Leadership Stories

Big Pharma and the Factory of the Future with Antonio Buendia, Director of Automation, GSK Vaccines

May 07, 2021 Mike Walsh Season 1 Episode 2
Leadership Stories
Big Pharma and the Factory of the Future with Antonio Buendia, Director of Automation, GSK Vaccines
Show Notes Transcript

Antonio Buendia is the Director of Automation, Global Industrial Operations, GSK vaccines and is responsible for establishing and executing the Automation Strategy, aiming to secure OT assets, setup the right foundations, simplify, and enable the next wave of productivity gains. He is joined in this conversation on the future of the pharmaceutical industry with futurist Mike Walsh and Rashesh Mody - Head of Monitoring and Control Business at AVEVA Software where he is handles global delivery and implementation of advanced applications projects.

Mike Walsh:

The pandemic placed a spotlight on the digital transformation of the pharmaceutical industry, with innovation and production efficiency now literally a matter of life and death. But even with the global crisis as a burning platform, change management remains difficult. Why do you think that is?

Antonio Buendia:

Yeah. Maybe I can share with you, one, one thing that happened to me 20 years or 25 years ago when [inaudible 00:00:39] I was starting my career. We still don't use uh, inaudible 00:00:43] the email. The email came to all the companies. And we began to use it. No? Inaudible 00:00:47] one of my colleagues, at that time, at my age 50 plus. And we, began to use the emails. Or I say, "Hey, [inaudible 00:00:56], what are you doing?" He said, "I'm work on email." he was working the email. Then when he finalized, he pressed the print-screen button, printing a paper, and put in the fax. I said, "Hey, but why are you doing that? No, no, because the, email is not [inaudible 00:01:09]. The people only attend to the fax." No? That's an example where you can create new fantastic tool. But if, if it is not the, right user adoption innovation is useless. I think that we need to put the emphasis, not only [inaudible 00:01:25] the innovation and the tools, but also in the people, and how the people is going to use a new tool, and how I want to create something that uh, creates value for them. And if they really need it, and they really willing to adopt it. No?

Mike Walsh:

Absolutely. R- Rashesh you, have a similar view, I suspect.

Rashesh Mody:

Absolutely. Thank you, Mike. And in fact, what we are seeing also during last 10 months, the amount of digitization and digital transformation happened, it's unbelievable. [inaudible 00:01:54]. It's almost five years worth of work has happened in the last 10 months. It is absolutely going very fast. And to do this rapid acceleration and transformation, people plays a big role, absolutely. How do we provide more information? How do we provide contextual information? How do we provide on the right device with the right context? That's what We call it performance intelligence. Add data, add information, add knowledge, all of them on their fingertips to make right decisions We believe this is absolutely a very crucial time. And change management plays a major role, Mike.

Mike Walsh:

I'm speaking today with Antonio v- Buendia the, director of automation at GSK vaccines, and Rashesh Mody, who's the head of monitoring and the control business at Aveva Software. Thank you both for joining today on Leadership Stories. I have to say th- this is such an important time to be discussing this topic because there's probably no other industry under more pressure or more important right now than the pharmaceutical industry. And this is coming at a time where we're seeing accelerating technologies, new ways of working and, really the, kind of r- rebirth of the idea of the factory. With all that i- in context I think it can be tempting to see digital transformation as just an issue of technology and infrastructure rather than one of culture and people. What's been your experience, Antonio?

Antonio Buendia:

Yeah I think, we use the, triangle, people, process, technology. But we need to start in that order, people, then process, and then technology, the latest one. [inaudible 00:03:34]. So, um, I think that the, digital transformation is about producing new tools that going to be produced by people and are going to be used by other people. So I think, many companies has started this from the technology point of view. And most of them are failing. Those that are putting emphasis on the people, how to set up people that are able to create the tools, but more importantly, how to set up right [inaudible 00:04:03] the right training on the people that are going to use the tools are, the one that are successful. So we need to take, also, into account, this tension between people, technology, processes. And normally, there is also the common mistake because people [inaudible 00:04:22] start or companies start with, technology, to put the IT teams or the automation teams leading the initiatives. I think that's a big mistake, again, because that's putting- The effort on technology. I think that this has to be user driven, but with some tension because if not we can see for example, what Henry Ford said, "If I would have just listened to my customers, I would just [inaudible 00:04:46] a faster horse Sometimes the, users don't know what is possible. I think the, magic is when we have hybrid teams where we have users at the, front seat, but also people telling them what is possible. And in that confluence and these hybrid teams i- is where the magic happens. No?

Rashesh Mody:

S- and in fact, Mike, if I add just on top of it, if you look at it [inaudible 00:05:11] and really [inaudible 00:05:12] technology helps them connect people, site, systems, and all the necessary t- tools you need to make them connection. What happens is technology changes every four, five years. But the machines and factories don't change for 20, 30 years. The question-

Mike Walsh:

Affirmative].

Rashesh Mody:

is, "How do we abstract from the technology perspective so that new technology keep coming, but the solution remain same, giving them productivity, giving them more performance, giving them more agility?" I think that's [inaudible 00:05:42] vendor like us, from Aveva side, this is what we really strive for. Absolutely, "How do we connect people, technology, process, and number of sites?" Is becoming very crucial in this digital transformation

Mike Walsh:

this is something really unique to the industrial sector, isn't it? Because it's not like the consumer electronic space where you're getting a rapid turnover of platform and product. The, shelf life of, factories, as you say, could be 50, 100 years.

Rashesh Mody:

Absolutely because what the We wanna provide a platform, so we can abstract everything out and give them a very standardized approach so that they can continue to operate [inaudible 00:06:23] processes, but things could change below it and without any any disruptions,

Mike Walsh:

I'm really taken by Antonio's idea that the, leadership component of teams is important, that it can't just be run by engineers. When you think about these new ways of working and, leading, what have you seen, Antonio, in the last 18 months in terms of shifts in the way people in your team or elsewhere in your organization have changed the way they, work, the way they collaborate, the way they create solutions?

Antonio Buendia:

I think I've seen a dramatic change in the, in how we work. No? At the end the, human relations are the same. But technology has demonstrated And I think that has been a big change, that remote work is very effective. And you can do almost everything. What you cannot, for example, is establishing new relations. When you don't know anyone, you don't know someone getting to know the person for the first time is much, more difficult in the remote environment. Now, when you have a already solid established team, established relationships you can work very effectively. And that [inaudible 00:07:35] a change. For example, now, we are considering much more than before, having remote locations for, new hires. No? I think this is going to be forever now. Inaudible 00:07:50] of things. Also, it's very important that you don't have the tendency to focus on very short terms. I think that we need to keep [inaudible 00:08:00] focus, but again, maintain the tension between having a wholistic view looking at the strategy, at the same, [inaudible 00:08:07] the strategy and inaudible 00:08:08] one bite at a time. No? Go for a tactical approach. But the tactical approach is the answer to a bigger picture. No? There are many companies that they want to do tactical items, "Lets save uh, 5% here in energy." But that is totally disconnected with the, factory efficiency or with other Energy efficiency disconnected from factory efficiency, di- disconnected from people efficiency. No? You need to have a wholistic view keep on that that view, and execute in chunks. No?

Mike Walsh:

Le- let's, just drill down for a second cause i- it can be contradictory. People talk about Agile teams. But Agile wasn't designed for remote work. And you also mentioned high level strategy. But often, that can be at odds with an Agile squad that, as you say, is very focused on tactical outcomes. How do you reconcile those sort of three paradoxes?

Antonio Buendia:

No. I think, that you need to have a, certain tension about that, no, because you cannot be, in the trap of, "Hey, you're looking at the wholistic view." And then try to do everything at the same time. Sometimes, people is very ambitious. Um, That's very good, no, that the people is ambitious, and they want to go the Olympic games in one shot. But I'm telling them-

Mike Walsh:

[laughs].

Antonio Buendia:

"Hey, before you go to the Olympic games, you need to go to your neighborhood championship. Then you need to go to your city championship. And then you need to go No? You need to have a goal in mind. You need to have a direction. And then you need to do Agile progress on that. The problem is that many companies do the Agile, but they don't know where they are going. They go, sometimes, to the north. And then the next step is to the west. And then the next step is to the south. No? There are Normally what I see [inaudible 00:09:52] bunch of disconnected [inaudible 00:09:55]. No? You need to see how to connect the dot how What is your goal, and how you, slice that into pieces that you can do [inaudible 00:10:04]. Inaudible 00:10:04] and a strategy [inaudible 00:10:05] are not contradictory. They're totally complementary. No? I think that is, balance. No?

Rashesh Mody:

A- and Mike, if I can give you couple of examples we have done a major project with ADNOC, which is Abu Dhabi National Oil, where they put a completely panorama display, bringing 10 different business unit data into version. It's almost a single version of truth. That's a high level strategy. They want to bring everything. And with making decisions, they are able to save, right now, more than like 100 millions uh, every few months. It's absolutely, digital transformation at a top level. And it goes to every business level. Same way for if you look at, the Duke Energy. They got a fleet of assets everywhere. Now, they are connecting. And they wanna predict potential downtime or potential issues, or potential areas of fault, "How can I predict in fu- In, little bit, in ahead of time, so I can avoid some big downtime?" these are all technology pieces helping them do remotely [inaudible 00:11:08] with using artificial intelligence, using cloud. They're using the augmented reality, all in industry 4.0 key areas simulation. It's really helping them to improve collaboration and providing right information, right person, and on the uh [inaudible 00:11:25] right devices

Mike Walsh:

w- when you think about that new team structures, the importance of agility and, also data and visualization people are, inaudible 00:11:37] talking about this as a new form of Lean or Lean 4.0. What are your views on that?

Antonio Buendia:

I think that's a very interesting view. I learn about that a couple of years ago in a conference where they were talking about Lean 4.0. And I think at some point, Lean is about making things more effective. So digitalization is providing tools or making things more effective. I think that if we can put the digital tools in the hands of the Lean practitioners, we have the right [inaudible 00:12:07] symbiotic effect. No? There are some, people from the, Lean departments, that they see [inaudible 00:12:15] the, digitalization a threat because they think that is the new trend, that this is going to eliminate their jobs. But most of the people are very clever. And they see another opportunity, another set of tools. It's not, everything or all the time digitalization. It's about improving the process. And then you set of a traditional Lean tools. And then you have the digital tools. I think the right combination And normally, I find that one of my best allies, one of my partners are the Lean, people, the Lean department. I think that is a fantastic If, in your company, you have these two groups working together, that's a signal of, inaudible 00:12:59].

Mike Walsh:

Th- this, brings me to the I guess the topic, which I know you're a big fan of, which is the, factory of the future. And at the heart of push to reinvent the pharmaceutical industry is the opportunity to leverage digital infrastructure and entirely new ways of working to really realize a 21st century production model. What are the major challenges that, that we face with bringing that vision to life?

Antonio Buendia:

I think, the factory of future is is a term that is very inspiring. And at least in our case, we are aiming to do two things. One is the traditional process automation [inaudible 00:13:36] traditional, but still it's standard. And under-utilized Okay? There are many things to do to avoid manual movement, to avoid It's not about having, lights-out manufacturing or eliminating the operator. It's not about that. It's about eliminating non value-add of the operator. We want that the operators use less, their muscles and use [inaudible 00:13:58] more their brain. No? Today, we have a lot manual activity. Again, this is not about lights-out manufacturing. This is not about eliminating the people from the factories. It's about eliminating the low value-add. Okay? So, We can do that with the traditional process automation with robotics. But there is another worst thing, that is the data automation. The first one is about making what we do today more effective. The second one is making new things that we are not able to do today, like better understanding our processes, understanding, where we have opportunities, "How can we increase the deal How can we shorten the cycle of time? Uh, How can we predict what is going to happen in our process?" And if we can predict, we, likely, will be able to change. That is the data automation. And, that where we need to esta- Again, it's not all about artificial intelligence. I think artificial intelligence [inaudible 00:14:52]. But artificial intelligence is the last uh, step of the [inaudible 00:14:55]. You have a lot of process before, a lot of tools like process, basic process automation basic KPIs, basic statistics. And then you can go to the, artificial intelligence. I think this is going to unlock these two topics enable the operator, make the operator use their brains, not necessarily their hands and, unlock new ways of productivity that we are not aware of today. No? Now, for that to happen is very important because there is a lot of a lot of effort on the data. And sometimes Uh, We discussed previously. When the data is [inaudible 00:15:34] from the technology teams, we get a lot of data data piece connected. But there is a very interesting diagram from McKinsey where they depict Hey, for every one million of data points that we gather, there is only 20% that are that are used. And of this 20%, only 1% is transformed into something meaningful to the user. And of this 1%, 0% is really used for something positive." So, because at the end, we can have a lot of data. But what is what I'm going to do different? Again, we go to the people, process, technology, "How is the process going to be changed? I, now can see this does work in reality? I'm, going to do something different with that. If yes, perfect." If [inaudible 00:16:27] I'm going to gain some knowledge. But I'm going to keep acting the same, we are failing. No? It's very important that the information is actionable and is changing the [inaudible 00:16:38] of the people. This is about changing the way we work. If we have a lot of tools, but we, work the same that's, nuh-, that's a failure. No?

Mike Walsh:

[laughs].

Rashesh Mody:

[crosstalk 00:16:49].

Mike Walsh:

Crosstalk 00:16:49].

Rashesh Mody:

[crosstalk 00:16:49] Antonio and Mike, actually, we did this exactly same thing, actionable intelligence and factory of the future with Schneider Electric. Schneider has got 100 plus factories. In fact, we did almost 70 or 80 different factories. We rolled out this tool, which is Lean, Agile with information and actionable, that, that What Antonio said, actionable intelligence extremely important because data is, becomes information. Informa- [inaudible 00:17:13] becomes knowledge. Knowledge becomes wisdom. And ultimately, you'll do something with everything. I-

Mike:

Hmm.

Rashesh Mody:

When I see everything map, I wanna send a message to somebody, "[inaudible 00:17:22] take care of this problem." Or, whatever action I wanna suggest. Last step to [inaudible 00:17:27] from knowledge to wisdom or knowledge to action is extremely important. In fact, we rolled it out in Schneider factories. We are working with number of other customers like Nestle and few other ones, where they wanna provide all the information to operator on the [inaudible 00:17:42] floor, everything with a context, financial information, the maintenance information, operation information, realtime with Including engineering information. Give the person all the available information, so he can make the right decision. That's absolutely factory of the future is, driving towards

Mike Walsh:

a- as we were talking about earlier, w- one of the unique features about the industrial sector is the fact that you, often have very different, very proprietary uh, systems and hardware, which don't change very often. In order for this factory of the future to really work and this kind of data layer to, to be effective, surely, standardization and mutual agnostic tools are, actually essential.

Antonio Buendia:

I, think that's absolutely essential. I'm a fan of the standardization. And I am a fan of the standardization because I'm lazy. [crosstalk 00:18:37] this standardization means that I can copy and paste. So uh, standardization means for me, less effort and being able to copy and paste. And if everything is different, you cannot copy and paste. We have 10 factories. And then we want to Whenever we have some best practice or we [inaudible 00:18:52] some standard to be able to replicate and work one time, roll out or, inaudible 00:18:59] 10 times not, to develop 10 times the same thing. Okay? That's crucial, to be able to standardize now. We need to take care of One of my boss used to say, "Hey, take care. Don't go [inaudible 00:19:11] this standardization for the sake of the standardize and uh, standardize the tiles of the bathroom." No? As a, little bit joke. No? Standardization [inaudible 00:19:20]. You need to understand [inaudible 00:19:21] standardization. And in the past, the focus was, "Let's [inaudible 00:19:24] standardize on brands and model. I want always the same the brand, always the same model." And we recognized that for a factory in the US and a factory in Japan, maybe the vendors are not the same. And there is no need, or maybe it's not positive to have exactly the same vendor because maybe a vendor that has a very good customer service in the US does not have even Not even good or bad, no customer service in Japan. No? We need to be adapting to the local markets. But now, how to do the standardization? We are shifting from this model of brands, and models to connectivity standard. At the end, what we want is machines that are similar, of course. But we can standardize on the connectivity so that we extract the data from the machines. And we can create similar or equal metrics, equal information. That's the way we want to standardize.

Rashesh Mody:

A- and here, actually, we Aveva has a very good track record for more than, 30 plus years now where when we brought to Edge to enterprise software, we have this, the Called system platform. That's our key offering, which allows customers to abstract all the hardware. And, we create templates so that Antonio said, in, in Maybe in Europe, you're using the hardware devices from vendor A. And, Japan is vendor two. We can create a common template. We just standardize it. And that allows more, all of our customers to do horizontal integration and vertical integration. It can-

Mike Walsh:

Mm-hmm Affirmative].

Rashesh Mody:

connect to other system. At the same time, it can provide, connect, collect, visualize, operate, integrate all different layers of software. It's fully available for standardization because that's how you multiply the effects of standardization into templates and roll it out. That is becoming very, powerful [inaudible 00:21:18] fleet of industries, fleet of machines, fleet of [inaudible 00:21:22], "How do I save that engineering cost?" And that's how you do it. And that's what We've been doing this one for last 30 years. And it's been very successful at, GSK, at Many, customers. I think we absolutely very proud of that, the standardization and templatization approach

Mike Walsh:

there's another dimension to this I'd like to explore, which which I think has been critical during the pandemic cause it's, it relates to how we've had to reimagine training and capability upgrades. We've talked about remote collaboration, training and, other potential uses of technologies like augmented reality for, some time. But suddenly, in the last eight- 18 months, this has become an essential part of ensuring that organizations have had the right capabilities in place just because we haven't been able to do on the job training or come together in person. What has been your experience both of you?

Antonio Buendia:

That's, a topic that is absolutely crucial. And has been more important than ever during this pandemic, especially because there is the option on distant learning. For the people like, like us that work in the office, we have done a lot of distant learning. We can, understand. We can watch videos, et cetera. But the people that are in the shop floor, they require a really different kind of training. In addition to the distant learning, there, there is Some part, of course, can be distant learning. But they need an on the shop, on the job, on the machine training. And that has been even, worsened by the fact that because of COVID, we have some medical leaves. We have a more than normal uh, rotation on the people. We need to train other people in the manufacturing lines. So, one of And, and that's uh, today [inaudible 00:23:11] ways that you need the machine. And you need the people to work on the machine. You need to, be led by someone that is expert. You need the show-and-tell. And you need to, watch that the people is able to do that and, correct them or tell, "That is exactly right way. This is very intensive. And also, these need the assets 'cause these need the, line. And these need the line to be idle. The lines to train the people are [inaudible 00:23:39] asset. Every time we stop them, we are not producing. But we need to stop for training. We have a new rotation people that has to be trained. You see where, the problem is. To, to give an answer to that, we are exploring new ways of, virtual training, like Google glasses that are directing the, people to tell "Do do this, do that." Or uh, the use of simulators where the people At the end, they will need to go to the real machine. But if they can do the simulator first, and the simulator is good enough, say, maybe 80% of the work can be done offline, and then complement with the final At the real, line. But we save a lot of time. These tools, I guess that they're going to be more and more important in the future. And this pandemic has brought the, need to, use them. No?

Rashesh Mody:

Yeah. And if I, uh Absolutely, Antonio. In fact, lot of use cases We are working with number of [inaudible 00:24:40] producers. They create equipments, and they ship it, the equipments, number of factories. And their expertise sitting at headquarter. But they wanna provide full troubleshooting knowledge to all those, their customers. And what they created was exactly Using augmented reality, they can create and provide the full training and give them realtime help and say, "Do this screw." Or, "Open this one. Open this bracket and fix the things." Completely remotely. That's absolutely Second area also happening is collaboration and skill management because there number of attrition happening on the [inaudible 00:25:15] floor and number of workers, new, coming up. How do you train them? You build a simulation. You train them. Second thing, we also added a new thing called Facebook and YouTube. Every It's almost e- each employee take the video of the thing, how to operate [inaudible 00:25:31] fork truck, or how to do this thing. And then that becomes a library. New person can look at it. You can see how many times he had watched the video [inaudible 00:25:38] and create a self training. lot of new technologies coming, helping them simulation, helping them troubleshooting, helping them remote collaboration. All these are really helping during this COVID situation

Mike Walsh:

I like this idea of YouTube for factories. But, I think it's a really positive message because you have the automation of processes. But you also have the, automation of technologies designed to improve the capabilities of people as well. You have both automation and elevation at the same time.

Rashesh Mody:

Absolutely.

Mike Walsh:

[crosstalk 00:26:12].

Antonio Buendia:

Yeah. And that's really important. That's really important because now, we are putting For example, one of the things we are doing is we are putting, today, the emphasis on people capabilities. And we are developing a specific trainings for digital aspect. So, We are training And an important thing is that I think, initially, this training was focused on the technical people. Now, we are training the users so that the users are able to adopt the technologies. No?

Mike Walsh:

A- Antonio, your CEO at GSK's placed some very ambitious and inspiring goals around sustainability. What are some of the areas that you're already looking at now? And, how are they potentially impact with, techno-, emerging technologies?

Antonio Buendia:

Yes. Our CEO has set the ambitious goals of being net zero impact on climate and positive impact on, inaudible 00:27:03] by 2030. That's something very aggressive that we are actively working on. I think from engineering and automation, the area we are working is on energy management CO2 emissions. And one of the first things that we are doing is measuring because you cannot measure You cannot improve what, you don't measure. We are putting- First, an initial emphasis on measurement. So again, we go to the general topic there, a lot of sensors. Uh, Normally [inaudible 00:27:34] normally, you would need to add more sensor. The sensors are there. Even more, the data is captured, but nobody use this data normally. So, now, the effort that we are doing is assembling all this wealth of sensors and data that are there and, converting into, meaningful KPIs, so we can understand, "What are our energy consumptions? What are the opportunities for improvement we have? What are the behaviors that we can change?" Also, we are, And that's a major uh, step that we are doing today. Also, we are o- creating some specific [inaudible 00:28:10] automation. For example, we are measuring the particles that we have in the air and adopting, adapting the, the airflow because now, for example, that is not measured. So, We are always working like, at the maximum. And now, we are going to adapt the, level of airflow, depending on the environment and conditions. There a lot of things to do. But I would say the major emphasis is measure, take advantage of all the data that is available, understand "What is the, energy consumption pattern?" And then act toward it

Rashesh Mody:

crosstalk 00:28:44] Aveva side, sustainability and helping customers is a huge emphasis in our side, from technology perspective, because greenhouse affects the energy efficiency reusability. And, this absolutely is very important for our software stack, that, "How do we help our customers to shape sustainable future?" That's absolutely true. And in, in fact, if I give you some examples, We have a customer in, Called Henkel. They make special chemicals and additives And they use our software to improve energy efficiency. It's [inaudible 00:29:24] efficiency [inaudible 00:29:26] they get it more than 15, 16%. That's a huge Helping them to create the sustainable part of their initiative. Similarly, Gwinnett County this is Georgia, where they utilize our unified operations center, our Number of our, The technology, they helping They, produce and clean and, manage water, waste water and, delivery system to more than one million citizens How do you continue to have sustainable future with this new technology, helping customers to improve efficiency, improve energy, improve the, sustainable part of the, all their initiatives? And that's what we are really, emphasizing from a technology perspective.

Mike Walsh:

I guess if we pull this conversation to- together there's, there, there's really never been a more important time to reimagine, not just industries but particularly the, pharmaceutical industry. And in many ways, the success of vaccines globally has generated a lot of goodwill. Where do you see, Antonio, the next horizon for transformation when it comes to manufacturing, operations and really the, pharmaceutical company of the future?

Antonio Buendia:

I see, three layer aspects here. The first one is the factory of the future, is all, that we have discussed, is how to improve what is happening within the walls of the factory. There is a lot to do there. There is a lot of potential. And we are going to see a lot of transformation. But there are other two aspect that are equally important. The second is the integrated supply chain. So now, we look We have 10 factories. And how these 10 factories are connected, normally, one product is not manufactured in one single factory. One product requires 20 different raw materials, is made at least in two different factories, and then has to be sent to a different distribution center. How we visualize, how we understand, and how we optimize the supply chain to be able to respond on time, minimize inventories, be faster, and respond customers, be customer oriented, and be lean. Okay? And the third one is the time to market. Normally, among many other things, we need to do the investigations in our R&D department. And then we have there, small factories with the small machines. And then we need to scale and, transfer to manufacturing. That's called technology transfer. So today, in most organizations, this is not an easy process. And it's not a short process. If we are able to extend the digital platform, the data platforms, across R&D and manufacturing we will be able to do a much faster technology transfer because we, will have the same data. We will have an early product and process characterization that we will be able to replicate. And that will mean, of course, a lot of advantage for the company because the area that we can put in the market, the more revenue. But also it's uh, critical We seeing in the, pandemic, time to market is absolutely crucial. And the patients are there, waiting for products that maybe they have been proven effective. And we need to be faster. I would say that these are the few dimensions inside the factory, outside of the f- the connected factory and the connected enterprise, and how to be faster. It's going to a new way of Faster to market, efficiency cheaper and, increased quality and productivity.

Rashesh Mody:

A- and Mike, from the supplier perspective, we wanna make sure we provide all the tools to Antonio and GSK to achieve those three things he's talked about. But this is absolutely true for pharmaceutical lifecycle Life sciences and, those key industries. But at the same time, this apply to food and beverage It applies to metal mining. It applies to oil and gas. It applies to power, major vertical, cities, smart cities. This apply to all the segments of industrial and, big manufacturing operations. And so we want to really enable customers to provide the factory of the future to We wanna provide better operational excellence. We wanna provide Reduce the downtime, improve the efficiency. Absolutely, these are the, what we strive for. And we are very happy to provide great partnership with GSK and all these customers. Thank you very much, Mike.

Mike Walsh:

This has been a fascinating insight into digital transformation, not just in pharmaceutical sector, but many other industries as well. Thank you very much, Rashesh and Antonio for being on the show.

Antonio Buendia:

Thank you. It has been a pleasure.

Rashesh Mody:

Thank you.