Carter Wilson's Making It Up

Making It Up with Mark Stevens, author of The Melancholy Howl

June 21, 2021 Carter Wilson/Mark Stevens Season 1 Episode 8
Carter Wilson's Making It Up
Making It Up with Mark Stevens, author of The Melancholy Howl
Chapters
Carter Wilson's Making It Up
Making It Up with Mark Stevens, author of The Melancholy Howl
Jun 21, 2021 Season 1 Episode 8
Carter Wilson/Mark Stevens

Mark Stevens is a helluva good writer and an all-around good dude. Best known for his Allison Coil mystery series, Mark’s novel Antler Dust was a Denver Post best-seller in 2007 and 2009. Buried by the Roan, Trapline, and Lake of Fire were all finalists for the Colorado Book Award (2012, 2015 and 2016 respectively). Trapline won. Mark has been named Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers' Writer of the Year, hosts a regular podcast for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, and has served as president of the Rocky Mountain chapter for Mystery Writers of America.

Among other things, Carter and Mark discuss what it was like being raised by librarians, how an early life in journalism fueled a passion for writing crime fiction, and the Herculean task of posthumously publishing fourteen of a friend’s novels.

At the end of their chat, Carter and Mark create a rather bizarre story using a sentence from the non-fiction work The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick by Norman Kagan.

Connect with Carter at www.carterwilson.com

Connect with Mark at www.writermarkstevens.com

Show Notes

Mark Stevens is a helluva good writer and an all-around good dude. Best known for his Allison Coil mystery series, Mark’s novel Antler Dust was a Denver Post best-seller in 2007 and 2009. Buried by the Roan, Trapline, and Lake of Fire were all finalists for the Colorado Book Award (2012, 2015 and 2016 respectively). Trapline won. Mark has been named Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers' Writer of the Year, hosts a regular podcast for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, and has served as president of the Rocky Mountain chapter for Mystery Writers of America.

Among other things, Carter and Mark discuss what it was like being raised by librarians, how an early life in journalism fueled a passion for writing crime fiction, and the Herculean task of posthumously publishing fourteen of a friend’s novels.

At the end of their chat, Carter and Mark create a rather bizarre story using a sentence from the non-fiction work The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick by Norman Kagan.

Connect with Carter at www.carterwilson.com

Connect with Mark at www.writermarkstevens.com