Satisfaction Factor

#50 - You Don't Have to Get Back on Track for Fall!

September 07, 2022 Naomi Katz & Sadie Simpson
Satisfaction Factor
#50 - You Don't Have to Get Back on Track for Fall!
Show Notes Transcript

It's the week after Labor Day, and a new season often means a new version of diet culture popping up. In the fall, it's usually the narrative of "getting back on track" after the summer. So this week, we're breaking down all the reasons why you actually don't have to get back on track at all! We're chatting about: why we might feel drawn to diets again at this time of year; how we can reclaim our routines & structures without framing them around diet culture; why fluctuations in our routines & our bodies are a totally normal part of life; and how we can redefine the idea of the "track" altogether!

Plus, we've got some big news about the future of the podcast - including the opening of the waitlist for our upcoming online community, The Satisfaction Space! Click here to join the waitlist & be the first to know when the community opens!

You can stay up to date on all things Satisfaction Factor by following us on Instagram @satisfactionfactorpod!

Here's where to find us:
Sadie Simpson: www.sadiesimpson.com or IG @sadiemsimpson
Naomi Katz: www.happyshapes.co or IG @happyshapesnaomi

Full episode transcript available at satisfactionfactorpod.com.

Naomi Katz:

Welcome to Satisfaction Factor, the podcast where we explore how ditching diet culture makes our whole lives more satisfying. Welcome back to Satisfaction Factor. I'm Naomi Katz, an Intuitive Eating, body image, and self trust coach.

Sadie Simpson:

I'm Sadie Simpson, a group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and Intuitive Eating counselor.

Naomi Katz:

Before we dig into our topic today, we wanted to give you a heads up that we've got some big changes coming to Satisfaction Factor pretty soon.

Sadie Simpson:

Yay.

Naomi Katz:

Some exciting stuff. We are coming up on our one year podcast-iversary. That's going to be at the end of this month. And after that, we are actually going to be switching to an every other week podcast format, just to give ourselves a little bit of breathing room in between these things. But if you are worried about getting your Satisfaction Factor fix, don't worry. Because at the same time, we will also be launching an online community that will have bonus content, live Q&As, and a chance to connect with like minded people. If that's something that sounds interesting to you, you can get on the waitlist and be the first to know, and get some fun bonuses. That link will be in our show notes, and we will definitely come back with more information next week.

Sadie Simpson:

Yay. I'm excited about both of these things- about switching to an every other week format, and to begin building a community. Because, don't get me wrong, I love our conversations with each other, but I am excited about expanding these conversations to other people, instead of us just talking to a microphone and not being able to get direct responses, or feedback, or communication back from other folks. I'm excited to be able to like really interact with people in our podcast community. So yay.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, totally. I completely agree. Especially- you know, we've talked on here so many times about how there's a difference in the community that you find outside of diet culture, and so having a place to kind of hold that and nurture it is going to be really cool.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes, yes. And this is a two woman show. We edit this thing, we market this thing as best as we can, and doing it every week for a year- that's been a lot of work. So it's gonna be great for us to have the space to be able to pour more into creating content with quality that feels good for us as the podcasters, and for our listeners as well.

Naomi Katz:

So this week on the pod, we are going to be talking about all the reasons why you actually don't have to be getting back on track, or back on the wagon, or any of those things, now that summer is coming to an end.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah, at least here in the United States, we have just gotten through Labor Day weekend, which generally represents the end of summer, and we're getting ready to shift into the fall season. Which, sidenote, I am super excited about. Because as much as I love summer, I'm ready to not be hot all the time. We are getting back into a routine after summer, and I know for a lot of folks, myself included, getting back into a routine after summer is kind of hard sometimes. Because summer, for us, in my household, has been kind of a free for all. My husband's a teacher, my kid is on a school calendar type schedule, so we're all over the place in the summer. So I kind of look forward to this time of year of getting back into a groove and getting back into a routine. It feels like one of those cyclical times for us to get back- to- almost to do like a reset. And I know that idea of a reset has a lot of diet culture connotations for a lot of folks. And I think it'll be good to talk about some of those things within this episode, as we're kind of coming towards the end of summer.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, totally. Because getting back into a routine does not have to be framed around diet culture. Like a lot of us feel more settled and grounded with a routine. A lot of us do see those kinds of cyclical shifts in our schedules, and behaviors, and- and our habits, and stuff like that around summer, and then the transition back into fall, and stuff like that. And that's all totally normal, and it doesn't have to be framed in terms of like a diet culture get back on track, or anything like that.

Sadie Simpson:

Mm-hmm. Yeah, it's real interesting, too- this is one of those times of year- it's almost like the second renaissance of the annual New Year's resolution time, especially working in a gym setting. And this is when, typically, we see a big influx of folks coming back after being away from the summer. And I think it's going to be interesting to see what happens this year. Because- I mentioned this on a previous episode- we've had a massive comeback of people coming to the gym in like June and July, which is not typically normal. So I'm going to be interested in seeing if things start to really get busy in group fitness classes and in our personal training sessions in September. Because a lot of times, again, there's this get back on track mentality when it comes to the fall.

Naomi Katz:

I don't have kids, I'm not a teacher- like very little about my schedule theoretically changes over the summer. And yet, even I notice that there's a big change in that stuff for me. Like, I mean, I- my day job is that I'm a paralegal. I work at a law firm as my day job. But like, it's just a known thing that over the summer things slow down most of the time. People go on vacations. Because I don't have kids, but a lot of people do, and so they schedule their vacations in the summer. Everything kind of slows down a little bit over the summer, and then picks back up momentum again come fall. And so most of us, in some way or another, see this kind of shift, even if we aren't working on a school schedule.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah, well, one thing that I've been thinking about lately, since we are pretty much tied to a school schedule forever, until my kid graduates and/or my husband retires, which will be a long, long, long time from now- getting back into this groove of making sure we've got food and groceries to pack in lunchboxes, and having snacks for school, and snacks for work, and things like that. There was a time- so, prior to working in the fitness industry, I used to be a teacher for three years- and I can remember this time as a teacher. I looked at it as an opportunity or a cue for me to clean up my diet after a summer of traveling, and eating, and drinking. And I can remember feeling really excited for this excuse- like, quote unquote, excuse- to pack my lunch, versus being at home, and just kind of having, you know, food everywhere, and a schedule everywhere, and all this sort of stuff. Like I really looked forward to this time, those years ago, as a way to take back some control of my food intake. And you know, it's kind of wild to think about it now, because, ironically, what I assumed to be was myself taking back this control of my diet or my food intake, I realize now, it was diet culture, beauty standards, this pursuit of the thin ideal, all of these things controlling this narrative, and it wasn't really me having any sort of control whatsoever.

Naomi Katz:

Mm hmm. I am curious, though, like as a person who tends to really like structure, and routine, and stuff like that, now that you've removed the diet culture mentality from all of that, do you still kind of find some satisfaction in returning to some more routine and structure in the fall?

Sadie Simpson:

Oh, for sure. I definitely am feeling some relief of getting back to like a routine of what day I typically go to the grocery store, and what day I might spend a little bit extra time in the kitchen, like, batch cooking up some foods so, that way, we have it easily available to eat throughout the week, or to pack in lunch boxes, and things like that. Like I just- I love that kind of a routine. And I personally thrive with that kind of a routine. I know that's not the way everybody works. But yes, even without all the diet culture control stuff, being a part of this routine- I still like really look forward to this time of year.

Naomi Katz:

I love that. That's awesome. And it's such a great example of how these- like routine and structure doesn't have to mean diet culture, and that, like, you can still honor your own preferences for that stuff, and you can still take some satisfaction in that stuff, without it being about diet culture narratives.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. Well, I think, as it is with everything we talk about, everything we do around here on this podcast, really examining and understanding this why behind why we feel like we need to get back on track or back into a routine during certain times of the year is really important. Because, again, this time of year, it just is so common and so normal to see a lot of these, like, fall reset- 30 Day fall Whole 30 challenge- like it's- it's kind of like a New Year's thing. And I think it's a really good opportunity for all of us to examine what does getting back on track really even mean. Like, who decides what the track is? And what does the track look like? And why do we feel like we need to get back on it, especially right now at the end of summer?

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. Well, I think we know the answer to that is, basically, diet culture.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

Diet culture is why we feel that way.

Sadie Simpson:

Rhetorical question.

Naomi Katz:

I once posted something on Instagram about like the four seasons of diet culture. And it's- it's- like in the fall, you kind of can't feel that pressure about getting your summer body ready or whatever. So diet culture kind of has to focus on shaming you for what you might have done over the summer with your summer body instead, right? Like if you think about the seasons- like in winter, you've got that new year, new you, and also that, like, super toxic summer bodies are made in the winter, and stuff like that. In the spring, you've got that summer's almost here, so everybody panic thing driving you. In the summer, you get that like double down on summer beach bodies- like, it's here, get it together kind of a situation. And in the fall, they're just like, oh, hey, well, you had your fun this summer, better get back on track after all those good times you had in your summer body that we forced you to have.

Sadie Simpson:

My gosh, that is so accurate, unfortunately.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. So, definitely, that's why we feel that way. It's been- it is a real strong narrative in diet culture, that's for sure. But the great thing about Intuitive Eating is that there's no such thing as getting off track, or falling off the wagon, or anything like that. Like, everything is just food, it's just eating. Like there isn't anything you can fall off of, basically. I always find it really interesting, but I would say that's even true if like we're practicing Intuitive Eating, and then maybe we go back on a diet briefly, or something like that. I think it's really easy to look at that as like, oh, I fell off track with Intuitive Eating, or something like that. Yeah, going on a diet is not Intuitive Eating- like definitively. But it's like actually pretty normal and common for people to go back and forth between these things as part of their Intuitive Eating journey long term. And it can be even like a learning experience that helps you to understand Intuitive Eating better, or like something like that. So when we say that there's no such thing as falling off the wagon, or getting off track, or something in Intuitive Eating, we really, really mean that.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

That's kind of an all encompassing statement. I think within Intuitive Eating, we really recognize that fluctuations in our eating, and our movement routines, and things like that are really just like all part of being human. I feel like Intuitive Eating is kind of- like when you really get down to it- It's about like honoring the fact that we are humans, and not machines, and not, you know, automatons, and stuff like that- like that we are actually just human beings, and fluctuations are part of being human. And if we're not putting weight loss, or, quote unquote, health- like as it's defined in diet culture, meaning like primarily body size- if we're not putting that stuff up on a pedestal, then like, there's really no reason to see those fluctuations as straying from some goal.

Sadie Simpson:

It is really hard to wrap our minds around the idea that fluctuations are normal when we are immersed in diet culture. And I feel like saying that out loud, normalizing that, can be very, very helpful for folks to hear.

Naomi Katz:

We can talk about why fluctuations happen, starting with the framing of there's nothing wrong with fluctuations and cyclical changes in our behaviors. Categorically, there's nothing wrong with that.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

And taking our word for that can be hard. There's no growth in just being like, well, Sadie and Naomi say it's fine, so it's fine, and I don't need to unpack it at all. It can be helpful to look at why those fluctuations might be happening, so that we understand why there's nothing wrong with it, and why it's part of being a human. So I think one of the big things is just pleasure. You know, as much as we are conditioned to like deny ourselves pleasure- and we talk about this concept a lot on the pod, but I also feel like maybe we haven't talked about this before- but we have like a drive for pleasure as humans. No matter how much we're conditioned to think we don't deserve it, the reality is that we're going to seek it to some extent, because what is life, otherwise, really. Right? When we're talking about pleasure- ice cream in the summer, right? Like, is there anything better than that?

Sadie Simpson:

Not much.

Naomi Katz:

So, I know for me, and I imagine for a lot of people who maybe drink alcohol socially, outside day drinking is one of my favorite experiences. Like I look forward to that like all through winter. First day that I can go sit on a patio and have a drink in the outside is something I look forward to all year. And so, like I do that. I go and sit outside, and drink beer, and margaritas when my stomach isn't hating me, things like that. And that's like just part of- barbecues- barbecues are a great example, right, which are- you know, so much of this stuff is- it's cultural, and it's, you know, social, and yes, it's also physical pleasure, and that kind of thing- but so much of it is just that we have these opportunities to let food experiences be nourishing and pleasurable in multiple ways.

Sadie Simpson:

Oh, my gosh, yes. And yes to all of those things that are pleasurable and enjoyable in the summertime. And, you know, that's another thing to kind of consider- some of those cyclical things we experience, and when we're coming into different seasons- not just the end of summer, but the end of fall, and then the emergence of like hibernation mode, and then the reemergence into spring- like really considering all of those things that we find pleasurable when it comes to things like eating, or drinking, or resting, or moving, or not exercising, or whatever- recognizing that these things are going to just come in different cycles and different times of the year, and enjoying those things when the time is right for that. So on that note, another thing to consider is also the weather. Because in the summertime, it's really hot, and this summer it has been extremely hot, and that can have an impact on our energy levels, on our desire to move. And, again, that's something that happens again in the wintertime when it's really cold, and we are also tired. So in an ideal world, if we lived where it was mild, and spring or fall like weather all the time, everywhere, we would want to assume that we could be consistent with things like exercise, and movement, or, you know, drinking water and staying hydrated, or whatever the thing is, but, honestly, like, I don't know that we would do that either, even in that ideal temperature world.

Naomi Katz:

Because life would still be a thing that happened.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes. Yes.

Naomi Katz:

But yeah. I mean, dude, summer is hot, and sticky, and like all of those things. I am- you know- I know that, like, I simply will not ride my bike outside during certain times of year here because it's just too friggin hot. Like, you know, you basically have to get up like at dawn in order to not be like baking, and I'm not going to do that. So, you know, there's that. But honestly, like, even- you know, we have- I've mentioned before, we have a gym in our basement, but it's not air conditioned down there, and it gets hot and humid. And just- like, there's not a lot you can do in there during certain times of year. And I think that that's just- like, I don't understand- I see people outside running, and like, I know people will go like hiking and stuff like that at times of year- like in the summer. I just don't understand. I don't understand how that happens.

Sadie Simpson:

I don't know.

Naomi Katz:

It is beyond me.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

And lastly, because I'm me, I have to also bring up the way that capitalism impacts these fluctuations, right?

Sadie Simpson:

Yep. Mm-hmm.

Naomi Katz:

So this is especially true in the US, but the society that we live in gives us very little leisure time.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

We have very little time off, and our seasons are very structured around what our work life is like- and I include school in that because, you know, in a lot of ways school is like training us for jobs and stuff like that. You know, we've talked about the impact of scarcity on things like the binge restrict cycle with food, and I think that concept really applies here too. We get so little pleasure time, and like so little downtime, that when we do have some lulls or some opportunities for like fun time, we like really lean in it- lean into it. Which isn't a bad thing- again, like get your pleasure where you can, always lean in to pleasure when you can get it. And it's helpful to see how like there's a scarcity mindset happening there- that like the scarcity of that like pleasure time might drive that fluctuation over the summer a little bit too.

Sadie Simpson:

Oh my gosh, yes.

Naomi Katz:

The reason why it's helpful to sort of look at all these different reasons why fluctuations can happen- and, you know, we just we named like three, but anything in life can cause fluctuation. COVID surges can cause a fluctuation in our behaviors, personal changes can cause fluctuations. There's like a million reasons. So like, we're not trying to say that these are the only three reasons that this happens. These are just some that are specific to summer. But the reason that it's helpful to recognize this stuff is that it can help us take that sense of guilt, or shame, or scarcity out of all of this. And taking that out of all of this really makes summer activities like so much more fun too. Also true for like any vacation we ever take. Taking that mindset out of it, being able to just enjoy the food, enjoy the activities, enjoy the connection, and like all of that stuff without the sense of being off track, and like without the impending doom of getting back on track- all of that means that we actually get to just focus on the fun that we're having. And isn't that just so much better?

Sadie Simpson:

Oh, my gosh, yes. Just focusing on the fun. Go figure. We have to say that out loud, even for ourselves- to just focus on the fun versus all this other stuff that we feel like we are obligated to focus on.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, absolutely.

Sadie Simpson:

So with all of that said, you don't have to make up for what you ate or drank over the summer, over a holiday weekend. You don't have to go to extremes by feeling like you have to enter the season by exercising more, or changing your diet, and eating differently. And I just think it's so important to remember that things like movement, and eating, and drinking, and living, and resting, and all of these things can coexist without one thing having to cancel the other out, especially as we're coming off of a season of what is generally thought of as being like a time of, quote unquote, indulgence, or relaxation, or whatever. Like let's freakin indulge, and relax, and enjoy it without feeling like we have to make up for those things down the road.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah, like it doesn't have to be transactional. Those things are good just because they're good.

Sadie Simpson:

Exactly. So if you're listening to this episode, and you are feeling as if- you know, we've ended the summer season, we just got past Labor Day- you're feeling this draw to go to the extremes, to get back on this arbitrary track, or whatever, after the holiday weekend or after the season, it's just really important to remember we can move how we normally move. We don't have to go do some sort of like 75 day go hard or go home exercise challenge. And we can get back on track- on the proverbial track- eating the way we normally eat, eating the foods we like to eat, doing the things we like to do. There's no need to view this time of year as trying to reset ourselves or go into some sort of extreme. Like, let's just reconsider how can we continue to live our lives in a way that feels good, that is supportive for our lifestyle and our needs, without having to do the whole let's get back on the wagon thing.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. Like what if we considered the summer, or the vacation, or the holiday weekend, or whatever- what if we consider that part of the track?

Sadie Simpson:

Oh my gosh, yes.

Naomi Katz:

Right? Like, what if the track is life? And that includes things like summer, and holiday weekends, and vacations, and parties, and like celebrations, and all of that stuff. It was all just part of the track.

Sadie Simpson:

Holy shit. Well, we had talked about this before recording this episode, but I didn't talk about it while we were recording. So as we're recording this, I just got back from a trip to Dollywood, where I rode a roller coaster for the first time in like 15 years. And yes, I feel very just old and not very roller coaster-y after doing that. But that makes me think of the roller coaster track, too. Because there are some slow parts, and there are some uphill climbs, and there are some fast drops, and like some upside down loop de loop things. Like we're doing some metaphors here. Maybe it's a roller coaster track or something.

Naomi Katz:

Yeah. Which- it's funny. I feel like a lot of times, when we say something's been a roller coaster, there's like this implication that that's a bad thing. Like we use that to describe something that's been bad, or hard, or whatever. Roller coasters are fun. Okay, not for me. I hate roller coasters. But people who ride roller coasters, ride them because they're fun. So like, where did we get the idea that something being a roller coaster was a bad thing?

Sadie Simpson:

Oh my gosh. Yeah, like roller coasters are designed to have fluctuations and to keep you sort of like on your toes of not knowing what's coming next. And that is life. And we are basically philosophers now.

Naomi Katz:

Yes. Absolutely. I don't know what to call our philosophy, but we have one now.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes.

Naomi Katz:

I also think this is a great opportunity to practice that idea of, when something feels like a should, asking says who. Because I think that a lot of times when we come back into the diet culture-ness of post summer, or post holiday, etc., there's a lot of, well, you know, that was all fun, but I should do this now, and I shouldn't do that now. And I think that, like, this is just a time of year when a lot of shoulds pop up. And so just sort of gently offering that reminder of, when that should shows up, asking ourselves says who, and really noticing that, like, there's a really good chance that that says who traces back to diet culture, and that maybe that's not actually the choice we want to be making for ourselves.

Sadie Simpson:

I love that. So Naomi, what is satisfying for you right now?

Naomi Katz:

Okay, I'm gonna blow your mind right now. Are you ready?

Sadie Simpson:

Oh my gosh, yes. I am so excited.

Naomi Katz:

What is satisfying for me right now is Instagram reels.

Sadie Simpson:

What?

Naomi Katz:

I know. Okay, let me- let me explain. I hate- I still hate that I have to make reels, and that Instagram is basically just becoming TikTok, and it requires so much more time, and effort, and planning, and all of this stuff to create a reel, as opposed to creating other kinds of posts, and stuff like that. And so, like, I hate the impact that reels is having on my life. And, over the past like month, I've kind of leaned into reels as a concept and started to learn how to use them a little bit more- how to, like, come up with ways to do reels that aren't super time consuming, and polished, and whatever. And it's been kind of satisfying to like learn some strategy around that and some tools for that. And so, weirdly, that's actually what's satisfying me right now.

Sadie Simpson:

Wow, next thing you know, you're gonna be on Tik Tok.

Naomi Katz:

Right? And I just- it's funny- like, honestly-

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah. yeah. There's like so many reasons why I feel like it's stupid that I'm not just doing it in both places, but also like

Naomi Katz:

So yeah. Sadie, what is satisfying for you right now? having to manage the social media interactions in a new place- because I know Tik Tok has its whole other set of, like, the kinds of people who are on there, and the trolls who are on there, and the ways that stuff shows up on Tik Tok is like-. I have- like, I can manage all that stuff on Instagram because I'm used to it at this point. And like, I don't know if I have it in me to try and manage a whole other platform right now. Even if it's just a matter of copying and paste- of like literally repurposing the same content. Like even if I'm not creating new content for it, it just feels like- I don't know if I'm ready to dive into that.

Sadie Simpson:

So for the last, I don't know, like, eight years, anytime I need new tennis shoes, I have, believe it or not, a routine that I like to follow of purchasing new sneakers.

Naomi Katz:

No.

Sadie Simpson:

And years ago, I had this thing where I really like minimized my wardrobe. And you can see me right now, I'll mostly only buy like gray or blue solid color tank tops because I know that they will just match any sort of shorts or pants that I'm wearing. But I've started doing the same thing with shoes. So especially when I was teaching a lot of group exercise classes, I found that Nikes were the best brand for my feet, like just across the board. I've tried a bunch of different kinds of shoes, and a bunch of different brands, and I never really had any problems with Nike. So I started, every time I needed shoes, going to the Nike outlet that we have at our outlet mall here in Asheville. And I will immediately go in, and I will immediately look at all of the black and white shoes. And I will try on a pair. And if they fit really nicely, then I'll just kind of wear it around until I get to the next pair. And I'll travel until I find- you know, I'll go through that process of elimination with all the black and white shoes until I found something that fit well. Well today, I had to purchase some new shoes. So the pool where I teach Aqua Zumba implemented a new rule where you couldn't wear like street shoes on the pool deck, but we can wear like clean tennis shoes while we're teaching classes. So I was like, well, I probably ought to get me a pair of inside shoes anyway. I've been meaning to do that for like the last 15 years, and I'm just now getting to it. So I went in to the Nike store and immediately went to the first pair of black shoes, try them on, they fit great. And I started going down the aisle, and I found a pair of black and white Nikes, of course, that I really liked how they fit. But then right beside of them, there was like this dark pinkish purple pair. Same style. Same size. $30 cheaper than the black and white pair. And I bought them. So for the first time in forever, I have non black and white Nikes. And I'm actually really excited about it.

Naomi Katz:

Oh my god, I love that.

Sadie Simpson:

I'm breaking my routine.

Naomi Katz:

That is awesome. I love everything about that.

Sadie Simpson:

New shoes, new season, new me.

Naomi Katz:

I'm a big fan of brightly colored sneakers.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

It's funny because I also usually just buy like gray or black sneakers because they'll go with everything.

Sadie Simpson:

Yup.

Naomi Katz:

But I actually love brightly colored sneakers. I think they look so nice.

Sadie Simpson:

Well, I'm excited to test them out tonight in my class.

Naomi Katz:

Awesome.

Sadie Simpson:

Yeah.

Naomi Katz:

So just a reminder, next week we are going to be giving you some more information about the upcoming changes to the podcast, including our new schedule and our online community. So definitely stay tuned for that. And if you would like to be the first to know and get some fun bonuses for that online community, head to our show notes and get on that waitlist.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes. And if you have any thoughts or feedback about today's episode, come on over to Instagram- we are @satisfactionfactorpod- and let us know what you think.

Naomi Katz:

And finally, one simple thing that you can do to support us if you have gotten value out of this podcast is to leave us a rating and a review on Apple podcasts or Spotify. Those ratings and reviews bump us up in the rankings and they help us reach more people,, and we always appreciate it.

Sadie Simpson:

Yes. All right. That's it for us this week. We'll see you next time.