Satisfaction Factor

#43 - Listener Q&A: Cooking & Meal Prepping in Intuitive Eating

July 20, 2022 Naomi Katz & Sadie Simpson
Satisfaction Factor
#43 - Listener Q&A: Cooking & Meal Prepping in Intuitive Eating
Show Notes Transcript

This week, we're answering a listener question about how things like cooking, meal prepping & meal planning work through an Intuitive Eating lens! Ditching dieting & diet culture definitely has an impact on these practices because it has an impact on the way we relate to food. And, contrary to some misconceptions, meal planning & prepping absolutely has a place in Intuitive Eating...just not the same way it does within diet culture. In this episode we're talking about: how the framing of cooking, meal prepping & meal planning within Intuitive Eating changes; how these practices are not a one-size-fits-all solution for everyone; and how our own relationships to these practices have changed as we've adopted the Intuitive Eating & anti-diet mindset.

And, don't forget that Naomi still has 3 spots open for  1:1 Intuitive Eating & Anti-Diet coaching! You can get all the details & submit your application at happyshapes.co/coaching!

You can stay up to date on all things Satisfaction Factor by following us on IG @satisfactionfactorpod!

Here's where to find us:
Sadie Simpson: www.sadiesimpson.com or IG @sadiemsimpson
Naomi Katz: www.happyshapes.co or IG @happyshapesnaomi

Full episode transcript available at satisfactionfactorpod.com.

Referenced in this episode:
Routine and Things Nourish & Flourish Meal Prepping Pad

Naomi Katz:

Welcome to Satisfaction Factor, the podcast where we explore how ditching diet culture makes our whole lives more satisfying. Welcome back to Satisfaction Factor. I'm Naomi Katz, an Intuitive Eating, body image, and self trust coach.

Sadie Simpson:

I'm Sadie Simpson, a group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and Intuitive Eating counselor.

Naomi Katz:

Before we dig in on our topic for this week, just a reminder that I have opened up three spots for one to one Intuitive Eating and anti diet coaching. So if that's something that you are interested in pursuing more, if you're looking into leaning into ditching diet culture and learning the ins and outs of Intuitive Eating, definitely check that out on my website at happyshapes.co/coaching.

Sadie Simpson:

A few weeks ago, we asked on our Instagram Stories for potential topics from you, our listeners. And today's episode is going to be from one of those suggestions that we got in a question box.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, so, every so often, we'll drop a question box in our Instagram stories and ask you for suggestions, and we really, really loved this one. So the question that was submitted was can we discuss cooking and meal planning from an Intuitive Eating lens. And we thought that was just a really great suggestion, and definitely something that we haven't really talked about yet.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah, I love that suggestion. And sidenote, if anyone is out there listening that has a suggestion on a topic that you would like for us to discuss, send them over to us. On Instagram, we are @satisfactionfactorpod. So traditionally, when we think about things like meal planning, or meal prepping, or cooking, that is from a diet culture lens. Because, I don't know about you, but when I think of the phrase meal prepping, I automatically think of something like the 21 Day Fix, or some type of restriction, control, cooking up a bunch of food, carefully portioning it out into these controlled containers for calorie restriction, or for macro ratios, and then restricting ourselves to eating just those pre portioned things for every meal and every snack.

Naomi Katz:

I don't think about it this way anymore, but for a very long time, I feel like meal prepping and portion control were pretty much synonymous in my head. Like I'd hear them as the same thing.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. I used to- back in the day of my early days of trying to do online business stuff- would post some Instagram posts, and stories, and things like that about like my weekly, Sunday meal prepping. And I'll never forget, one of my friends- it was right when this meme first came out- like I had posted about like, I'm meal prepping such and such for the week. And I'm over here like silently rolling my eyes at myself for being that person. But somebody sent me that meme- I don't know if you've seen it- but it's seven little Tupperwares, but it's got like a piece of pizza in every Tupperware. And she was like, is this what you read by meal prepping? And in my mind, I was like, well, yeah, that looks pretty awesome.

Naomi Katz:

That's so funny. Yes, I have totally seen that meme, and it's very funny. And I think what's interesting is, because there's so many misconceptions about Intuitive Eating out there, I feel like, asking somebody who's unfamiliar with Intuitive Eating what meal prepping through the Intuitive Eating lens would be like, they'd probably say something like pizza in a Tupperware for lunch every day.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

You know, because I think there's that misconception that Intuitive Eating is just eating pizza, and doughnuts, and

Sadie Simpson:

Yes. chips all the time, and stuff like that. And so I kind of love

Naomi Katz:

You know, in my personal experience, adopting an that you brought up that meme because I feel like it addresses two things. The reality, though, of, you know, Intuitive Eating, and ditching dieting, and diet culture, and stuff like that, is that it does change our relationship to things like cooking, and meal prepping, and meal planning, and stuff like that, because it changes our relationship to food. But there's a lot more nuance to it than, oh, now you put pizza in a Tupperware everyday. anti diet mindset has like very much opened doors for me in terms of my relationship with, I think, cooking especially. Like, honestly, meal prepping isn't something I do a whole lot of, largely because I work from home and have for a very long time, so it's, like, not really something that I have to do a lot of- the prepping part. Meal planning- you know, I'm very lucky, my husband does most of our cooking, which also means he does most of our menu planning. And so again, like, that's not something that I have a- that I do a lot of, so. But, you know, for me, I have always hated cooking. Like, always. And it wasn't until very recently that I realized that I think one of the big reasons I always hated cooking was because I had such a messed up relationship with food for so long. There were like two levels to that. Like on the one hand, food in general was something that was more complicated than it was enjoyable, and so cooking required me to think about food, and be with food, and interact with food a lot more than I wanted to. And then the other side of that is that the only times I ever cooked were when I was on a diet and trying to make like, quote unquote, healthy stuff that I definitely wasn't excited about. Like it was not delicious, pleasurable food. So, you know, there's always that like novelty of a new diet that you're like real excited at the beginning, and sometimes that would carry into my initial experience with cooking, but it very quickly became unenjoyable because I was not doing it for the purpose of pleasure. I was doing it for the purpose of restriction, and control, and like fixing myself, and stuff like that. I still don't really cook. Again, I'm very, very lucky because Ben is an amazing cook and usually even enjoys it, honestly. Not always. Nobody enjoys it all the time. But I have- we've gone through phases when our schedules were different and stuff, where I've done things like Hello Fresh for a while. And, honestly, I didn't hate doing it. Plus, I've found that I actually really enjoy baking.

Sadie Simpson:

Oh, fun.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah.

Sadie Simpson:

Have you baked anything fun recently?

Naomi Katz:

Yes. It was Ben's birthday recently, and so I made a chocolate Bundt cake that he requested.

Sadie Simpson:

Ooh.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. And it's good.

Sadie Simpson:

That's awesome.

Naomi Katz:

Which is really- I mean, that's the thing- is that, now that I'm making things that I actually enjoy, and that I don't have to feel guilty about enjoying, and stuff like that, cooking and baking just doesn't feel so yucky to me. I still don't love it because, I think, naturally, I'm just not a homemaker, honestly. Like, I think some people have instincts for stuff like that and some people don't, and, like, everybody who knows me will tell you I do not. I will step over messes instead of cleaning them up. I hate cleaning. I hate dishes. I hate cooking. Like I hate all of that stuff. That is just not my thing. But it doesn't feel yucky to me anymore on the occasions that I do have to cook. Does that make sense?

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah, that makes sense. And you know, it's kind of interesting to hear you say that, as you have disengaged from diet culture, you have found an enjoyment in baking. I can remember whenever I first stepped into diet culture, when I first started dieting for the purpose of weight loss, I kind of went through this phase where I really wanted to bake stuff. And at the time, I was pretty young, like late teens, early 20s. But- so it was mostly like, you know, boxed brownies and cookie mix. It wasn't like fancy baking. And I went through this phase where I thought that I was like, oh, I'm gonna be a pastry chef, I want to go to culinary school. And I hadn't really thought about this a lot until recently, but a lot of that was founded in restriction. Because I would go bake something almost out of rebellion. Because I would restrict myself from sweets, and baked goods, and things like that, and when I was trying to, you know, quote unquote, cheat, or I wanted something, quote unquote, bad, it was things like brownies and cookies, and I would resort to baking out of rebellion. And that kind of evolved into, like, an obsession for me for like sweets and things like that. So I think that's like the opposite flip side of that, which is really interesting.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. Well it is, but it also really aligns with some of the stuff that we've talked about before, about how, when you're restricting, you do some of these, like, almost like compulsive behaviors around food, like always looking at recipes, or pictures of food, or thinking about what you're going to eat next, and stuff like that. And I think that that can totally translate to, you know, looking for recipes for, you know, brownies, and cookies, and cakes, and stuff like that. And like maybe even that sense of I'm going to make a career out of this.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

That's so interesting.

Sadie Simpson:

Well, and even, not baking, but cooking in general. And we talked about this a little bit before, but up until high school, I was a really picky eater. And once I started discovering new foods, I started enjoying cooking. And this was, again, when I was like a teenager. During the summer, when I would be home from school, and my mom was at work, she would leave me her debit card, and one of my jobs- it was kind of a self appointed job, almost- but once I could drive, and I was 16, I took my mom's debit card, and went to the grocery store, and bought groceries for the family. And like sometimes I would cook things. I didn't cook every meal, and I didn't cook big fancy meals, but I would cook stuff. And that was a part of me finding that I enjoyed cooking. And it was also a part of me like experimenting with new foods that I previously just wouldn't eat forever, because I was really picky. And it's kind of interesting to think back on it. Because again, like I really enjoyed the whole process of grocery shopping, and looking at recipes, and things like that. But that definitely evolved into my dieting life too. Because, you know, at one point I was cooking stuff to try new foods, and because I found all these new flavors and things, but then eventually that evolved into like researching diet based recipes, or cooking Weight Watcher meals for myself and for my family. And thinking about this episode, even then, when I was cooking or planning meals specifically for weight loss or for body control purposes, I've generally enjoyed the process of planning and cooking. And I still do for the most part. You know, it's evolved, and it will continue to evolve based on different seasons of life. But, gosh, even when I started having more work responsibilities, that was another time- like it kind of- I kind of lost that joy and that fun in cooking. And I went through periods of time where I hate the idea of cooking, or grocery shopping, or anything like that. And that was more from an overscheduled life versus a diet culture life. But that's a whole nother episode. But I think that's another layer to consider is that these things evolve. Like we go through phases where maybe we are super into cooking, and meal planning, and grocery shopping, and sometimes we're not, and that's okay.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. I also- I think it's so interesting how our different personalities impact this stuff too. Where, like I said, I am- like, I'm just not- I'm not a homemaker. Like I don't- I don't do that kind of stuff. I don't enjoy it. It's just not my thing. You love planning, and scheduling, and stuff like that. Like that's part of your personality. And so it makes sense that planning- even within diet culture, and now outside of diet culture- that like that element of planning was always kind of satisfying for you.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. That's very, very interesting. We need another personality quiz for our cooking slash meal planning style, I guess.

Naomi Katz:

More personality quizzes. Yeah. Well, and I think that's a really important thing to recognize here, is that like, yes, our relationship to food is going to have a really big impact on our relationship to things like cooking, and meal prepping, and meal planning, and also our personalities, our preferences, our lifestyles, all of that stuff, is also going to have a big impact on that. Intuitive Eating, food, none of that stuff happens in a vacuum. It's always going to interact with all this other stuff about you and your life. And so, you know, it's interesting to see how that shows up for the two of us here, too. You know, we had talked about how, within diet culture, that's something that's like super, super related to restriction, and portion control, and just control in general. And I think that sometimes we feel like a practice like that could never have a place in Intuitive Eating. But it actually totally does.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

Meal prepping is a great practice in Intuitive Eating because it helps us to honor our hunger. And I think that's especially true in terms of planning for when we'll be hungry. So how I like to call that honoring future hunger.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

I think that there's, you know, that misconception in Intuitive Eating that like, if you're eating intuitively, then you always just have to eat like whatever sounds good in the moment. One, that would be chaos. You could never plan for anything if that were true. And it would be like outrageously expensive.

Sadie Simpson:

Uh, yeah, it would. We would be going out to eat for every meal.

Naomi Katz:

Every single meal would be like going out to eat, or delivery-

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

-or- I don't know- maybe you have to have like a personal chef who can like whip up whatever you want on a whim or whatever.

Sadie Simpson:

I mean, that would be amazing. But yes.

Naomi Katz:

I mean, listen, don't get me wrong, if I had access to that. But, yeah, I mean, so that's just a huge misconception in general. Like, no, we live lives. And we definitely- and we live within means- and we definitely need to be able to plan for things like hunger and stuff like that. And I think meal prepping may not be a necessity for everybody. Just like, you know, I talked about, I don't really do meal prepping, that's not a thing, because I do have a lot of flexibility working from home. But meal planning, I think, is something that like literally everybody does. Because when you think about it, meal planning is just like going to the grocery store and knowing what you're going to buy so you can plan to eat it in between shopping trips. Like, whether that's once a week, or even- even if you grocery shop once a day, you're still technically planning the meals that you're eating between shopping trips, like.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. Oh, that's a really, really good point.

Naomi Katz:

I think the big difference is how we frame these things within Intuitive Eating versus how they're framed in diet culture. Meal prepping and even meal planning in diet culture is- you know, like we talked about- it's all about making sure we don't eat too much, and that we don't eat the wrong things. It's really about making sure we don't eat things. Meal prepping and planning in Intuitive Eating is actually about making sure we have enough. Diet culture is all about what's too much. Intuitive Eating all about enough. Is it enough food? Do we have enough choices? Do we have enough satisfaction from this stuff? And I think that's the really big key in shifting how we think about this stuff.

Sadie Simpson:

I think that is such an important distinction. And if there is any takeaway from this episode, that is it- that meal prepping and meal planning in Intuitive Eating is making sure we have enough. And that is just- I feel like we can't say that enough times. I feel like that is just so so important.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. It seems like such like a simple shift. And again- I guess it is a simple shift, but as we always say, simple and easy are not the same. And so, you know, there's a fair amount of background work that goes into getting comfortable with the idea of enough. It's not- like all of the rest of this, you don't just flip a switch and go, oh, now it's enough. I think the other thing that we can kind of look at as the common thread in how Intuitive Eating, and anti diet practices, and stuff like that impact cooking, meal prepping, meal planning- I wish there was a better shorthand for those three things- but I think that the common thread that we can see, in addition to that whole thing about enough, is pleasure and satisfaction. Diet culture, these activities are all about limiting or restricting pleasure. Again, it's that, like, too much- like avoiding the too much. And Intuitive Eating, I feel like it's all about letting pleasure and satisfaction be our guide in how we relate to these things and how we approach these things.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah, and I think to do that, we just have to consider what we like and what we don't like in terms of planning, and prepping, and cooking. We've already discussed that we have very different styles and how we operate. I like to plan. I like to be, you know, kind of detailed, and organized, and that sort of thing. And you are the opposite of that. And I think it's really important for folks to see where they fit in maybe on that spectrum. And there's variations. You don't have to be one extreme or the other. And examining how we like to do these things, or even if we like to do them. And if we don't like to plan meals, and if we don't like to cook, is there an opportunity to delegate that out Totally. I think that's one of the reasons- I think that whole, to another person in the household? Do we have the access and the means to do something- like you've kind of mentioned- like HelloFresh, or some of these pre cooked, pre planned recipe box type things? Or do we have access to things like convenience meals? I think that is a big thing in all of this, is normalizing convenience things, like frozen pizzas, and grilled cheese sandwiches, and stuff we can whip out really quickly. And for me, and I know for a lot of folks I've worked with, having some go-to three or four meals that we can have done in like five to 10 minutes without a lot of effort has been key in- in life. like, challenging the food police part of Intuitive Eating makes all of this stuff so much easier. Yes.

Naomi Katz:

Because it does- like we do work through the whole concept of like, oh, convenience food is bad, and stuff like that. Personally, I have been on such a kick lately of, like, those like prepackaged salad kits. And then I'll just like throw a can of tuna in there. Which, like, okay, tuna has always been a thing that I've been okay with. But I tried, recently, can- like, a can of chicken. Like, you know how you can get the same kind- it looks like a tuna can, but it's chicken. I bought one of those and threw it into my pre packaged salad kit. It was so good. And it's the kind of thing- and it like just added some substance to my lunch salad, and like just had me set for the afternoon, basically. But there was a time where I would have turned my nose up at something like that- where I would have been like, oh my god, I would never eat something like that, because of all like the food police stuff. Which, I mean- and you can hear even in how I talk about it- like there's so much elitism and classism in our relationship to convenience food. And so like breaking that stuff down, and realizing that, oh, this is something that I could totally put in my also conveniently packaged salad. It's awesome.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. Oh my gosh, yes, let's normalize convenience Yeah. You know, it's so funny, as much as I don't like a lot of food. It is okay to eat stuff from a can, or a box, or a bag. And another thing I think we could consider too is how we like to grocery shop. Because in the year 2022, we have options. And personally, again, I find joy in going to the grocery store. Most of the time. I won't say 100% of the time, because sometimes it is very inconvenient. But if I have the time, if I'm prepared, if I am like focused, and if I can go by myself, especially, it is very fun for me. And I know some household tasks, I actually kind of enjoy grocery shopping. folks hate it. And thankfully, we have things like grocery Again, sometimes. Like, everybody's gonna have days delivery services, now you can order things online. There's just a lot of options that give us the opportunity to meal plan, and meal prep, and grocery shop in a way that works for us. where it's- like, this is just- I am doing this purely because it has to get done, but I don't really have time, and it's like kind of a pain, and whatever. But mostly, I actually really enjoy grocery shopping. You know, in our house, we also tend to split stuff up. So like, Ben does the meal planning, so he'll like make a grocery list, and then he does a lot of the cooking. But I try and do more of the grocery shopping. And, you know, again, we sort of split that up based on, like, who is best equipped to handle these different tasks. I love that. Well, and, you mentioned earlier, even the whole cleanup process. Like, I can't stand cleaning dishes, but Trey, on the other hand, likes to hand wash stuff, and I'm like, hey. This is very privileged, first world problem of me, but I could not live without a dishwasher. That was a non negotiable for me.

Naomi Katz:

Same.

Sadie Simpson:

But he- he kinda finds some pleasure and joy in hand washing, especially big pots and different, you know, pans and things like that.

Naomi Katz:

Ben and I, I think, equally dislike washing dishes. So we kind of- that's one that we split up sort of- where I deal with like unloading and loading the dishwasher and stuff like that, and most of the time then does the hand washing stuff. But when I have time, I will, you know, do some of that also, or we'll split it up- like he'll do some of it and I'll do some of it. But yeah, like all of this to say, by the way- you know, we've talked before about how like part of self care is maybe asking for help, and setting boundaries, and like having these conversations with our partners, and stuff like that, so that everybody's needs can be met. Nobody has to read people's minds. And I think all of this stuff is like a great example of that.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. Well, just another side note, but something that I found, I guess it's been about two years ago, that I just love- and this is a hot tip for anybody out there that likes to plan and have a little organization going on- there is a planner on Routines and Things- so Routines and Things is a podcast, but they also have a store of stationery, and like different little planning type items- and there is a planner within the Routines and Things store. It's called the Nourish and Flourish meal planning pad, and it is like the greatest thing ever, in my opinion. So it's a paper pad- so it's just like- I think it's like 50 sheets of paper, and once you use one, you just rip it off and throw it away. So you're not- you know, you don't have this notebook full of stuff that you have to figure out what to do with it forever. Basically, it has a couple of different sections, and one of the sections is taking inventory of what you already have at your house, and then planning out what meals you want to have for the week. So it's got like a little section Sunday through Saturday- I guess it's- I think it's every day of the week- and then another little section for backup meal ideas, where you can jot down things like convenience items, or like frozen stuff, or ideas of, like, if you want to order a pizza one night, or whatever the deal is.

Naomi Katz:

Oh, I love that.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. And then it has like a section for you to make your actual grocery list, and it's- it's sectioned off in things like dry goods, frozen, proteins, produce- like it just has like the different little sections of different types of food. I love it so much. Because again, you just tear off the page once you're done, you can take it with you to the grocery store, you don't have to fidget with an app. Like I've never been a person that can use an app for a grocery list, I need something that I can like mark off. And it's just streamlined.

Naomi Katz:

I definitely use an app for grocery shopping.

Sadie Simpson:

Like, I can't- I can't do it. But I like it because it's a system that works for me. And I think that that's- that's an important thing that you mentioned, too. Because you like using an app. So maybe some folks, you know, really do well with that type of thing. But it's all about finding stuff that works for us.

Naomi Katz:

Absolutely. Yeah. Oh my gosh, I love that. And what a- first of all, I love that you listen to a podcast called Routines and Things.

Sadie Simpson:

It's really good.

Naomi Katz:

That- I feel like, for somebody like Sadie, it's like- like, that's the kind of podcast that just like calls to you.

Sadie Simpson:

It does.

Naomi Katz:

Like, ooh, Routines and Things.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes it does.

Naomi Katz:

Whereas, me, I hear that, and I'm like, I don't think that's for me. Oh my gosh, I love that so much. But yeah, I- but I also think that that meal planning pad sounds like an awesome resource. And it sounds like just the way it's set up is really aligned with some of the things that we learn in Intuitive Eating and stuff too. Like, I love that it has a section for backup convenience stuff. Because that happens. Like the reality of life is that you have your meal plan for the week, and then one night you do not feel like cooking, or you're working late, or the power went out, or like a million things like could come up. And kind of the whole thing about Intuitive Eating is not letting your food requirements run your life. Where like, oh, shit, my meal plan for tonight isn't gonna work out and now my whole world is shaken. Like, and that happens. I distinctly remember that happening while I was dieting- is that, you know, I would have everything allotted in portions, or macros, or points, or whatever, and then life would happen, and I would like spiral about like, oh my gosh, now nothing works, essentially. And so I love that this has a section of like, hey, by the way, sometimes life is gonna happen and your meal plans not going to work out, so how about you have some easy stuff on hand too.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes, have a backup plan.

Naomi Katz:

I love that. That's awesome.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. Well, I think all of this is finding what works for you. And that's really really really hard to do within diet culture, whenever we are inundated with all these external messages saying we have to eat this time of day, and eat this many whatevers, and this many portions, and this is how you're supposed to do it. Like it doesn't give us the opportunity to explore if we even like cooking or not, or if we like meal planning and meal prepping or not. And some folks find pleasure and satisfaction in planning and cooking, and some people don't. And it's okay. If you are either one of those things, it is okay. If you are neither one of those things, and fall somewhere in between, or kind of go back and forth. It's just all about figuring out what works for you, versus having an external rule or template dictating what you're supposed to do.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, I mean, that's basically everything about Intuitive Eating-

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

-right there in a nutshell.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

So I hope that answered the question, dear listener. And again, if you have questions that you'd like us to address on the podcast, definitely reach out and let us know on Instagram @satisfactionfactorpod. We really enjoy answering your questions.

Sadie Simpson:

And last week, we shared that we were meeting in person to plan future podcast things, and we had a lovely time hanging out, but also planned some cool things for the podcast. So stay tuned. We've got some exciting changes coming this fall as we approach our one year podcast-iversary.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, definitely. It was a good time, and I'm also so excited about the stuff that we've got coming down the road.

Sadie Simpson:

Me too. You know I am. You know I like to plan stuff. So.

Naomi Katz:

I do know that. I know that, and I appreciate it immensely. I definitely could not do this at all otherwise.

Sadie Simpson:

So what's satisfying for you right now?

Naomi Katz:

I am getting ready to go and visit my family for the weekend, and I have not seen them in like a very long time. Like I honestly am not even sure when the last time we went and saw them was. It might have been Thanksgiving. And we were supposed to go earlier in the year, and then COVID got in the way, and we weren't able to go see them. And so we're really excited. And like a family tradition every year, my parents take like the whole family to a Yankee game. And we are doing that. We call it Yankeefest, and this is Yankeefest. And I'm just so so so excited to see my family, and to go and do this thing that we enjoy every year. And it's just- I'm very satisfied about all of that right now.

Sadie Simpson:

That sounds awesome. I can't wait to hear all about it.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. How about you? What's satisfying for you right now?

Sadie Simpson:

I am- after about fourish- five- yeah, about five years of having longer hair- chopping my hair all off on Monday. And I am so excited about it. I go through these phases where I'll just grow my hair out mostly out of pure laziness and not wanting to call and make an appointment, nd it will get really long, and then I will cut it off really short. And then I'll maintain shorter hair for a while, and then something in life will happen, and then it'll just grow back out again. So I'm ready to get back into the short hair phase of my life again. It's getting to be hot. It's getting to be heavy. I'm tired of dealing with it. So yeah, I'm satisfied slash excited about having shorter hair again.

Naomi Katz:

Oh my gosh, I'm so excited to see this. The only the only time I've ever seen you with shorter hair was when you used to have- like your Zoom profile picture was like a really old picture of you, and you had shorter hair in it. I've never known like live Sadie with shorter hair.

Sadie Simpson:

It's always in a ponytail anyway, so I might as well just cut it.

Naomi Katz:

I'm so, so excited to see that. Awesome.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. So if you enjoyed this episode, and you would like to support us, one thing you can do is leave us a positive rating and review in either Apple podcasts, or Spotify. These ratings and reviews are what helps us reach more people. And we really enjoy seeing your feedback.

Naomi Katz:

Definitely. Well, that's it for us this week. So we'll catch you next week.