Cocktails and Conspiracies

Epi 25: The Boys on the Tracks

March 09, 2019
Cocktails and Conspiracies
Epi 25: The Boys on the Tracks
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Cocktails and Conspiracies
Epi 25: The Boys on the Tracks
Mar 09, 2019
Tessy and McDub
Small town, unsolved murders, drugs, money and politicians - This story has ALL the sketchy things.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Today we're discussing the murder of Kevin Ives and Don Henry.  This unsolved/cold-case goes all the way to the top.


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Speaker 1:
0:13
Love it. Love talking about money and drags out money and drugs today. I need drags him death. MDD. I mean what else is there? Hi Guys, how are y'all? Do Hey everyone. Welcome to cocktails in conspiracy. That was very professional. Was that? Yeah, it might have been the most professional. I talk about some fucked up stuff today. Oh my God we're talking about are really fucked up case today and it has to do a little intriguing political shit. Drugs and small town unsolved deaths. So one day you and I are both crazy about crime and murder but the thing that scares me the most after listening to, I can't tell you how many hundreds of cases solved and solved whatever. Here are the two things that I'm most scared about when it comes to like getting away with murder or like protecting yourself is anyone with a shit ton of money.
Speaker 1:
1:16
Like the McAfee guy that we talked about that one time, like getting away with murder and two very rural small towns in the United States. Scary as fuck. And then you add in some politicians. You got to mix that McAfee guy though. He literally this guy. Okay, so what is the documentary is called the documentary on Netflix and literally like his sexual thing was women shitting in his mouth and I'll get her a hammock. They would, they would sit on the hammock and he would put his mouth underneath the hammock and he would eat their shit that he got aroused by it. That's, that's a thing like, you know, weird. I know no judging but like, no, I'm judging. I am. Well, you know golden showers, that's like, I think that's like the gateway, like golden showers. Like pee pee on their face or no, just peeing on somebody.
Speaker 1:
2:16
That's like a turn on for a lot of people. But that's nothing compared to eating someone's chest. Gatting is that called? Oh, why is that called sex? That should be called because I'm like, you know, I don't even know die tomorrow because of all the bacteria and stuff that's in there. Yeah. Why didn't he go [inaudible] I'm very, I don't think he ate it. I think he just went to, I dunno. Oh, let's see. Okay, whatever. Just watch the documentary. You know what we're talking about sick. Why is it called MCAFEE? The MCAFEE, hold on, I got to see what it's called. Where did you have to grab like a sweatshirt?
Speaker 1:
2:58
It's called green go green go. And that's the dangerous life of John McAfee. It's on Netflix and it's so nuts. So this guy, if you remember that antivirus, it was literally, it's still around, I think it was on every like PC and the 90 [inaudible] the most successful antivirus like company. He started that from scratch like ever, ever. It's around his richest hall. He's gotten into politics. He still retro. Did he lose all his money? Yeah, he's super rich because people still buy it. It's still like loaded onto your, it's like a standard. It's like a Microsoft, but for antivirus, like, yeah, almost like a standard that's loaded onto your computer automatically. Oh my God, this guy's not y'all. Everyone needs to watch it. You will be just astonished at this psycho. So today we're lazy and we didn't make a cocktail for this. Well, you kind of made a cocktail. It's a bobcat. What? Vodka and like, okay, so Perrier has make these slim can like um, their sparkling waters and they come in a bunch of flavors. The ape, I think it's either a peach or apricot is the best. It's like okay. It's so tasty. Right? It's true.
Speaker 1:
4:15
That's a, that was a clone. That's a full glass right here. And I know you just drink while I was talking to you and I didn't count my pores. So usually count to like what do you count two for this class? Cause it's big. This actually it's a short class but it holds a lot. I go one by five fast ones. Oof. Oof.
Speaker 2:
4:41
Okay.
Speaker 1:
4:42
All drunk today. Let's just get, cause I need to get drunk to talk about this fucking psycho ass story. Oh, let's do some quick housekeeping. Yeah. We um, we want to do a Q and. A. Yeah. You going to ask us any questions? I know you talked about that a few, a couple of episodes ago, but, but the problem is we talk about it at the end and nobody listens to all the way to, I don't, I very rarely do they is it as soon as they're done telling the story? Exactly. I mean it's understandable, but we're bringing it up at the beginning. Email lists, messages through Instagram, our base back. Any questions you have? We're going to do a complete Q and a and like, just talk about that silly question. Yeah. We want to tell you about ourselves. I mean, yeah, I mean just don't be gross.
Speaker 2:
5:39
What do you mean? Like,
Speaker 1:
5:41
I mean if you have an open Q and a, like how gross. Like have you ever taken a shit on someone? Yeah. Yeah. Well we can both, thankfully very, very honestly answered no to that. That's the grossest we never killed anything. Oh, okay. I did whatever show. I wanted to collect butterflies when I was younger. So I like went up with a mason jar and collecting butterflies in my mind was smushing them and then putting in the jar and my mom was so sweet. I think she looked at me, keep them and then they smelled really bad and I got rid of him. She let you keep all the dead butterfly. I used to collect roly polies so I loved real. And then I am also known as doodle bugs to Sun doodle books. I've never heard that. Um, I used to go get a bunch of tadpoles from our creek and put them in our bird, bad bird bath.
Speaker 1:
6:38
And my mom was like, what the fuck? Cause I wanted to see them develop into frogs. You know, I love science and all that shit. Or like my biggest fear fear you, you know how gross debt outright, you know I'm scarred from frogs. Hatim toads, frogs, the little green ones that hang on your windows like fucking hate him all. Really? I will jump out of my skin. They're so scary. I hate. Oh yeah, go scare Ya. How they move. They move their real still as all of a sudden they're not. Yeah. And like anything that moves erratic, jumpy. I move a radical. It's why I don't like chickens. I don't like bunny rabbits. I know you don't like buddy cute as hell. Like I follow a lot of them on Instagram but like the way that they move their rural families follow on Instagram. Oh I'll show you real cute.
Speaker 1:
7:27
Just funny pages. They're sweet. They are sweet. But I don't like the way they move cause there's still and then all of a sudden the jump in, you know, struggled. I get, I do too. So yeah, all the time. It's the only thing that scared me or like worried me about frogs or toads was like the worst thing because you can get work, which is where the wives' tale. Oh is that? Yeah, it's not true. It's not from frogs. No. Are you sure it's bacterial in its hereditary? No. It's a virus and it's hereditary. Like, oh I thought it was from frogs. I had, I had one on my hand and I got removed like, and my dad had some like growing up, my mom never did, but it's hereditary for sure. Weird. I didn't, I didn't know that. Yeah. And it's a virus so they can spread.
Speaker 1:
8:14
Are they known to spread through frogs? No, they just have like bumps on their back that looked like words. Such an old wives' tale for sure. I thought it was straight up science. That's why you believe in these conspiracy. I now I believe in everything. Okay. So speaking of, tell us what you, you give the overview on this one. So again, today we're talking about the boys on the tracks and you guys, this is such a good one. Okay. So the boys on the track, this is a super fucked up, unsolved cold case murder, but it goes all the way to the top to this day. So, um, this has to do with two boys named Kevin Ives and Don Henry and this tiny little town in Arkansas. MENA. Yeah. So Kevin and dawn were best friends. They were besties and this whole thing happened. This is the end of summer, 1987 and August. Yes, we're Babas or I was a Bubba. You were just, I was probably being conceived crazy little Zygote. I was probably the size. Like asleep. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
9:29
So Kevin Ives and Don Henry, they're best friends. It's the end of their summer, their junior year or they're about to get into their senior year. They're hanging out with some friends and like a parking lot. Did you ever do that in high school? Like just hang out in parking lots that we used to hang out in sonic parking lot, like drank, like just the grossest liquor and sonic mixed drinks. Oh my gosh. Yeah. Yeah. So, but these two boys, they were really good boys. Like they're about to start their senior year this night they go back to dawn's house. So member, it's Kevin and dawn. They go back to dawn's house around midnight to check in. Well, they go to check in because they were spending the night at dawn's house and they wanted to check in with John's Dad Curtis. So then, you know, they asked Curtis, can we go hunting?
Speaker 1:
10:16
And he's like, yeah, sure, go, go ahead. Be careful, whatever. I'll see you in the morning. This was totally normal at the time too. And so they were going to go do a form of hunting that's called spotlighting. And this you can only do at night and it's illegal, but very common I guess. And so that's what they were going to go do. So they had their spotlight, they had their rifle and they leave around 1230 to go start hunting. Um, so let's cut to the following morning, 4:25 AM there's a 75 cars, 6,000 ton cargo train that it's on its regular night run from Texarkana to little rock. So remember this is all an Arkansas. And as the train starts to approach Bryant, the engineer and a few workers start to notice something on the tracks ahead. So at first they think it's an animal, but then they quickly realize it's two teenage boys and they immediately slam on the brakes.
Speaker 1:
11:13
They start blowing the horn, they're trying to wake them up. They know that the train's not going to stop in time. Remember, it's completely dark. It's pitch block and they run over these two boys. So again, when they first saw the boys, they slammed on the brakes or whatever, and then after they read over them, that train finally comes to a stop. So they get out of the train, they get out of the, what's the main, yeah, yeah. Could be, no, not that could be the caboose is at the end, right? Yeah. They get out of their training or whatever and they're trying to, you know, find whatever sort of evidence they can. They call the and just imagine the scene. I mean, a train ran over a 75 car train runs over these boys. Um, they were just completely mutilated. Yeah. At the carnage.
Speaker 1:
12:08
Yeah. Yeah. So it's not like they were identified immediately. Yeah. Right. You couldn't be like, oh, I recognize you. He didn't have anything if you don't recognize anything on them. So, and also, it wasn't until the next morning that their parents, again searching for them because remember they knew that they were hunting. Right? Yeah. Um, so that following Monday, like a day later, local officials contacted the eyes and Henry families after the two boys had been identified conclusively through dental records. So the story was covered statewide and soon went national state officials, including the State Medical Examiner, Dr Family Malik, which we will talk about, he's a total dickhead. He almost immediately rolled the boys staff and has inherent suicide. Yeah. Despite the fact that all four parents disputed the ruling, they were like, there's no way our sense would commit suicide. We know them. Like this doesn't make any sense. This Guy Malik, he was the state medical examiner at the time and this is really important because he had these really bizarre rulings in several homicides.
Speaker 1:
13:11
Yeah. That just didn't make sense. Um, so this was kind of a theme when it comes to this, this is a real character cards type of situation here. Yeah. The is the word back scratching going with the whole family. Yeah. Have you seen a picture of the sky? He looks like an edit chin. So Doctor Malik, this medical examiner, without any supporting evidence rule that the boys had each smoked more than 20 marijuana cigarettes and in a psychedelic Stupore had fallen asleep on the tracks and that was that. That was his ruling. Uh, it was later close guy go home. They were too high profile.
Speaker 1:
13:53
It was later learned that the state crime lab never even tested the concentration of marijuana. And in fact they had used a test on the boys bled, which was designed to be used on their urine. So he basically use their blood for a urine test. This guy was the worst. I mean, that's a horrible mistake, right? Yeah. They're very different. One's yellow, one's rent. Yeah. Come on guys. Get it together. This is a running theme by the way. Like so many cases are mishandled and we've talked about this before. It's like, especially in some of these smaller areas where they either, there's not a lot of crime, they don't have a lot of experience or their budget is small. They don't have a lot of people. And it's not always the police's fault. It's really not. But there's a lot of mishandling of, of deaths and disappearances, which is unfortunate. So Doctor Malik, he has a major ties to the Clintons. And Bill Clinton at the time was governor of Arkansas. So he refused. Governor Bill Clinton refused for several years to dismiss a state medical examiner who, who's controversial decrees included a ruling that helped Clinton's mother, a nurse anesthetic and, and a thesis. Anaesthetists anaesthetists anaesthetist a nurse slash anesthesiest person. Oh God, what is that?
Speaker 2:
15:28
Oh Shit. Right here.
Speaker 1:
15:34
Anaesthetist and as best first and an ethicist, one of those, something like that. Fuck, I don't know. She's a nurse. And she assisted with the anesthesia of patients. Anesthesia anesthesia, like when you go on, or is that what it's called? So I know a doctor that does that as an anesthesiologist. Right. So nurse and the NFS and an aesthetic. Wow. Am I having a stroke? Having a stroke right now? Whatever. Oh, okay. So he helped. So there's this medical examiner who is, Malik helped Clinton's mother avoid scrutiny in a death of a patient. Um, so doctor Malik was protected by the governor and the State Laboratory Laboratory. Wow. Board. English is my first language guys. I promise. So, okay, here's some other cases that are fucked up and this is from the same medical examiner says this is how jet our concerns are. Right. So other cases that this guy royally screwed. So I'm the first one is known as the Albright case. So in June, 1985 Raymond p Albright, who is 50 years old of mountain home, was found in his yard dead of gunshot wounds. Albright had been arrested the night before on charges of theft. Malik rolled his death a suicide, but Albright had been shot five times. All five shots were in the chest. The weapon was a high power pistol, we think. Says Maggie Hall operates ex wife. He was murdered. No Shit.
Speaker 1:
17:21
So yeah, he, he stole something the night before and then like decide to kill itself. It wasn't the people that he shot himself five times the chest, his trigger finger with this. I know. Wow. So that in this timeline, as far as like a chronological timeline then the ice Henry Case, which obviously that's what we're talking about. Okay. Even after this royal fuck up with, uh, I have, uh, Henry Case. Another case came along the Malcolm June, 1989 and this was about a year less than a year after the Kevin Ives and Don Henry Case. This Guy Andrew Smith, age 59, who police said had shot himself, was declared brain dead at university hospital in Little Rock life support was withdrawn. A week later, Malik told officers that the order to end of life support was given by a deputy county coroner Mark Malcolm, who had not consulted Andrew Smith family and that he would have to roll that Malcolm killed him. So Malik said the police officer killed this guy. Okay. The attending physician had used the medical symbol on Andrew Smith's chart. The guy that died, um, to show that life support was ended after the family had been consulted. The director of the State Health Department said Malik apparently have mistaken the symbol to mean without family consultation and apparently had misread the chart to me that permission in life support had come from Malcolm.
Speaker 1:
18:58
He, uh, yeah, so they say that Malik apologize first and say, I mean the science, we've got to be fastly different because they mean you're in the fucking shower. They all look the exact same fashion. It's like everyone knows when your kids or your friends dude, especially those codes, he said he was sorry. Okay. Well at least he apologized. Sure. Um, the next, uh, the Stephens case, these are all less than a year apart. So Gregory Stephan's, he's 25 of hot springs. Arkansas was fatally shot while he was on the front porch of his home. Prosecutor Paul Austin brought earnest, earnest lemons, age 21, a parolee to trial on murder for Gregory Stephan, that guy on the porch, witnesses said that Stephens had been shot from the street 40 feet away. When Malik took the stand, he said that seven's had been shot. Point blank. Deputy prosecutor Bruce Mcphee was stunned. He knew his case was doomed and he had asked the charges to be dismissed because Malik said no, he is shot point blank, not 40 feet away.
Speaker 1:
20:09
Prosecutor Boston angry at being blindsided. Sutton evaluation from three outside pathologists each said that Stevens had not been shot pointblank and once that it seemed that Malik had studied the wrong tissue samples, oh my God. DNA analysis confirm that either blood samples or the tissue samples that Malik use had come from another corpse. Um, it's, it was said that [inaudible] was quote unquote shocked by the DNA results if this guy is fucking clueless. Yeah. Okay. So Malik, this shady motherfucker, um, he's working with bill mom, Bill Clinton's governor at the time, and he loves him. Bill Clinton Loves Malik. He supports him unconditionally. So this made it really hard for the eyes and Henry family to testify against him. So finally his parents were like, fuck this, no one's listening to us. We can't get through, you know, to our government through our government. So they went to the media public.
Speaker 1:
21:10
Yeah. And they're like, fuck this, we're going to the media. And the next day, the day after they went to the media, they were able to get the case reopened. Um, so zoo. Yeah. Great. That's, you know what, that's pretty fun to have. Like, do you, I mean, how many examples do we have of like government not doing anything until like public pressure is applied? I know. Well that tells you can't piss off the public. You need them. Yeah. Yeah. So I think they did the right thing. So this case is finally reopened, which led to a grand jury, which was led by an attorney named Dan Harmon. Remember that name? Danny boy. So this guy is like really, really close to the family from the start. From the very beginning. He's like, I want to help you guys find justice. Yeah. Free of charge pro bono. He's helping him out.
Speaker 1:
22:04
She felt the mom felt really good. She was like, you know, I really felt like he had a heart. Yeah. I mean, how could you not if this guy is willing to help you out, free of charge. Yeah. So nice about it. I know. So Nice. So he lives at all, I'm sure. No, no, no. He even requested that the judge residing over the grand jury appoint him special prosecutor to supervise the investigation's over the death. So he was like weirdly passionate about this case and he's, uh, he's like, I want justice for you guys. Like I'm going to do everything. I can work day and night, blah, blah, blah. Um, so the case is reopened and the bodies are examed nationally recognized forensic pathologists. Dr. Joseph Burton was assigned from the grand jury, and he's actually from another state. So this had like there, there's no bias or anything like that system.
Speaker 1:
23:03
Right. And his findings revealed a completely different story. Right. So his findings revealed that Don Henry had been stabbed in the back and Kevin, I, his face had been smashed by a blow from a rifle, but before their bodies were placed on the railroad tracks. Burton's autopsy also revealed that Malik had mutilated Kevin's a skull by sewing it. And Remember Malik is the original medical examiner he mutilated. Kevin saw by sewing it in so many different directions that it was impossible to tell where the original skull fractures, where maybe he's not someone competent after all. Yeah, he knows what he's doing. Malik had also completely dismantled Kevin's job. Burton stated that he had performed thousands of autopsies and he had never seen anything like it. Yeah. It's like, why is that necessary? Right. Just really mutilated his already mutilated body. He likes me to do the choir, but I mean, sadly, but also it's kind of like a better city cover up a physical evidence.
Speaker 1:
24:03
That's what it was. Right, right. But the parents were finally able to prove what they knew all along, which why is that the boys had in deep and Margaret. So their case was officially changed from an accidental suicide to a homicide. Um, do you have any time? So if the focus of the investigations turned towards allegations that their death had something to do with the drag of trafficking. And this is what Linda Ives is super passionate about. This is like her theory that she's standing behind and it, I mean it makes a lot of sense. Probable. Um, actually she believed that some additional people were thought to be connected to the desks or to have information. People who knew each other and supposedly it new things about the county's quote unquote drug underworld had to have been involved. The governor, Bill Clinton and his board declined to fire Malik despite more than four years of public criticism of mounts work.
Speaker 1:
25:02
The record shows that melt testified erroneously in criminal cases that his rulings were reversed by juries and that outside pathologist challenged his findings. The scarves in hot water but was protected by the Clinton administration and Arkansas for yours and yours and yours. To me it sounds like it was a political placement like for shad, some, some of the like the bare minimum requirements she was there are scratching people's about house of cards, free kill style and just rinse off with the, yeah. Oh Frank. Under what man? What I he free kill. Where did Hilton, I don't know. Nah, I dunno. Anyways, so like, no, it seems to me like this guy, either it was like on drugs all day and just didn't give a fuck or he just was completely incompetent and was put into a position of power that he was not, I think he was bribed all the way around.
Speaker 1:
26:03
Oh yeah. So years later people are finally starting to like kind of come up and can fast what they really saw and like the story is slowly coming together. There is a grand jury that's opened up and like all these eyewitnesses are starting to randomly fucking die. And it's really weird because they're all connected to the case. Right, right. And after Dan Harmon was tasked with assembling the grand jury, um, Harmon himself maybe have known more about the morning of the boys were found that he had let on and no to most of the community, Dan Harmon had been heavily involved in the local drug trade, particularly drug parcels that were dropped around the area. So, so there's, there's two people that are really important to this. It's Charlene Wilson and a guy named Keith McCaskill. So I actually start with strong lean. So a woman named Shirley Wilson claimed that she too had been on the railroad tracks that night.
Speaker 1:
27:04
The same night that Kevin and dawn went spotlighting. She, Charlene Wilson, Dan Harmon and Keith McCaskill had all met each other there in anticipation for a scheduled drug drop. The group hadn't realized that Kevin Dawn and other boys from the area had heard stories about airplanes flying low near the area and wanted to check it out for themselves. Obviously are the planes that were dropping off drugs, whether it was simple curiosity or if the boys had planned to steal the drugs for themselves is up for debate. But according to Charlene Wilson, when the boys were spotted, something had to be done about them. So the story is slowly coming together. What really happened and Charlene came forward, um, and she's actually believed to be a very credible witness because she implicates herself. So she said that Harmon's motive was to find out the names of the local informants and others who may have had information on what it really occurred that night and take them down one by one.
Speaker 1:
28:04
And that's why he wanted it to be so involved into like the judicial process of this case. Right. So in spite of her confession, Dan Harmon was never considered to be a suspect shared. So she had like been dating Dan Harmon and the Ed Hammond was like the playboy of Mena. Sweet. Yeah. Hot. So, um, she was actually framed later for by Dan, like not framed, but he straight up set up by Dan. Yeah. And she got put into jail for a number of years for having drugs, for having draft first drag offense. She was Peninnah Gel for like 30 hours. Yeah. It's insane. So she was put away so she could talk. She wasn't killed, but everybody else was. So we can talk about that. So everybody else will. Yeah. So one by one, anyone who may have known anything about the deaths of the two boys died under mysterious circumstances. Among them, of course, had been Keith McCaskill who was with Charlene and Dan the night that they were spotted.
Speaker 1:
29:20
So Keith was a bar owner on the outskirts of dry saline county who dealt in methamphetamine, Duh. So loved math. They loved it and they, so he'd also been known to work as a police informant. So McCaskill because of his relationship, alluded to one of the officers he knew well that he had information about what happened on the railroad tracks. The Night Kevin and dawn were found, none of this information was ever proven. And McCaskell was one of the few people who could provide that information to a grand jury. He was found stabbed to death in his own driveway. Hmm. So Nabi corroborated it and he didn't get to testify because he was killed before. He also McCaskill ways actually hired by Dan Harmon to take photographs to take aerial photographs of the scene because he knew you wouldn't do a good job or Kizzy new, I'm going to fucking kill you anyways.
Speaker 1:
30:19
Yeah, exactly. Oh, this is all just us speculating. This isn't, you know. Well Keith McCaskill, he's the walnut and manager of a local club, obviously somehow involved in the drug, whatever asked to ask by harm. And you take these aerial photographs and then murdered a couple of weeks after the case and right before he is testifying before the grand jury. Yeah, it's good. She's fine. The next one, this guy, Gregory Collins, who allegedly had information to present to the grand jury in regards to Kevin and dawn's death died from a gunshot wound to the head. His death had later been ruled a suicide orbit. Melik did it like anybody with a gunshot wound killed himself? Yeah, sure. Well he had, I read that this guy at three shotgun boss to the face off. Hello everyone like murders themselves. Oh my God. How do you see your fingers and Meena that bang. It's true. Is that uh oh well a trigger finger is like how you like, how's your trigger finger? Like are you fast? Do you have a fast trigger finger? Well, how can you do one, two, three? You can't. Yeah, that's my point. Amena, they've got some crazy little old trigger fingers in there now. She had a high school mascot. Just a finger welcome to me. Crazy shoot. 'Em Up that trigger fingers.
Speaker 1:
31:43
I like it. I can see that. See that too. Just like one big thick cleaner. Like I love that. Well you think we should start a high school football team called the fingers and Mina. Mina. Yeah. Okay. So if the deaths of two key witnesses weren't enough, Keith Kony, another boy who had known Kevin and dawn had allegedly gone with the boys to the tracks that night had also died under mysterious circumstances within months of Kevin and dawn's discovery. According to reports, Kony had been driving his motorcycle at a high rate of speed when he crashed into the back of a semi truck. Some say it was tragic accident now like while others, I believe he was being chased because of what he may have known. Yeah. And like apparently the crime scene, it looked like he'd been kind of like run the road and I think he was like stabbed in the neck.
Speaker 1:
32:43
So yeah, Malik ruled that suicide. Suicide. Yeah. I'm going to make another drink for myself cause those first, first day right after work guys and account. So there's one more. Jeffery Edward Rhodes, his body was actually found in a landfill. And April of 1989, all of these deaths were ruled a suicide by dented Anna, the suicide, the suicide king himself, Doctor Family Malik, he loves suicide. Um, okay. So all of these deaths ended up ruling as actual homicides, surprise, surprise, and March, 1990 after yet another investigation. So Tommy Knight House, he was 12 years old at the time of the murder. He said he was with some friends that night in the woods by the tracks and they spotted a few men on the tracks. Tommy and his friends witnessed these two boys, Kevin and John going up to this group that they saw and they saw that they were kind of hesitating and tried to walk away, but one of the men yells at them and then a gun, a shot.
Speaker 1:
34:00
And Tommy and [inaudible] house did not want to come forward for years because he was so scared. Um, and then dies. Suicide. No, I think he, I think that's what actually did. Maybe they thought he did. If you want to believe Malik's there's a trend people like, um, and then Ronnie Goodwin, he was driving by and said he saw the boys getting beat up by two men in an unmarked cop car and specifically stated that one of the boys look like he got hit by the butter end of a rifle and he saw it in actually. Yeah, right. And then shockingly dies. So let's fast forward. It's right around the time 1991 guest who's running for President William Jefferson Clinton, Aka
Speaker 1:
35:00
cool bill president. Yeah. So, uh, as soon as they'll runs for president and all this shit about Malik's coming back and people are like, fuck you, you know, everyone's trying to find some scandal with, of course the guys running deep low for that one. But Gas let Malik's resignation conveniently appears in the media, right as William is running for press. So several allege that he made a deal with the Clintons, but thank God regardless of if, whether he made a deal or not, he's not doing that job anymore. Well, and, and here's another little thing, little fast fact about that case. Like after his ruling, his initial rolling got overturned. Clinton had hired two pathologists out of state to like come and review his performance and they gave him super high marks Malik and said he should get a raise. So we've got a 41% raise.
Speaker 1:
36:01
Linda Ives found out about that raise. It got fucking pissed. Yeah. So she um, and others who felt wronged by amounts decisions begin exchanging phone numbers and they formed an organization victim of mallets incredible testimony or vomit for short, which I love. I love it. You know that they're like, we gotta make it safe. What title? I love it. Yeah. So they began collecting signatures on petitions, seeking his resignation. And for three years vomit says Clinton staff had refused to let it present the petitions to the governor when he was still governor. Gotcha. And to your point, not get the fuck out of dodge whenever Clinton couldn't protect him anymore, which is so fucking shady. Yeah. This is why like, look, I don't care about your political affiliation. We don't talk politics on here. Like the whole tower all fucked up. I mean, come on. No matter if he was a republican or a Democrat should like that that comes to light.
Speaker 1:
37:11
How could you, how could people say that they've loved Clinton. They just liked to play the saxophone, which was actually a brilliant PR law. I mean I liked it and that was cool. But because that is like fun and Gimmicky. Yeah. Like shit like this happened all the time. Like I don't care. What if that came to light today people would be up in arms because I bet that this, these kinds of stories didn't reach any one cause it was in a local paper and Bina exactly. Well that's a huge thing. Like every time it got national press, like it Kinda got swept under the rug. So supposedly if you ask anyone in Arkansas, everyone is super familiar like with the case because they'd all heard about it like from their family or from their friends. But like nationally it's not really that well known because you know, they try and get right back. Exactly. So yeah, the, the whole like conspiracy here, it's not really a conspiracy because it's fact was that Mina was a drag drop and Barry seal who is a former DEA spy, he, he had actually already died before this whole thing happen and it is thought that Barry seal, he had this whole thing set up and Dan Harmon actually took over, did he get shot 10 times in the chest and killed himself? Suicide. I don't know how, let's see. Trigger fingers.
Speaker 1:
38:46
Okay, so this is Linda eyes like theory. She says the drug drops at that site which was known as h walls according to Barry seal's Subarea. Okay. Barry Seal's was part of the CIA. He kind of was like a double agent, so he was working for the government, like monitoring these drug transactions. But then on top of that he was also working for the drug lords, trying to make money aside. It's like a double agent really was set up. Like you said, he died before it came to fruition, but he had been right. And apparently it got passed down to Dan Harmon. But this is Linda Eyes theory. Um, which is I think, pretty accurate. I mean, it sounds pretty accurate. The drug drops at that site, which was known as a 12, were arriving weekly and they weren't just drugs. They included money as well. The drop that was made the week before the boys were killed, went missing.
Speaker 1:
39:42
And the people on the ground, we're on high alert trying to find out what happened to it. Kevin and dawn come walking down the tracks and they immediately think like, oh, it's probably these two fuckers and grab them, interrogate them. Uh, they were beaten and stabbed and put on the railroad tracks covered with the tarp and the hope that the train crew would not realize that they had run over actual people. And this information, it actually isn't just from London, comes from various witness statements. That's what a lot of people think like around the town. That's what happened. Um, there is a documentary called the Clinton chronicles and Linda Ives was filmed in it. This actually really goes into the Mena airport. We don't have time. Like we don't have 10 hours to talk about all the drug drops in the drug. Conspiracy around the mean at airport, but apparently it's thought that this had been the command post at the biggest drug smuggling operations in the United States importing $100 million of drugs per month.
Speaker 1:
40:41
And to me now, and I know that's your competition, it is alleged that much of the many had been laundered through the Adfa, a bonding agency that governor Clinton had created to help small businesses get started. So that's why this is all sketchy around the Clintons. And then in November, 1996 at CIA inspector general's report was declassified. And this admitted that the CIA had been at Mena for routine aviation related services that LD Brown, who was an Arkansas state policeman assigned to security at the Arkansas Governor Mansion, had been a candidate for CIA employment in 1994 at the suggestion of Bill Clinton and the CIA had limited contact with seal and installed cameras on his plane. So that's where this whole thing comes from. And this case is still unsolved. Yeah. So especially with like a lot of these like older cold cases, and this is what people hope for.
Speaker 1:
41:43
There's, there's two things. One is advancement in technology with existing evidence that you can process that better. And to time investigators and police officers, they and, and, and detective, they hope that as time passes, people who were scared then come forward. And so actually there's an article, and this was posted a year ago in February, almost exactly a year ago. I'm a new witness came forward. So this guy, his name is Billy Jack Haynes, in March of 1987 this guy was, he was a wrestler on and he was in Detroit, Michigan during wrestle mania. And then that same year, 900 miles away, of course our story happened, right? Um, then today, February 13th of 2018 Haynes who that honest and exactly a year ago, Haynes, who's real name is William Albert Haynes, claimed he witnessed Kevin and dawn's death. So the big question was, why should they believe him? Why now? Well, hey, if you like if he's sobered up a few years ago and reached out to Larry and Larry and Linda eyes after a years of guilt.
Speaker 1:
43:03
Um, so the trio, the three of them contacted a private investigator named Keith Ruden civil and Hanes spilled his side of the story in a youtube video. And I have it right here. It's a last minute confession. Like, so he did this to raise money. Um, and he says, I come with no hidden voice. I come to you straight face to face because this is reality man. Don't hide nothing in the tape confession. So this is what it says. Um, he claims that while performing for the, the, that rustling the wrestlemania him, he transported and traffic did cocaine through the United States and his side job eventually brought him to Arkansas. So he's a wrestler that was also like getting some cocaine cash on the side. Um, he said I was also an enforcer or who provided muscle to other parts of the criminal element to insurance. They're illegal business dealings were collected upon, bought in are in August of 1987 I was contacted by an Arkansas criminal politician and was asked if I would provide muscle and an Arkansas drug transaction.
Speaker 1:
44:12
So, and then in the video, Hanes refers to a male criminal politician multiple times that never named him by name. Haynes at the politician was suspicious that cat from direct many drops was being stolen. So he's conducting security for the drug. Many drop while he was doing that, he says, I witnessed the murder of two young boys. They were murdered by other individuals who were working for the same criminal politician. Their bodies were placed on railroad tracks to be mutilated by passing allowed God. So he's now 64 APP in 28, I guess he's 65 now, says he reached out to Linda Ivs in 2016 explained what he saw in addition to providing his account of what happened, Hanes said, handed over names of everyone who was at the scene. I'm in ego to quote, I'm standing here putting my life on the line telling you that I could very well be killed.
Speaker 1:
45:08
Well, that's the trend. Um, they have to be taken down. Wow. Yeah. So, so she, Linda, and here's her, that'll response. She goes, we're very excited about the information he has. Um, so justice for Linda, justice for Linda, for Mama. I know. So now, and I haven't seen an update from this from a year ago. They are waiting to hear from saline county investigators as about whether they've spoken or plan to speak with Haynes. So to continue the investigation, they're still waiting to see if they'll like actually talk to this guy. So I'm going, fuck, you know who we should call Billy Jack Haynes. I was going to say, let's call Donald Trump. He would love to get into this, I think. Yeah, I think he's friends with the Clintons. Are you kidding? No, there's no way. Yeah, for sure. Do you think they're fine now? They hate each other because he was not the most conservative Republican.
Speaker 1:
46:15
He's not like right wing Republican. I feel like they're just in the same social circle almost. Well, but that's what I'm saying. Like, I mean Donald Trump because they're all a part of the Illuminati. Yeah. I don't think they're friends though. They relate. Disrespect each other. Well, I think they were both competitive, I think over the years they were friends. So anyways, this final thoughts like, yeah, 100% this was a total the thing, everything that we've talked about, that's all fact. There was, this was like a heavily like a drug drop. Yeah. Area or whatever. I think it's, it's just basically like all of these murderers data tied to the Clintons, the sketchy ass medical examiner who's like BFFs with the Clintons. Yeah. Who gets a raise and gets, you know, save taken care of and taking care of. It was definitely a cover up. It definitely had to do with drugs and, well I guess now it's like it's just, it's a conspiracy because it's still isn't it solved? Yeah. Because it goes to the top. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
47:32
Those fingers. Five fingers. I love it. I don't know. So, okay. Dan Harmon has been prosecuted. Finally, we're drugs for drugs for this case. No, not for this case, but for drugs and for a lot of other cases and for being involved in a lot of sketchy shit so that like, that's a little bit of justice. At least he's locked away. One thing I know for sure is we wouldn't be talking about this today if it wasn't for Linda eyes. Yeah. She's a good mom. Kickass. Yeah. Good job, Linda. US. Yeah. Okay. Well guys, hopefully this was a good story. Go to like, seriously, go read about this. Go read some details. It's fucking not as crazy. It makes you mad. It does. It makes me a little upset by, it's like, I mean, it's a great cold case. Praying for her deathbed confession. Love those. We need more of this. And you know, we did that one. We'll do some more. Yeah. Well, we love you guys. God bless and really trust no one for me. Yeah, sure. Dot. Trust your government.
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