A Server's Journey

3 "Knows" To Being a Better Boss

September 26, 2018
A Server's Journey
3 "Knows" To Being a Better Boss
Chapters
A Server's Journey
3 "Knows" To Being a Better Boss
Sep 26, 2018
Rocky DeStefano
How can you survive your worst nightmare of a boss? Listen to find out.
Show Notes Transcript

Join us in our 22nd edition of A Server’s Journey to explore the three essential “knows” to ultimately being a better boss to your team. Here Rocky talks the truth about how 21 percent of workers truly do not feel motivated to succeed in the workplace. With another failed epic moment in leadership between AOL and Time Warner and a frank discussion about how profit and loss aren’t sustainable ways to motivate people, learn how businesses that invest in and know their team create true business success.

Speaker 1:
0:00
Yes,
Speaker 2:
0:10
welcome to this edition of a servers journey with rocky destefano. Thanks Larry. The premise of this show is that everyone is leading something or someone. In fact, the reality is every one of us is a leader and is being led, whether you're a parent leading your family, a coach, leading a team, a team member, leading a few or a CEO leading an organization. We are all on this path of being a leader and we're all on it together and thus the title of a server's charity. You know, I've been listening to all that you've been saying and I think it's starting to rub off. Well, that's a good thing, larry, for sure, but why don't you talk to us about what's on tap for today.
Speaker 3:
0:51
Vision of a service journey. We have one of your favorite episodes. All right. Epic moments in leadership. Yeah, I do love those and I understand that this one may be a little bit different. Again. Yes, it's going on the other side and good bosses, bad bosses. Again, it seems to be top of the list. We're hearing a lot about that. Yeah, I don't know how well your story about your father was received and I thought it would be nice if you would share another one of those great stories and I believe we're going to hear the one about you and your kitty cat. Yeah. In fact, you know, the crazy thing is I'm a softy for cats. It was never a cat person until I married my wife and became one by force. Um, and fact we were just watching old home movies, seeing our category and home in my.
Speaker 3:
1:43
Well I'm sure we've got a lot of listeners who can identify with this story about you and your cat. Absolutely. And it seems like everywhere I read something about surviving a bad boss and that's really a shame. Yeah. And so kind of on that topic a little bit is, you know, we're pleased to announce that one of our former guests on the show, Isabella sends and Meechie has joined the servers journey team as our media and communications coordinator. Well, she's not the bad boss either. Now she's had the great team member who became a great boss and who now as the circle of the world works is going to be coming back and helping us out. You know, she worked with us in the CIC play store here in Claremont when she was in high school and then she went off to Fsu and graduated and she's going to be heading up some of the creative work on our new website that is in production now and I really can't wait to see how the new website looks.
Speaker 3:
2:41
Well, you know, I understand that we're partnering with acs creative in developing our new website and I understand when it comes to creating a website, it pays to go to a pro instead of having those cheap things. Well, we've definitely learned the hard way. There's limits as to what we could produce and it's to get a professional. No, well that's why we've gone to acs. Great. You know, I understand they do logos, brochures, direct mail, ad campaigns, and especially websites with all the things it would take to build a good business and a podcast. And I understand they don't play games with your money now, they were a joy to work with and actually still are a joy to work with, which is even more important to say, um, and you know, we'll be able to give you a lot more information on this as the website is developed, but we really want to thank acs creative, uh, and that team there, they're just a fantastic team.
Speaker 3:
3:36
Oh, and by the way, you can contact acs, creative on the Internet at acs creative. It's that simple. Absolutely. Check them out, guys. Epic moments. Oh, I love when you do that. Someone's going to be called failed moments in leadership. Yeah. You know, and you're going to have some of these if you, uh, if you are in business long enough, you're going to fail at some things. But here's, here's one story where the biggest isn't always the best. And so we're gonna talk about when Steve Case and Gerald Levin sketched out the AOL Time Warner merger. Now we're dating ourselves. I'm very few people maybe have the younger set, might really know how powerful AOL was at one point they've course heard of time warner, but aol one point was a powerhouse for sure. Well, they were a giant in the internet business. That's right. Everybody had to have all that's right.
Speaker 3:
4:35
And every movie had you got mail. That's right. You know that guy. There's a movie titled You've Got Mail, which, which you guys should go back and watch. It's a great movie. Tom Hanks. Tom Hanks and I had a crush on the Costar, but I'm trying to remember her name. I know I'm, I'm, I'm, but I should have come back to us. So anyways, they had, they really. These two guys were talking about they had visions of a giant Internet media service. Well, and so what happened? Well, in reality, the marriage was so far from easy. Both of them had huge staffs. In fact, there was over an 85,000 people together between the two companies and their cultures were just different. Um, it just didn't work. And honestly, they immediately had to lay off almost 2000 staff members with many, many more to come and it's become known as the biggest mistake in corporate history.
Speaker 3:
5:32
While so don't think about being bigger, being better. Sometimes it's better to get better and if you're gip and when you get better, bigger happens. Can you repeat that again? Yeah. People are always trying to get bigger. And I think if more companies focused on getting better, that bigger inherently happens. Now chick-filet go through a process time like this, but they, they managed to get through it. Yeah. You know, in the early eighties, um, I'm usually chick fil a as an example, but this is a good example. Yeah. You know, it's one of those rare moments, chick plates, corporate policy came out of this period of very, very dark period chick fil a at that point, I'm in the early eighties. Everything they touched had been gold. They were, how many stores did they have at 50? And everyone they opened was a success. So they wanted to grow and they said make it bigger.
Speaker 3:
6:26
And of course anything we opened will work. So they actually tripled in size over a two year period and 80 and 81 and 82, you know, right around that time period. What they found was suddenly they were opening stores that weren't really good, who and their organization structure was in strong enough and there was all these issues with how do you meet the demand now have a chain of a hundred and 50 and did they have the infrastructure set up now? I'm absolutely not. And so they, they really were in financial straits. They were really concerned that they weren't going to be able to make it as a company. So there's a great story about how they went away to try to, you know, one of those late our meetings, they actually went away for a couple days, try to figure out how are we going to survive this financial disaster instead?
Speaker 3:
7:19
True. It made this comment of why don't we get better and if we get better, bigger will happen. And then the other thing he said is, why don't we remind ourselves why we do this and who is true? It's true at Cathy was the founder of chick filet and their corporate purpose is to glorify God by being a faithful steward of what they're entrusted with and they have a positive influence on people they come in contact with and that purpose mission statement came out of that retreat and uh, it's kind of guided them ever since. So getting better was getting bigger, getting better, allow them to get bigger. Yes. Wow, that's a great story. Absolutely. So again, Larry, even with a chick, filet and true, Cathy or, or aol and Time Warner, the big question is what kind of leader are you going to be?
Speaker 4:
8:23
Daddy? How long do Kitty's lift for? That was the question posed to me, but my youngest daughter, abby, age five, one day on the way home from church, Kitty in question was, toby are lovable but eccentric pet. Don't know sweetheart. I answered. Cats can live as long as 20 years, but most only live for around 15. A slight pauses. She pondered this daddy, how old is toby? She countered, he'll be 15 this December. Honey, I said another pauses.
Speaker 5:
8:56
Abby digested that. And then daddy is toby going to die soon and there it was the real question she had and the only one I feared, I scrambled for an answer thinking back to the day that toby came home to live with us. My wife and I, we're still newlyweds. She 23 and I 25 living in a city, far from our respective families. We were just two kids playing grownup, still feeling our way around. And Toby, to me at least symbolize that we had indeed made it. He represented family in a weird way. It was just tricia and I and toby against the world. We practice being responsible, even trying out parenting skills on him. He was our first awkward steps into being adults. I remember how he used to like to bite as a baby. So tough and rough, but how if it thundered, he would come running into our room to sleep with us.
Speaker 5:
9:51
I remember bringing him to Nana and Grandpa does Stefano's house so they can meet him. I remembered his first Christmas when we had presents wrapped under the tree for him presence that foretold many Christmases to come when our kids were born and I remembered how much we loved him real and deep and pure love. He was our family, but once the real kids came along, toby slowly lost some of his shine in our eyes. We loved him still for sure, but only as one does with an old once. Loved toy from their youth in our hearts. Totally was still there, but up in a faraway shelf, dusty and under appreciated like some velveteen rabbit. I don't know, baby. I answered. Toby is getting old and we have to be ready at any point for him to go to heaven. Little Abby chewed on that for awhile and said, Daddy, I think toby's the most beautiful kitty in the world and I want to take care of him so that he can live with us for a long time.
Speaker 5:
10:51
This time it was I that paused as I realized that to abby and Madison and Ansley, toby was still a special as he was to us before they were born. My mind quickly scan the great memories and even the hardships of our family's lives and I realized that toby was present in all of them. I remembered how he always patterned after the Easter eggs we hit for the kids or how we always seem to have at least one picture of him buried in the discarded Christmas wrapping paper. I remembered how my children love making him chase a flashlight beam and how tender Ansley is with him carrying him around the house like a baby doll and toby is always such a trooper accepting every indignity without complaint. And I remembered that day before Anthony was born, the doctors tests had come out bad and they had diagnosed her with downs.
Speaker 5:
11:43
The well meaning. Doctors saying, don't worry, the kind of downs that she will have won't allow her to live very long. Toby and I rode many miles together. My Nissan, toby laying my lap while I thought and prayed to my God to protect my unborn daughter. Thinking through this, I decided that toby really was part of our family and our fourth child and something to be cherished. Abby baby. I said, daddy thinks you're right. We should be very careful with him. Said he can live with us as long as God allows. Abby smiled and quickly changed the conversation is only a five year old can do, but later that day when no one was looking, I picked up my cat. It was the first time in awhile and I scratched him high up by his nose where he likes it. I carried them around the house like a baby doll.
Speaker 5:
12:36
I even cleaned his litter box, washed dried and restocked it, and finally I bought this new cat food that is supposed to be a good for older cats and I threw out the old cheap stuff. I placed him by his food bowl and I watched as he ate hardly from it. Eat Toby. I thought strengthen yourself and live a long time and then even though I know you shouldn't pray for animals, I did just that. I asked God to keep them with us as long as he could allow. After all, I knew three young girls that needed and loved him.
Speaker 4:
13:12
Postscript. Toby went to heaven in late April of 2008 and even though our new cat Buckeye is now on the scene, there is never a cat like the first one. Toby was my first Christmas gift for Tricia after we were married and he will always play a special part in our memories.
Speaker 3:
13:33
Hey Rocky, thanks for sharing your story about your kitty cat. I'm a softie. It's always good to get to know you better. You know? Maybe I need to get some manlier stories. Maybe I'll. I will write something about in nature hike or even that wouldn't work. Maybe I need to do some, I don't know. Great hunting excursion or I dove off a cliff. Maybe one of those stories. I don't think so. I think these are very good and I'm looking forward to the next one. I understand you got another one? We do, yes. Okay. A couple more coming. Wow. What? What time do you write? When do you sit down and write these things? Do they just come to you or have you been pondering the ideas and then you put them together or you have a very good way with words? I think, um, it, it comes to me very slowly, so I'm not a disciplined writer, so I think about a topic for a long time before I sit down and write and I don't know that I have much more than a short story in me so far, but uh, you know, it's something that I definitely thought through for awhile.
Speaker 3:
14:34
Well, if you could put 10 more stories together, then you'd have 13 chapters and then we can put the book out. We can have, what was it that, you know, the famous book chicken soup for the soul. We can maybe do chicken soup for the servant leader soul. How about that Larry? Very good. And if and if he's listening and we'll, we'll cooperate with you. Jack. Jack Canfield, if he is, I believe that was the author. I don't know him. I just know this. I know the series, so he did quite well. Hey, let's get down to some meat for today's program. What do you think? It seems like bosses are getting bad raps today, but maybe they deserve it. Yeah. You know, we, we found this linkedin story and it was really called hottest survive a bad boss and what they were talking about is that bad bosses come in a variety of flavors.
Speaker 3:
15:22
You have some that are never around and this author caused them, calls them ghost the kind that swoop in and make a mess and fly off what I'm offering you aid and she calls them seagulls and then of course you have the worst type. The incompetent manager. Well No. You know, when you say the ghost manager, when you say swoops in and makes a mess and fly. So I have seen you and work in and you do not. No, no, no. You do not do that. You pitch in, you I understand. Even claiming garbage cans when you need to. Oh Geez. Yes. You know, sorry to bring that up. But yeah, you know, you do things to help and not hinder you. I, I try to add value. Most of it too is just um, a little bit ocd. And if I see something going on, I, I want to help, but you know, I'm sure we all have moments where we're ghost or seagulls, but I don't think I'm being that type of leader is good.
Speaker 3:
16:20
Longterm. No. So let's talk a little bit about the author. Her name was Mary Abby. Jay. Yes. What does she recommend? Well, she suggests that you sit down with your boss and ask them how they would prefer to be communicated too, which is really good. There are priorities, you know, there might, it might annoy them, but let them know at least that you want to work with them. Right. So this is kinda like, not from a servant leader. Well, it's being a servant to your, to your employer. Yeah. To our boss. And, and, and here's the reality too. I don't think most managers want to be a bad manager. I don't think most get up and say, Hey, I want to be a jerk today. Sometimes they just don't know how they're coming across. And so it's really helpful and it's been helpful for me when people have sat me down and, and maybe shared with me something that was a weakness that I didn't even realize I was doing.
Speaker 3:
17:14
You know, if you can clear the air and if you can get on the right foot, perhaps you can even sell which a relationship after all and if not it may be time to start looking for another assignment or another employer, but the jobs don't grow on trees. So it's always better if possible, to work with your employer and to try to salvage a relationship. That would be a good idea. Donna Connor, who was the senior management of business consultant, focused on a fortune 500 tech and wireless companies. She says, go since seagulls are in Qa and incompetence. This is what she to say about half of American workers have left the job to get away from a terrible boss. And that's really crazy. Yeah, well, and sometimes it's a terrible boss and a terrible job kind of mixed in together. So you can't minimize those. Sometimes it's hard to be a boss in certain jobs because it's just a terrible job and, and they, and those do exist.
Speaker 3:
18:10
But, um, I think again, that's a staggering number when you think about half who was, who was, who did that, that TV show the, the bad bad jobs, or Mike, Mike Rowe's, dirty jobs, but he found that people love their jobs, right? You know, so you're not selling chicken, but you're cleaning whatever. Well, here's another staggering stat. Two, it says that only 21 percent of workers think that our performance is managed in a way that motivates them to do an outstanding job. Um, and that's according to Gallup's 2017 state of the American workplace, that that's pretty shocking, that only not even a quarter of the team, um, in, in this country feel like they're being motivated to do great work. And you, you've quoted this statistic before or close to it, a full time worker will spend more than 2000 hours at work every year. Yeah. So having a bad boss has an immense impact on your overall wellbeing and happiness. It could even lead to ptsd. That would be bad. Yeah. You know, it's amazing to me because if you've been in a situation, if you've ever been in a job where you're managed through fear or your managed through tactics that aren't very healthy for your human psyche and absolutely you can come, you can come out of that job almost suffering from symptoms that are similar to ptsd, which is a scary situation for sure.
Speaker 5:
19:40
But you know, work.
Speaker 3:
19:44
It's a lot of who we are and a lot of people get there
Speaker 3:
19:49
perception of, of, of their being through what they're able to offer. So you know, doesn't seem too big of a stretch. That being under a terrible boss could really impact you mentally. Well. Talking about. Let's talk about being a good boss. Okay, let's do that. What are some areas that make for being a good boss? What are. I know you have three different points. Yeah. We're going to talk a little bit about this, uh, three areas that can make you a good boss. And you know, we've talked about some of these things before, but it's always good to remember and so we kind of call them the nose here. I think it's know who they are, who you are, who they are, who they are right now, who they impact. Right. And then the final one would be know the score score. So you as a boss need to know your, your employees.
Speaker 3:
20:38
Yeah. And you want to know them intimately. Always sounds kind of gross. But I don't mean it that way. What I mean is you have to know who they are. And you know, we, we tell the story about, I had a team member who um, had worked really, really hard, very bright young woman had achieved everything, had worked her way through college. And chick flay was the, you know, school time job where it was flexible but she can make enough money to pay her bills. And she worked like crazy to achieve her goal career. And then about two years in she came back and said, hey, can we grab lunch? And we sat down and she shared with me that she was wanting to come back and work with chick fil a, which was really shocking to me because I knew how hard she had worked to get this career.
Speaker 3:
21:27
So what happened? Well, I, you know, I asked her and I'm always concerned when people want to make a dramatic switch like that. So I asked her, hey, where's this coming from? Because you know, maybe you're going through something and if you're going through something it may not be about where you're working. It might just be something or going through in life and switching jobs that might change the geography, but it doesn't really change the problem. So I was trying to figure out maybe what she was going through, but she told me that she loved the career, but she hated where she worked. Why would that be? So she didn't know at first she was having a lot of issues with coming to grips with this thing that she had always wanted. Why was she not feeling fulfilled? And she said it dawned on her that after the birth of her first child, she had left to take maternity leave.
Speaker 3:
22:21
So she's gone for six slash seven weeks, comes back and she said not one single person in leadership or on the staff asked anything about her daughter, the name, how the daughter was doing nothing. It was just like radio silence. And she left because she was not known now. Thankfully she was able to find another, another place in the same career. And she's happily ever after now. But it's still, it shows how important it is to be known. So you as an employer, you can ask kind of like personal questions after they're working for. He's right. Well once, I mean you, you of course you have to be careful. There are some questions you can't ask. How's the family? That's right. Yeah. Once they're hired, they're no longer being interviewed. They've been given the job. It's okay to get to know them and their kids and their kids likes and her hobbies and you know, is their daughter a dancer or are they, you know, in the sports, this is normal stuff that you want to share with people and anybody who has kids, you can't imagine not being asked about your family.
Speaker 3:
23:30
Right. Okay. So one of the three areas we would want to be a good boss. Knowing who the employees are. Second learning is knowing the impact or the impact. Yeah. So what do we mean by that, Larry? Well, I'm not sure you're going to have to tell me. See, this is the one I was setting layer yet because he doesn't know this when in fact he's a, I'm probably a little bit better versed at this than I am, but you know, the idea is that people need to know, they need to know the connection between what they're doing and they need to know that it impacts somebody or a group of somebodies and if it, if they don't it, they can die and you know, they can emotionally die inside. And it makes sense. Yes. And you don't want them to do that now, of course, not the world.
Speaker 3:
24:20
We were just talking about empowering an employee that they would be able to do something so they can impact the whole company. That's right. Well, and if, if for instance, um, you know, we talk a lot about mission statements and mission statements are great things. Um, and sometimes they don't really have seemed to have anything to do with what you do. You know, at Chick filet we, we cook food, so you know, we give you chicken, you give us money and we take the money and we make profit. It's Kinda like a hostage situation. But at the end you don't get your loved one back. You get, you get a delicious chicken sandwich. But this is what chick fillet went through. Right? Right. Well, that's what we do. But you know, that doesn't seem to move the needle, you know, it didn't really share with the team, this is how you're impacting people.
Speaker 3:
25:12
And so that was really hot. Chick fil a came up with their mission statement, which was to glorify God by being a faithful steward of what we've been given and have a positive influence on people. Those two things seem to resonate with people and they don't talk at all about profit or food. Wow. You know, if you can get your needle above the profit and loss and get up the impacting people, yet you know profit and loss is never going to be a longterm motivator for people and impacting people in your team members and your guests right there. There's two different levels there. You know who, who does a great job at this to Larry, and I'm a huge fan. In fact, my daughter just bought a car from this company and I am telling you, she was motivated by their commercials, which are phenomenal, and that Subaru and Subaru, what we know, what their emo is with their commercials is they had this super, super melancholy, sappy song and they have these scenes of a flashback.
Speaker 3:
26:21
In fact, one of my favorite one has a father, a cleaning out in old Subaru and as he's cleaning out the car, we don't know why he's cleaning out the car, this really beautiful song as is playing that's talking about time and the passage of time and he keeps finding these things and then they show a flashback of where, when that got put in the car and one is um, in a hospital id bracelet and he remembers when his daughter broke her arm. And so there's a flashback to a scene of a little girl with her arm broken and then coming home from the hospital. And then there was another where there's a dried flower and it's a flashback to her high school prom. And then there's another one and then all of a sudden the commercial is this coming to an end. The daughter walks out fully grown almost 16, 17 and he's handing her the keys to the Subaru.
Speaker 3:
27:16
And waiting in the wings is another beautiful new Subaru. And you know, it's amazing to me that I almost cry every time I watch that commercial you are. I am a sap. But, but, you know, what it does is it connects what they do, uh, you know, it's reminding not only us who's, who's buying the car, but it, it's reminding their, their team, their internal customers, right? Subaru's team members have to understand that when they're building that car, they're not just putting brake pads on this automobile. They are providing a way for parents to drive their kids to all these amazing life events. So they do one of the best single best jobs at telling their internal team, their employees, how they're impacting people with their product. So did your daughter say when she got the car that she's getting the car now and planning on giving it to her children?
Speaker 3:
28:21
She didn't, but we did talk about how she's only 22. We did talk about how she will definitely have that car when she has her. Do you know when she has her first child? Um, because Subaru's last a long time. But you know, again, it's sappy, it's simple, but it works because Subaru's doing a great job of telling us this is the impact we can have on your life. This was an unsolicited Subaru. If you do have or want to be a paid endorser, we'll be happy to take your money, but okay. Anyways, and then Larry, what's in the last. Well, knowing who, who they are, knowing that an employee has an impact, but you also have to know the employee has to know how, what the score is. Yeah, absolutely. And speaking of scores, you know, uh, there was a football game a couple of years.
Speaker 3:
29:12
Was it last year? The Alabama Georgia game? Yeah. We talked about this at a different episode where we talked about how 28 million people were watching this game because they wanted to know the score. That's right. Everybody watching a sporting event wants to know the score. There has got to be a score and just like that at work, you're just got to be a score and a score can be something really simple too. It doesn't have to be anything elaborate. You don't have to really think, you know, too in depth or work really hard at creating this elaborate, you know, you know, x, y axis with this is the, when it could be something as simple and it really, it could be internally motivated. What do you do on the drive through yet? So, you know, drive through. We, we look at how many smiles can we get over the next two hours because, you know, people listen, they're coming through a drive through their super, super.
Speaker 3:
30:05
I'm in a hurry. I mean, you, you don't stay in your car and buy food if you're not in a hurry, you're going somewhere. Um, you know, a lot of times they're agitated because maybe their day hasn't worked quite as well, how they thought it would. Maybe they waited a little bit longer in the line than they wanted to. And so sometimes they come up and they're not exactly joyful and hey, how you doing? You know, so our job and really how we can tell if we, if we win, is by seeing how many people we can get to smile before they leave that window. Wow. And that's a great goal and it's a fun thing to do and you know, give them 10 seconds the wind and yeah, so we, we do get a little bit crazy sometimes and we make jokes and we try to laugh with them and you know, anything we can do, but, but you know, all around your, your place of business, your work environment, there's all type of little measurements that you can help your team understand, you know, and it could be something if you're ocd, it could be that hey, this every label face out, okay, that's a win, you know, I mean if you're an ocd person, that's a win.
Speaker 3:
31:10
That's a me. That's right. Yeah. So you know, it, it's really trying, you know, knowing the score. It doesn't have to be the Alabama, Georgia National Championship with 28 million people watching. It could be something as simple as daily interactions with their customers. Wow, okay. So knowing the score, knowing how they impact or can be impacted in knowing who they are are important things for a box. Let's go through that again, knowing who they are. So that's as a boss that's on me, I have to know who they are, knowing who they impact, that's kind of on me and also on them because I've got to paint a picture of this is what you're really impacting. It's not just about this. And then the last is knowing the score and that can be. I can set it for them. A lot of times they'll come to me and they say, Hey, I made this many people happy today.
Speaker 3:
32:02
I don't even give them the goal, but they were looking for a way to measure success. And that's really it. Larry. That's pretty simple. Wow. Okay. What a show. Yeah. So that worked out pretty well I think. Yeah. Um, I want to thank you for joining us here on a survivor's journey. You know, remember to subscribe to the podcast and you'll be able to hear more of what rocky wants to share with you to be a good leader. Learning to lead by serving. That seems so. So, uh, what does it UNAMERICAN lead by serving? You know, it's not, is not always a very well a desired trait, but it is the right thing to do. And if you subscribe to the podcast, you'll be getting the service journey moment here on Tuesdays. So if you like what you hear here, tell a friend and if like us and sheriffs and on facebook leave a comment at the bottom of the podcast, we'd, we'd love to hear from you.
Speaker 3:
33:05
In fact is, um, oh, when the new website comes out, you'll be able to even communicate with us even more. And as I mentioned earlier, our website's going into overdrive Orleans, I think, acs, creative. Thank you guys. You creative geniuses. You. So. Until next time, uh, I'm forever. You're faithful companion. Larry. We are Hans Solo and Chewbacca behind the microphones here. You bet them. Hey, we want to ask you guys a do is to favor too. We really want you to grab these shows, share them with your friends. We had the, uh, uh, honor to speak at an event not too long ago. Uh, one of my first real speaking engagements and Larry was there, did an excellent job. We both, Larry actually did it the next one shop and I think it was one of those is other worldly moments where somehow we walked on stage and we woke up 40 minutes later and people were clapping and we don't know really how that happened, but something descended, whether it be the holy spirit or some kind of A.
Speaker 3:
34:09
I don't know what it was, some sort of Harry Potter potion. We're not sure, but no, it was more of that. But it worked. And here's what we came back with afterwards. I was interacting with a lot of the people who had just, uh, taking part in this presentation. I was shocked at the number of tears. But what that tells me is this is a topic that's important, which has always been our premise. We're not just doing this because we want to waste time every week and honestly, we might never make a dime off this and we're okay either way, but we believe that this message has to be shared, has to be shared because again, 10 percent of the workforce, 21 years and older report that they're clinically depressed. And some people say it's even worse with those 21 and under, there's an epidemic of hopelessness in our society and when we're spending almost one third of our life at work we deserve, and it is our distinct honor to serve people and maybe maybe help some of those people that are feeling depressed to fill worth and valued. This is an important message and we always say this, we are all on a journey and it's how we serve. That's important. And that's why every week Larry and drag ourselves here,
Speaker 2:
35:39
we make time out of our week to do this thing. We call a server's Jeremy. So I'm rocky Desta final. I want to thank you for joining us. And together we are going to become better leaders because the world needs better leaders.