The Studio Drummer Chats!

Drummers: If you only have 30 minutes, here is what to practice.

December 28, 2019 Jonathan Cazenave Season 2 Episode 13
The Studio Drummer Chats!
Drummers: If you only have 30 minutes, here is what to practice.
Chapters
The Studio Drummer Chats!
Drummers: If you only have 30 minutes, here is what to practice.
Dec 28, 2019 Season 2 Episode 13
Jonathan Cazenave

This is a specific minute by minute daily practice regimen. Try it for 30 days and see what happens. 

Show Notes Transcript

This is a specific minute by minute daily practice regimen. Try it for 30 days and see what happens. 

speaker 0:   0:00
Welcome to the studio Drummer chats. This is a creativity podcast. We talk about creativity, drum stuff, music, production, sometimes philosophy, life. What kind of stuff? Hopefully all things that will contribute to and help your creativity, no matter what your creative thing is, the dates podcast is focused towards drummers and drum practice. You could take the fundamentals of this sort of structure I'm gonna lay out and probably apply it to just about any instrument are just about anything. But this one is really for drummers as it is a specific drum practice regimen that you might follow every day. A few things about practicing. I've had a couple of other podcasts and past episodes you might check out. One is called Something like Forget practice, Have fun. And the over riding idea is that you try tohave fun when you're practicing. Try to focus on some things that you really enjoy doing so that you're not looking at practice as something that you're dreading or something you have to do. And all of these approaches are valid today. This one today is gonna be a little bit different. Another one that I did waas for practice tips to help you kind of in anything. They were kind of big picture things that you could use to help motivate you to practice and help help get the most out of your practice time. This one is very specific, and I'm going to give you some specific things to play every day. And as I was going down this list, one interesting thing that I noticed was that it almost is the same thing I would recommend to a beginning student. A lot of these are the fundamentals to beginning student as I would to an advanced it, because all these things are things that we are always trying to get better at. We're always trying to either maintain or maybe even improve on daily basis, a couple of things. The idea is that this will be a 30 minute practice. You have a chunk of time that you can carve out every day. You know, most days, every 55 to 7 days a week and 30 minutes is a manageable amount of time that any of us can carve out of our day. That's that's kind of the first thing. The next thing is while ah, lot of these are focused on playing on a drum set. Um, we're gonna talk about the rudiments and things like that, but you could conceivably do any of these on the practice pad or an electronic set. Ah, a few of them would be better served on the Trump set. It is designed primarily for a drum set, but it could be adapted to any playing surface. And if you were to take this and played on a pad every day, you'll still see lots of improvement before I get started with the specifics. If you would like me, too, go through this practice regimen on a video so that you can see it end or play along with it. I'm going to do that. If I get some feedback from folks that would like to see this, I'll put a YouTube video of me going through everything I'm talking about here. So this podcast will be uploaded to YouTube as always. And if you will comment please on Episode 13. This episode is called Drum Practice. A 30 minute list comment there with the word video or or hey, I'd like to see the video you talked about in the podcast, anything like that, that we've been my first choice so I can keep them all in one place. But you can. By the way, that is at the studio drummer on YouTube at the studio drummer. All one word. Same thing on Instagram. If you want a d and me on this program, that's fine. Just reach out to the studio drummer on Instagram and let me know there that you would like to see this. Uh, the thought is that I would do a video and it would give you something to actually play along with. Okay, The 1st 5 minutes, I recommend that you play. You're single strokes and double strokes with the vic first dot com play along from bronze all the way up to Diamond. If you've never done this or don't know what I'm talking about, then go to YouTube and put in single stroke role. And one of the top hits videos will be the vic first. Play along and it is a, uh, like, for instance, bronze give you a tempo. You play along, it speeds up by about five b p. M. On the next one. You play along with that one, and it goes from kind of, ah, slow ish medium speed all the way up to a pretty fast speed, a couple of things on just the video itself. If the tempos air too fast for you on YouTube, there's a great feature. If you don't know about it on any device, you can slow down the video, so I recommend this to my students all the time. You can go 75%. You can do 50% and it sounds good enoughto play along with for most beginning to intermediate students, probably best to start with a single stroke role and sort of warm up that way. I like to start with the double stroke role, because for me, those speeds of the Devil Stroke role in the way it's presented there is a better warm up for me to then go to the single stroke role. But try and both if you're really pretty comfortable with the double stroke, Willett's kind of fine either way, because you're starting slow and speeding up. Each video is about five minutes, so your 1st 10 minutes are going to be five minutes of single stroke rolls and then five minutes of double stroke rolls. I'm a big proponent of working on multiple things at one time, even though we can't really multi task. And what I mean is, if you're working on a single stroke role and you're working with the Metrodome, you can kind of shift your focus between both of those things as you're playing and you're working on your timing and your hands at the same time. So any exercise I do with students, I'm always trying to figure out ways so that we're combining multiple things. And, of course, when you're playing stuff, it's great to play with the Metrodome because then again, you're whether consciously or unconsciously, you're working on your timing while you're doing the exercise. So that's a little times saving hack that you can when you're working on something depending on where you shift your focus, you can actually change what it is you're working on. So let's just take the single stroke for a second. If you focus on the space between the notes and the the even nous and the consistency between the notes, then that's really a completely different headspace than if you're thinking about your hand technique. You can shift between those two things. You can think about your hand technique for several bars, and then you can kind of shift and think about the space between the notes for several bars, the more and more you do it, even though as faras brain science is concerned right now, we can't really multi task. We just shift really quickly between a bunch of tasks, just like a computer does. But the more you do this in, the more you get comfortable with it, even though you may not be able to actually think about multiple things at one time. If you're thinking about your hands and you've spent enough time thinking about the space between the notes and you're single stroke starts to become a little bit jagged or uneven, your attention will quickly shift to that and you'll start working on correcting that. So one of the big challenges for the beginner and intermediate player and advance too, for that matter is I mean, okay, so you play single stroke rolls for five minutes a day. But I mean, what what? What am I supposed to be paying attention to? What am I supposed to be working on with this, not just about getting faster. You're trying to develop control of your hands. So another Goodwin is dynamic consistency. If you're playing on a pad, it's different than if you're playing on a snare than if you're playing on Elektronik Set. And I do these on all three almost every day. So when you're doing this dynamic consistency you're thinking about, you can you can really hear it on an acoustic snare. You can really hear it on some of the more sensitive electronic drums because of of the triggering sensitivity. Depending on how that set and how close you are to the trigger, you can hear it on a pad. And if you have a nice loud, you know, real feel pad. So dynamic consistency just means that every every note sounds the same. So in the case of ah, a single stroke role, one of the things you see a lot in young players is the right hand is coming up further off of the playing service in the left hand, and it's louder, it sounds like, but that's about that about that. It's very common, and it takes a while to fix that. But that's just one thing you can think about when you're playing, um, hand technique. Oftentimes I will shift between two different techniques. All shift between a finger technique and a wrist technique is I'm playing. In the case of the first play along, I may play one set with one technique and another set with another technique. Sometimes I might shift in the middle of a role so that I can see if I can shift smoothly between techniques without altering the sound. That's an additional challenge that I do sometimes. So there's more things you can work on and think about with a single stroke role. But that's plenty for now. The point is that in the beginning, if if you're a new player, pick one of those things and really pay close attention to it initially, you're just going to be trying to play it evenly and try to keep up with the Metrodome. They're gonna be your initial challenges. As you go into intermediate, you're gonna want to pay more attention to your hands. You're gonna want to pay more attention to speed, dynamic consistency, things like that. All of the previous supplies to the double stroke role as well, with the exception of finger and hand technique. Typically, the method that I use with hand technique is closer related to what Bill Bachman teaches, But you can check out his videos. Or if you want me to do a video on this some point, let me know. But he's got an excellent book that covers all of these and the different hand techniques that you might use at different speeds. Bill Bachmann has a YouTube video about this also. Okay, so that's your 1st 10 minutes. Remember that almost everything we do on the drum set is just a combination of singles and doubles. The next thing I like to do and sometimes I start with this. But lately I've been starting with my singles and doubles just to get that out of the way. Because sometimes if I leave it to the end and I run out of time, it doesn't get done. So that was just that was just transparency and honesty there. So I have now moved my singles and doubles to the first thing I do when I sit down to make sure that it gets done. In addition to whatever pad work I do that day. The next saying I like to do is hands and feet together in unison. You can count it his eighth notes or sixties notes, depending on what you're doing. This is one of my favorite warm ups it simply because it gets all of the limbs moving at once. And it's, you know, when you're trying to warm your body of I mean, you could do jumping jacks that gets the blood flowing and gets the muscles, gets the heart pumping and muscles full of blood and all that good stuff. There's lots of ways to warm up the body, and this is sort of the drummer version of that. I have a double paddle. If you have a double peddler double bass, I like to play hands and feet together in unison easily. I'll pick a very comfortable tempo start with which for me might be 90 or 100 bpm. Justo play 1/16 notes, and I will do this for five minutes and I will add in variations around the set is I'm playing, but as a starting point, just snare and either right foot on bass drum left foot on high hat in unison is a great way to get all of your limbs warmed up. Now again, where you focus is important because as you're warming your body up, you can also be really thinking about synchronization A with the Metrodome, meaning that the attack of your snare drum and bass drum, in this case playing to 1/16 note click lands at the same time as the attack, the first transient of the metronome. And then also you could be thinking about synchronization between the limbs so that your right foot and right hand are landing together at the same time and not slammed in any way. If this is a new exercise, start really slow with this. Just right, left, right, left, right, left, right, left. You can use this as a speed challenge later, after you're warmed up and after you've done your 30 minutes. And if you want to try to push speed and play around with it, it's a lot of fun. But when you're warming up, just start really slow at a very comfortable tempo. When I'm warming up, I'm looking for attention in any of my muscles. If anything starts to get tense. Then I slow down or I stop and figure out why. So when you're warming up, you don't want muscle tension. You want everything to feel. I call it jelly arms. It can apply to your legs, too. You want your muscles to be moving. You're obviously you're having activate your muscles to make a list happen, but it should feel like everything is fairly relaxed and not like you're full of tension. Like your arm. It's clenched or your leg is cliched. We now have 15 minutes under our belt. Here we have the five singles five doubles five unison Sze. All the limbs are warmed up, so now that everything's warmed up and you've worked on your singles and doubles than the next five or 10 minutes, depending on how you break this down, I would recommend playing. Whatever specific thing is that you want to be learning. So it might be a song that you're working on. If it's a song you're working on and you're trying to get it, let's say you're trying to play all the way through at this point. Then in 10 minutes you can probably do that song three times if it's a fill in that song. It's just maybe just one specific section or you're working on a beat, then just work on that thing for 10 minutes. If you need to work on two things, maybe work on that for five and then you work on reading for five. So this could be anything that you want to work on or that you're really motivated to try that. Accomplish? It could be Phil Techniques something out of a book. It could be a specific style. It can be a focus on getting better at reading notation Any of these things spend this either five and five or entire 10 minutes working on that thing. If you're not sure what that thing is and what your goal is, then sit down and think about it for a bit so that you can plug that into your practice. Have a clear goal what it is you like to work on again. It could just be learning a song, making a video prepping for playing in a band, learning a new style, etcetera. We all have a fantastic stopwatch and or countdown on our phones, so be sure you're using that during this process to keep track of your time. It helps keep you focused. And by having that right in front of you as you're playing, you'll know. OK, I've done this for five minutes. I've done that for five minutes, so we've now covered 25 minutes in the last five minutes. I like to end with just something super fun. Whatever your favorite thing is, this might be a song that you already know how to play. This could be something that I call creative practice, which I will probably do a whole podcast on. I've talked about it a little bit in the other two about practice creative practices, almost like you're practicing improvising where you there's a bunch of ways to sort of approach it. Sometimes it could be thinking about playing something you've just never played before. Uh, it can be playing two loops, things like that, but in with something that's just a lot of fun. It might just be soloing for five minutes. That's you know, however part a big part of what we're doing here is we're enjoying playing the drums. So while we're trying to get better and we're trying to introduce maybe for some of us, a little bit of discipline by having this time thing that we're doing. The one of the reasons we're doing it is so that we can enjoy playing and play whatever we want to play and whatever pops in our head when you're doing ah free play or you're improvising or something like this, trying to think about it too much, just kind of let it come out. There's a creativity exercise where you just sort of think about letting the idea is just flow out of you without judging them. We're thinking too much about them and just let them flow out and flow out and flow out by doing this repeatedly and by working on this sort of creativity, this is how you create your own individual style and your own thing, and it takes time. It's like learning any learning, a single stroke roll or anything else. It may or may not be something that just comes to you quickly. It may be something after to develop over a long period of time to develop like your own sound and your own thing in your own vibe, in your own crew and all these things, but one. Certainly we need to practice it. And so one thing I like to do I love playing with loops, but I will frequently and again. I'll give you an example of this. If I end up getting enough requests to do the video, I'll take a synthesizer app on iPad or on the iPhone, and I'll start a little sequence and I'll start playing along with that. And this, for me, is a great way to get in a creative mode. Sometimes it turns into a composition that I'll use for something else so quickly. Just start, Ah, little combination of notes and let the secret Sarah put the hold button on but the secrets or carry the sequence pattern and then I'll start playing toe and att. This point. You're pretty much playing to a metre known as well, because it's ah computer, and it's playing it pretty much perfectly. Sometimes the way the sequences change and ebb and flow, it moves the one around, and so that's an additional challenge you can solo over these. That's just something that I like to do. But again, this could be when you just think you do at the end can be just whatever you like to do. Just jam. Just have fun. Play your favorite song. So let's do a quick review and wrap up here. What I've given you is a fairly straightforward set of exercises that every drummer that's fairly serious about the instrument probably does every day. And, of course, if you have longer than 30 minutes, then certainly you can stretch each one of these out. You can double the amount of time for each one of these, or double or lengthen any of them and turn it into an hour or an hour and 1/2 or two hours. But I chose 30 minutes because many of my students, from young to old have trouble finding the time to practice. And I think a lot of us think that this means we need to sit down for three hours, you know, and and the consistency of doing it every day can be daunting. So to me, 30 minutes is a great starting point and that 30 minutes when you start to add that over the course of a year, it's a lot of time behind the set. My challenge for you is to try this for a month. Just, you know, just pick just picked 30 days and try it. And if you do this consistently, you will see results, particularly in your hands. And, of course, any of these segments of time, you could add another rudiments as well, and you'll start to see growth in your creative outlook. When you're trying to create new things and you're trying to create beats and you're trying to play consistently with songs, all these things, you're going to see growth and betterment as you're doing them. If you haven't done this kind of practice on a regular basis, you're going to see pretty dramatic results in just a couple of weeks. I encourage you to stick with it for atleast 30 days and beyond in the hopes that you will develop a habit of doing this and it'll be on your schedule and then imagine what you're going to sound like in six months. Be sure that you've got a reminder to go off to tell you to do this on your phone. If you keep paper notes, be sure that your list has this in there, and your schedule and if you miss a day, don't sweat it. Just hit it again the next day. Okay? Remember, if you would like to see me do my 30 minute regimen basically go through everything I've talked about here in 30 minutes on a YouTube video. Please contact me in the comments of this podcast on YouTube, which is Episode 13. And I believe let me scroll up here and tell you what the title is. The title is drum practice, a 30 minute list. If for some reason that doesn't work for you, you can contact me on Instagram at the studio drummer. You can direct message me. That's fine. And just let me know that you like to see the video. Thank you for listening. And please share this with at least one other drummer. And I hope you will subscribe and leave me lots of good comments and ratings on iTunes. That's really helpful to help other drummers find this podcast and I will talk to you soon.