A Server's Journey

Hospitality Management: Isabella Senzamici on Failing with Grace

August 29, 2018
A Server's Journey
Hospitality Management: Isabella Senzamici on Failing with Grace
Chapters
A Server's Journey
Hospitality Management: Isabella Senzamici on Failing with Grace
Aug 29, 2018
Rocky DeStefano
Isabella Senzamici shares the best ways to servant lead in the Hospitality industry.
Show Notes Transcript

Joining us today is former Chick-fil-A Senior Hospitality Director Isabella Senzamici who shares her story of climbing up the Front of House leadership ladder. Senzamici talks failing with grace, the importance of a consistent and efficient evaluation process, and more. 



Speaker 1:
0:10
Welcome to this edition of a survivor's journey with rocky desteffano. The premise of the show is that everyone is leading something or someone, whether you're apparently leading your family, a coach, leading a team, a team member, leading a few or a CEO leading an organization. We're all on the path of being a leader. Thus, the title of the program is a server's journey. Thanks Larry, and I, I really hope that everybody listening will be able to walk this journey of leadership with us. I want to say a special thank you to everyone who attended the Florida Georgia lay leadership summit in Orlando. It was Larry and I's
Speaker 2:
0:50
distinct pleasure to be able to personally share our thoughts as we are all on this journey of being servant leaders and I do hope we added value. Larry, I'm. I was a little bit skeptical if we did, but I'm hopeful. Well, it's amazing how many were perking up their ears to hear and to hear us each week here on a server's journey. Yep. Well, Larry, what's on tap for this addition of a survivor's journey? Well, we're going to start with one of your favorite segments, epic moments and leadership. Wow. That Larry, I love when you do that and I'm pleased to have here in the studio a new member of the servers journey team. Isabella, and can you say her last name? Isabella sends them ICI. You got it. You got it. See that shit name right? She's, she's nodding her head. She's got like that.
Speaker 2:
1:40
Yes. It's very good Italian name. I know you have a phrase at chick filet. A talented transition. Yeah, and I remember that. Isabella, as a high school student used to work for you in the store and then she went off to Fsu and served two stores while going to college and now she's honored. I'm back on our team again. This is fantastic. Absolutely. And I think we have more of those. This one or that one. Questions for Isabella also and now it's time. Once again for epic moments in leadership. All right, and today we're going to talk about Mary Kay ash, who started Mary Kay cosmetics in 1963 and her goal was to provide women with the kind of opportunities that she thought were being denied to women in the sixties and I think that absolutely was true. So she and her son built the multilevel marketing company according to direct selling news to the sixth largest network marketing company in the world by 2015.
Speaker 2:
2:45
And she had a wholesale volume of over three point $7 billion. Whoa, Whoa, whoa. What did she do as a leader in the very beginning? You know, Mary Kay had chosen in, in the beginning as a corporate symbol, the and as any area dinette aerodynamic engineer. That's easy for me to say. Now we'll tell you, bumblebees can't fly. It's wings are too small to let its body, but since none of the engineers bothered to tell the Bumblebee, it flies anyway. So Mary Kay cosmetics flew away, yet with Mary Kay's devotion and her concern for individuals, their lifestyle. That was, that was probably one of the greatest things she did. Yeah, absolutely. And this commitment from the top and the devotion carried Mary Kay cosmetics into being a recognized leader and a good servant leader. Yeah. And I always remember those pink cadillacs. You remember those that you could win. So that was a great, a great company for sure. So the question is, what kind of a leader are you going to be today?
Speaker 3:
3:56
Right?
Speaker 2:
3:58
So today we're going to welcome. Izabella sends Amaechi. Is that right? Yes, that's right. It's just like this to find out. It's nothing like that. It's easy for me to say so because it's my name. Isn't she from a Dahlia? Do She? Well, yeah. Her background is Italian. Her both your mom and dad or just your mom?
Speaker 4:
4:16
Both of them. My Dad is actually half iris, but he's the one that will make me to send to me.
Speaker 2:
4:22
So, uh, we're, we're welcoming Isabella here and she has a lot of what we like to say where the rubber meets the road. So we talk a lot about theory and philosophy and the reasons to be a servant leader and she gets to live it every day. Um, and so tell us your title and where you worked and so forth.
Speaker 4:
4:43
Okay, great. Um, so I, uh, was the senior hospitality director for a to chick fil a's in Tallahassee, Florida. Um, I started as a team member. I'm here with a rocky actually in Claremont, um, as a 16 year old. And then once I moved to college there, I'm in Tallahassee. I worked as a team member, graduated college and then worked my way up the front of House leadership. So I was a team leader or does the team leader for a little bit and then worked as a team supervisor, um, moved up to a area director role. Um, I, I worked as an area director at one location and then my operator approached me and four other people about working as senior directors, so being in charge of a specific area of the business for two different locations in Tallahassee. So there I served as the senior hospitality director.
Speaker 2:
5:40
Okay. So now, um, I know that you are true servant and we saw it at 16, but she learned nothing from us. I can tell you that when she worked for us, we were still trying to figure it out, so everything she is she owes to. Terry has been a great, great. He really hard. But the resume along way sir. Oh, okay. Well there you go. She, she could do. She knew chick filet, so they were, hey, this is a great, great fine. Now you're, that's a college town right now. It's got to be a different market than what you're used to in our small town of Claremont.
Speaker 4:
6:16
Absolutely. And as a hospitality director, finding ways to integrate hospitality and the restaurant is very different with, you know, 18 to 24 year old than it is with kind of the family environment that surrounds a lot of chick filets. I'm even when I was working at two different locations, one location had a little bit more families living in the area. The other had more college students
Speaker 2:
6:38
and, and it's different I would imagine like trying to figure it out. What I used to serve a college student is much different than. Yeah,
Speaker 4:
6:44
family. Oh, so, so different. I mean, certain events that you can even hold in your stores, I mean, having like a kid's event or you know, in common paint, paint, little wooden cows that wouldn't really work in the college area even though the one that I started at and you're, the college doesn't have a playground. Um, so it's, it's very, it's very tailored to that customer. So the hospitality we do is geared towards people who bring their dogs to the drive through. So they, those dog treats really, really help those customers want to come back because they're always bringing their dogs to drive there know I could see that. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
7:19
So, so how did you, what has influenced you the most about, because I, again, we mentioned your, your true servant a, you're definitely a leader and I know it's your heart. Wow. How have you come to that? Um,
Speaker 4:
7:34
I would say that really just kind of my arc, um, uh, through the chick fil a leadership line, I'm really learning how to fail with grace. Um, as I was a team leader and team supervisor and really kind of envisioning what I wanted for myself and how I wanted it to be taught and how I wanted to learn to lead others. Um, so really coming alongside of the people around me as a team leader, I was kind of one of the only team leaders in the store at the time and I was working 40, 50 hours a week after I graduated college. So, um, yeah, so learning, learning to, to communicate with my team members and like I said, even as a senior director, I, I would tell my team leaders and my team supervisors in my area directors, Hey, I've been in your shoes before. I've walked through every path that you've been in,
Speaker 2:
8:26
which, which means a lot because I think when you have been through it, they know that you're not too good to do.
Speaker 4:
8:32
Oh yeah, you had to live it. Oh yeah. And I will always say I will, you know, I'll, I'll pour the lemonade and the machine. I'll stand next to you and I'll help you back. I'll run trays with you. Uh, you know, I want my team leaders to know that I'm there as their support system.
Speaker 2:
8:46
Yeah. I, I read your final facebook post and you were saying goodbye to your team and we'll get to this because she's got a huge, exciting, scary change happening, but I'm, your last post was you might not miss billing lemonade on yourself, but everything else
Speaker 4:
9:05
I will, I will. I loved working alongside of those team members and if there were days where team members were teaching me things, um, you know, as you kind of move up in the business, unfortunately the nature of a higher leadership role is you get a little, a little more detached as, as you know, as much as you don't want that to happen.
Speaker 2:
9:23
Yeah. Because your, your eyes run
Speaker 4:
9:25
the bigger picture on your goal setting, your vision setting for the entire store. So,
Speaker 2:
9:29
right. And we, you know, you look at, and we've talked about this before at other episodes, what makes you a great leader is your desire to connect with your team. But when you have 200 people across two stores, it's much different than when you have 30 or 40 people that you work with.
Speaker 4:
9:47
Oh yes. And that's why my goal is to. I always tell my team leaders as to you've got to make little mini maze out of yourself. You have to duplicate yourself, you know, you have to kind of somehow instilled at heart for people and the people that you're working with and around you.
Speaker 2:
10:01
So tell me if you have leaders that are, of course across all spectrums. Some people come to it, they gravitate to leader, a servant leadership just naturally. And then some are harder, harder pill to take. Have you had success with helping somebody who was not naturally a servant leader become one?
Speaker 4:
10:22
Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. Um, so I'm at the store, I kind of created an evaluation process for leaders and when I was leader kind of, it just wasn't there. I was just kind of, you know, doing my best and hoping that what I was doing was correct. So, um, that was something that was important for me to give to the leaders underneath me was just this consistent feedback. So, um, I would always say to them to, you know, your evaluations, nothing on your evaluation should be a surprise. We should be giving you on the clock feedback in a constructive and positive way. Um, so I did develop kind of a one on one system where I'd have a one on one with each team leader, um, once a month and then alternately per quarter they would actually be scored. And so through those development conversations, um, one leader in particular member great.
Speaker 4:
11:13
I mean just amazing with follow through and getting tasks done. But her relationship with team members, very strange, very strange. It's all in the delivery of, you know, what she was asking them and I'm really kind of not really understanding how to utilize herself and utilize, um, work ethic alongside of them. She was kind of standing around just kind of telling them what to do and maybe not so nice if a way. Um, and that didn't come naturally to her, but everything else did. So we had a few one on ones where I just, you know, you say very openly and honestly, hey, you are excelling in these areas of the business, but if you to be the best you can be. Right. Exactly. Um, and now she's one of the area directors there and it's crazy the turnaround she's made just from that honest and open feedback.
Speaker 2:
12:04
So you attribute that, the fact that you had the guts to be real with her?
Speaker 4:
12:09
Oh yeah. And that's something that for me it was the biggest growth piece for me. I mean nice person. I don't want to, you know, I want everybody to like me, I don't want to offend anyone but you're not going to. If you deliver it in the right way, you know, and if you are developing a culture where everyone has a growth mindset and of course you're going to run into people who don't want to listen to the feedback and you know,
Speaker 2:
12:33
and sometimes they'll self select themselves out and sometimes they, they won't, they'll have to be asked to leave. But probably in both situations it's better for them. You know, we, we talk about it, we have a little, well I meditate because I tend to be like you. I like to be liked, I want to be a positive influence and so I have to remind myself that conflict is necessary and useful. Now we want good conflict, we want there to be a good give and take and be constructive. But sometimes a person has to hear what they have to improve.
Speaker 4:
13:07
Oh yeah. And reflecting on the conversations that were had with me as I was growing as a leader sometimes hearing those hard things, I would go home and I'd be upset and I'd be like, that's not true. Here are all the reasons why that's not true. And then once I took a step back to reflect, I would say, okay, you know, if I'm going to grow I have to internalize this and I have to think about ways to change this.
Speaker 2:
13:30
Yeah, there, you know, you always hear about the, what is it, the seven stages of grief or five days. So I think that there's one for like growth stages of growth where you're going to have to, at first you might get mad and then there's denial at some point I have to deal with. It's very good. I liked it cause she's gonna she's gonna edit it. You're going to. What were some of the things you were looking for in those conversations when you were talking with the leaders, other people?
Speaker 4:
13:58
Um, I am really looking for them to give me some ideas on how I can help them grow. Um, so I will always sit down and tell them, okay, so we're having this evaluation process. This is a chance for us to give you feedback. This is also a chance for you to give us feedback and let us know, are we missing anything, you know, where are the gaps that we can fill in your knowledge? Whether it's training, whether it's a leadership competency like, uh, like confronting your direct reports or um, you know, so I was really looking for, for them once maybe an issue was addressed for them to say, okay, can you give me some tangible ways
Speaker 2:
14:34
to improve this? That's good. That's very good. So I'm getting, I'm writing a lot down here because we like to do a recap and I do feel um, so I understand what it's like to be an a chick fillet owner operator. But as, as you said, you get a little bit further away. So I have to kind of go back in and into the frame, remind myself what it's like, what you're giving us is these are real. I mean, okay, this just happened and it, it seems pretty. It sounds pretty when you read it in a book or when you heard on a podcast and then you have to deal with real life. Oh yeah. So tell me about maybe, and this is a, it's going to be maybe a little bit hard, but, but talk about a great success with a customer or with a team member. And then maybe a something that you wish you could take back, something that you didn't maybe do as well.
Speaker 4:
15:29
There was. I'll start with something that I wish that I did a little better retrospectively. It's amazing how we always go to that. We always remember those more. Um, there's a few, um, you know, I'd like to say I've learned from them. Um, but there, there was a team leader who was kinda consistently falling short of the standard we had given him consistently over and over and over again. And with multiple development conversations, it just wasn't working right. Um, and, uh, it came to the point where he was stealing from the restaurant. And for me, I think because I am within a similar age bracket of those that I do work with. And this was very, very early on in my leadership. It was something that I, I, I didn't really turn a blind eye to, but I did a little bit. But, you know, I kind of, I would address it halfway, but then I would let some of his lesser offenses kind of slide by the wayside. And you know, um, and uh, it just really, it really negatively affected the morale of our team. Um, you know, when, when you're not upfront with someone about where they can go, it just, it just, and the team knows it too. Yeah, exactly. And the team was looking at me saying, why aren't you addressing this? You know,
Speaker 2:
16:48
then you lose credibility because they're saying, well, what kind of. I mean, how, what can a leader are you letting this happen?
Speaker 4:
16:55
Exactly. So that's definitely something I would do differently. And I still think about this individual, you know, pretty pretty often because I really don't feel like I set them up for success in his future endeavors. You know, hopefully he will have taken a little bit to heart. But yeah,
Speaker 2:
17:11
yeah, yeah. I mean sometimes you can't always save somebody but you can definitely present to them the truth and then hope that they learn, you know, and I've got a situation just like that where I, I know I failed and my failure wasn't in having to let the person go was in having it not being man enough to share with them. This is a real deal. Yeah, exactly. Okay. So how about, how about I really good story to pick us up. Police. I need it. Um, let's see. I'm thinking, um, so, and we can stop if you need to. Um, I think my
Speaker 4:
17:50
biggest success with a molitor was a. So when I was working at two different stores, um, it was hard for me to get that one on one time because I was at one store three days a week and then the other two or three.
Speaker 2:
18:04
So you truly were kind of over both stores going between the two.
Speaker 4:
18:08
Yeah. Taking care of in store events. Also coaching and leadership development. Um, any guest complaint that came through as a cares call, anything like that. So, um, as I was at both different stores, yeah, I was, it was kind of tough to get that individual feedback to the people that I wanted to. Um, but when I, when I was at one particular store, there was a leader, um, printing was Russian. I know she would not mind me sharing her name and she, I remember her running into the office and sitting down on the chair and just dissolving into tears and she just was like, Isabella, I cannot do this. I have no idea what I'm doing. I, I'm so overwhelmed. A guest just screamed at me because I pick something off the floor and I didn't wash my hands and I know that I shouldn't have done that.
Speaker 4:
18:59
But I did. Um, so, um, I remember that conversation so clearly because it was invigorating. So I sat down with her and I just, we just spent an hour and a half going over list and list and list of every potential future scenario, an opening list at closing list every nugget of Info that I had attained over the years. Um, and I remember the next week she texted me because I think I was at the other store and said, I just ran the best shift I have ever run in my life. And she said, and I feel so good about it. I feel so rude
Speaker 2:
19:40
word. And those are the moments, you know, it's so easy to focus on our failures, but there's been a lot more successes. We had to remind ourselves to keep those stores so that when you're not feeling as good about yourself, you can say, you know, but I am having an impact here. And now she's a shift leading pro because she is constantly pushing herself and pushing yourself. So now when you started with chick fil a, you were 16 and um, it was a job I'm sure. And that was it. Yep. When did you realize that you liked it? Liked it, you know, you wanted the data, you know, and, and maybe, um, what, what drew you to that? Why did it become important to you? Besides just money? Because I know Monday
Speaker 4:
20:25
part of it, right? So I graduated college with a degree in editing, writing and media and I was still living in Tallahassee. All of my friends kind of had jobs, uh, you know, that they were headed off towards. And I didn't, I didn't have anything lined up and I had actually taken a three month break from chick fil a because I was really stressed and overwhelmed and I kind of thought that that's what was causing it. And I was, I was a team leader, but I wasn't, I was not a successful team leader at the time. I actually, I think they took me off leading shifts because I was not successful at it. So I took this three month break, did not enjoy where I was working. I was working at a restaurant as a hostess. And then, um, I texted my scheduler, hey, I'm back.
Speaker 4:
21:12
Um, after that three months, the place ended up going out of business actually. Yeah. Um, so yeah. Um, so I texted her, hey, I'm back and she scheduled me 45 hours that next week. Um, so, um, there were some leadership changes and they said, okay, Isabella, you're going to be the morning leader, the morning leader. So I was working 6:00 AM to 3:00 PM, Monday through Saturday every single day, busting my butt super exhausted, um, and failing a lot. Um, but also learning a lot and then by the end of, I think it was, I think by the end of two months of just doing that, spending 50 hours in the store, I was realizing that the leaders around we were coming to me for advice and coming to me for support and I was realizing how incredibly happy that made me to help those people around me succeed.
Speaker 4:
22:04
Um, I love watching people do the best that they can and I also love being on my feet and I loved working with guests and I loved turning up poor customer experience on a Ted and having them walk out of there with a huge smile on their face so that, you know, that's why I come to chip play satisfaction. Oh yeah. It was incredible. So I think that was kind of the change to where, I mean all throughout high school and college, I seriously thought, okay, can't wait to get outta here now. I was like, you know, this, this is good for now, but you know, I got dreams, you know, I'm going to go and use my degree. Um, and then I started kind of realizing, you know, all the tools and knowledge they learned even with my degree are applicable to this environment. So where and when we talk about editing and improving people's work and giving them a voice and that's Kinda what I felt like I was doing within the store is giving people a voice and kind of revising their, their behaviors and giving them the tools because I knew they had it in that, you know, so that's when I started. I just started enjoying every personal interaction that I was having within the store.
Speaker 2:
23:12
You know, it's funny at, at a Claremont, our mission is make their story better and it's because I, I'm a huge story moves me and you know, when you've heard a good story and you know, you remember that movie or that player, whatever. And so I think as an editor in some ways you literally were like taking somebody's story which is their life and you got a chance to edit to make it better. And if you can think of it that way, it's not just about those interactions. It's about the fact of, no, they're a better person because of this and it's awesome. It's a great thing. Yeah, absolutely. And that's an edit Mr. editor right there. So. All right, so Larry, do you have anything else? Because I have a bunch here, but I want to know I'm hot at the time. Listening to my mind is open. So, so here's what I've got so far. I've got fail with grace lead how you like to be led, duplicate yourself. The incredible need for an evaluation process that is consistent and that includes feedback, positive and negative, negative. Um, and then you have to be willing to give and take feedback because there's the giving part, but there's also the, if, if you're not living up to year end of the relationship.
Speaker 4:
24:27
Yeah. And that's something I, that's something that's been very hard for me because I've, I've really prided myself on being able to lead well. And when I fall short in those categories, sometimes it's hard for me to step away and say, okay, yes, I could have changed this. So during those evaluations, when I give them the opportunity, I don't really want to do it. Sometimes I'm like, oh, I got to force myself to allow myself to just be a sponge because there could be. I could be doing something that I really, I'm just not aware of. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
24:56
Well, and many times it's not that we are intentional. We don't call them our way to, to think, hey, I'm going to hurt this person. How can I do it? But it's there still. And then the last thing is be willing to teach. And I think that that's where, you know, when Rochelle, Rochelle, Rochelle, Rochelle, when she came to you, she was desperate and she had a situation where she was, she was feeling like she was failing at every, you know, every juncture. And yet you took the time to sit back and really spend time with her and teacher, hey, even if you feel like you're failing now, there is a path out. And that means a lot to a lot of people because so, so many people I think are just like, figure it out, right? Yeah. Go do it. Here's what it looks like
Speaker 4:
25:41
and I'm a very pleased, you mean clear expectations and guidelines for how I can do my best and I will. I want to give that to people because that's what I wanted.
Speaker 2:
25:51
Okay. So talk about your, who's influenced your life like, because I'm sure there's people behind you that have really created who you are.
Speaker 4:
26:00
Uh, as cliche as it sounds. My mother, she's a wife. I know your mother. She was wonderful. She did wrong with that. Nothing wrong with my mom has been in leadership since I was a child and she's always been in some sort of leadership role, whether it's in retail or you know, where she currently works at the Chamber of Commerce. I'm in Claremont. Um, so I kind of was a witness to the way that she handled every conflict from within her employment since I was a little. Um, and she is, she's, she's a go getter, no doubt about it. Yeah. She takes what she wants and then she also is great at feedback. Um, so just kind of watching her and watching the way she parented me, honestly, she was fantastic. And I'm sure she'll love hearing that job. So she's given me every business, kind of the character that I have in business, you know,
Speaker 2:
26:58
why don't you talk to me to be on a board that I had said no to probably a dozen times. Oh yeah, she's convincing only because it was her. I said only because it's you and I told her I'm not going to be very good and I'm only half bought in, but I'll do it because you want me, you know. And it's been enjoyable because she's a, she's a person who really has integrity and cares about people. So it's been fun to watch. Um, so tell us about your next step. So now you're, you're leaving chick filet and that's exciting and scary and all those things. So, so what are you doing? What's your next step?
Speaker 4:
27:30
Um, I am. Well, the goal is to move to New York in October, um, work in the city, maybe live a little bit outside of the city and work in the publishing world. So whether that's as an editorial assistant for a publishing company or maybe kind of work my way into the journalism field as well. Um, I'm kind of open to pretty much anything
Speaker 2:
27:54
thing. So if anybody needs a book, ghost written or edited theories, somebody knows somebody who maybe isn't the industry and they want to push her along.
Speaker 4:
28:04
Oh yeah. I'm all ears. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
28:06
Her now, her mom and I were crying. We were kind of trying to talk you into becoming an owner.
Speaker 4:
28:10
So it was my, my operator Terry was too. He was. And then I'm the executive director there, jared and they both, they wanted me to join the, um, leadership development program, that check point. Does he travel? I'm in travel and just kind of in a work like crazy for 10 years at the end. That is something that was definitely in the back of my mind and something that I, I feel like I would love it. I feel like I would really enjoy it, but I also, I want to take this leap with another passion before I go ahead and do that. Because chick fil a was my first job after
Speaker 2:
28:44
well, and I feel like when I tell people that are thinking about chick fil a is it, it's never wrong to go try something else because whatever you learn there it, whether you're successful or you're not, you'll bring that back and, and so you can always come back to chick fil a because maybe it's not a right now thing, but maybe in the future it will be. Hey, so I'm going to. Who in this room did that? Yeah, no, I, I did it myself and I learned a lot. A lot of what, what not to do a buy some of my failures and, and um, law school was a good thing for me. Um, I don't regret it but I don't know that I would have been anywhere near the operator I am now if I hadn't have fallen on my face.
Speaker 4:
29:31
Yeah. And that's Kinda how I feel where, you know, I, not that I think that I wouldn't be successful, but I think that going out and kind of chasing that is really going to equip me better. I think be well rounded. I'll
Speaker 2:
29:42
be able to have experienced different fields, you know, and I think it's a situation where you always learn something from the adventure always and it there is no failure no matter what I like. I think you're going to make it and do great, but even if it's not everything you thought it was, if you're going to learn a lot, right? Yeah. And you either learn, hey, I really loved chick filet or you'll learn something that is applicable or you'll become the next big editor and you know, I hear you wanting her back. It's, you know, that's what I'm trying to get some more experienced at it. I want her to edit a future book I want to write. I'm not sure. I don't know if you're an office fan, but I'm not going to make an offer you, you will probably.
Speaker 4:
30:24
Okay. I really am. What does that book that he wants to write it? I managed somehow manage that so that I'm going to write a book somehow I manage and she's going to edit it so I can't wait. That's the dream job. And there we go. Alright, so
Speaker 2:
30:35
we're gonna pause here and we're going to do a segment that we like to do. It's called this or that and we're going to tell say two things are two names and you get to choose which one you like more and maybe why it nothing. Nothing too crazy. Okay, great. Okay, so the first is Elon musk or Richard Branson. And do you know who Richard Branson is? She's too young. Is what it is. Richard Branch, you know who you'll must see. It's an age thing. Richard Branson is the Virgin Atlantic Virgin Atlantic Airways Virgin records store. Yes. Yes.
Speaker 4:
31:11
Oh, that sounds like someone I would like. I'm going to pick Richard Branson. I talked her into it. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
31:18
Steven Spielberg or Walt Disney. Walt Disney. Yeah. Why?
Speaker 4:
31:25
Um, well, you know, Disney is the most magical place in the world.
Speaker 2:
31:32
Star wars or Harry Potter? Harry Potter hands. I knew that was. See, that's a generational. Oh yeah. So I, I know the next one to Broadway or rock and roll or maybe I don't. That's a hard one for me. So how about favorite Broadway? Favorite rock and roll? Do you have one of each or no
Speaker 4:
31:49
favorite Broadway person? Probably show. See this is a Broadway girl because she's taking it down to the person or, or shower. Then I really like legally blonde them. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
32:00
Isn't that great? Yeah. Well, yeah. My daughter's been playing one of the songs. It's about female empowerment and trying to think of the name. There's so many. It's great.
Speaker 4:
32:08
So many. It's great. Um, and then um, rock and roll. I mean, wow. The amount of music that I listened to, how can I possibly narrow it down? I'm still a pretty huge Michael Jackson Fan. I've actually found out recently started listening to some of his music and I was like, wow. I actually pretty good this year.
Speaker 2:
32:27
Okay. And the last one we're going to go to is a Florida gators or Fsu. Oh,
Speaker 4:
32:36
even a question on the sheet.
Speaker 2:
32:42
All right, well we want to thank you so much for being on the show and we truly welcome your input and really you've taught a lot. There's a lot of good content and I love getting back because this is stuff that even I don't get to do as much as I wish I did, so it's awesome to hear kind of your thoughts of when the rubber meets the road. Thank you guys. Thank you for being on.
Speaker 1:
33:08
Thank you. Joining with us here on a service journey. Remember to subscribe to the podcast and you'll hear all of what rocky wants to share with you to be good leaders, learning to lead by serving, and if you subscribe, you'll be getting a survivor's journey moment. A quick pick me up to help your day and if you like what you hear, tell a friend like us sherice a service journey on facebook and we get announce it yet, but our website's going into overdrive. We'll be announcing more about that in the near future, a survivor's journey. So rocky, until next time I'm ever faithful companion. Yes, you're my jerry, my ben like that's like ice cream or rocky road babes. There we go. Hey guys. Remember everybody. We are all on a journey and it's how you serve others in that role, and that's why every week we're going to be sharing a survivor's journey. I'm rocky death to find out. I want to thank you for joining us as together we learned to be better or worse.
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