South Carolina Politics

Zoe Warren: From Humanitarian Missions to Political Ministry - A South Carolina Senate Campaign Unveiled

April 06, 2024 Bob Slone / Hannah Miller/Zoe Warren Season 2 Episode 20
Zoe Warren: From Humanitarian Missions to Political Ministry - A South Carolina Senate Campaign Unveiled
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South Carolina Politics
Zoe Warren: From Humanitarian Missions to Political Ministry - A South Carolina Senate Campaign Unveiled
Apr 06, 2024 Season 2 Episode 20
Bob Slone / Hannah Miller/Zoe Warren

Ever wondered what drives a man with a heart for humanitarian work to step into the political arena? Meet Zoe Warren, a South Carolina State Senate hopeful with a mission to weave the fabric of neighborly love and justice into the very laws that govern us. Our enlightening discussion peels back the layers of Warren's commitment to local outreach and his transformative vision for the Republican Party. His shift from international missionary work to political ministry underlines a deep passion for political science education and a staunch opposition to the divisive labels that often plague our political discourse. 

This episode offers a behind-the-scenes look at Warren's campaign platform, addressing how he aims to grapple with issues like medical freedom, government overreach, and the fentanyl crisis that's gripping our communities. Through a candid conversation, we tackle the challenges of reconnecting elected officials to the grassroots, the questions surrounding school choice and the handling of state finances, as well as the intricacies of election integrity. As Warren invites you to join his journey, you'll gain unique insights into the heartbeat of District 23 and the strategy that aims to align the Republican Party more closely with its foundational principles.
https://www.zoewarren.com/
https://thehannahmillershow.buzzsprout.com/

https://bobslone.com
https://twitter.com/Rwslone
https://www.facebook.com/BobSloneAudioProductions
https://www.thehannahmillershow.com/

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered what drives a man with a heart for humanitarian work to step into the political arena? Meet Zoe Warren, a South Carolina State Senate hopeful with a mission to weave the fabric of neighborly love and justice into the very laws that govern us. Our enlightening discussion peels back the layers of Warren's commitment to local outreach and his transformative vision for the Republican Party. His shift from international missionary work to political ministry underlines a deep passion for political science education and a staunch opposition to the divisive labels that often plague our political discourse. 

This episode offers a behind-the-scenes look at Warren's campaign platform, addressing how he aims to grapple with issues like medical freedom, government overreach, and the fentanyl crisis that's gripping our communities. Through a candid conversation, we tackle the challenges of reconnecting elected officials to the grassroots, the questions surrounding school choice and the handling of state finances, as well as the intricacies of election integrity. As Warren invites you to join his journey, you'll gain unique insights into the heartbeat of District 23 and the strategy that aims to align the Republican Party more closely with its foundational principles.
https://www.zoewarren.com/
https://thehannahmillershow.buzzsprout.com/

https://bobslone.com
https://twitter.com/Rwslone
https://www.facebook.com/BobSloneAudioProductions
https://www.thehannahmillershow.com/

Speaker 1:

Welcome back to South Carolina Politics and on today's podcast we're going to be interviewing Zoe Warren. Zoe, thanks so much for coming into the studio today, or, actually you're not here. I'm sorry You're not here, you're over the phone. So thank you for being over the phone with me today, zoe.

Speaker 2:

I am honored, I am there in spirit. Yes, I think we've already been conversing.

Speaker 1:

It does feel like you're here and we've already been having a great conversation. So, for our listeners, zoe is running for state senate, district 23. And we're just going to be introducing you guys to him and his platform today. So let's get. Before we get going, I want to give people, where they can find your information, more information about you, and I'll give this information again at the end of the podcast. So first of all, that's Z-O-E-W-A-R-R-E-Ncom, and then Zo4, the number four, s-c, and that's Facebook, and you said the website's got more of your platform. The Facebook has more of just daily news kind of stuff. Is that correct?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's correct. Just my commentary on stuff.

Speaker 1:

Okay, great. So welcome in, virtually, I guess, to the studio here for South Carolina Politics. And very first question can you just tell our listeners a little bit about Zoe, about Zoe Warren, yourself, your family, your background.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. My name is Zoe Warren. I live in Lexington, south Carolina. My family and I are missionaries. We've been in the spot we're at right now for about 14 years. We've taken the path of God. We went with him, and I don't know what that means to most people, but for us it just means we're trying to follow him and stay as close to Jesus as possible. We were missionaries to Pakistan as a family. We went there in 2015, into the Philippines in 2017.

Speaker 2:

And we also were stationed at a mission to the homeless and working poor downtown Columbia, where I was full-time and my wife would come on Thursdays and my kids would come too, and we and we just served the community there, preaching every day, making sure that there's food, and I was pretty much the chief custodian. My job was to make sure that all of the uh, all you know the, the fecal matter and and and waste products were, were were removed from the building every day, um and so, and also that everybody was well fed and that we were all safe and that we heard the word of God. And my wife would come and she'd do Bible studies too, and it was just an amazing time where the Lord he kind of shifted us over into the governing ministry, and so we found ourselves teaching, and not just teaching the Bible, but teaching what our responsibility is as Christians in the civic sphere. You know, like, how do we, how do we live according to the word of God in a society where we're not trying to essentially, like you know, put pressure on people to be Christians or to force people to, you know, to believe in Jesus, but to still, you know, promote values that are founded in virtue and righteousness and justice and mercy. You know, and how does that look in public policy? What does it look like? And my answer to that is policies that love your neighbor as you want to be loved. You know, it's really simple, it's not that complicated, it's just how would you love your neighbor? How would you want to be loved? That's our policy should be equal, they should be equally applied, equal justice, and I think that's what John Adams said.

Speaker 2:

He said that in his estimation you guys can look this up a republic was a government in which every citizen, no matter what your class or your stature, were equally subject to the laws, and I found that we have fallen so far from that republic. I mean, I could pretty much ask anybody Democrat, republican, independent, you name it Do we have a republic right now where everybody's equally subject to the laws? And they will say absolutely not. And that means that our republic is actually under the feet of someone. Our republic is being destroyed, our republic is being destroyed, our republic is being compromised and so we have to restore that republic to the stature that our founders decided that we should have. And I believe it's an accurate summation that a republic where everybody is equally subject to the laws is the kind that we really want. Everybody wants for your neighbor to be under the same laws as you, whether they're governing or not, whether they're elected or not, whether they're bureaucrats appointed to government or not, government employees or not, equally subject to the laws.

Speaker 2:

And so what I have been making every effort to teach now, constitution we did. Constitution as a workshop, excuse me Constitution as a solution workshops. We Constitution as a Solution workshops. We've done political science trainings for Center for Self-Governance, just teaching systematic politics and how do we strategize and really learn how to write policies, how to write resolutions, how to aid the folks that are elected right now, whatever level of government you know, from school government, municipal government, all the way to state and we've been to DC five times over the last year trying to fight the weaponization of labels in government.

Speaker 2:

And so the Lord moved me into this ministry. Because you know what I was watching politicians and what I saw was people who really were high on rhetoric and and and red meat kind of topics, but when it came time for virtue it was severely lacking, very, very anemic. And so, um, as I, as I entered this whole political sphere, in mind was how do we restore this self-governance so that these people with virtue that are out here complaining, that are not connected, connected to government, can be connected through their elected again, because it's been severed, that connection to their elected has been severed. And so, therefore, virtue is not coming from the precincts, not coming from the activists, not coming from the people on the ground that have to live with the policies that are created and getting to the elected. The elected is getting their decision making from somewhere else. So we need to restore that connection so that we can restore a republic where there's oversight, where everyone's equally subject to the laws.

Speaker 1:

So that kind of leads into the next question and maybe even answers it, which is what inspired you to run. And of course I didn't mention this before, but you're running for the Republican Party and a lot of the answer, or a lot of what you just talked about, are things that are important to the Republican Party platform. So that might have, you know, people probably deduce for themselves, but what you know, talking about all of that, would you say that kind of sums up what inspired you to run. Or you know, maybe there's even more that's kind of prompted you to do this.

Speaker 2:

To some degree. Yes, I am satisfied with helping electeds too and helping them strategize. I came into the Republican Party and I made it my mission to be an education arm to try to help our activists get trained to the point where they could actually become the chief counselors of our electives, rather than our electives having to go to what I would consider domestic elite organizations to get all of their policy and all of their strategizing. The activists in the Republican Party who want to participate can provide some of those things, can provide resolutions and policies amendments, and it's not just a shouting with signs and waving signs for candidates or knocking on doors and making phone calls, but actually giving substantive counsel to our electeds, because oftentimes they don't know how to do those things you know, and so I mean, for better or for worse, our electeds. They get elected and they go into the office and they don't really know how to govern, and the first people that are there to give them any counsel are lobbyists, even the associations that you know. I mean they have to be trained. Governance training is a thing, right, and those are still associations that are going to provide them policy, insurance, funding, training and lobbying, and so therefore, that disconnects them from the people in the precincts that have to live with the policies they create. So, with that said, I'm satisfied helping electeds.

Speaker 2:

But as I've been in this process of helping electeds, I have been asked by my peers to run because they're like Zoe. You have to because there are folks that are completely betraying us or they're disappointing us and they're unreasonable and they're obstinate, or they are. Oftentimes they're called names. I don't like to really necessarily call people names, but I would say there are uniparty people that have loyal opposition and the Democrats that would prefer to have loyal opposition that will help them preserve their you know, the pipeline of money from the federal government. Then they would have liberty-minded people who want to secure the rights of the people because it might affect their money or their power. And so another reason why I ran was because I was asked to. I was asked by people who are currently elected. I was asked by people in our community like Zoe, please are you going to run, you have to do this, and so I am. I'm 100% pro-life and this kind of goes into my issues and my platform. But there have been some very disappointing actions of my opponent and I won't say their name but.

Speaker 2:

And the problem is just that you know we have a platform and somehow some misinformation campaign has been waged against the Republicans to make everyone think the Republican party platform is extremism, when it's not it's. That is moderate Republicanism. That's, that's the stuff we all agreed on. That's why it's in our platform. That's not the extreme position, that's not the pie in the sky maybe one day position. That's moderate republicanism. That's the thing you can do safely and know this is Republican Party. And so it's been my effort to reconnect our activists to the platform itself and reconnect the electeds to their mission, which is the mission of the Republican Party, which is to promote the platform and elect candidates that will support it. And so, because of that, I think that's what they asked me to run to, because largely Republicans are not satisfied with having a Republican trifecta in South Carolina since 2003. And they're like struggling for several sessions to save women's sports or to preserve lives of babies in the womb, or to even have medical freedom in South Carolina.

Speaker 1:

Well, like you said, that kind of leads into the next question, which is you know, what is your, what's your platform? What are the things that are most important to you? What are the maybe the top three things that and I don't know if you could even break them down to the top three, but what are the important issues that you would like to tackle head on if you were to be elected?

Speaker 2:

Okay, if I had to give you the issues I want to tackle.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's what I was going to say, like, just give us a little foundational, let's start there, and then we'll see where it leads.

Speaker 2:

Foundationally, I believe that parenthood is given to us by God. Okay, and it should be respected, it should be upheld, it should be honored by government. Foundationally, I believe that personhood is an institution that is given to us by God and it should be the same. It should be treated the same. Personhood should not be marred by giving personhood to things that are not actually persons. And, lastly, is statehood, that is, our collective community, that we have the ability to be sovereign and make decisions of our own. We give the national government its limits its it's, not the other way around. And so the thing that undergirds all of my decision-making is does it uphold, respect and preserve parenthood, personhood and statehood? And then there's a list, a laundry list of items that I am specifically particularly concerned with making sure that we have some advocacy in the Senate. As you know, philosophically, in my worldview and so like. Number one on that list is medical freedom. Right, are we letting bureaucrats make decisions that would violate bodily autonomy, that would violate basic principles of individual liberty, that would violate even the separation of powers? How can we allow bureaucracies to make policies with the force of law, enforce the policies that they created and then, if you've got a problem with how they enforce it. You've got to go through their courts, their appeals, administrative courts, first before you can even go to an actually constitutional court, and so we need to have discussions of how we restore the basic values that our country was founded upon, which are the separation of powers, due process. You know, these are things like even as far as unreasonable searches and seizures. People have lost property, they've lost their jobs because they wouldn't put something inside their body and the government gave everybody who was producing it immunity. So these are medical freedoms on the top of that list. You can see how parenthood was affected, in that I mean you can see how parenthood was affected, in that I mean you can see how personhood is affected in that you don't have the right to even decide things for yourself without being punished for it. That's a violation of individual liberty. You're right as a person, and so it's my opinion that underneath that, the structural foundation of how I essentially approach any idea or concept or problem, are there going to be some things, like you know, gun rights advocacy.

Speaker 2:

I'm 100% all in for gun rights. I host a show called 2A4. Today it's distributed by the New American Magazine, where I talk about things related to gun rights and policies that are coming down the pipe Policy puke. I call it coming down the pipe to try to abridge or infringe on our rights to keep and bear arms. I'm 100% pro-life.

Speaker 2:

I think personhood really is a human. A human that's being, it's any human when they begin to be. They're a person, not rivers, not trees, not lakes, not AI, not governments, not corporations. Those things should not be called persons. I think we have done human beings a disservice and allowed their murder, allowed their oppression, allowed this medical mandates from hell on believers and on people who have individual liberty, because we let personhood get marred.

Speaker 2:

I'm opposed to social experiments like CRT and DEI being funded by taxpayers. I want lower taxes. I want less government involvement. The less government, the better. Laissez-faire. I mean to be honest with you.

Speaker 2:

We have $1.8 billion that was just kind of randomly found in the comptroller's office. I mean, I don't have $18 know $18 laying around the living room right now, you know, but he had $1.8 billion just in, I guess, on the floor of his office or somewhere. I don't know how you lose $1.8 billion, but it tells me, if you can misplace $1.8 billion, then you've been overspending and overtaxing. South Carolinians period. You cannot lose that much money and not have it felt that unless you are overtaxing and overspending, you know. Obviously, medical freedom for protecting our children, chemical castration, all the augmentation of that, that should not even be a thing. I mean, when they become adults, go do whatever you want. But no, no, no. In the culture of South Carolina the medical community should not be involved in that kind of butchery and I think it's disgusting.

Speaker 2:

I want our primaries closed. I think we should have truly Republican people selecting Republican candidates. I mean, that's just. I don't know why that makes sense to me. I want election integrity. I would love to have paper ballots. I would love to have one day voting, except for the military and people that are, you know, that can, that are hurt, that are sick, that are hurt, that are sick, that are whatever. They have absentee balance. Our system was fine before that. I don't know why we had to change it.

Speaker 2:

I like school choice. I don't necessarily like government-paid-for choices, especially in a Keynesian kind of sense. I don't give $6,000 per child right now I have three kids. I don't give $6,000 per child. Right now I have three kids. I don't give $6,000 per child for my kid to go to school and in taxes and so for them to give me $6,000 back. That's collectivism, that's socialism, that's not conservatism. By any stretch of the imagination, that is not conservative. And so I do like the idea of school choice being where if I'm paying for my kids to go to school, then maybe I'm exempt from being taxed to pay for the public school system if I'm going to a private or homeschool. But you know I am a school choice proponent. I do like the idea of choice. I just know that with the Department of Education, with anybody who gives you money to go to school, there are strings attached. That's just the way it works. And then I want to end.

Speaker 2:

In South Carolina, the illicit fentanyl poisoning epidemic the worst disaster on our citizens right now is taking place and it's almost like our electeds are paralyzed and have done really nothing to stop it. They've been medicating it with Narcan and fentanyl strips. But we need to stop the illicit fentanyl poisoning. It's not just a pill that you take and somebody died from an overdose because illicit fentanyl poisoning. There's no dosing instructions on illicit fentanyl.

Speaker 2:

Matter of fact, some of these folks are taking a pain reliever. Former military, they hurt themselves. I'm former former military. They hurt themselves. I'm former military myself. You know they hurt themselves. They have an injury. They're not able to get a pain reliever. Their friend says hey, man, I got a Percocet If you need one. Oh man, great, yeah, thanks. They give them the Percocet, but it's got fentanyl in it and fentanyl, the grain of salt size, can kill a human being. And so they're being murdered drug-induced homicide through illicit fentanyl poisoning.

Speaker 2:

And our electeds I don't know what they're doing. They're up there trying to pass fake vaccine mandate, anti-vaccine mandate bills. I mean, the S-965 is not an anti-vaccine mandate or anti-COVID vaccine mandate bill. It actually makes statutory, it actually gives the ability for corporations to fire their people if they won't take a COVID vaccination. It's in the bill. But they're up there arguing in that.

Speaker 2:

Up there, arguing in that they're trying to get health stars in place and all kinds of stuff, rather than stop the murder of our children through illicit fentanyl poisoning which is coming through our southern border, which is being produced by the CCP and run into our country through the Mexican drug cartels. We've got parents being called domestic terrorists, domestic violent extremists. But the Mexican drug cartels are not foreign terrorist organizations. Come on, we got massive problems and I think our electives are not focusing on the right thing. I don't think we really have anybody in the Senate right now that will stand up for the rights of the people and securing their rights, and that's why you know, I want to, I want to serve in the Senate, I want to. I want to represent our people in Lexington County, in my District 23, and as a whole Republicans, the Republican Party platform, should be governing in South Carolina. There is no reason why it isn't, except that somebody is getting paid so that it doesn't.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for coming on to the show today and educating folks a little bit about who you are, where you stand and again, your website is zoewarrencom and your Facebook page is Zo4SC and people can kind of get more on daily news and interactions from you there. So thank you so much. I really appreciate you coming on and doing that for us today. Zo.

Speaker 2:

I am honored. I'm so thankful to have the opportunity to speak to your sphere of influence, and thank you for giving me this opportunity.

Speaker 1:

You're welcome. Before I let you go, what's your campaign strategy and how can people get involved? We've just given them your website and your Facebook page. Is there anything else that or any ways that people can get involved if they're in District 23?

Speaker 2:

Yes, okay, we want to meet all of our district face-to-face, and so we have a massive doorknob campaign that we're planning and putting on right now, and I would love it if you guys would help. If you can come volunteer your time, that would be amazing. You can go on my website where there's, like you know, some fields there that you can fill out and it'll send me your contact information. I'll put you on our volunteer list. Also, if you can't come volunteer, if you physically can't do it or you just don't have the time, I mean we have to pay like $10 an hour sometimes for, like, a paid door knocker, and the paid door knocker is way better than paying the USPS to take mail around, even though it may be a little more expensive Because the USPS I'm nothing against the USPS, but I would much rather have one of our people that can go up to the door, hand them a palm card, express our platform and then maybe find out if they're undecided or they're from my opponent and give me the opportunity to go meet them personally.

Speaker 2:

And so if you guys can help fund that, that would be amazing too. Again, it's like 10 bucks an hour, and so I mean if you guys can donate $400, that would give me a week of a 40-hour work week out of, you know, I mean close to 40-hour work week out of a paid door knocker. That can help us to reach all 16,000 voters that we need to reach to win in the general and for right now, for the primary, we want to be able to reach 9,000. So if you guys can help me with that, that would be amazing. You can do that right on our website, zoewarrencom. You can hit the donate button. You can join in the middle by filling out the form.

Speaker 1:

Thanks so much, Zoe.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for listening to the South Carolina Politics Podcast. I'm your host, bob Sloan. If you have any questions about what you heard here today, email me at bob at bobsloancom. That's B-O-B-S-L-O-N-E dot com. You can find out more about what we do here at Bob Sloan Audio Productions on my website at bobsloancom. Again, thank you for listening and make sure you follow, share and leave a review.

Interview With Zoe Warren for Senate
Election Candidate Discusses Platform and Issues
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