Tell Us How to Make It Better

Face Your Challenges And Improve Who You Are

April 04, 2022 George Siegal Season 1 Episode 32
Tell Us How to Make It Better
Face Your Challenges And Improve Who You Are
Show Notes Transcript

April 4, 2022
32. Face Your Challenges And Improve Who You Are

Pascale Brady helps people so they can better face their challenges. She teaches them how to grow their courage and resilience muscles so that they can survive crises of any kind and be better humans at the end of them.

Here are some important moments with Pascale in the podcast: 

At 10:05 How does someone know when it’s time to hire a coach?

At 11:18 Walk us through the process of how you work with people?

At 17:12 What advice do you have for people who sit around and complain about their situation but aren’t doing anything about it?

You can follow Pascale through the following links: https://www.facebook.com/Pascale.Brady.TheChallengeCoach

www.linkedin.com/in/TheChallengeCoach

https://twitter.com/PascaleBrady

https://www.instagram.com/the_challenge_coach

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIOFPqTy0v3G2_waTVMeDfA

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George Siegal:

Tell Us How to Make It Better is partnering with The Readiness Lab. The home for podcasts, webinars, and training in the field of emergency and disaster services.

Pascale Brady:

You are stuck, you are stuck. So you are being, trying to do this thing, whatever that is, you know, losing weight, getting better shape, having better relationships, get the next job, switch careers, be a better parents be happier, feel better. You know, and you've been wanting this for a while and you're just spinning your wheels. You're just like a hamster on the hamster wheel. And, you just don't know how to get off and how to change direction. You're, you're stuck. You don't know how to do this. And you just, and the how you know is you just don't feel right.

George Siegal:

I'm George Segal. And this is the Tell Us How to Make It Better podcast. Every week, we introduce you to people who are working on real world problems and providing actual solutions. Hi everybody. Thank you so much for joining me on this week's Tell Us How to Make It Better podcast. If you listen today and enjoy what you heard, it would be great if you could share the link to the podcast with your friends, feel free to leave a comment. Shoot me an email on anything you liked or didn't like about the program. Do you ever feel like you've run into a wall with some of the challenges that you might be facing? Maybe it's time to consider getting a little help, maybe even some coaching. My guest today is Pascal Brady. The challenge coach. She's a life and business coach with over 30 years of experience, helping her clients transform their challenges into growth and success. She's a widow, mom of two young adult women and in her spare time, she is a parent educator. Pascal. Welcome. Thanks for coming on.

Pascale Brady:

Thank you, George. So glad to be here. I really appreciate you inviting me on.

George Siegal:

Glad you could do it. So what is the problem or issue that you have been working on?

Pascale Brady:

I'm working on with, for myself and with my clients on overcoming challenges on getting through to the other side of big, typically big life issues that people that everybody, every one of us has confronted with and how that happened was I became a coach and that's the long story that I would love to tell you at some point, if we have time today, but I became a coach. And you know, when you go through coach training, people say to you, they kick you out of coaching school and they say, go pick a niche. You know, you've got to figure out who you're working with and I said, well, you know, I'm an ex-pat, so I'll be an ex-pat coach. That kind of makes sense. I'm an immigrant here. So I'll be, I'll be doing that. Cause I used to work in international sales and marketing, and then I was also a parenting educator, which is how I came to coaching again, my long story that I'd love to tell you, I became a parent educator and I thought, well, I'll be a parenting coach. That makes sense. And then I let you know, open my shop and everybody that showed up, nobody, I should say that showed up was either an ex-pat or a parent client. So I'm like, what is up with that? And so then I'm like, okay, so what do these people have in common? I got, they told me I need to pick a niche and the niche, let me find a niche. And so slowly it started emerging that what these people had in common for the most part was really big life, heavy duty life challenges that were really getting in the way of, of doing life in a good way of living life in a good way of being the best humans that they could be, you know? And so. And, and that had become, put the apparent that, because I had gone through a lot of stuff myself, which I never consciously really dwelled on, and thought it was a big deal, you know, but then I realized it had actually equipped me to really be able to empathize and really relate to all these people and these challenges and that I really had some tools in my toolbox to be able to help them you know, get through those challenges to the other side and be better at themselves.

George Siegal:

You're in a pretty competitive field in terms of a lot of people are reinventing themselves online and calling themselves coaches or doing counseling or different things. What is it that, that sets you apart? What, what are you bringing to the table that people can go, yeah, this, this woman can help me because you know, when you look at your website, it's really impressive. So what would you say you bring that sets you apart from all the other folks that are, that are doing this?

Pascale Brady:

So I think two things. One is the story that I'm dying to tell you.

George Siegal:

Well, please, let's, let's jump right into that. I'd love to hear your story. Maybe that'll circle back on this whole thing.

Pascale Brady:

I absolutely will. It definitely will answer your question. So when I was in my thirties, I finally had my first child and I had been wanting kids for 25 years. So I had been dying to have children finally have my first child. And I'm here in the U S as a foreigner. I'm French, my whole family, all my friends, my whole support structure is in Europe. And I had been wanting to be a month for so long. I knew I was going to be an amazing mom. I had had a decent childhood, good parents, you know, so I thought it was going to be an amazing Batman. Who's going to be a fantastic experience, turned out it wasn't, everything went wrong from, you know, trying to have the child to being pregnant, to delivering the kids, then having the kids to then being a mom. It was a mess and my French friends I'm French. So my French friends around here in Washington DC said, oh my God, you got to go take these parenting classes. It's called pep, the parent encouragement program. It's going to change your life. I'm like, seriously, like you can take a parenting class. But I, I run there because I was so lost with my kid and not knowing how to do this right. And so I took these parenting classes and there were three pep one, pep two, pep three. So I took one, I took pep two, I took pep three. I had another child, I took pep one. I took pep three my husband finally says, how many times are you going to need those parenting classes? Like how many times do you need to hear this stuff before you get it? So it's like, okay, I'm just gonna, you know, and so the only way for me to continue taking the classes was actually to become a parenting educator and the the reason why I want to, I'm dying to tell you about this is because the the psychology, the, the theory that underpins those parenting classes that I took is Adlerian psychology. So Alfred Adler, Adlerian psychology. He created and invented what is called individual psychology. And he is known as the grandfather of all modern psychotherapy. And he's also known as the grandfather of coaching. You know, I had my kids, my first kid, my second kid, I had stopped working. We had just moved to the area and then I thought, you know what? I don't want to go back to international sales. I don't want to be, you know, half the time in other countries, I actually want to raise those kids myself. So I'm going to stick around and find another job. And because Adler was the grandfather of coaching, I became a coach. I really wanted to become actually an adhearance therapist but that meant with my French American, with my French MBA, I had to go back to school from scratch and start, you know, four years of studies and stuff like that. That, that was out of the question. So the fastest way, the faster path to what I really wanted to do, and to actually corresponded more to me because I'm a business person. So coaching was more of a business relationship then than therapy was I decided to become a coach. So that's how I became a cushion. That's what sets me apart. I'm an adherent coach and there's very few of us out there.

George Siegal:

I made a documentary film called License to Parent. And it was about it's about the parenting problem in this country. And the fact that people get the job of parent with no idea really what they're getting into. It sounds like you've certainly fell in that category. It's a tough job and there's not enough support for parents. You know, parents get lost and confused and are trying to balance all the challenges and you're going, whoa, what am I doing here? You probably run into that a lot with people that are just lost in that job.

Pascale Brady:

Constantly. Well, yeah, because I continued, I am still teaching those parent education classes. It's kind of volunteer work that I do on the side, but I do this almost as a full-time job because it's a complete passion. I'm also president of the board of pep now. I'm part of the Adlerian associate national American Adlerian association and part of their parenting tracks, et cetera. So I swim in this all day long. It's not the focus necessarily of my coaching, but it's definitely a big part of what I do. And so parents are lost, you know, I always joke with my, with, with people in my classes, my parents and my classes, that it should be a prerequisite. If you asked me should be a prerequisite, you can't have kids. If you haven't taken a parenting class. Who, who takes parenting classes, when you go to school, it's not something that's taught. It's the most important job on the planet, it's your birthing and then raising the human beings of tomorrow. Don't you want to know how to do that. Like, and it's not that complicated by the way, but if you haven't learned it is going to be really tough. It can be really tough.

George Siegal:

Yeah. I always ask people. I said, if you had to fill out an application to get the job of parent, do you think you would get hired? And a lot of people would be told you know maybe you ought to get a puppy. Maybe you ought to work in the garden because people have no idea. The lifelong commitment they're getting into.

Pascale Brady:

And, and how children learn. I don't know if you want to get into this with me now. I don't know if, if it fits the conversation, but children really learn by pushing our buttons by pushing the limits that we set around them. That's how they learn. That's how they define themselves. And so if we don't know how to set the limits, how to uphold the limits, how to not get triggered by the buttons that they push, you know, there's this noted Adlerian therapist. His name is Jim Bitter. He's a fantastic Adlerian therapist and he's specialized in parenting in particular and families. And he talks about the fact that we each, every parent has a big red button. That the kids are born in PhDs and they're born with PhDs now, big red button. And they, each child knows exactly what the big red button of their parent is and their job is to keep pushing it. So it's better if we know how to react to that, because otherwise we're going to react. We're going to not be our best selves in the interaction, in the reaction to what the kid is doing to us. And now we're not going to do very good parenting because we're parenting out of fear, out of anger or frustration or out of like, just not knowing and will not bring our best parenting to the table. And now we're not doing our best job, you know, towards our kids.

George Siegal:

Absolutely true. They have this built-in ability to know exactly how to get to you. And if you know if they have siblings, they know how to get to each other and push each other's buttons, like nothing anybody will ever see. So getting away from the parenting for just a sec now, going back into the, the, the actual coaching. So on a day-to-day basis, how would this somebody recognize. Hey, I'm kind of spinning my wheels here. I need to get a coach. What would be the indications that I'm not going to solve my problems by myself?

Pascale Brady:

You know, it's like Nike, you just know because you are stuck, you are stuck. So you are being, trying to do this thing, whatever that is, you know, losing weight, getting better shape, having better relationships, get the next job, switch careers, be a better parent be happier, feel better. You know, and you've been wanting this for a while and you're just spinning your wheels. You're just like a hamster on the hamster wheel and you don't just know how to get off and how to change direction. You're, you're stuck. You don't know how to do this and you just, and the how you know is you just don't feel right. You don't feel okay. You don't feel good.

George Siegal:

So then they reach out to you and you just kind of go back and forth to see what the areas might be. Do you determine like, like if I go to a counselor because I want to discuss my mental health it could be an open-ended thing where I'm just going every week until I feel better. And sometimes after a couple sessions you do, I guess it depends on how deep your, your issues were. What do you typically find with that?

Pascale Brady:

How they come to me or how long we work?

George Siegal:

How you determine what there, what you're going to do with them. What's the process going to be? I say, Pascal, I've been trying to do this, this, this, and, you know, so how does that, how does that work kind of like walk me through how that would go.

Pascale Brady:

So, so somebody would just set up a, some, you know, alpha free sample sessions, because I think it's very, the fit is really important I'm not a good coach for everybody and not, everybody's a good client for me either. You know, it's gotta be a good match. And that's the key, that's the secret sauce is that we work well together. We get along. And so they, they find me through some source of another, you know, I'm very present on social media. I have a website. Yeah. Speak a lot. I go out there a lot and talk to people and I do a lot of stuff because I love what I'm doing. So I go talk about my stuff, right. And then people see me in this. Can I talk to you about, you know, I have a problem. They schedule sample session. And during the sample session, they just get to experience coaching with me so that we determined this match thing. But typically somebody that calls or writes, they know exactly what they want to work on. They have a problem. And sometimes the problem is I don't feel right but I don't know why. I don't know what's wrong. Can you help me figure that out? So sometimes we work on, on figuring out the goal together. Most often though, people come and really already know, you know, it's just like I'm in this job. And I, I just. I'm in the wrong career. You know, I, my, my dad told me I should be a surgeon. He always wanted to be a surgeon. So I became a surgeon I've just finished 15 years of school. I have a hundred thousand dollars in debt and I'm this surgeon I've been doing this for five years and I am depressed out of my mind, what do I do? So they know what they, you know, they know what they want. They just don't know how to get out of where they are and how to get to what, where they want to go to.

George Siegal:

Well, I'd be scared to death of talking some guy at a surgery or a woman out of surgery, but I guess you're just directing them and saying, what is it going to take for you to find happiness?

Pascale Brady:

Exactly. So you, you, you just really put your finger on something very important, which is that a coach is not a counselor. It's not a consultant. It's not an expert in anything but questions. Coaches are catalysts. I'm not talking you out of anything. You come to me and you say, I'm a surgeon. I'm telling you the story. I just told you, I'm a surgeon because blah, blah, blah. And I'm miserable and depressed. I don't want to be doing this. I'm in the wrong career. And I said, okay, so your goal is you no longer want to be miserable and you want to find, you know, how to not be miserable. And they say, yes, and then we're just going to be coaching, which is we're going to be talking. I'm going to be asking questions. I'm going to help this person, you know, mostly through conversation, but all three also through assessments and things like that to find what are the values what's really important to them. What's what matters in their lives, where maybe where they went wrong. Why, why did you accept that? You know what's okay. About today. What's not okay about today and if you were to change it, what would you change it towards? Like, and how would you get there? Right. So it's all about just as a catalyst, helping the person see clarity for themselves and see inside of themselves, and then helping them along the path, because see, the key of coaching is the homework.. The homework that you have in between sessions, that's really where coaching is different than any other profession. Cause you help people move from point a to point B by getting them into movement. Because between sessions, they have stuff that they have to do. And then they have this accountability partner with them to have an appointment. Who's going to show up at an appointment that they am paying a significant amount of money for saying, well, I'm sorry, I didn't do my homework. Nobody does that. So you get moving, you get moving, you get stuff done.

George Siegal:

You know, I used to, I used to be less of a believer in that when I was making my last documentary film, I joined this documentary film group and it was eight other filmmakers where we would talk about the issues we were all facing. And I used to roll my eyes at these kinds of things, but it was because of that group, I actually ended up re-editing my film making significant changes because all of a sudden you have people holding you accountable. You're not just lip service saying, oh, I want to do this. Or I can't do this. They challenge you and you have to do something.

Pascale Brady:

So you became a believer in accountability through that process?

George Siegal:

Absolutely not all the time, because I'm usually pretty much, self-motivated where I don't need somebody to give me a kick in the ass, but I see, I see the value in it and I, I can imagine your job has gotten more challenging the last couple of years with people that maybe were no longer able to go into the office, maybe just realize their life needed to change. Did you see things change as the world kind of changed? Did it change the problems people were having or make them any better or worse?

Pascale Brady:

Yes. But not in the way that you just expressed that. So what changed was after the initial three months stand still of everybody holding their breath to see what's coming next. What happened then? Is that people really? I, I don't like to, I think this expression might not be politically correct, but kind of like coming to Jesus kind of moments of time. It's like, this is really sensing mortality, sensing that's some really big things like a pandemic can happen and really through, you know, your life could end tomorrow. Things could be over tomorrow. Things the way you knew it are over. And so really thinking, oh my God, this is really a time where I have to stop just saying, I'll do it tomorrow. I'll do it tomorrow. I'll look at it next month. And they really, so I, we all in the, in the helping professionals have a lot more work these days. And I think that a big part of it, well, of course there's problems with significant new problems that they never had before. Right. So there's definitely that part, the whole grief and losing jobs and, and things like that. But there's also just simply realizing, you know, I can not, I can not wait. I've been sitting on this for too long. I've been hesitating for too long, and this needs to change now. Like who knows how much time I have left.

George Siegal:

Now, the, the primary driving force behind the direction I took this podcast was I think a lot of people just sit around complaining for the most part. A lot of people that I've, I've known over the years, but they don't really want to fix anything. They just like to complain about it. And I said, well, rather than complained about it, Tell Us How to Make It Better. So what's your advice to people that are floating around, out there going, they just complain. They just complain about their life, but they're not doing anything.

Pascale Brady:

Well, I don't know that I have advice because again, as a coach, I really don't have advice, but my big bet, because I'm a coach, I have questions. And it's like, so how's that working for you? And then my next thing that I would say is if somebody, cause we do have clients sometimes hiring you and they really hire you because they pretend they want to change something. But then you find out that's, after a certain amount of time, you find out that in fact they just really want to be heard and they just want to complain. And so we might spend a little bit of time initially exploring why that is, why you not in movement? Why are you complaining? How is that serving you? Is there a purpose behind this? And, but then if, if this continues and this becomes the recurring pattern that they're just complaining and not really wanting to change, then at some point I would say, you know, I don't think coaching is for you because in order for coaching to work, somebody has to be coachable. And in order to be coachable, what that means is you actually want change, you must want change. So for example, it doesn't work as somebody calls you up, whether it's a parent of a, of a 15 year old or a parent of a 30 year old, and they say, can you help my kid? If the kid doesn't want to be helped or a spouse, you know, if the person doesn't want to be helped, it's not going to work. Coaching only works with people who really want change. And so when somebody comes and says, yeah, you know, I just want to complain or they don't say it, but you realize that's what it is after a while, as a coach me special, especially because I'm a kid, I'm a mover and a shaker. Let's put, let's put it that way to be, to be polite and we'll move on to shaker and I'm not going to put up with people that are just not interested in change. I'm like wasting my time and I don't want to, you know, it's a waste of time.

George Siegal:

I agree with you. I mean, I feel that way about certain projects that I've had a chance to do over the years, even though I might get paid for it. What's the point that's really accomplishing nothing. Do you, can you light a fire under somebody? If somebody is, I mean, I know you're saying I totally get what you're saying. You're not, you're not telling people what to do. You're letting them tell you what their problems are. And then that leads to different ideas about what they might be able to do. If somebody is just kind of flat lining, can you, can you ignite that fire and get them motivated by talking about it?

Pascale Brady:

Yes. Not against their will though. There's gotta be so, so that's, I'm glad you asked that question. Cause I do want to add that to the previous sentence we just finished, which is some people seem like they're coming to complain and they are complaining a lot and they're not moving. But some of them really do want to change. They just don't know how to, they just don't believe that they can, they don't really, they can't see how this things could possibly be different. And so, yes, by having a conversation with somebody like me, not just me, but like me, and I'm definitely somebody who was like that because I have so much passion, so much enthusiasm and so much belief that things can be different and things can be better. And so much belief in you and you, my clients, I see your, your gifts and your beauty and what you're capable of. And. Going to let you not live up to that potential. That's what you're hiring me for. So yes, I we can ignite fire under people. If we have, if our questions are good enough to help them realize what they're doing to themselves. And, and if our questions are good enough to help them understand why they're doing this to themselves. And if we're able to be encouraging enough and believing in them enough that we can mirror back to them, their beauty, their excellence, their gifts, the things that they have to contribute, and then demand that they show up, you know, demand and ask them, ask them repeatedly through encouragement that they show up to their potential.

George Siegal:

Now, I would never have asked about this because I don't really like to get too personal with somebody, but in your bio it says a widow. How did that, how did that change your life? What was that? What was that effect on you?

Pascale Brady:

On Valentine's day. You asking me this. Thank you very much.

George Siegal:

I'm sorry. I just, I, you know, I, it is a personal question.

Pascale Brady:

I am teasing you you know, radically, radically because this guy, his name was Steve was the man of my life. He was, he was the guy of my life. He was a so much to me on so many levels. And, and by the way, you know I left my country, my family, my friends, my career. I left everything to fly over the Atlantic to be with him. I left my life to be with him, and then he dies on me. Thank you. It's like that. It was not the contract that I find with you, Steve. So the answer to the question is it was it was devastating like everybody, who's probably listening to this podcast. Who's had such an experience in the last few years. A lot of people I've had this experience, but you know, if you lose somebody you love it's, it's absolutely devastating. And then if on top of that, it is the, your spouse and the person that you, that was your soulmate and the person that you thought you had married for the rest of time. And then if on top of that, you've given up a lot and gone through a lot to be with this person, then it's, it's really tough. And then I had two kids, you know, they were 10 and 12 when he died and then I had to raise those kids. Now that was my survival. If I hadn't had the kids, I don't know that it would be here to talk with you today. But so. Yeah,

George Siegal:

Single parenting. Single parenting is a lot tougher too. When all of a sudden, you, you don't have that other, that other person to talk to and say, and that happens in divorce also when all of a sudden you're the parent, the only parent that's really in control. So those kinds of challenges have, has that shaped your perception or overall as you coach people, you bring these experiences into play, knowing how you've overcome these very challenging things to deal with.

Pascale Brady:

Yeah, completely. So I think you were asking me in the beginning and I think I've forgotten two things that make me different. The first thing is the being an Adlerian coach. The other thing that makes me different is this what we're talking about now, which is that I think that when a human being goes through certain debts of suffering and I think that's can be a whole slew of different experiences. And everybody has different levels of reactions and depth of suffering, depending on what happens to them in life. But when you go to certain depth of suffering and pain, you now understand better. Sorry, I'm going to get emotional, you know, understand better the depth of pain of other people. You know, you, you, when you go to a certain depth inside that deep, deep, down in the mud at the bottom of the ocean, now, you know where that is, you know how deep that is and you know, how dark and murky that is. And so now you can relate to other human beings in a similar place better. And because you can do that better, you are better able to recognize them see them acknowledge them. And then in the case of, of what I do, if we're living as a coach, I can, I can help them. I think better because it's not like if somebody was talking to, if somebody was trying to help someone who had experienced great suffering, but hadn't themselves felt it, they would probably be somewhat of a disconnect. You know, you can't, you can't imagine those places. You can't make them up in your mind and you can't. So I do think that there's, so there's that, that piece of it, of, of the knowing of the depth of the pain, but there's also the the fact that I overcame that I, I practiced it. I mean, thank goodness I was an Adlerian. Thank goodness. I had taken parenting Adlerian classes and classes and Adlerian theory classes, and I had become a coach. And I knew the tools of centering of calming oneself down of not sleeping out, not losing it, not succumb to depression, not committing suicide, not, you know, I, I knew how to do this stuff. And so. And, and I practice it. So like, I'm, I'm for real, like, I'm not lying to you. I've done this myself. I know how to do this. And so I'm not going to tell you how to do it, but I have the empathy and the knowledge that you can survive this, I know this because I did. And you can too. And if you want to, I can help you survive this and get through this and get to the other side.

George Siegal:

Did you see the movie Goodwill hunting? I did. There's an amazing scene in there when Robin Williams is with Matt Damond. And he's trying to figure out what's what this kid's all about. Cause Matt Damon had insulted him and he started pointing out examples of how he thought he knew something because he read a book, but he didn't have the life experience to go along with reading that book. And the life experience is everything. If you reading about it or, or are thinking, you know, something as opposed to actually living it, those are two very different things, right? So, yeah, I think that's I think that's all part of, of, of making you good at what you do. So what advice would you have for somebody who wants to start a business or start something up in their life? And they're just afraid to jump in there and do it. You've reinvented yourself. You have your, your business and what you're doing. What would you tell somebody who thinks they have an idea, but they just haven't got started yet?

Pascale Brady:

Well, you know what I'm going to tell you is I would have questions to start with. It's like, what's, what's holding you back? Like what, what is getting in your way? Cause it could be a number. It couldn't be so many, many things that would hold somebody back. Right. And typically people. Generally speaking, probably it's going to be a lack of self-confidence of some sort. Like, I don't believe that I have enough knowledge. I have enough money. I'm not an entrepreneur. I don't know how to sell. Very often that's the issue with people wanting to start a business is they, they don't know how they're going to make the money because they are afraid to sell. And so they want to start a business that has nothing to do with selling. Like I. I'm good at massaging. You know that that's not a sales person, it's somebody who's good at massaging. And so they say, but I'm afraid to do this. I have a job. I'm getting a paycheck. I, I can pay, you know, my food or my rent. And if I start my own business, I'm going to have to go sell myself and tell them that I'm a good massage therapist. And then I have to have get people in the door and so that I can earn enough money so I can pay the bills. So very often it's based in self-confidence. And so my, my initial stance would always be understanding really what type of problem is getting this person's way. And then just, it's just a problem. It's just a, a thing that needs work. So if you lack self-confidence, we're going to work on your self-confidence. What are your, what are your strong points? How are we going to get over that hurdle? Like what, what is good about you and how do we grow that muscle? Self-confidence. If you don't know how to run a business, let's go to take a business class. Teach you how to run a business. If it's because you are unsure of your idea, let's do a market research and figure out how your idea can be certain. So, nothing in life is ever anything but a problem that can be solved if you stay calm and you think about it systematically, and you start working on it, like a P like a homework, like a, like a project, right? You deconstructed, you really understand what the issue is. You deconstructed and then systematically one after the other, you tackle each step and you get the steps out of the way. Andthat includes mental barriers, like mental, like, like self-confidence like I don't know how to speak in public or I don't know that I'm good enough. Or, you know, I got this subliminal message from my parents that I was a piece of crap and I can't do anything right. Right. All of these are just issues that can be tackled and worked on one at a time.

George Siegal:

Very good. So what's the best way for people to get in touch with you if they are thinking of checking out, having a coach?

Pascale Brady:

Just go to the challenge. coach.com. The challenge, coach.com. That's my website. And you can find everything you need to know about there. You have a contact form. You have can schedule sample session. You find my contact information on there. That's the easiest and best way.

George Siegal:

All right. Well, great stuff, Pascal. Thank you so much for coming on today and continued success with with coaching.

Pascale Brady:

It was absolutely my pleasure, George. Thanks so much for having me on and if you want to do another one with someday about just parenting, I'd love to tackle that topic with you.

George Siegal:

Oh gosh. I have five kids. I could do it. I could do a year on that. A life on it. So absolutely. We'll have to do that. Thank you.

Pascale Brady:

Thanks George. Have a good rest of your day.

George Siegal:

Thank you for listening to today's Tell Us How to Make It Better podcast. We have a contact form on our website, and if you heard anything that you liked or didn't like, or have some ideas for a future show, it would be great if you could fill that out and let me know. And maybe somebody that you have in mind will end up being a guest on future podcast. Thanks again for listening. We'll see you next time.