next time I'm, you're ever faithful companion. Now I like the term companion. Yes.
Speaker 2:
35:33
Maybe we can be like, do you remember the wonder twins? No. Okay, so that's another pop reference
Speaker 1:
35:38
culture that's died. Kids look up the wonder twins. Okay. Marie and I are the wonder twins, wondered tour cohorts. I'm going to have to look that one up. Goes, is that, was that before or after me? It was a justice league in the 19 seventies. Great cartoon when I got up early every Saturday for it. Anyways, listen, let us hear from you. We want your comments, your questions pack even send me some green paper weight 100 if I said that green paper. Okay, I didn't say that. Did send us your comments and your questions. That's soupy sales job and try again. You would have soupy sales. Hey, we're all on a journey and it's really about how you serve while you're in that role and that's why every week we share a survivor's journey of rocky desteffano. I want to thank you for joining with us as together we learned to be better leaders.