The History of Chemistry

93: Resistance is Futile

November 05, 2023 Steve Cohen Episode 93
93: Resistance is Futile
The History of Chemistry
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The History of Chemistry
93: Resistance is Futile
Nov 05, 2023 Episode 93
Steve Cohen

We hear of events from the early 19th century onward that led to the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the 1980s. Surprisingly, it all started with Humphry Davy and his assistant, Michael Faraday, and continued with a competition between Kamerlingh Onnes and James Dewar over who could liquefy hydrogen first. After that, Onnes turned to the idea of finding evidence for condensation of newly discovered electron fluids. The competition in the 1980s for high-temperature superconductivity was a race between Paul Chu in Houston, IBM Zürich, and Bell Labs.

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We hear of events from the early 19th century onward that led to the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the 1980s. Surprisingly, it all started with Humphry Davy and his assistant, Michael Faraday, and continued with a competition between Kamerlingh Onnes and James Dewar over who could liquefy hydrogen first. After that, Onnes turned to the idea of finding evidence for condensation of newly discovered electron fluids. The competition in the 1980s for high-temperature superconductivity was a race between Paul Chu in Houston, IBM Zürich, and Bell Labs.

The Neil Ashton Podcast

This podcast focuses on explaining the fascinating ways that science and engineering...

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

(Cont.) 93: Resistance is Futile