The Professional Hypnotherapists Podcast. eaph.ie

Session 008 Fiona Coyle, CEO Mental Health Reform

September 29, 2021 Hosted by Aidan Noone
The Professional Hypnotherapists Podcast. eaph.ie
Session 008 Fiona Coyle, CEO Mental Health Reform
Show Notes Transcript

Fiona Coyle brings to Mental Health Reform,  her many years of vast experience from Community Development in Ireland to International Development in the United Nations and Women's Rights in the European Union. Fiona's commitment and dedication and her advocacy for human rights and mental health reform are without question. Above all, Fiona explains why it is necessary that proper funding is essential to provide for fit for purpose mental health services.  All of this and more on  today's edition of the PHP.

http://www.mentalhealthreform.ie

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This is, The Professional Hypnotherapists Podcast Session Number 008, Fiona Coyle, Chief Executive Officer of Mental Health Reform. Fiona brings to Mental Health Reform, her many years vast experience from Community Development in Ireland to international development in the United Nations and Women's Rights in the European Union. Fiona's commitment and dedication, and her advocacy for human rights and mental health reform is second to none. Listen as Fiona educates and informs us on mental health reform. All of this and more, on today's edition of the Professional Hypnotherapists Podcast. Welcome to The Professional Hypnotherapists Podcast, a production of the European Association of Professional Hypnotherapists, that's eaph.ie.

Aidan Noone

  01:13 - 01:22

Welcome to Fiona Coyle, who is the Chief Executive Officer of Mental Health Reform in Ireland. Thank you for being here today, Fiona.

Fiona Coyle

  01:23 - 01:25

My pleasure. Thank you for having me.

Aidan Noone

  01:26 - 01:41

Fiona, mental health is very much in the media. You know, we're hearing about it, in both printed media and visual media and rightly so too. To ask a question, how important is our mental health?

Fiona Coyle

  01:42 - 03:02

Yeah, I think our mental health is fundamentally important and you know, I think that the pandemic has really opened up a conversation. You know, it was often for generations here in Ireland, seen as maybe something quite separate, you know, something quite individual I suppose to the person. Discussions on mental health difficulties often focused on individual factors and rarely was it discussed that the circumstances which people are born in, or lived can affect our mental health. I think the pandemic has made people realize everyone has mental health and that it can be impacted, by external factors. So, it's really great to see it having such prominence in public discourse at the moment. And rightly so, as you said, because they say there is no health without mental health. You have to look at the whole being, both physical and mental health and they are equivalent to each other in many ways.

Aidan Noone

  03:03 - 03:12

Excellent. Now you're the CEO of Mental Health Reform. Do you yourself have a background in health, or indeed in mental health?

Fiona Coyle

  03:13 - 04:17

My own background, I'm actually a community development worker, by training. I've been working, you know, originally working with kind of communities effected by drugs in Dublin.Then I moved to work in international development and in human rights. So I, I worked with the UN for a number of years, working in a country called Lesotho, working on human rights and gender projects. And I worked for Irish Aid, which is Ireland's overseas aid program, and I've been working on kind of, very much, kind of human rights. The last number of years I joined Mental Health Reform in 2020, and before that, I worked in Brussels for four years, working specifically on women's rights. So yeah, Mental Health Reform, we're the national coalition for mental health in Ireland. We're an umbrella body consisting of over 77 member organizations.

Fiona Coyle

  04:17 - 05:09

And we very much, you know, take that human rights perspective. so it's been really born into, to take my experience of working in different countries in different contexts, back here to Ireland because we there's so much, you know, that can still be done. Like people have a right to help people have a right to, to mental health services. And in Ireland currently, you know, our legislation is I to sync with international human rights standards. our services are kind of under invested in and, you know, people have have long waiting lists that they're facing. So it's, it's been really interesting to kind of take some of that experience of garnered over the years and look at it in the context of, of working towards better mental health services for, for individuals throughout the country.

Aidan Noone

  05:10 - 05:36

Excellent. Well, you preempt all of my questions anyway. Now you mentioned, you know, in terms of that you're a coalition of 77 different member organizations and also on your website, you mentioned that I'm reading here that the government is serious about its new mental health policy. That's sharing the vision and wants to make recommend those recommendations are reality investment as needed.

Fiona Coyle

  05:37 - 06:41

Yeah. Like, High, quality services need high quality investment. You know, there's, there's no other way around debt, you know, you, you, you need that, that investment. And for years it's, it's, it's generally agreed that their has been under investment in our services and in this country, it hasn't been prioritized politically. and you know, COVID, has really exposed some of the gaps in the system. people would say that before COVID we had a mental health crisis and, you know, we're, we're what we're facing into is, you know, perhaps increasing demands for a number of years to come. so, you know, we, we really need that investment. There's, there's a lot of talk, there's a lot of support for mental health, but unless that's translated into actions and into money, you know, new money on budget day, you know, services can't grow and can't develop with out, with that new money.

Aidan Noone

  06:41 - 06:55

Yeah, indeed. And, what, what do you think, you know, you mentioned that it resolved, there's lots of talk and lots of, you know, talking about it, or why do you think mental health, you know, is way down on the pecking order

Fiona Coyle

  06:57 - 07:15

Yeah, I think it's, I suppose if you kind of take a bit of a historical perspective of, of mental health in this country, like in the 1960s, we had more people in mental health institutions than anywhere else in the world. I think that figure one and four, you come across very often.

Fiona Coyle

  07:17 - 08:24

Yeah. And that's not that long ago. and we started to transition, you know, like, you know, like the UK and like other countries away from that model, you know, really kind of going towards like a more community model into the, the eighties and then the nineties that, that led to the, to the launch of what was then seen as a really important, document, the vision for change the mental health policy, that really was moving away from institutions and led to the closure of a number of institutions across the country. but the vision was that you would move away from institution book, build off those community mental health services. and you know, it was brilliant, really brilliant document, but then our land went into an economic crisis and mental health wasn't prioritized, and the changes that were to be invested in unaware to be brought forward.

Fiona Coyle

  08:25 - 09:12

It never quite happened. And we're still struggling from then to now to really start building, you know, those services. yeah, like I think, you know, there's, there's, there's obviously challenges that are, that are faced, you know, within the services, in relation to recruitment of staff, that's, it, that's a challenge for, you know, for the health service more broadly. but I think that's led us to where we are today, you know, unfortunately, you know, that policy was launched at a moment in time when the country was just on the verge of a crisis and, you know, the funding instead of increasing actually got caught across the board and we were still recovering from that period. Yeah.

Aidan Noone

  09:12 - 09:17

Yes. Do you think Fiona is at a, there's still a stigma about our mental health

Fiona Coyle

  09:19 - 10:24

Most definitely. And, you know, I think sometimes, you know, in Ireland we might pat ourselves on the back a bit too soon and say, it's brilliant. More people are talking about mental health, we've got celebrity speaking out, you know, you know, we've all these campaigns. but when you people speak to people, especially people who have maybe more severe and enduring mental health difficulties, the stigma and discrimination that they face, it's still very real, you know, and I think, you know, like I mentioned, the 1960s like that, my parents' generation and the stigma of that time of having a family member in an institution was huge. And, you know, people weren't institutionalized, like the evidence shows they weren't, you know, institutionalized for mental health difficulties alone. You know, some people perhaps, you know, they, they were, they were, they were gay or lesbian or, you know, some people for, for just being poor, you know, they were put in institutions.

Fiona Coyle

  10:24 - 11:14

So that, that stigma that takes time to, to move away from that. And, you know, that's kind of 60, 70 years where we're moving in the right direction, but, you know, we, we still need to still need to demystify a lot of things, you know, around some of, some of the kind of difficulties and some of those who, who have more severe and enduring, mental health difficulties that people, people are comfortable with it, you know, so much of our knowledge comes from movies or TV programs where, you know, things are sensationalized and that's, that's not always the way. so we, we need to open up a more genuine conversation, I think, the more accepting country, for, for people with all types of difficulties.

Aidan Noone

  11:14 - 11:17

Yeah. And how do we open up their conversation in your opinion

Fiona Coyle

  11:18 - 12:29

I think it's, you know, it's giving more space to, to, to people who, who, you know, who, who have those difficulties, you know, and who have, you know, who've recovered or on their own recovery journey. Like there's wonderful initiatives like the green ribbon campaign, which is ongoing currently has the aim of doing just that, of breaking down the stigma. you know, that the work that C team does, throughout the year is really important in, in that regard. so it's, it's bit by bit and, you know, a lot of the work that we do as well is, you know, Mental health, it's not just the department of health, you know, it's not just for them, you know, we, we need a cross department approach. So it's equally as important. You know, that someone, there are so many people now, you know, who are living with mental health difficulties who could live independent lives and, you know, there was no housing for them, or they're not able to get employment because of some of the stigma surrounding, their, their difficulty.

Fiona Coyle

  12:29 - 13:36

So, you know, it's, it's really taking that holistic approach. It's knows just about the, kind of the, the mental health services. It's allowing people to live their best life. And, you know, like opening up conversations with employers, like to demystify, you know, what it's like, maybe employing someone with, with the, with the mental health difficulty that someone with a mentally have difficult actually feels comfortable saying to their employer, look, you know, I have this, it might mean X and Y, or I might need this type of support and they don't have a fear that they're just going to get by, or, which has been the case, you know, in the past. So there's, there's lots of different ways. and I think it's people, you know, educating themselves as well, you know, what is mental health Do I actually know what that term means, or, you know, it's been used so much now that people are, people may not know, you know, what exactly it is, and they may be, fearful of asking because they don't want themselves to be judged for kind of asking what they perceive to be, you know, a silly question.

Fiona Coyle

  13:36 - 13:42

So I think it's okay to ask and it's, you know, it's okay to learn and to, to be on a journey.

Aidan Noone

  13:42 - 14:10

Yes, indeed. And to what, to what extent, you know, is, does language and labeling, you know, come in to the whole scenario because you, you, you use an expression there, the word, the difficulty now that in itself can perhaps conjure up in people's minds, a what I would refer to maybe a negative connotation. Is there, is it, is there in your opinion, a different terminology that we could use

Fiona Coyle

  14:11 - 15:35

Yeah, no, it's, it's, you're, you're very right. Like words are so powerful. And the language, language is really powerful. Like, like I was meant to have a form or our preferred terminology. We do use mental health difficulties. Now, I suppose, or the terminology you would hear would be, you know, a mental health illness. And we've, we've tried to keep away from, from that language ourselves. Now we do say, you know, anyone, you know, it's, up to someone is living with the mental health difficulty. If they want to call it an illness or difficulties of that up to them to determine the language that they're comfortable with. So we'll never be in that regard for what authors use before all us, you know, we are, we're very aware of moving away from magical terminology because of, you know, what kind of, we're trying to move away from a medical model in this country and using that type of terminology, is, is not, you know, is, is not, I suppose, appropriate language, but, you know, people would react and, and, and relate to, to language very differently and language, you know, it can act as a barrier to prevent people kind of understanding and then maybe showing empathy or helping others.

Fiona Coyle

  15:35 - 16:15

Like, you know, I'm sure we've all, you know, we've all kind of been using terminology like, oh, you know, or that's crazy, or that's not sorry, you know, that, that's something that's been very common, very colloquial type of language in, in, in the English language, but it's, it's, it can stigmatize, communities and can stigmatize individuals. And I suppose, by changing even some of that basic language, you know, we can kind of help understand open up kind of, channels to, to understand other people's experiences.

Aidan Noone

  16:15 - 16:46

Yes, indeed. And sometimes I like to, you know, if we used to use a metaphor for, if you use the metaphor of a boat, a rowing boat, and one, or is your physical health and the other, or, or is your mental health, and, you know, both of them should be pulling at the same rate so that the boat gets where it wants to go. So that's, that's maybe some, some way of looking at it, in terms of our mental health and our functioning in a whole, in an holistic manner.

Fiona Coyle

  16:47 - 17:36

Yeah. That's, that's a lovely way of looking at it. Like, you know, there's, there's a huge intersection between both and, you know, mental health. It is a continuum as well, you know, you've every confirmed kind of people know, some people are listening, you know, over the last 18 months we've experienced kind of, you know, level anxiety for the first time or are kind of in a low level depression, but then you're kind of got a whole spectrum then towards more kind of severe and enduring difficulties. So even understanding that, and that it is a spectrum and that at any one stage, we could be anywhere on that. And any of us can, can move along that and yeah. It, and it's how it intersects then with their, with their physical wellbeing is really important.

Aidan Noone

  17:37 - 17:51

No, in terms of mental health reform, you know, you have, I suppose you have a mission and you have, let's say a vision, so how do you go about effecting or implementing your mission and vision

Fiona Coyle

  17:52 - 18:53

Yeah. So I suppose just what we're trying to do is trying to ensure that, you know, we, we live in a country, for every individual, no matter where they are, are able to achieve their best possible mental health. so, you know, that's, that's the goal, that's the word we're moving towards and what we do then within that, that we're, you know, as a coalition, we try and bring together, members and speak with one strong voice, which we all know is so powerful, to drive that, that reform of our services and our supports. And I suppose in the day-to-day, you know, that all may sound a bit abstract, like on a day to day level, what does that look like So, you know, we do a lot of policy submission, so we try and, you know, we try and change and reform the way that that services are, are set out and policy.

Fiona Coyle

  18:53 - 19:53

So to, you know, not just with the department to help, but, you know, we did policy submissions to parliament, adjusters of housing employment, you know, just so that mental health is considered. So we bring our members together and use that collective expertise to, to feed those submissions. We also really, put a huge importance on people with lived experience and, you know, their family, friends, and, and carer. So in everything we do, we really try and ensure that we'd been reflective of some of their experiences. So we have, a grassroots forum, which is comprised of service users on their family, friends, carers, and supporters, and a number of years ago, which you may find interesting. We did. the first of its kind study in Ireland called my voice matters, which looked at, the experience of service users and accessing services in this country.

Fiona Coyle

  19:53 - 21:05

So, you know, what are people's experiences, that was really insightful. you know, so much came out of that. Like, you know, the people, you know, even when they're in the services, they feel like their, their, their, their voices is perhaps missing, you know, and that's what we're moving towards in this country. And in our new mental health policy is services where it's a partnership between the service user and the service provider, you know, because each person's mental health journey is unique. so the services have to cater for each person individually, that, so that's kind of our research and then we do a lot of campaigning. So, you know, at the moment what we're campaigning for is for the government to invest 85 million Euro in, additional money, inner mental health services in budget, 2022 in a few short weeks time. so we kind of bring our members together and try and make your voice as loud as it can possibly be to ensure that mental health remains on the top of the priority list.

Aidan Noone

  21:05 - 21:15

Okay. Now on, and that happened in terms of that you launched your pre-budget campaign on Tuesday, the 31st of August,

Fiona Coyle

  21:16 - 22:01

Yes, we did. we, we, did we did it outside Lenister house with some of our members and, and service users, and then we had an event, a virtual event as all events are these days, where we had, you know, we had people, a wonderful activist called Mary from the west of Ireland share her experiences. And we had some insights from, and some of her political allies, if I can call them that. So, Senator Francis bark and deputy Rosin shorthall, and, and, and, and deputy, Nessa Horrigan as well, joined us for, for that event, which was brilliant. yeah, it was a great starter campaign.

Aidan Noone

  22:01 - 22:16

No, you, you also mentioned on your website at the currently apparently Ireland spending 5.1% of the health budget on mental health, and you want that increased to 10%.

Fiona Coyle

  22:17 - 23:27

Yeah. 10%. It's, it's not just our ask, you know, this is the government's own, commitment under the slainte care document. They've committed to invest in 10% of health budget and mental health. And, you know, like, as I said, previously, high quality services demand, high quality investment, and, you know, the 10% figure actually, you know, the, who they recommend that mental health spending should be a 12% in the UK. They spent 13% in other countries in the Nordics. It's, you know, 13 to 15%. so we're spending, you know, it is very far behind for where it should be in our opinion. And, you know, we'd like the government, you know, we don't expect, you know, the budget to be doubled overnight, but we'd like a plan in place. You know, we'd like that commitment that there's a recognition of. We need to get to X we've said, this is our own recommendation. How are we going to get there You know, are we going to try incrementally increase their spending year on year

Aidan Noone

  23:28 - 23:48

Okay. Now that's one of the steps you, I think you have nine point there too, what to do governments need to invest in. And the first one I can read here is that it's temporary, that you want to budget increase the 10% there are also like increasing staff levels across mental health. Can you just briefly go over those points if you don't mind

Fiona Coyle

  23:49 - 24:51

Yeah, no problem. So like, I suppose our mental health services predominantly, you know, there are staff based services and staffing, you know, across the country community, mental health teams, have huge staffing issues. and you know, we, we need to have new money to put new staff in place. Now I will also acknowledge that, you know, it's, this is a difficulty, there is a difficulty in recruiting, certain, you know, certain types of staff, but, you know, we, we need to look kind of creatively how we can, you know, how we can we engage. how can we engage staff across our own And, primary care is another huge area of investment. And like currently, you know, people's first port of call most often, is to go to their GP, to, to, you know, to get their advice. And the GP will put someone on a waiting list for maybe primary care psychology.

Fiona Coyle

  24:51 - 25:56

There's a 10 thousand people on that waiting list, currently, majority of your children, and half of those more than half have been waiting for more than 12 months to be seen. so, you know, that's really important too, that we're investing in that primary care. You know, then we hear so often in the media, you know, talk about our child and adolescent mental health services. Cams is the acronym you might hear. again, long waiting lists, you know, for, for children. so they, they need to be invested in the community and voluntary sector, like over the last 18 months, you know, many of our members moved their services online overnight, you know, going from face-to-face to virtual, like developing new types of services. and the last year, you know, there was additional support there, but we're moving into a period now that there's no going back, you know, the previous model of delivery, there's no going back because we've learned so much.

Fiona Coyle

  25:56 - 27:30

We started to dip our toes into E mental health to have the innovation, but, you know, that's costly. It costs money for our community and voluntary organizations to develop new new services. and they've also been reporting, our members have been reporting an increase in demand, for their services. So we believe, you know, we're calling for money to be invested, to support the community voluntary sector. and then we have both asks kind of specific to different areas. So our advocacy services, we've been calling for years. Like often it can be very difficult and very lonely journey, someone navigating or mental health services. And, you know, in other countries we've seen, an independent advocacy service can really help people. So someone who's on your side who can help you navigate the services. so that's something we've been calling for for a number of years, but there doesn't seem to be an appetite there at the moment to set up such a service, but to just really transform, you know, I think people's experiences, then, you know, investing in kind of affordable housing in employment support, and also in, in terms of, you know, really scaling up, the mental health services and for those who are in the prison system, there are so many individuals at the moment, who are in prisons should simply, shouldn't be there.

Fiona Coyle

  27:30 - 28:03

You know, they, they, they need different types of support. they're not getting that. So, you know, there's a lot there that can't be done with like the 80, a 65 million recalling it's 20 million for to maintain the services as they are today, you know, costs go up, things happen, you know, if could cost 20 million to run today's service next year is what we believe. And then the additional 65 million, you know, that's a lot, you know, can achieve such a lot with that money as you just heard. Yeah.

Aidan Noone

  28:03 - 28:17

And it's interesting. I know you mentioned there about, the prison population, because I I'm don't have the statistic, but I'm sure quite a large percentage of people in prison that they have a mental health issue. No doubt.

Fiona Coyle

  28:18 - 29:27

Yeah. I think I, I don't have the statistics in front of me there, but yeah, I do know, like in terms of the prison system, it does disproportionately, I suppose, I suppose have a disproportionate number of people living with mental health difficulties in, in,the present and, you know, like what we've been calling for and what some of our members have been calling for is that, you know, they need to be diverted at the earliest possible, you know, with their first, you know, the various possible juncture, they need to be diverted away from the justice system into the health system. And you can, you know, we can, we know that that's not happening because you know, the mind, the pressure that is on the central mental hospital at the moment, you know, there, there, there is, you know, a new hospital you just opened and put a righty, we're hearing from those who work in that system, that there are, you know, there, there are like not enough beds.

Fiona Coyle

  29:27 - 30:48

and I think one of our members, the IPR T the Irish penal reform trust, found that the lowest number, this is in 29, July, 2019 to July, 2020, and the waitinglist from prisons into the central mental hospital, the lowest number was 20 Picked 90 service users waiting to be transferred in. And the highest was 33. So that that's really high 20 people who are in a prison who are really, you know, when you go into that central mental hospital, you have, you know, severe difficulties and you need specialized support. And the fact that those 20 individuals were in an, an Annette an environment, which we brought in I think, severely distressing for them, but also for their families and communities to think that someone isn't getting the support that they need. but yeah, this is something, again, for years that we've been highlighting that there hasn't been a huge amount of change on. and I suppose, you know, unfortunately when you talk about the, the prison, community, it's, it's, it's not a topic that gets maybe the, the, that gets into public discourse as much as it should, but people's rights are being violated.

Aidan Noone

  30:49 - 31:20

you know, what comes into my mind is that, as, as therapists and specifically hypnotherapists, you know, we would deal with clients who are not having their needs met. And it's when you, when you're not having your needs met, something goes awry within, within ourselves. And perhaps it's a mental health issue that happens there or something else. So that's, that's my take on it. What's your take on that in terms of having our needs met

Fiona Coyle

  31:21 - 32:30

Yeah, I, I think that's exactly it, it's, it's this kind of, you know, how do the external factors that are so important in all our lives that, you know, if your needs are not met and have needs are not being met by, by the very system, that's there to meet them. you know, that's, that's a huge challenge and that something needs to be prioritized in this country. And there's an opportunity now to do so, because there's so much discussion on Mental health, you know, I think before there, wasn't an understanding of its importance. Well, now, you know, you, you speak to people, they're like, yeah, but it's so important. so it's, there's, there's a moment here to, to capitalize on. so I, I think, you know, it's, it's quite positive in that regard. It's one of the, if I can even Dare to say one of maybe the more positive aspects of, of what we've gone through is, you know, the realization of the importance of mental health, of all of us at an individual level investing in it, and then at a society level, prioritizing it.

Aidan Noone

  32:30 - 32:60

Yes. And you touched on it earlier with regard to the voluntary sector and th th the huge value that volunteers give, in various different aspects of Iris life, but what specifically, for example, Samaritans pieta house some and volunteers who do the work there. And, you know, I often think that if people were to monetize that, that work, it would be worth worth that actually millions.

Fiona Coyle

  33:01 - 34:06

Yeah. Like I think Ireland has, has always really bravely prided itself on, you know, it's, it's community spirit, and certainly, you know, over the last 18 months, but did not disappoint, you know, we lived up to it like you, and you've seen such wonderful stories of, you know, people delivering medicine or food to neighbors. And, you know, so many of our member organizations are so dependent on the work of volunteers. and yeah, like some artists in particular, like, you know, the work that they do, you know, we, we launched her campaign and Waterford with the, the can of the Samaritans and that region. And, you know, they've answered more than 560,000 calls. And last year, you know, that's such a significant number of calls. you know, all of our members, like they provide such valuable support and across the country, and, you know, really needs to be, be commended.

Fiona Coyle

  34:06 - 34:45

but you know, also I think it's, let's, let's kind of, or where they're, they're, they're, they're doing such a wonderful job. Like we can't over rely, you know, the Smartian and should not be, you know, t he the public services should be there. It quickly assist individuals, you know, it shouldn't be either or. Like they shouldn't be filling that gap. We need to ensure the public system, you know, the, the work that, the smart of the so important, so complimentary to that, but, you know, it's, we do need to ensure that, that the public system is strengthened. So people get the support that they need at the right time.

Aidan Noone

  34:45 - 34:57

Yeah. That's an excellent point in terms of that, we, we shouldn't really be like relying on, you know, the volunteering section sector for, let's say an absence of our inaction on the part of the government.

Fiona Coyle

  34:58 - 35:01

Yeah, yeah. That's exactly it yet.

Aidan Noone

  35:02 - 35:12

No. and maybe just to recap a little bit, I noticed the statistic there, for cams there's over 2,700 children on a waiting list.

Fiona Coyle

  35:14 - 35:58

Yeah. Yeah. And that's, you know, if you can think about it that each it's sometimes when you hear numbers, it's you forget that behind each of that number is a child who has a family goes to school more than likely, you know, who lives in a community and, you know, the impact that, that has that the person isn't getting the, it impacts all of that ecosystem. but yeah, it's, it's one of the big challenges in this country for, you know, last number of years and continues to, I suppose, to, to be a block from the chapter jotter of the success of governments that they haven't quite managed to, to, to invest in that area, to get those waiting lists down.

Aidan Noone

  35:59 - 36:04

Okay. Fiona, now going forward, what's the route forward in your opinion

Fiona Coyle

  36:05 - 37:14

I think there's, you know, there's huge to be positive about it. There's huge opportunity there. I think, you know, this is a top issue in this country at the moment. Like, you know, I think, our team painter and did a survey asking people, you know, what are their top areas of concern and the new normal survey I believe it was called And mental health came and forth never appeared previously in any of those, surveys. So there's a moment for what we need, we need investment. So we need government to invest in what you're 2022, but money alone, you know, w we need to be realistic money. The investment is crucially important, but we also need the leadership behind that, both political leadership, but also one of the things we've been calling on is for a senior director level position within the HSE reporting in our health service executive reporting directly into Paul Reed, who's the CEO or whoever that CEO, or maybe who can move forward.

Fiona Coyle

  37:14 - 37:55

Some of those structural barriers that are there, who can drive forward the reform, and, you know, that would speak to hse, who's taking mental health the same parity of esteem as it does to physical health. So, you know, I think we need both of those levers at the same time, the investment on the leadership. we have a wonderful policy. We have, you know, public supportive of prioritizing this issue. and we, you know, we have an opportunity once maybe in a lifetime opportunity to change the system for both, you know, this generation and generations to come.

Aidan Noone

  37:55 - 38:08

Excellent. Okay. If you want to, so how can anyone out there who's interested in getting involved in mental health reform or mental health per se, what what's in your opinion do they need to do

Fiona Coyle

  38:09 - 39:02

Yeah. great question. And I suppose if anyone out there is kind of, maybe not in the long to some of what I'm seeing and wants to get involved, and support or work, every voice matters. You know, we, we need to continue to remind, you know, what the political world, the political leadership in this country, that this matters. So please go onto our website, healthreform.ie you know, follow us on social media, make your voice heard, you know, on our website, you know, there's an easy kind of call to action that you can share on your social media, or there's an easy way for you to contact your TD and representatives to let them know that you want mental health to be a priority in budget 2022. So it mental healthreforum.ie and all the information should be there.

Aidan Noone

  39:03 - 39:34

Thank you Fiona Coyle, CEO of mental health reform. You have been listening to the professional hypnotherapists podcast, please stop everything and start exploring to find the right solutions for you at EAPH.ie. You know, you want to make positive, beneficial change in your life. And yet you may not have the know-how allow yourself to discover how you can start that change process and begin to reap the benefits through ethical Hypnotherapy therapy