Graduate Theory

Jack Boxer | On Waking Up and Chasing Your Dreams

June 07, 2022 James Fricker Episode 33
Graduate Theory
Jack Boxer | On Waking Up and Chasing Your Dreams
Show Notes Transcript

Jack Boxer is the Founder & CEO of Golden Hour, a lifestyle design brand helping people to chase the uncommon life.

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Content
00:00 Jack Boxer
00:21 Intro
00:53 Jack's Origin Story
06:55 Maximum Achievement Today
09:54 Jack's Current Reading Habit
14:49 How Jack Thinks about Upskilling
18:36 Facing Challenges and Courage
24:18 How Jack learnt about building a business
32:02 Jack's Mission
39:48 Who Inspires Jack
41:51 Jack's Advice for Graduates
44:01 Connect with Jack
45:32 Outro

Jack Boxer:

And you're like, like that, that sucks. That's not a way to leave. Cause then you're wasting five out of seven days. Which is like 71% of your life. It's like, what, how did, how have we all let that be the normal thing that we do?

James Fricker:

Hello and welcome to graduate theory. Today's guest is the founder and CEO of golden hour, which is a lifestyle design brand, helping people to chase the uncommon life. He is a blue belt in Brazilian jujitsu. Please. Welcome to the show today, Jack boxer, Jack. Welcome to. Cool. Yeah. I'd love to, like, I'm looking forward to chatting with you today, uh, and keen to sort of go back to the origin story of this, uh, utopia golden hour, all these kinds of things that you're doing. Um, and when did this first, like when did this first start the idea that to sort of pursue these kinds of.

Jack Boxer:

So basically, so we've got to go back. So I came out of high school, uh, went to uni in 2017. So I moved from port Lincoln to Adelaide to go to uni. Um, Always just thought coming out of school, that I was going to get one of the four jobs like physio teacher, um, tradies, something like that, that guys are just told out of scope or I sort of just like, oh, 50, $60,000 a year. Something like that. That's just, that is what it is. That's work. Um, so I went to uni, started a bachelor of human movement. Did that first semester wasn't for me. So I changed into a bachelor of business and property. Um, and then that's where I got into doing real estate, like working at a real estate office. Cause I saw the money, but real estate, I just could Mack. And I was like, oh, that that's like, maybe I could do that. Um, and then when I was working for this real estate agent, he just randomly one day, he just gave me two books on his table. Um, just saying that I should read them. One of them was maximum achievement by Brian. And I remember writing that book and that's what changed. Like, it sounds corny, but it like changed my whole life in terms of like how I thought about success. And they're just like showing me that success is in your mind, like how you think about yourself and what you can accomplish is what you will accomplish. Like always just thought, oh, you just work five days a week. You get a weekend. Like you just live, how everyone around you lives. But it that like opened my eyes to there's so much more. Yeah out there for everyone. And it's just up to us to seek out these ideas and ways of thinking, because like, if you believe you can do like wild, massive things, you can, you just have to, like, you just have to know that you can, like, you just have to be aware that it's possible. And so I read this book, they opened my mind up to so many different opportunities and like a different way of living and how, like, it's not actually that hard to find. Like substantial money and support everyone around you. So I was just like, that caused me to just like question what I was doing and be like, all right, like, is this really what you want to do? Like, um, and then all this getting uncomfortable in real estate. And I was just like, whining that it wasn't for me. Like I was saying a lot of gray area in the industry and I was just like a little bit dirty. And I was like, ah, I don't want to be involved in this. Like, I don't want to be around. Like, I want to be honest when I have a clear conscience, like, I don't want to be around any like gray area stuff. So I was, I remember, I clearly remember like one time in Adelaide, I was in my car, parked on the side of the road, was pouring down with Ryan. I was bawling my eyes out because I didn't know what I was going to do with my life. Like, just like beside myself. And I was speaking to me. And the foreign. Um, and yeah, I just didn't know what I was going to do. And I was like, all right, well, I'm moving on. Like I'm coming back to Paul Lincoln. Um, and that's when, before I came back, I started seeing a loft coach in Adelaide, who we had a few sessions together just to like try and work out what I'm interested in, what I could do with my life. Um, and we came up with the idea of like, why not just start sharing stuff. You're interested in, on social media. That's when I started golden hours, main Instagram page, which is just at it's gold now and now. Um, and that was just sharing. I was just trying to build an audience around my interests basically. Um, cause I was like, well man, I knew money followed attention. And I was like on eight attention to make money. That's what my mind wants. I was. So I was like, I'm going to build an audience now and I'll figure it out monetizing later. Um, so I started building golden hours, Instagram focus for a year just to building. Um, call that to like 10,000 followers. They're not, they're not told everyone in my family and friends, like I was doing it fully sacredly. Um, total everyone, um, started selling like a couple of pieces of clothing. Um, and then I was like, all right, I need to work out how I can monetize this. So I wanted to make a personal membership, but I knew that my personal brand wasn't strong enough yet. So I was like, can membership with everything that I've learned about like personal development and self-help and everything like this, everything that can help other people discover that like, life can be enjoyable. You can make money doing what you love. Um, so that's when I just started putting together all these resources that you see inside utopia now. Um, and yeah, that's ended up being what your type here is now, which is just, yeah, a massive archive of personal development content by.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Cool. No, that's so good. Yeah. I've got heaps of questions to ask you about that, that journey to getting to where you are now. Um, one of them is, is the, so you've mentioned the first book on the table that you got given was maximum achievement. Do you remember what the second book was called?

Jack Boxer:

No, I can't. No, I can't remember. I, I, ah, I was like, imagine if I had a choice, the other book,

James Fricker:

Yeah,

Jack Boxer:

I was like, fuck Jack, that, like, I just remember that because I just remember looking at him and I was like the other P Luke good toe. Like, it looked like a good book. Like I had a good cover and I was like, I don't know. I think like he made a little comment about maximum achievement and it caused me.

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

I actually don't know if I'll be doing this. If I hadn't read that book, like like that, that happens in your life and just changes like the whole course of your life. You're like, whoa, is that like what? Yeah. I don't know if it's like sounds weird, but if it's like fate or whatever, but it's just like, shit, like that happens a lot and makes you question what is going on.

James Fricker:

no, definitely. Yeah. What are some. Like, it's pretty incredible. How, um, you know, much of the impact that reading that book had on you is, are there any like lessons and things from that that you sort of continue to use and sort of act on today? Or is it more of just like a, that was kind of paradigm shift and then now it's just like opened your eyes to a bunch of other.

Jack Boxer:

I think like initially it was the whole idea of seeing yourself as a successful person. Telling yourself, you can be successful and seeing it in your mind before you can see it in reality. Like that was the biggest thing. And that, that book caused me to start like visualizing in the mornings as well. Like you would think about like what I wanted in my life, like what I wanted to accomplish, like the things I wanted, like the house, it was like supporting my family. So I'd started to like, actually say that I could be successful in my mind. And then. I always say it's like the law of attraction in the sacred. It's like, if you, if you believe it and you can say it and you work hard for it, like it's going to happen for you. It's just that they was just the first book that opened my mind to that. Like I'd never really correlated success and you're more onset. Like I'd never really put the total. Oh, I was just like, we put eight hours into this job. Get paid, whatever hourly. Right. I mean, that's it, it's like, I'd never really, yeah. Correlated how you think and the amount of income you can make. Like, yeah, it was just mainly a paradigm shift. Like, I've read it, I've read it twice fully. And then just like going back through little bits, but yeah. It was one of those books, a lock. I don't know if it would be as good now, like rating it, but just at the time, you're like, yeah, it was massive. Like fully changed my life.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Cool. No, yeah. Uh, I think it's really cool. And I've, I think I've listened to it once and, and Brian, Tracy, I think it's by him, he's like a pretty incredible author and has a lot of good stuff on it. I was listening to, um, to him recently and actually he has, uh, it's called the psychology of achievement, I think. Um, I dunno, it was on audible. It might be a physical book as well. Um, but it's, I think it's kind of a, a theory behind like maximum. And I was listening to it in the car recently and yeah, I just listening to it. I'm like, wow, this is like, it's pretty incredible stuff. And he explains it quite simply as well,

Jack Boxer:

Yeah, he's a good author. Cause he wrote, um, is that eight that ate the frog, ate that frog or something like that? That principle, I haven't read the book, but that principal's like massive. Like he's, he's got some good ideas. Like he's a good author. I need to read where it was. Books.

James:

thanks for listening to this episode of graduate theory. If you haven't already subscribed to the graduate theory newsletter you can do so by at the links in the show notes, the graduate theory newsletter comes out every single Tuesday morning with my thoughts and lessons from each episode. But without further ado, let's get back into it.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Yeah, definitely. No, I think, I think he's, he's so good. Um, because like reading that, I mean, and like his reading still, like there's there's books and stuff in utopia, like you mentioned, but is that still something now that you, you know, you really sort of spend a lot of time doing and it's really, you know, something that you sort of.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah. So in. So I started, I read that book in 2018. Um, and then from then on, I was reading just like avidly, like every day, probably like an hour a day, like half an hour in the morning, half an hour at night, uh, went through a period in like 2020 where I stopped for some reason. I can't remember why just stopped. And then in 2021, I started again like just an hour a day, just burning through books and like, Yeah, I love writing now. It's like with, when I was getting, when I got like really serious about you talking to you, like at the start of this year, around like February, March, I just like put everything. I was like, you need to just focus sole focus on this. You need to like, cause I had the whole like day routine. So I'd like exercise. I would, um, write down 10 ideas and then I would like have cold shower, like have coffee, like all this like routine stuff. I was like, no, you're just. Get rid of everything. And just you talk to your work. Is it like, you just need to focus on, cause like you say those graphs all the time where it's like multitasking and then you end up with like all these tasks that are just mediocre. Whereas if you just focus solely on one thing, like it's all those mediocre tasks in one. So it's like, you can just get so much further. So I was like, all right, you need to just solely focus on this. So I eliminated rating as well. Probably pretty dumb. Um, but yeah, I've started again, like just re I probably read like half an hour every, every second day at the moment, but once I've got like all this utopia stuff, cause right now it's just hectic, like getting,

James Fricker:

Mm.

Jack Boxer:

when you're setting out something new, like building something new it's. Just the amount of that little toss that pop obvious to just hectic by rating. Who definitely I love rating. Um, especially just like, yeah, like self-help stuff. I'm looking at my books now, like behind the camera and like, see how like self-help personal development, left finance, all that stuff. It's interesting to me.

James Fricker:

Yeah, absolutely. No, I think it's important to, uh, you know what, there's probably a bunch of sayings about reading, but I think it's important to like, you know, keep your mind engaged with content like that. Um, you know, it doesn't necessarily have to be. Only reading. And I think at times, and I'm guilty of it as well, where like reading, you know, I think it was a 2020, like I had this goal to read like 52 books in the year, uh, whether it was like reading or listening or whatever sort of mode. Um, yeah. But then, you know, and it was good and I, you know, I got through heaps, but then like, um, it sort of became this thing where I was just reading just for the sake of it. And it was like, not really. You know, it wasn't like, I choose to read this book for this reason. And I'm like, I'm looking to get this out of it. It was more dislike. I've got to like read this or even just like, have it, like, you know, I'd be driving somewhere, listening to the book. And then it's like, you'll just sort of be honest, like background noise. And then once I finished it, I'd be like, yep. Now the one down, like,

Jack Boxer:

On all your main, it's like reading for accomplishment rather than understanding, like I've, I've found that before as well. Cause you're going to be like, oh, look at all these books I just read. And it's like, well, tell me something about it. Like what, what was in it? That's why. Yeah, because I used to read and just like, not holla or anything. I dunno if you hollow out or like dog ear pages or anything like that. But I used to read and just like, like not do anything, like just read the pages and then finish the book and then. You get like a couple months later and it's like on eight a raid that again, I can't like there's no physical way to remember what was in that. So now I just like highlight and doggy pages. So if I want to like revisit a book all after it, it was just go to certain pages for the best bits. And it's like made it a lot easier to recall information.

James Fricker:

Yeah, definitely. No, I think that's a good way of doing it. Cause yeah, I think that you can kind of read, I think when you're reading these kinds of books, you're sort of reading with the intention of it, having some impact, like you're reading, like how to do like X, Y, and Z so that you can go and do it. Uh, and so if you're not like if it's not having an impact at then yeah. Then it's like, w yeah. Then you kind of need to risk. It's like, wait, what you're actually doing.

Jack Boxer:

I've heard Tim Ferriss talked about, you would have heard it as well, where he says you want to read for just in time information, not just in case information. So like, just in case information is just like reading all the time. And then like your mind, if you run into a problem, you might remember what you learned, but just in time, information is like running into a problem. Then reading about the solution. Which is what I've heard, Sean period. Talk about that as well, but that was an interesting idea to me as well. It's like, that's, that's good. Cause I definitely do like, just in case.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Yeah, no, that's such a good way of thinking about it. Yeah. Wow. That's cool. Um, I want to ask you as well about like, sort of upskilling more generally, and in particular I wanted to ask about like getting the life coach situation and kind of what was like, what led you to decide to pursue that? Is it, is it.

Jack Boxer:

So, yeah, that was mom. So I was, yeah, I was just like fully. I was having a proper light break down. Like I was like, like knowing just wasn't able to put into perspective that I'm so young. Like I was like 20 years old. I think at the time wasn't able to put into perspective that this is like the first fifth of your life. I thought like my life was over. I didn't know what I was going to do with my life, like all this stuff. And mom's just like, mom's the best mom and is very good at. Calming down and just like, or what's the next step? Like what can we do from here? And she was like, well, why don't you look into. Um, getting someone to help you. There's people that do this for a job, like help you find what you want to do for a job. I was like, oh, I'd never really thought about it. And then I kind of like went through that stage of like, ah, fuck, I don't want to be like, you know, like, I don't want to go to a loss coach. Like, uh, like it didn't really say benefit of it. And then mom, she buys me a lesson with the loft coach, like. She's the best. She's so good. And then, so she bought me a lesson. I go to this lesson and we just like got along really well. Like he was just like, he wasn't trying to like sell any particular why? Like he just listened and then like, that's that's most of it, I think like them just listening. And then from that first interaction, he went away and like actually did the work. And I came back with like, all these options, like told me things. Well, I thought I knew, but I really wasn't like thinking about like, he would just like tell you like, well, you're telling me this, like, why are you doing this? And I'm like, what am I doing a lot, the obvious shit. I was like, oh God. But yeah. And he just, he just got, made a write down like 25 options as well. I think that's the biggest thing. Like what I found anyway. It's just, if you aren't sure about something, sit down and just think about it. Like we don't do it. We like sit down with your phone, put your phone on for half an hour. Make yourself an iced coffee. And then put your phone away. Like put it, get it out of you, like no money and then have a pen and paper and just think like, just write down what you're thinking. And you will come up with solutions for whatever problems you've got. Like, that's been the biggest thing for me with anything in the past two years, that's like that have just been causing me like mental problems. It's like, just think about it. Like you're, you're just not thinking enough about it. Like you're, you're agonizing over stuff. You haven't thought. And it's like, that's nonsensical. Like, if, if you, if you haven't sat down for what about it, and then like, you still don't have a solution then, but then you've done the work and, you know, it's a tough problem, whatever, like, but if you haven't actually sat down and thought about it, like you cannot complain every time I've sat down to think about something, if it's not going to happen in that first session, but if you're consistent every day, Sitting down to think about something and your record or your thoughts. Um, the next day you go back, you look over your past thoughts about like, what are you going to do? And like you just add to it every day, you will come up with solutions and like, you find what you want to do with your life. And like what makes you happy? Like a hundred percent. It's just, it's just putting in the time to like actually figure it out. And that was, that was one of the big things that loft coach told me.

James Fricker:

Yeah, that's cool. No, I agree with that. The get your brain is at. Like, it's a very interesting and, uh, you know, powerful thing. And

Jack Boxer:

Yeah,

James Fricker:

I, I agree with that. I think like, you know, certainly you can sort of, yeah, like you said, face challenges and then just not like, uh, you know, not consider any solutions and then just like, be like, oh, I have this problem. And then, and that's kind of it there's no, like how would you go about fixing this? It's just know you just kind of accept that it's there and then just, just persistence, like forever.

Jack Boxer:

And then PayPal that's when you say the paperwork to just complain about that situation. And it's like, oh, like I hide my job and it's like, well, don't like do something about it.

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

don't complain. Don't like, there's plenty of jobs out there. You can do like, down and have a think about it. But I it's like, oh, like, you know, like, I don't know what I'll do. It's like, you're telling me exactly what you should do. You should just like, you need to just think like, but most people don't want to do it. They just don't want to put in the work to like improve their life. It's like, because most people don't want to get out of the discomfort of a bad job because it's another Tim Ferriss quote, but most people prefer unhappiness or the uncertainty and it's like, that's yeah, it's I get it. But it's like, You don't want to be unhappy.

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

You don't want to do that.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Well, yeah, it's like, um, maybe you would be more unhappy if you changed jobs and did something you didn't like, but, uh, you know, it's, uh, uh, in any case it's still better than accepting that your things aren't going well, where you

Jack Boxer:

Exactly. You don't want to get to light stage of life and be like, I never, what he fought did tag that chance. And then it turned out unreal like you, that regret fucking makes me feel like it literally gives me a feeling in the stomach where I'm like, I don't want to fucking take it back. Cause you say it so much in paper, whether it's just like old and like. Peter. And like you tell them about like what you're doing and they're like, oh, that's probably not going to work. And it's like, you just, didn't never did anything. You never tried. And like, now you're bitter that you don't have the energy to, and like hide out. I don't wanna, I don't want that feeling like, yeah. It's doesn't seem good. Doesn't sound good.

James Fricker:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah. There's um, I don't know if you've ever read the Alchemist. Um, but it's like, like super popular book and it's like a. Like fiction, fiction novel, um, like some interesting lessons. And one of the stories in those, like this, this guy's like a shepherd. He starts working through this, this guy, um, and, uh, like this, this shop owner person has had his shop for so long. Like it's like heaps and heaps of years. Um, and he is like complaining that he never got to go and do like the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca. I think it's called, um, And he was saying like the, the only re like now the only thing that keeps me going is like the thought of, of, of like, thinking about going there is like, better than actually realizing it and going there, like, like if you actually went there, it would be worse than like hitting, like his imagination is the thing that's sort of keeping him happy. Um, and I think for lots of people that is kind of, you know, the, the thought of having like a nice job and all that kind of stuff. Um, it's a nice fantasy to have that like, to actually go in and try and realize it is like, is that that's like too much, too much pain to go through. And until it's easier just to accept like the current situation,

Jack Boxer:

Um, that it like, cause we S like you say it, like you, you'd probably say, you know, people like directly in your family and your life that have just led it, luck that doing stuff that doesn't then like, if you weren't paying them, they wouldn't do it. It's like, it's like that. That's not the way to live. Like you want to be doing something. Where, if you weren't getting paid for it, you'd still do it. It's just what you do. Like, it's just what you're interested in. So it's like, yeah, I just don't get people who settle for jobs that like, make them unhappy or settle for jobs where it's like, it gets to Sunday and it's like, fuck, like I gotta go to work tomorrow. And it's like, you know, you're sitting with your family and then you just remember you got to go to work. And you're like, like that, that sucks. That's not a way to leave. Cause then you're wasting five out of seven days. Which is like 71% of your life. It's like, what, how did, how have we all let that be the normal thing that we do? Like, cause that's what most people do. And it's like, who the fuck? Let that happen? Like this.

James Fricker:

Yeah, no, I absolutely agree. And I think even sometimes, like if you see someone that is pursuing something that they want to do or something that they're passionate about, um, then it's, it's almost seen as like, like a bad thing. Like they're, they're off doing something crazy or whatever. Um, when it's like, um, it's almost, perhaps it's like a sign of like, people are almost a little bit jealous that someone can go and do that. Um,

Jack Boxer:

Yeah. It's like,

James Fricker:

of want to bring them down, like back on to, to our level, if that

Jack Boxer:

yeah. There's another coil. It's like the thought of your success heightens the feeling of stagnation in. Which is like, obviously not a good feeling. Like you don't want to feel like you're being left behind. And if people aren't doing anything with their life, and I say, you sharing that, you're doing stuff where you're trying to better yourself. It can make them feel bad. And like, they don't want to feel bad. They want to bring you back down to their level. So you feel the same. It's like, it's not a good trait, but we've all got it in us in some, some degree.

James Fricker:

Yeah, no, I definitely, um, I want to ask too about like your, so you're building all these things, Instagram page utopia, all this kind of stuff. Like how do you, or pardon me? How do you think about, um, sort of upskilling yourself and learning about how to do all this stuff? Cause like when you're building a business from scratch, You know, heaps of stuff you have to learn. And I wonder like, do you like how you've sort of gone about, you know, cause you, you went from real estate to this, which is, you know, there's not heaps of overlap. Um, you know, so learning all this stuff is quite new for you. And I wonder like, w have you, have you sort of gone about approaching that.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah. So basically. Yeah. So I think about learning, like, I just think that now that we've got the. There's no excuse, like there's no excuse to do whatever you want. I like to build whatever you want. It's like, if you don't know how to do something, just like go to YouTube or like Google it there's like thousands of articles. And like every weird obscure question you've got about something, someone's asked it on you on Google, like you'll find an arts. So that's what I've found with like website design and all that stuff. It's just like, if you run into. The internet has a solution for you. Like there's so much free content out there. Um, and I also like I've thought about like getting people to do certain things, like getting people to run the social media, getting people to run, or like design the website, getting people to like manage the apparel side of things. But I was like, I wanna, I wanna have a capable and like, Really good at all this stuff before I bring someone on to do it so that I know if they're doing a good job, if you know what I mean, like, um, and I'll also like, just knowing how to do things as well. Like I used to hate that feeling of like being a beginner and like, um, you know, like you're the full, like I used to hate that I used to not like, it was just uncomfortable. It was like, I look like a loser. But I've come to learn through listening a lot to Joe Rogan. Like I listened to a lot of Joe Rogan. I listened to his podcast every episode. Um, but he talks a lot about, you have to be willing to be a beginner and be the full, if you want to be the master. And it's like, there's just no way around it. Like you can't, you can't be good at something without first being bad at it. So I just, I was just like, all right, that's just is what it is. That's, that's how you get good at stuff. So. I'm just letting myself be a full one. Like just laugh at yourself as well. Like, cause like, oh my God, the amount of mistakes of maybe like the Instagram and website and like just everything. Like I'll just get to the stage where you're an idiot,

James Fricker:

No.

Jack Boxer:

you just have to be at a lofi. So, and just like realize that no one starts. No one starts as good. Like everyone starts as shit. You just have to realize that. And that's fine. It's just, that just is what it is. And yeah, you get better. It's just the bit, one of the big things in my life is consistency. Like some are really trying to live my life by is like consistent effort. If you're saying no results, you have to be consistent. And that that's the biggest thing with like learning stuff and learn new skills is just like, You got to sock and you're not going to be better tomorrow, but if you just keep showing up and like learning and keep trying, you're going to get better. It's like, it's the most simple formula ever, like just consistent effort and like focused effort. You're going to get better. It's there's no way around it. Like, that's what I've found and yeah, it all just comes back to enjoying learning, like learn what you want. And you'll love learning.

James Fricker:

Yeah, no, that's cool. I love what you said. The, you know, like everyone, like everyone starts from, from nothing in some, in some sense. Right? Uh, I think that's important, uh, to recognize and keep in mind when you are starting something new.

Jack Boxer:

And that's like, cause like with jujitsu, like doing jujitsu, when you're a beginner, you get, you get fucked up lucky you get strangled and squashed and. You just get like, you're on the bottom, under this massive guy, who's just putting your thoughts of who you were up. Like he's just throwing them out the window. Like you thought you were a man, you thought you were like this big, tough guy. Like you thought you knew everything. And this guy's like got your arm wrapped around your head and he's like sitting on you and you can't. I was like, this guy could do whatever he wants you right now. Like you're dead. It's like that. It humbles you so much. And like makes you realize like, oh, that's, it's one of the biggest, um, examples of like, you have to be a foal to be a master because when you're starting out at a martial art, it's, it's a very good ego check. Like it'll, it'll match your match. You realize like you, you're not always say it's good for your brain. It's good for you.

James Fricker:

Yeah, that's so good. Yeah. I've heard very good things about Mahershala. Joining for awhile, but yeah, I think, yeah, it could be on the cards.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah, it's good. It's, it's good. Fun. And it's like hard exercise that you're also learning how to defend yourself. So it's like a useful form of exercise, which that's what I love about it. It's like, you're exhausted. And you also just learnt how to defend yourself if, if you have to. And it's like, oh, that's so.

James Fricker:

yeah, absolutely. Yeah. What was the inspiration for you to get started?

Jack Boxer:

Mostly, it would have been Joe

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

if it's not, if it's not like, it's just like subconsciously it would definitely would have been like listening to Joe Rogan. And just listening to him talk about the benefits of it, especially for your brain. Like I was saying, like for humbling yourself. Cause I had, I still do. I have a mad ego problem where like, I'm like, what's better now because I'm. And I'm aware of it and I can like, be like, oh yeah, you're act like that's your ego. Especially in jujitsu class, in the Alec, if you have an ego and you're trying to like over power a guy's better than you, um, try and tap out a guy who's better than you you'll get humbled real quick. Like he's going to tap you out and he's going to make it pretty brutal with your ego's trying to like go really hard. So yeah, I did it to like pull my ego in check. Get fit, learn how to defend myself. And yeah, I just liked the idea of yeah. Being comfortable. Cause I, I used to feel like a bit of a bitch. Like if people said something to me, I always got scared. Like if I had a girlfriend or whatever, and then we're walking down the street or whatever nightclub was selling and someone said something like, what am I going to do? Like, I don't know. I don't know how to do anything, but now I'm comfortable with like, all right. If something happens, like I know what to do. you learn jujitsu, like if you do six months of jujitsu, you luck, you know, it's all right. Like you're going to be okay if you're against someone, same size as you who doesn't know what they're doing, but hasn't had any training, like you'll do, you'll be fine. You'll be fine. Which is, it's a good feeling. It's like, that's a feeling I wanted. So.

James Fricker:

Yeah. No. Yeah,

Jack Boxer:

You'd love it. You'd love it.

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

it's probably the best martial art for like, cause you can go as hard. Like when you're wrestling, you can go to like a hundred percent, but you're not getting knocked out. It's not like boxing where like you can't go a hundred percent and then you get knocked out and you can't train for a month or so. It's really good for that. Being able to simulate what an actual flight would be like, and then just be on tap and just go again. So it's yeah, it's good.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Great. Yeah. I'll

Jack Boxer:

Do it

James Fricker:

around it. Yeah. I've been convinced out. Oh, that's a good, yeah. I want to ask you too, like, so what is like, you know, you've you finished real estate, um, and then there's sort of, the world is sort of open to you for deciding what to do and what to do next. And then clearly this week, what you're doing now, utopia golden hour. Uh, this is kind of an underlying mission there. It's like sort of things that you want to see in the world and kind of, how would you describe that? Um, with the kind of things.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah, so utopia. What I tell people the easiest way to describe it. It's like a gym membership for your mind and lifestyle. Like you get a membership to go to F 45 or go to 24 fit or whatever. This is a membership where you're looking after your brain, you're looking off the future and you're looking after the lifestyle you live. Um, like you look out to your body, you want to look after, you know, like your, your future and your success. So I just say so many people, like we were talking about before that are just unhappy.

James Fricker:

Um,

Jack Boxer:

don't know, I don't think it's their fault. Like, I feel like it's, um, the education system and how we taught through uni and through school is we're taught from a perspective that came before the internet, where you didn't have the opportunity to share your ideas through like YouTube or social media or blogs, or you could, you really, it was a lot harder to pursue your interests. Um, If, you know what I mean? Like the methods of distribution just weren't there. Like now we've got so much free distribution through YouTube and social media and like websites. Obviously you have to pay monthly, but it's not much like you can set up a blog for 10 bucks a month or something. Um, so. Yeah, there's a lot more methods for distribution now to get your ideas out there. So I wanted to expose people to people who had done that to pit. Like that's what the mentor section in utopia is. People who have utilized the internet to get their ideas out there and shot like Croft bay income around the interests and what they enjoy. It's it's like blueprints for how we can all live and we can all do the same. Um, And yeah, like we talking about before, just so many people unhappy due to the way, like we're brought up and like you say, like this isn't a dig, but a lot of like girls coming out of, um, school, it's like, you end up like nursing is just, like you say, like four girls in the same, same friend group ended up going into nursing. We're very different people. It's like, you've all four of you. I don't think absolutely love nursing. That's like your life's passion. Like, that'd be very weird coincidence. So it's like a lot of people just choose jobs and choose the lofts because like their friends are doing it or school told them this is a good job or whatever. And then they end up like resentful and unhappy and like, oh, I've gotta go to work. Like go to go to this job. It's like, I wanted to expose people to ways where you don't like, you don't have to live like that. And that's why we've got investing tips. We're investing toes and investors to follow because I want to show people, you can make passive income, which can help you like escape the rat race. So that's where you want. You want to be making passive income that lets you do what you really love in your time. So you want, you want to like automate your income, which allows you, which just frees up your time and allows you to pursue like all your interests and whatnot. So. Um, and then yeah, when we get to like books and podcasts inside utopia, that's, that's the learning stage where you can learn how to start a business or how to be healthier, how to, um, you know, think better and all this stuff it's utopia is basically just an archive of resources to help you become a better person and live a better life. Uh, life that you actually want to live a life that's like big siding to you. Cause I feel like a lot of people, when you say stuff like this to them, they'll be like, oh, I'm happy, I'm fine. You know? Like, and it's like, okay, you're going to say that to me, but you have to go home and like get into bed. And like, is that, do you may not like, I dunno. It's like, that's, that's a question everyone has to ask themselves on the line in bed at night. It's like, do I really enjoy my life? They're not going to tell you. Everyone knows the answer and you know, I just want more people to enjoy their lives. That's why I made that's where, yeah, I'm mumbling on a little bit, but like, that's why I'm at the time in model PI what you want, because I didn't want price to be a sticking point for people. I just want, like, I really just want this to help and just get these ideas out there because they're not promoted by the news. They're not promoted by school and uni and everything. I want it to show people. There are different ways to learn. There are people who have done it this way, who are successful. Now you can invest. It's not that hard. Um, you just have to know like what to do like, so here's all these role models for investing and here's all these tools you can use. That'll help you get educated and, you know, make better decisions. And then, um, there's also like life hacks, which is just 30 ways to upgrade your life. Basically. It's very random, but I just feel like if S if you gave me a fresh person, like a blue, like just a fresh person, like 20 years old didn't know anything. And he just gave him, you talk to you that they're going to be okay. Like, it's, it's set up so that if you gave me like a fresh light load, all this information into them, they're going to live a life. They enjoy.

James Fricker:

yeah. Hi, it's cool. It's, it's an inspiring stuff. And certainly I think you're tackling an important, important problem, um, that we have, uh, at the moment where people are just doing things that don't fulfill them at all. And it's, uh, it's not even like a party. I like some of my job, like, hate all of it. Um, and you know, that's no way to live. And I think this is, yeah, this is, this is a really cool, uh, you know, thing to, uh, I really appreciate what we've done with the sort of pricing model of things, where anyone can sort of go in there and, and digest these things. And you've made it really easy to digest the lessons that are in there. Um, so yeah, I think it's really cool.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah. And with that, with the pricing model, I just want to say something really quick as well. Um, so obviously that relies on the Goodwill of people. Like you kind of just in Squarespace, the website design platform that I use to create the membership, you can either choose to put a price on. Well, make it free, like a set price on or make it free. So I always want to stay power. You want, like, I wanted to put the power in people's hands. So the only way I found to do that was to make access free. And then once you're inside, you choose the price of your membership, which I actually thought was probably better because then people can look around, see what's valuable, see how it's going to help them. And then like make a judgment on value from there. Um, So far it's, it's like, I'm very grateful for everyone who has been supporting and what not it's it is designed to be a paid membership. I know. I want to keep it as pay what you want because. Yeah. I don't want people to say a price and just be put off and not even look at it. Like if you can't afford it or if you don't feel like it's valuable, then yeah, that's fine. But I do believe most people aren't free riders and most people will choose a fair price if they say value. So what can you do?

James Fricker:

Yeah, yeah. Totally. No, I hope it goes well, certainly. And what you've put together is pretty valuable, so, uh, yeah, so, well done. I wonder, I want to ask you too, a couple of questions before we wrap up. And one of them is like, Who inspires you. And I wonder if it's someone, uh, you know, like a Joe Rogan or someone that's super famous like that, or if it's people that are sort of more local and more connected in your network and things like that, like who, who do you look up to and who inspired?

Jack Boxer:

probably I posted about this a lot that I think Joe Rogan is one of the best role models in the world for men luck, a lot of paperwork. Who don't listen to his podcast. We'll sell it always. This is that, but Hey, a hundred percent is one of the best role models in the world for men, just in terms of being a healthy human and being a nice person and like giving yourself challenges every day. Just like just seeking happiness. He's been a massive influence in my life, like the last couple of years and like, um, yeah, I'll listen to his, every episode of his podcast. And I see him as a massive influence in my life. Um, definitely this is very cliche, but it's it's mom and dad, because just because like seeing them give back ma'am assistance, everything, like, I feel like they're not regular parents. Like they give us a lot. They're very, very supportive. Even if it's coming out of. Their future. Um, and they believe in may a lot and like put a lot of trust in me that I know what I'm doing. So I really, really, really need this. Like, this is going to be successful for them. I'm going to give back to them. And that was just a decision I made. I was like, this, there's no alternative. Like this is going to work out and I'm going to give back everything, tenfold to the paperwork supported me a lot. So that's pretty much it.

James Fricker:

Yeah. Cool. No, but, um, yeah, that's, that's really great. And then. And I think that's so cool and certainly a really good way to give back to your parents. Um, yeah, not

Jack Boxer:

They're the best parents that parents are the best. Yeah. I don't know. I know people have bad turns about if you get good parents, it's a blessing.

James Fricker:

Yeah, absolutely. We, I've got one last question for you, Jack, and that is a question I'll ask or, uh, all the guests that I have on the show and it is if you, uh, sort of graduating university. Um, this year, you know, what advice looking back at, who you were at that stage, you know, what, what advice would you give yourself?

Jack Boxer:

So if I get, so if I just graduated, what advice I give myself, like going out into the world after uni,

James Fricker:

yeah, yeah. Go.

Jack Boxer:

probably this is kind of specific, but. Sit down and double check your assumptions of what you want from your life. Because I feel like a lot of people, if they've just put in all this time at uni and got this degree, they feel like they have to pursue what that degree is. Even if they're like two and a half years thrown in, they're like, oh, I don't want to do this anymore. But they've invested so much. It's like a sunk cost and they feel like they have to pursue it. They've spent all this money. I've got to get this job. Just double check because you don't want to get stuck in a loft that you don't enjoy. And it's the trap of old traps. You only get one life. So you just do not let yourself get stuck doing something you don't fully enjoy. And just ask yourself, would I do this? If I wasn't getting paid, or if I had to pay someone to do this, like try and do something like that, we do laugh just, yeah. Double check it. Because it's going to a few, like a few months of uncertainty and a few months of like, oh, I feel like I wasted that whole time at uni it's. If, if that leads to a life where you're happy, that's why better than, you know, just cruising into this job. That is just a job.

James Fricker:

Yeah, no, that's so cool. I think that's great advice for people out there. I think I want to add, you know, read, read maximum achievement as well,

Jack Boxer:

Yes. Yes. Get that book out.

James Fricker:

Yeah.

Jack Boxer:

I'll show you what it looks like, everyone.

James Fricker:

Ah, there we go. Perfect. Fantastic. Well, thanks so much for sharing all that with us today, jackets, it's been a really great conversation and great to hear we've come from, and it's exciting where you're going to be, uh, you know, in the next few months and years, so, so good on you. Um, but before we wrap the podcast today, you know, where can people go to find out more about yourself and kind of things.

Jack Boxer:

Yeah. So on. Most of my presence is on Instagram. So in mine, golden hour account is at it's golden hour. So it's golden. And then HR, uh, the utopia Instagram at Nutopia learning. And then my personal Instagram is just J boxer underscore it's linked on those pages. Um, website's www.goldenhour.com.edu, just golden HR. That's the main goal now. So that way you'll find my blog. Um, you'll be able to subscribe to our newsletter, which we send out every week. Um, say what's going on in the Instagram. By-peril all that kind of. You type his website is utopia learning.com dot I, you jump on there, have a look, um, create an account. If you got any questions, just let me know. There's all the contact details on those websites. Um, we've also got ticked off. We've just been flying up the tick-tock. So that's, uh, the utopia page is at utopia learning golden hours, pages, golden HR official, uh, And then I've got an account as well. I think it's just, Jackbox a throw, but I don't post anything. Um, but that's it mainly Instagram.

James Fricker:

Nice. Well, yeah, I get around it. And yet, thanks so much for coming on the show today, Jack. It's

Jack Boxer:

thanks. Thanks for having me, James.

James:

Thanks for listening to this episode I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. If you want to get my takeaways, the things that I learned from this episode, please go to graduate theory.com/subscribe, where you can get my takeaways and all the information about each episode, straight to your inbox. Thanks so much for listening again today, and we're looking forward to seeing you next week.