Crowning Connections

Driven By The Success with Ty Majeski

January 05, 2022 Ty Majeski Season 1 Episode 1
Crowning Connections
Driven By The Success with Ty Majeski
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Rob Clemons of Crowning Connections kicks off season 2 with Ty Majeski, Driver of the #66 Toyota tundra for Thorsport racing. Ty, dubbed "The Deal" by Dale Earnhardt Jr., shares how he went from go karts to NASCAR and finding his dream business culture in Sandusky, Illinois. 

Listen in! 

Rob Clemons  
Welcome to Crown Connections with Monarch Roofing and Rob Clemons. Today, I've got a little show where we want to dive into what makes exceptional people exceptional. I feel like a lot of our business, people that listen to the show, have their own goals, they have goals for their employees, and, but it always comes back to a corporate identity. And a lot of times that identity is I've got to work harder. I gotta outwork the competition to get to the top of my game. And so today, I'm really excited to have Ty Majeski, Number 66 for ThorSport Racing with us. Ty, how you doing today?

Ty Majeski  
Good. Hope you guys are doing well. I appreciate you having me on.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, no, no, we really appreciate having you. You know, it's it's to have a person that's kind of been through the sports industry and done as much as you've done, quite frankly, it's really impressive. If you would tell us a little bit about yourself; how you got into racing?

Ty Majeski
Well, I'm a first generation racer. So a lot of the a lot of drivers nowadays are dads have done it and they, you know, kind of grow into it, so to speak. And so I'm first generation, and I was always the race fan. My parents were always raised fans growing up. And we're sitting at the dinner table one night, and I was about eight or nine years old, and I'm like, five four, 135 pounds. So I'm a small guy now. So you can imagine a smile was back then. And I was at that age where all my buddies were going out for tackle football. And, of course, I wanted to do it. And my parents didn't want me being a part of it and didn't want me getting hurt because I was small. And like I said, we're always race fans. So my dad's like, hey, what if I went out and buy a go kart, we can start racing. And like, sure that sounds pretty cool. And we just kind of the rest is history. We just kind of moved up through the ranks local go karts to national level go karts, and then eventually made the jump into late models and eventually NASCAR.

Rob Clemons 
Wow, that's really cool. It's it's kind of like racing's one of those things where I could see where being too big would almost be a negative, right? I mean, you don't see a whole lot of NASCAR drivers who are six foot six or anything, right?

Ty Majeski 
Yeah, for sure. I mean, even on the small side, for racecar drivers. I always say I can fit in everybody else's car, but none of them can fit mine. Add up a seat or whatever. But they you can't stretch the seat out. But yeah, obviously, the lighter you are, the more weight you can have in the vehicle, and you can strategically place that weight for handling purposes. So when you get up into stock cars, it's not as much, but definitely go karts. It's a huge advantage.

Rob Clemons  
Yeah, yeah. No doubt about it. So would you say that most drivers kind of get into it... And this is for somebody who might be listening that you know, wants to get in early? Would you say most of them do start with go karts? Or how did most of the drivers that you've seen get to kind of get into this?

Ty Majeski 
Yeah, I would say mostly that's the first step. You know, there's the thing that the funny thing about racing is there's no blueprint for it. Where obviously if you're in basketball, you you know play in, you know, grade school, and then middle school and in high school and then the college. And in racing, you can kind of do whatever you can start me you can race dirt bikes, you can go you know, off road, you can race dirt, go karts, asphalt, go karts, road tours, go karts, you can run Bandoleros legend cars for cylinder street stocks, there's so many different ways to get into racing. And there's no blueprint for it. There's no good way to do it. Everybody's had success, kind of paving their own path. And but I would say to answer your question, majority of them do start in go karts and graduate maybe in the legend cars, and then in the late models?

Rob Clemons  
Gotcha, gotcha. Going back through your career. I mean, you've had quite a few successes. I saw your Rookie of the Year, back in 2016. Was it? Or was the 2014? I belive it was.

Ty Majeski  
Yes. 2014. Yep. 

Rob Clemons 
Yeah. So how they did you know, you just hit the circuit, and you're immediately having success? You know, what did it feel like to be in that situation? I mean, you know, because obviously, there's a lot of competition. This, from your perspective, you know, what do you think you were doing right, right off the jump that made you so successful right off the bat?

Ty Majeski 
Well, one thing my dad taught me at a very young age is surround yourself with better people than you and always make you look good. And that's something that I try and take an account with anything that I do, whether it be racing, or just life in general, you always try and surround yourself with good people, and good things will happen. So I've been fortunate enough to be there to have worked with a lot of great people and a lot of and have had a lot of great mentors or the course of my career. And whether that be on the go kart level than in the late models. And now here, Thor Sport Racing. I've just been extremely blessed to be a part of a lot of great groups of people that have taught me a lot and you know that I've brought the best I started myself.

Rob Clemons  
Yeah, that's that's really cool. What? What's your favorite thing to drive so far? I mean, now you're doing the trucks, but I mean, what was your favorite?

Ty Majeski 
Um, I guess where I cut my teeth is late model racing. That's kind of where I made a name for myself. Midwest, short track racing, super late models. So that's kind of where I come from. And that's what I enjoy doing. I was actually ran a late model race this weekend down in South Carolina, and had some success this weekend. So I love going back to my roots. Obviously, you know, the trucks. The NASCAR level is what I want to do and where I want to be, but I always love going back to my roots.

Rob Clemons  
Now it's really cool. The next time you're in South Carolina, we're gonna have to get you by Myrtle Beach to check out the place a little bit. Have you been down this way yet?

Ty Majeski  
Yeah, I actually have been to Florence and spent a week in there. I was actually in Myrtle Beach. I was in Florence this weekend racing, which is, which isn't too far from Myrtle Beach. So I've, like I said I was at Myrtle Beach. I think it was a few years ago. I took my fiancee out there and we spent spent a weekend so it's a nice area for sure.

Rob Clemons  
Yeah, really cool. Really cool. So I was going to tell you a little bit about myself. So actually, my first year of college, I went to University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. So when I saw a little bit about your bio, I see you're actually originally from Wisconsin. 

Ty Majeski  
Yep. 

Rob Clemons  
A lot of racecar fans out that way?

Ty Majeski  
Actually a lot. So Wisconsin is actually a real honey hole for late model racing, short track wise. There's about you can drive four hour radius around the center of Wisconsin, and there's maybe 12 or 13 asphalt tracks, and they all race weekly. In some of the best weekly racing, in the country, obviously. The more you travel south, the more of an industry it is. But up and up in Wisconsin, it's a hobby for a lot of people and fans love going to the race tracks up there and supporting it on on Friday and Saturday nights.

Rob Clemons   
Yeah, that's cool. That's cool stuff. What do you think is the the mentor, if you have one, that whether it's racecars or not just you have a mentor in life that has meant a lot to you and your development?

Ty Majeski  
Well, there's a lot of them right. But you know, the obvious one I think, for a lot of us is is our parents, right? You know, my dad, he sacrificed a ton for me growing up. We've worked countless nights in the shop working out or go karts and learning together. You know, we, like I said, he was a, I was a first generation racer, he didn't know much about it. And we spent so much time and he sacrifice a lot. And I sacrifice a lot to get to the point where I am today. And you know, whether that be in high school, you know, going out with your friends or going to football games, I've sacrificed that to be in the shop, working on my go karts or race cars to try and be better and, and pursue a career in racing. And I don't think I think that's something that a lot of people don't understand is what actually goes into being a racecar driver, behind the scenes, and how much effort and not only from yourself, but for everybody supporting you and around you to be successful.

Rob Clemons 
That's a great point. You know, I actually, in getting to know a little bit about you saw, you know, you do some of the engineering on your own vehicles. So, you know, you're really behind the scenes making things happen. Do you find that's more you know, when you get to the cup series, guys, do you find that they're doing the same things? Or are they more you're relying on their team to that point.

Ty Majeski  
um, a couple of I feel like they're really relying on their teams, I think there's certain drivers that are involved. But I think more often than not, especially as you know, NASCAR has evolved. It's, it's kind of brought the driver sort of separated the driver from that for whatever reason. Things are so technical now. And teams are so secretive, you know, what they're doing, and how they're doing it. And they know drivers talk, right? So a lot of the drivers are friends. And they don't want their secrets getting out. And the way they get out is a lot of times the drivers believe it or not. So I know the teams are definitely more careful of what they let out. But I can say personally as a driver that is an engineer also, I learned a ton just knowing the ins and outs of what you're actually driving and understanding it. Why it works and how it works is huge to try and be better.

Rob Clemons    
Yeah, I figure on on the actual day of the race, you're probably giving some feedback. That's probably pretty technical, then you know, you're driving the truck and you're filling something you can probably convey it a little bit better to your crew chief or whoever I mean, would you say that's pretty accurate? You guys are talking a lot throughout the race. 

Ty Majeski 
Yeah, most certainly. And myself being here at Thor Sport. I know what goes into my truck. I know what the setup is. You know, I know everything about it, I can see it. And in the program's we have to sort of simulate the the race vehicles before we get to the racetrack and I know all those things and when I go to the racetrack, I can correlate them and build the data points for the next time we go to a race and the next time. And you just build up a notebook and see trends and what works and what doesn't. And as a driver, knowing those things, just helps.

Rob Clemons  
Yeah, no, no doubt about it. So let's go into a little bit of that practice you talked about. So I saw here that you are ranked number one, and I say where you may still be, ranked number one oval driving player of the world on the iRacing racing simulator. That's pretty impressive. I mean, there's a lot of racers on this thing. Like, what's the key to doing that so well?

Ty Majeski  
Just means I do it a lot. Right, right. It takes a lot of time. Of course, you know, iRacing has been a huge supporter of mine, not only on what their service, but they've always supported me and they sponsored me since I think 2014, or 2015. Like I said, they've been a huge supporter of mine. And I've used iRacing as a tool to just held myself behind the wheel just being consistent going around racetracks. Obviously, it's not 100% real. It is on a computer. But there's a ton of things that you can take away from it. Especially like road courses, new road courses that I've never been to I'll going iRacing and spent hours running laps and getting accustomed to the braking points in the line, which corners coming up next. And it just shortens that learning curve when you show up there in real life. And I've also met so many great people on iRacing. It's not just about getting on there and racing. It's about the camaraderie and the relationships you can build. Because a lot of people in the industry do use iRacing. And, you know, like I said, I've met a lot of great people, and they've provided me opportunities in the real world because of it.

Rob Clemons    
Yeah, that was pretty cool. I'll trash talking going on iRacing.

Ty Majeski 
Always. Yeah. Cross line. I feel like that's just a given at this day.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, no doubt about it. I was wondering, have you ever played any of the games on Xbox? Like, like NASCAR Heat or any of that stuff?

Ty Majeski 
I have a little bit, not much when I have time to, you know, I guess play video games. I don't want to call iRacing video game because it's higher than that. But I have time to do stuff like that. It's it's iRacing for sure.

Rob Clemons 
So so a little fun fact, and I don't want to challenge you at all. But I'm playing NASCAR Heat the other day and there are see Ty Majeski's truck in front of me and I pull it around. I took you in this race. I don't know. You're right. Right, right. I'm sure that was accurate. But yeah.

Ty Majeski 
well, you know, it's funny, I grew up racing, you know, on, you know, whatever, PlayStation NASCAR Thunder 04 and all those NASCAR games growing up, and you always think, man, that'd be really cool if I got my name on that video game, you know. And to be in one was really neat. And, and I don't even do it. So yeah, it's funny how, how you know, your dreams as a kid changes when you get older. So it's neat to be on that game and be a part of it. And it's a it's, it's crazy to think about back then and to see a dream come true is kind of neat.

Rob Clemons 
No, I mean, it does have to be pretty cool to see your, you know, your name on a video game. And I gotta say that, you know, just just to be clear, I think beating you in a video game was kind of like beating you know, Tom Brady on a football game on Xbox. Like, there's no, there's nothing good to it, but at least it was fun to talk about for sure. So let's talk a little bit about the short tracks, you know, and speed 50 one.com and 2016 rated you the number one short track draft pic. And, you know, I've heard a lot about your your short track, you know, kind of like almost the legendary kind of ability on there. What makes someone good on the short track? I mean, you know, what, what's the key to being really good at that.

Ty Majeski 
Um, I think just the finesse of... a lot of these, let me back up, a lot of these short tracks have a lot of character because at that level, they don't have the money for fresh pavement or to patch the bumps, right. So a lot of these tracks are old and worn out. So the more course surface it is, the more wears out your tires, and the rougher it is, obviously the harder is to get around. So I think you have to have a lot of finesse to get around there, to get around short tracks and a lot of discipline. From a tire management standpoint if you can go too hard and push your card too hard and your tires will fall off and you will have anything left to race with at the end. So I think having that balance of being discipline and understanding your the situation that you're in and what your race car is doing and what is doing right. And realizing that and acting and acting to it.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, it's a good point. I would say what do you think the reflexes are more extreme? Like are the the need for really good reflexes more important on a short track or does it really matter in comparison to the other tracks?

Ty Majeski  
Well, I think it's just a different set of instincts. On a short track you're looking for you know, mechanical grip and just grip in your racecar. You get to these mile and a half in the truck series. A lot of it his arrow base. So you go it's just a different way of approaching a race on a short track versus a track that, you know, you're going so fast that aerodynamics taken into account where you position yourself versus other trucks. So I would say that's probably the biggest difference.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, makes sense. Makes sense. So I was again, reading up a little bit on you. Dale Earnhardt, Jr. called you "The Deal" on a tweet, are you aware of this?

Ty Majeski 
Yeah, that was, boy, that was in 2015, November of 2015, after the Governor's Cup in Florida. Yeah, I do remember.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah. Okay, well, yeah. Like who's keeping track? Right? No, that's really cool. I mean, you know, to have like, you know, basically Legend of NASCAR talking about you that way, that's gonna be pretty special. I mean, where would you you know, as far as like, looking at your kind of heroes in NASCAR? Do you have anybody that you ever looked at, I mean, obviously, probably all of them were kind of special. But was there any particular driver that you really feel like you you respected a lot more than others, or just, you know, above everybody else.

Ty Majeski 
I think over the years, when it was happening, Jimmie Johnson's domination was maybe annoying to some people just because he, you just, he won everything you won a lot. Won how many championships in a row... seven total. And at the time, I didn't like him. But as I grew older, and began to appreciate what it takes to win in the sport, you just, that's something you learned to appreciate. I mean, we're, we're living in an era with, you know, Tom Brady, for example. I mean, we are never going to see another guy like this. And you might hate him, because he wins all the time. But you have to respect him. And so for me, it's it's Jimmie Johnson, just for him to be able to accomplish what he did in the era he did it in, we'll probably never see that again. And I've learned to appreciate that and, and I've gotten the pleasure to spend some time with him. We actually shared a, a go kart stall at a road course in Charlotte when I lived down there. So I got to spend some time with him and learn sort of what he did and how he did it. And at the level he did it at is just incredible. And that's something I really look up to.

Rob Clemons  
Now. That's really cool. Yeah, I mean, incredible career he's had and, and now I guess this year, he is trying something a little bit different. And do you find that to be fascinating itself? I mean, it almost seemed like it's such a different style of car. I mean, what were your thoughts when you saw that happening?

Ty Majeski 
Well, it's it's, it's, it's a jump. It's a whole... where you take something that you've done your entire life, and now you have to completely change those instincts and shape them into something else at, I don't even I don't want to age them at whatever, 40-45 years old. And that's not easy to do. And oh, by the way, you're going up against the best in the world at that discipline. So it's, I give him credit for trying it. And it's an incredible feat for him to just go out there and be competitive. And to see him do it at the level he's doing an at is, there's no doubt in my mind, he's the he's the greatest of all time, for sure.

Rob Clemons  
Yeah, that's really, really cool. Well, let's jump over to a little bit about yourself. So you, I was checking out your website. I mean, you got a pretty amazing website in itself. How have you, as a businessman, marketed yourself? I mean, what do you have a marketing team that works with you? Or, you know, how have you gone out to brand yourself as well as you've done?

Ty Majeski  
Well, that's an interesting in question. So when I first started in, in late models, and, and started having success, and started to realize that this is actually this could actually work, this could be a career, I could have a career in racing. You have to take a step back and think about what you're doing and be strategic about it. There's, unfortunately, a lot of people in the business that will take advantage of you. And I was fortunate enough to have some connections with some drivers who learned the hard way and got taken advantage of. And you certainly need to be careful who you surround yourself with, in the in, in the industry. There's a lot of good people out there for sure. But you have to make sure you find them. Otherwise you can get burned, and it can be the end of your career. So my dad and I actually did a lot of the marketing and business side in the early days, in late models, and then actually when I did the deal with Roush in 2017. That was all my dad and I. We handled all that, you know, got our own attorney to look over the contracts. And you know, a lot of drivers at at that time would have hired somebody and and we took it into our own hands and did it ourselves for a lot of years. And, you know, I never had the privilege of growing up with a sponsor or a family that had the means to support my racing. We always had to find teams that would believe in in me or people that would believe in me to to make it happen. And that's something that we've done all the way up until this year. And I've got a great group of people now behind me here at ThorSport and as well as another marketing company that that is more grassroots, and they only help out one other driver and I and, you know, I know I can trust them, and they believe in me and what I'm doing and create opportunities for me.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, that's amazing stuff. And so let's go to the team over at ThorSport. You know, I mean, obviously very, very impressive. race team company in general, from everything I've seen, when it comes to I'm going to say game day, for lack of a better, you know, race day, of course, how much teamwork comes into into the race itself? And how much of it becomes competitive between each other? I'm sure there's a balance, but I mean, are you guys giving each other tips leading up to it? Do you try to keep them to the to yourselves, you know, how does that look?

Ty Majeski 
I think there's, there's certain things that that need to get shared, and that do get shared. But every crew chief and every team has their things that they do, that the others don't know about. And that's just, everybody in this shop wants to beat each other, you know, more solid than anybody. It's just, it's natural, right? You know, I want to go out and, and beat the other Ford trucks when when I race here at ThorSport, because everybody knows you have the same equipment. And if you can take the same equipment and be better, that makes yourself look good. You know, and it's just, you know, human nature to want to do that. But at the same time, we all work under one umbrella, we all work for one man as Duke Thorson. And he's a great guy, and he gives us everything that we need to do to be competitive. And, you know, if ThorSport is is winning, we're all winning. So that's something that that we that we take to heart here. And we work together and make sure that all trucks are competitive. But like I said, we all want to beat each other. And we all have our own little things that we do to try and to try and have that little bit of an edge. But like I said, it's all about the team. It was awesome to see Ben Rhodes get the get the Owners Championship and the Drivers Championship in the same season. That's something that Duke has never done before. This is his first Owners Championship, and in fifth Drivers Championship, so it was incredibly neat to see that finally accomplish here.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, big shout out to Ben Rhodes, for sure. That was very, very impressive. And, and, you know, in general, I was always kind of wondering about that, because you can equate that with business. You know, over here at Monarch Roofing, for example, we have three locations. And so we all want to kind of push each other on a month to month basis. We all want to see who can do the most cells. So we all support each other. But we also have our our little competitive side. And we figure if we can push each other, we make each other better. So it's kind of neat to see that you guys are still doing that too, even at the at the most competitive levels of sports like NASCAR. So very cool stuff. So as far as your your future, I mean, what what's next for you? I mean, obviously, you know, you're with a great team here. But you know, where do you want to see yourself go in your career in NASCAR?

Ty Majeski 
Well, you know, when I when I initially moved down to Charlotte in 2017, and I had the XFINITY deal with Roush, obviously, your dream is to, to make it to the cup level and be competitive at the cup level. You know, so that was my, that was my dream and and what I wanted to do and over the years as I grew and had different opportunities and and seeing how race teams in Charlotte, not not perform, but I guess how they, how they act and how they handle themselves and how they work is was different than what I initially anticipated. So I really feel like I found a home here and at ThorSport. It's in Sandusky, Ohio, so it's sort of not your standard shop race shop in, in Charlotte. So like I said, there's a lot of great people here. The people up here are racers and they have the Midwest mentality of, you know, they work all hours of the day and they work until they need to get done. And in Charlotte, I just felt like a lot of the teams it was just a job to them. They would work you know, seven o'clock to four o'clock boom they were going on. Well here it's it's and it was a job right here. It's more of a way of life. We love to do it up here. And I think it shows in the performance and the product we put out on the racetrack. So, you know, obviously I met ThorSport to be a driver. I do love doing the engineering side but I'm here because I want to be a driver and and I know and I don't know Duke knows that and everybody here knows that. And you know I love to I love to have a full time opportunity here in the future. Whether that be next year or years down the road. I'm going to be here at ThorSport for the time being and I'm gonna enjoy every minute of it.

Rob Clemons   
And that's, that's such powerful stuff. And I say that because you just talked about a culture there, you know, and it's like, the culture is such a key to every organization, every winning team, and the fact that you guys are able to get people there who really, really, it's not just a job, you know, it's not clocking in the morning, how much overtime do I get? How many days off do I have a year? But it sounds like you're really driven by the success of everything and I think that's such a powerful thing. I don't even know how some companies think they're going to survive without having a really powerful culture. Do you find it this becomes something where during the hiring process during the all those processes that ThorSport does does a better job with finding who they're gonna bring to the team and making sure they're the right fit?

Ty Majeski 
Well, you touched on it. So it's obviously the racing industry is in Charlotte. And sometimes it's hard to get people up here. You know, it's Sandusky, Ohio is a hard sell, because it's just out of the Charlotte area. And you're out of the industry. And like I said, it's it's it's it's a, it's a hard it's hard work for us to get good people up here. And I feel like that David Pepper and and Tracy Hines and Duke have done a great job at managing that and making sure that we have good people up here and the tools necessary to go out and be successful as a race team. And not only one race team, but four race teams, and sometimes five, so it's a lot for sure. And they've done a great job, getting the best out of people. And they've done a good job taking somebody that loves racing that that has the drive and mentality do it. And teaching them the right way to do it and shaping them into being great, great mechanics and great engineers and great crew chiefs. I feel like the development here is very, very good. Instead of just taking a guy from Charlotte and hiring them. They'll take a young guy that loves racing, loves motorsports, and trains them. And I see a lot of a lot of that here at ThorSport. And that's why a lot of people have been here for so many years.

Rob Clemons   
Yeah, very, very cool stuff. Retention is a big thing, too. You know, obviously, especially in 2021, where it's so hard to keep people. When you see anywhere where they've had people there year after year after year, it says something itself. So as far as you go, what other what other hobbies do you have? I mean, when you're not racing.

Ty Majeski 
I'm from Wisconsin, and it's cold up there, and a lot of snow. So in the offseason, I love to go up there and spend some time snowmobiling. My dad is a part owner and a motor sports or powersports dealership up there. So we had the opportunity to grab some snowmobiles and go out riding on weekends and have a lot of fun. And I love winter sports and, and water sports in the summertime, whether that be jet skis or skiing or tubing or all that all that kind of stuff. So we find we have to be creative up in Wisconsin to have entertainment for ourselves. So I guess that's the way that's the way that I've done a grown up.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, that that makes sense. And you know, from my time in Wisconsin, I found it the football fans, they are passionate about the Packers there!

Ty Majeski  
Big time. 

Rob Clemons  
I mean, it's it's almost another level of passion.

Ty Majeski    
Yeah, there's, there's no doubt about that, that the cheese heads are definitely crazy up there. That's for sure. You're definitely not well liked. If you're not a Packers fan out there. 

Rob Clemons  
No doubt. And they have more jokes about the Chicago Bears and why they stink than any place I've ever seen.

Ty Majeski   
It's crazy. I mean, there's the new slogan every year. Right when you think you've heard it all, there's a new one. 

Rob Clemons  
Ya know, who's thinking of these things? And how are they getting out there? And I guess, just as we get a few minutes left, tell me about how social media affects your marketing. I mean, do you do much with obviously I've seen you on but do you do much of the social media and and you come up with this content yourself? Or do you you know, have a team that works on that?

Ty Majeski  
I'm most of it's all all myself. All natural, I guess, you know, and I'm not I've never been a big social media guy. I've always been on the mechanic side, get to the racetrack, do your job. Be a part of the race team. And, you know, some drivers have taken the other way. And they've taken social media and I've done you know, YouTube channels and videos and stuff. And I think that's something I definitely need to work myself into on that front. Like I said, I'm more of an old school guy in a new era, so to speak, from that perspective, so it's something I need to definitely, you know, work into and and develop that that part moving forward.

Rob Clemons   
Yeah, I mean, it's almost like the same here. You know, I find myself sometimes I'm like, oh, yeah, I should be talking about this stuff. But it's just something you don't really think about doing per se.

Ty Majeski    
Yeah, and social media is so powerful now you can reach so many people so quick. And if you use it right there's such good platforms to create content for your sponsors, and, and, and create a brand for yourself. And I've definitely done some of that for sure. But if we're going to continue to get better at it.

Rob Clemons   
Yeah, absolutely. So if somebody wanted to get into sponsoring with you guys, I mean, obviously, this is a big part of your business model at the NASCAR level, you know, what's the best way for a sponsor to get a hold of you guys if they were interested in you know, kind of like sponsoring a truck?

Ty Majeski   
Just to you know, obviously, it's people people need to realize that there's, there's there's a true if you do it right and build the model right for sponsorship program, there is a true return on investment. You know, there are there can be if done, right, and I know Jason Adalasky and everybody here at the team at ThorSport, do a great job of that. And we can, you know, just reach out to ThorSport Racing. You know, we have a phone number and, and a website online that you can reach out and, and hit us up. We're always looking for new partners and new and creative opportunities to, to try and create partnerships for the future.

Rob Clemons 
Yeah, awesome stuff. And just as we wrap up here, is there anything you want the viewers or listeners to know about Ty Majeski? You mean, just like anything that you would say, "Hey, this is the thing that I want on my tombstone one day" or anything like that?

Ty Majeski  
Man, that's a that's a big question.

Rob Clemons    
Right? Plus, I said, the tombstone. Yeah, that's not nice.

Ty Majeski  
I'm from motorsports standpoint. You know, I'm a guy that hasn't had financial support. And it's, it's not easy in this business without that, and I've been able to, I've been blessed to have opportunities, and the highest level of racing without that. And it's been done on winning races and results on a short track level. And I'm really incredibly proud of that, because there's just, there's only a handful of drivers in the last maybe five or 10 years that that have done stuff, something like that. Now, that's something I'm incredibly proud of, and something that I'm building my brand around, and, you know, just moving forward and having this opportunity here at ThorSport, I just couldn't be more thankful for it.

Rob Clemons    
And that's powerful stuff. He's Ty Majeski Number 66 ThorSport Racing, driving the Toyota Tundra as always. Ty it's been amazing having you on your world class guy. I feel blessed to have the opportunity to talk to you and best of luck in the future.

Ty Majeski  
Now I really appreciate you guys have me. It was good time.

Rob Clemons    
Absolutely. We'll talk to you soon. Have a great day. All right. Thank you. You too. And this has been Rob Clemons. I'm signing out with Crown Connections. We'll see you guys next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Exceptional People
Surround Yourself with Better People Than You
Favorite Vehicle to Drive?
MidWest Culture of Racing
Mentors in Life
iRacing
"So, I took you on the NASCAR Heat!"
Short Track Character
Heros of NASCAR
Business Marketing in Racing
The TEAM of Racing
Future: follow where you fit in with the culture