The Hunting Stories Podcast

Ep 100 The Hunting Stories Podcast: In Memory of Larry Peterson

May 13, 2024 The Hunting Stories Podcast Episode 100
Ep 100 The Hunting Stories Podcast: In Memory of Larry Peterson
The Hunting Stories Podcast
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The Hunting Stories Podcast
Ep 100 The Hunting Stories Podcast: In Memory of Larry Peterson
May 13, 2024 Episode 100
The Hunting Stories Podcast

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Gather 'round the campfire for our centennial episode as we honor Larry Peterson, the man whose hunting legacy courses through our veins. Joined by Dylan Peterson and Steven Bryant, we spin yarns of our shared adventures and the laughter that echoes through the wilderness. Our tales traverse from Saskatchewan's elk-rich forests to the bullet-riddled army tents of Washington, each one stitching a more vibrant patch into the quilt of our outdoor life.

Let's raise a toast to the pranks, the perseverance, and the profound moments that define the hunter's journey. From the thrill of a muzzleloader hunt to the ethical quandaries faced in the field, we don't shy away from the mishaps and mayhem that bring us closer to nature—and to each other. Our escapades, including a bee attack turned comedy sketch and a frigid camp that tested our wits, remind us that the hunt is as much about the chase as it is about the camaraderie.

So here's to Larry, whose spirit guides our sights and stories, and to all the listeners ready to etch their mark on the wild narrative. Share in our gratitude as we beckon you to contribute your own memories, ensuring the tales of the ones we've loved and the lands we've roamed live on. Join us in this celebration of heritage, humor, and the hunt that binds us.


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Gather 'round the campfire for our centennial episode as we honor Larry Peterson, the man whose hunting legacy courses through our veins. Joined by Dylan Peterson and Steven Bryant, we spin yarns of our shared adventures and the laughter that echoes through the wilderness. Our tales traverse from Saskatchewan's elk-rich forests to the bullet-riddled army tents of Washington, each one stitching a more vibrant patch into the quilt of our outdoor life.

Let's raise a toast to the pranks, the perseverance, and the profound moments that define the hunter's journey. From the thrill of a muzzleloader hunt to the ethical quandaries faced in the field, we don't shy away from the mishaps and mayhem that bring us closer to nature—and to each other. Our escapades, including a bee attack turned comedy sketch and a frigid camp that tested our wits, remind us that the hunt is as much about the chase as it is about the camaraderie.

So here's to Larry, whose spirit guides our sights and stories, and to all the listeners ready to etch their mark on the wild narrative. Share in our gratitude as we beckon you to contribute your own memories, ensuring the tales of the ones we've loved and the lands we've roamed live on. Join us in this celebration of heritage, humor, and the hunt that binds us.


https://www.instagram.com/huntingstories_official/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJgIZrs8cMFRpkcxemWFcA

Support the Show.

Speaker 1:

Howdy folks and welcome to the hunting stories podcast. I'm your host, michael, and we got a really special one for you today. Today we're actually doing episode 100. Technically it's actually 101 with a bonus episode we did, but it's quite the milestone for me and pretty proud of it, and we have something special planned. And we have something special planned.

Speaker 1:

Today we actually connect with my brother-in-law. His name is Dylan Peterson and one of his good buddies from when he was five years old. His name is Stephen Bryant. The three of us today share some stories about my father-in-law, larry Peterson. Larry passed away a little bit over a year ago. He was one of the first people that I asked to be on the podcast, but his level of progressed cancer didn't make that possible for him, so we unfortunately missed out on some stories. But, that being said, he was a character and he made plenty of stories for Dylan, steve and myself. So let's just jump into this thing, guys. I hope you guys enjoy. This was an important one for me and I want to thank you guys for helping me get to 100. Here's to 100 more. Thank you.

Speaker 1:

All right, fellas, welcome to the Hunting Stories podcast. How are you guys? Really good, thanks for having us. Yeah, yeah, you know it's been a long time coming. In fact, this is going to be a different episode than most, because I'm not asking you, gentlemen, to tell your stories. I'm telling you to tell your favorite stories about someone who's important to all of us. So, let's, let's start this thing off with introducing who you folks are, and then, dylan, maybe after that you can tell the folks who we're going to be hearing stories about today. So, dylan, go ahead hearing stories about today.

Speaker 3:

So, dylan, go ahead. Sounds good. Dylan, I'm Michael's brother-in-law. I live in Boulder, colorado, mostly hunt elk I started. Most of that has been in Washington state and then some here in Colorado, both the modern muzzleloader Perfect.

Speaker 2:

Stephen. Hey, yeah, stephen Bryant here. I went to high school with dylan um, live in washington, uh, now seattle and started elk hunting up here. But before that I hunted um lots of um white tails in texas when I lived there. So, yeah, and mostly modern firearm um, and then same with Dylan we started.

Speaker 1:

We started hunting muzzle loader and then I bow hunt as well perfect, yeah, and so you guys are actually my first hunting buddies, um, and probably the people that told me my first hunting stories, which is pretty cool, uh, because obviously I'm. This is episode 100 I don't know if you guys knew that, uh, and I'm having a huge giveaway, and at this point, somebody's probably already won that shit, but we're not going to worry about that right now. What we're going to do is tell the folks Dylan, I'm going to let you tell them who we're telling them stories about, because it's someone that I wish we had had the chance to get on the podcast, but unfortunately it never happened. So, dylan, why don't you explain the greatness of who we're going to hear?

Speaker 3:

about today.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thanks for honoring us with the 100th episode here. It is fun that I remember those first hunting trips with you. So this is all about my dad, larry Bergey Peterson, and I've got a little background stuff that I think is relevant, because people hunt all over the world. My dad was born in saskatchewan, uh, canada. He was the son of immigrants from denmark, but he moved to calgary where I was born and, uh, they're in the side calgary areas where his elk hunting experiences took place. But we moved down to texas, uh, when I was don't know six years old or something like that, and he really wanted to teach me hunting. But hunting in Texas wasn't his thing, being in a stand and shooting deer. He really theorized in some ways around hunting elk on public land and tracking them and couldn't do the elk hunting in texas. Well, I moved up to um, washington and, uh, he got his wish. So somewhere in I guess we were in our 20s steven, is that right? We're in our 20s when we first started hunting with him late 20s.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was. I was 28, 30 Maybe in the 30s.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and anyway, he hunted elk for meat. He definitely wasn't into trophy hunting. He made sure to tell us that about every hunting trip. He always hunted cow elk. They were more prevalent out there in the national forest outside Calgary and he always said it tasted better and that's a big part of his life in Canada.

Speaker 3:

I I've got faint memories and these might be I might be four or five being in a garage in Cochran and there's several families around and they're harvesting, they're butchering the elk that they had harvested and there was multiple elk music playing, a handful of families and adults.

Speaker 3:

They were drinking, they were smoking. It was sort of a pretty jovial time and I remember at one point him calling my name and looking up and he put this white kneecap in my hand. It's just like a white ball that felt like a cube, a wet cue ball, which was one of my furthest back memories and that's just to say that it's always kind of been elk hunting. It's been kind of anchored in my in my head from early days, even though I didn't get into it until my twenties. My dad used to remind me said that we I was partially made out of elk because that was about all the red meat I ate growing up in Canada and he pointed out that's why I'm so good at climbing mountains it's because I'm part elk that sounds like something Larry would say okay, well, you know.

Speaker 1:

And so fast forward into our late 20s, we moved to.

Speaker 3:

Washington state and you know. And so fast forward into our late twenties. We moved to Washington state and you know Steven knew a bunch about hunting whitetail. But it was quite a different hunting elk out in the national forest in Eastern Washington and those first few years we really looked up to him. He taught us just about everything back then and I guess that's where the stories begin.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'll jump in real quick. I'll tell my and I've told this on the podcast before. But yeah, I think it's an important one to kick things off. But my very first hunt with you guys. First off, I wasn't invited, uh, because I wasn't married to my wife yet. You guys are like nope, it's a family thing, you gotta be, you gotta be in for real.

Speaker 3:

So okay, fine, I got married. Yeah, I got married, yeah, right so, okay, fine, I got married.

Speaker 1:

If I have to, I got married now I can come hunting and, uh, we get out there.

Speaker 1:

We're hunting central washington the first morning. We go out and you guys are going up to the area you called, I think, the bird, the bird's nest, and you're like all right, you go with Larry, you guys go to the bear field and we get out there and we've got our red lights on and I'm terrified. I have no idea what's going on and all I know is Larry's like let's walk all the way across this field. So we just walk from one side to the other. Retrospect, we probably shouldn shouldn't have done that, but either way, we walk across the field, sit on this one tree and I'm sitting there with my muzzle loader, just as excited as could be terrified out of my mind, not knowing why I'm doing this, but happy to be part of the family.

Speaker 1:

And next thing I know is I hear something rustling in the bushes and I look around because larry was behind me and it's actually larry, and he's crawling through the probably knee-high grass on his belly, belly, crawling, just taking photos of me, and he's whispering no, no, look, look, look that way. Like trying to get like this is right when the sun comes up, like peak hunting time, and he's just trying to take these majestic photos of me on my first ever hunt and I'm like this this doesn't feel right, but okay, if this is what Larry's you know this is what Larry says hunting is, I'm just going gonna take these photos with him. What sucks is I actually never saw any of those photos. I just know that for about 15 minutes at first light on my first ever hunting trip.

Speaker 2:

I did a full-fledged uh photo shoot.

Speaker 1:

So that was uh something, something I'll never forget and and I really regret not getting those photos from him- and I totally forgot that.

Speaker 2:

We sent you on your first hunt into bear field, and that's just the name of the field that we called it. But we're like, yeah, you just go to bear field, you'll be fine. There's yeah, yeah, it's not a big deal, that's why we called it bear field. But they, you won't, you won't run into you, you'll be fine.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I definitely heard bears but never saw one. So plenty of bear scat around those, uh, those apple trees. But yeah, yeah, um I just wanted to kick it off with, with that story. I don't know if anybody else has one that they want to start with um, but I think that's a really important one to me because I think about it. I think about that story often makes sense.

Speaker 3:

I think we by then we that might have been our fourth year or something like that so steven and I had told him to stop taking pictures and leave us alone by then.

Speaker 3:

So I to pick on you he was just happy that I was there, yeah, oh, finally someone to take pictures of, I'm pretty sure we sent you to fairfield because, uh, it was level, it wasn't much elevation gain and my dad was going to go with you to teach you his wisdom all right, because we've had enough of it. And uh, he wasn't going to walk up to the other spot. That's the only option that's probably.

Speaker 1:

That's true. That's probably more the truth. Um, actually, here's another funny story. This is actually a fuck you guys story, uh, but I went before that trip.

Speaker 1:

I went to the store I don't remember the name of the store in seattle, there steven, I'm sure you do outdoor emporium, outdoor emporium, and I'm like larry, I need to get cam, get camo, because we had to get camo, and I get this sweet suit of camo that I've never been more proud of an outfit in my life and I think it was like two years in Hunting in that stupid outfit Before you guys. I heard from Larry that you guys have been talking shit behind my back that I look like MC Hammer Because my pants were so damn big. But I thought I looked cool as hell until I learned that you guys thought that. And so then of course, I hear that you guys are making fun of me from larry. So I go back to outdoor emporium with larry.

Speaker 1:

After he approved the first outfit, I get the next outfit, I don't know what brand. That was much more snug, fitting, made a lot more sense, I felt better in it, except that set wasn't waterproof. And hunting in washington, I remember the first day out was the coldest I've ever been, because my entire outfit was just soaking wet and absorbed all the water and it was. It was miserable. So fuck you guys, that's just wrong. Throw that one out.

Speaker 3:

I'm willing to bet that I'm going to bad memory, but I'm willing to bet that was completely manufactured by Larry, that he called you. Mc Hammer Pants and then told you we were making fun of him Cause that he called you MC Hammer Pants, and then told you we were making fun of him because I don't remember that.

Speaker 2:

That's a good possibility.

Speaker 3:

It's just the truth is just now coming out.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I didn't buy the upgraded gear, the upgraded non-waterproof gear, until the year after we killed our elk, our elk, right, dylan? I've told that story before. Maybe we'll get to that one later on, but I don't know.

Speaker 2:

Who wants to jump on the the spear next and tell the next story? I could tell some stories and I was just going to start from the beginning with like larry teaching dylan and I how to hunt elk. So you know, we spent a bunch of time doing just research online trying to find a good spot and we kind of went into this area over near ellensburg, washington.

Speaker 1:

Hey don't burn any spots.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, not burning the spot. And so we get to our spot and we had bought this big green army tent that we were using and it was super dark in there, so we get in there and set it all up. Larry hates the tent. All he does is talk shit about the tent.

Speaker 3:

And then we go to bed. Oh, hold on you, that's because the first time we got I mean it's a you, it's actually it was used there were bullet holes like bandaged up this thing is.

Speaker 3:

It's an armament, yeah surplus of efficiency and light weightness or whatnot, and everything was planned, except, oh, you had to work late. Well, that didn't make sense because we have to set the tent up in the dark. So we'll go out there and you know, those tents can go up fine with a handful, say four, people that know how to do it. But the first time doing it, where's my dad? The time my dad did it, I guess you and I set it up scouting or whatnot.

Speaker 2:

We had to set that damn thing up and it about killed us, and then you showed up after it was set up.

Speaker 2:

So I think that's where the started and, yeah, he's like this tense piece of shit, um, but anyways, we go, we, uh, we. He tells us all these stories about what we're going to do on opening morning, how we're going to hunt. You know he talks about like that you take like one step every one minute, just slow and be so quiet. And every step you take you stop and you turn and look, and so he's like we're going to get up super early, we're going to hike to where we want to be, we're going to get to the best spots and then we're going to just sit there for a half hour until it gets light. And so we're going to just sit there for a half hour until it gets light. And so we're all on board. Like we get up super early, we hike from the tent, we're hiking up the road and we get to our spots, which is maybe 20 yards off the road, and like, right before it gets light, we just see or we hear all these trucks pull up to right where we just walked into, and get out of their trucks and slam the doors like we just walked a mile to get to this place yeah, and just play

Speaker 2:

jump out of the truck, great, slam the door and then we're both sitting on this field. I'm sitting on one, dylan sitting on another, and the sun comes up just enough for us to see and it looks like we're sitting on a pumpkin patch because there's so many hunters out there, with Hunter O and John, and we're like dude, like this is what hunting's about. This is crazy. No one else had this idea, yeah, and so we're like. So now, larry, we're supposed to like take one step every minute and turn and walk really slow. I can't even remember what we ended up doing on that first hunt. We might have just called it and went back to camp and came up with a new strategy, but yeah, it was wild All that work for opening morning just to sit on it we were psyched.

Speaker 2:

How far did you hike in that those?

Speaker 3:

guys just drove up.

Speaker 2:

I feel like it was about at least a mile up the road that we we figured. You know we're not going to drive the truck up there, because you know that's the hunting area and everyone.

Speaker 3:

No one else will drive up there either, but that is not what happened yeah, right, yeah, it's like a super rookie mistake on realizing that you got to get off the roads um yeah, we were psyched on that first trip.

Speaker 3:

We felt we could put a lot of work into it. So it was a bummer when he got nothing. And my dad all his stories. Every year he got one. All maybe two or three of them got an elk, and so we kind of compared ourselves to that that first year. I remember that year too, we were, uh, because we were so like determined. There at some point in there like a snowstorm came in and it was just blowing sideways and I think we were doing it was like the evening hunt and my dad was kind of at my hip. He didn't have a gun, though he always said he was going to get a permit but he was out of state, and then when it came to spending the money, he was like I'll just go with you guys.

Speaker 1:

And where am I going to see see talk himself out of it. But he, uh, I think I think other than other than steven. I think I've been in the woods more with larry than anyone else and not once did he ever have a gun with him. He was always just there for the experience not once did he have a gun yeah, me too man advice no gun, yeah, but we hunted a lot.

Speaker 2:

Go ahead. I was just gonna say I probably got 20 days in the woods with larry hunting and never. He's never had a gun with him, maybe a pistol, but yeah, sure, the uh we were gonna hunt.

Speaker 3:

You know we had a lane to look at but it's like it's blowing sideways and at that point we also weren't real good about the gear we had. But he brought me to this kind of like tree that had a nice big thick branch covered uh and blocked the wind, and we could have probably stayed the night in there. It was cozy and um, we're plenty comfortable. But the best part of it was is we could just see over into, like this other field, and there was determined texas steven behind the tiniest tree.

Speaker 3:

The tree was smaller than he was, but he was using it for protection, so I was like we just spent the I don't know an hour giggling about him, like fighting the weather on his own, freezing and no elk coming by that's great.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was just sitting there on the side of this hill getting sleeted on. I didn't want to move because I wanted to wait for it to get dark and I just sat there for two hours, just you know, thinking come on, elk, come out and nothing came out and I just sat there freezing, shivering right, like if it's, if you're more uh, there's times you think that if I'm more uncomfortable there's better odds of me seeing something.

Speaker 3:

But it's not really how it works yeah, no, that's the same trip that.

Speaker 2:

Um, larry bumped into that old hunter that told him the 36 long story. Um, were you there when that old man told that story, dylan?

Speaker 3:

I was in the truck? Yeah, he was. This guy must have been. Do you know it? You want to tell it?

Speaker 2:

I can't remember if you were there or not. I was in the truck so I only got the story secondhand. So if you were there you can tell it better than me.

Speaker 3:

So this guy's walking and it's that same snowstorm, right. So my dad and I headed back to the truck. Um, you were out there fighting god and weather for your elk. So we got in the truck and, uh, it's snowing. It's much nicer in the truck and this dude walks out of the woods by himself. He must have been 65 or something like pretty impressive, uh, fitness and whatnot, and he's real friendly. So he stopped that. He stops buying chats. It goes on and tells us how, you know, his wife was passed years ago and he lives down in arizona or and on, uh, you know, like a retired home and and he's happy as hell. It's great it's loaded full of women, because it's usually the men that dies first and they're moneyed up and they've got 36 longs which he's referring to. I won't tell the joke, or tits, yeah, I think he was telling some story.

Speaker 2:

correct me if I'm wrong, dylan, but he's like yeah, when they're sitting in the hot tub with them, they're just floating on the water. That was 36 longs and Larry thought that was the funniest goddamn thing he'd ever heard in his whole life.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, the guy dropped the mic. Basically he walked off into the woods after that. That's right.

Speaker 1:

That's amazing. I've heard. Larry say 36 longs, but I don't think I'd ever heard where that actually came from. I just know that whenever Larry was talking about old lady tits, he always called them 36 longs yeah that's from that story man, that old man.

Speaker 3:

That's too funny.

Speaker 1:

That's too funny. Well, I'm going to I'm actually going to take a, I'm going to make us take a quick pause and from from something to away from the stories of Larry, to something that I think I don't know if Larry loved or hated. But, steven, I want you to tell us one of your jokes, because Dylan you said he couldn't, and he now he has to.

Speaker 2:

I, let's see, I'll tell the grace of God.

Speaker 2:

And a sturdy stick, yeah, I'll tell the bear one, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So these three old boys are out hunting in the woods and they go out to do their hunt and one of them stops and tells the other guys, hey guys, I got to take a shit, I'll catch up with you later and he goes and leans up against this tree and while he's taking a shit he falls asleep and his buddies are out there hunting and when they come back, uh, they had gotten an animal. When they came back, um, they found him, you know, sitting there, passed out up against that tree. So they took the, the bear's guts and just shoved him up underneath them and went back to camp. And then, uh, a little while later, the guy comes running into camp and he says guys, you won't believe what fucking happened. The craziest thing fucking happened. I fell asleep taking a shit and I shit out all my guts, but by the glory of god and the grace of a stick, I shoved it all back in larry I would tell larry that story and he would get so mad he's like that joke sucks.

Speaker 2:

Stop telling it.

Speaker 1:

What's funny is you told it every single hunting camp and it's like you didn't have a new audience.

Speaker 2:

It was the same people hearing the same joke, but you kept telling it and that's why it pissed Larry off so much. It's joke time. You guys want to hear a joke? And Larry would be like, no, goddammit, I don't want to hear a joke. I'd be like, okay, well, I'm going to tell it anyways.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and you always did it while making your chili. And he's like that's not fucking chili, it's just a bunch of cans of stuff poured into a pot. Yeah, yeah, right.

Speaker 3:

He started lobbying lobbying ahead of these events to try to ask me how we could get you to not tell jokes and how we could maybe take away your rights to cook one of the meals, because he knew it was going to be chili chili was fine, yeah yeah, dude.

Speaker 2:

He man, larry, just loved to fuck with me, is what? And I love to fuck with him back. That was the fun of it, you know, like I told those jokes specifically just to fuck with larry. That's awesome.

Speaker 1:

Okay, as long as we're talking about fucking with larry. I'm gonna tell a quick joke. You get or not a joke, but a story. Um, I'm not sure if I've told this one on my podcast already, but larry would fuck with people guys. I mean steven, you admitted to it, he would. He would like put rocks in people's backpacks. You might hike all day and you'd have a damn like three pound, five pound rock in your hunting pack. He would do it to his mother-in-law, he would do it to anyone is dylan, you'll vouch for that. He'll just put a rock in your luggage if you came to visit, right, yeah?

Speaker 2:

yeah, you gotta watch out for it so now dylan does that every time I go visit yeah, so I knew that was coming.

Speaker 1:

I I think this was maybe my second hunt, because he did it to me on the first hunt um, but I had bought those. I don't know if you guys remember the, the dirt discs, right? So it's a little canister. They're like five plastic discs. I don't know how, but they smell like dirt. So I threw them in my hunting bin so my clothes smelled like dirt. It made enough sense to me. Larry gave me so much shit for for having those dirt discs, thinking it was just a ridiculous thing. Um, so I don't know if you guys remember, but I took my dirt discs and I hid them in his luggage and he didn't have like a hunting bag or a duffel, he had like a carry-on, not a carry-on luggage but like a full suitcase. Yeah, right, yeah, with like the liner, a checked luggage, yeah.

Speaker 1:

He flew in from Texas to go hunting with us and he brought his checked luggage with him. So I took two of those things right and I put one inside, and then I unzipped the liner and put the other one inside the liner, thinking he'll smell it.

Speaker 1:

He'll immediately remove the one and think that he's won, but he won't know the second one he won't know about the second one and he'll just think that first one was so good that his stuff smells like dirt still, and so I put that disc, I put both of those discs in his luggage and he didn't remove that and he was going on a road trip. Actually, he didn't fly up, he drove up right, and so he went on a road trip and he was on his road trip for three weeks. After our hunting trip going, my stuff still smells like dirt. Those dirt discs are amazing and I'm like actually, larry, I'm sorry man, I open your liner, I put another one in there. So he is. He had been on a road trip, visiting his relatives in canada, visiting people in colorado, visiting people all over the country, and everything he put on smelled like dirt for weeks.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, he would have had to sell the luggage yeah, it was so goddamn, funny yeah, he, I got a story of him uh screwing with the canadian government actually. So this, like it wasn't just us, we, we shouldn't take it personally, but he you know I was saying earlier he doesn't wasn't into hunting for trophies, he was hunting for meat. But he did hunt for a trophy once. He got a draw for Rocky Mountain Sheep. In fact, I think you probably have it in the room you're in right now, is that?

Speaker 1:

right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's right behind me. Yeah, yep, um was a shoulder mount uh mountain sheep anyway he, uh, he got that draw and I really told that story to me a number of times. It was a different type of hunt for him because it's uh above tree line for one, so like much more athletic trip um than others and I guess they're like pretty easily spooked. Pretty much more of a long distance height shot. He was really into shooting 100 yards or less. I can't remember how far this this hunt was with his rifle, but he shot it and came crashing down the mountain and broke through trees and whatnot and apparently him and his hunting partner had a hell of an event uh packing it and the meat out of there wasn't a big fan of the meat but he ate it and he got that mounted. But and you know there's quite a bit of laws in canada for hunting regulations and so you had to take actually to go check in at I don't know what their equivalent is the ranger station or the wildlife department, but you had to take the head in there and the deal was that the uh horn had to curl around to touch the eye again. I can't remember a certain amount of degrees or whatever, but it basically comes back down around the eye just on one horn, and one horn it did, but the other horn it didn't, and it's. It was a pretty big punishment, apparently there to deter people from not paying attention to the law and whatnot.

Speaker 3:

And my dad hates authority, hated the government, hated the Canadian government most of all, which is why he left that area. And so he walked into that place and kind of played dumb and set the sheep head down on the table, whatever, with the horn. That wasn't long enough on one side, and I said, hey, I'm just here, you know, to register this kill that I got. And the guy came out there and he said he could see kind of the excitement on his face. He said, one second, I'll be right back and went back to get all of his buddies to make a bust. And, according to my dad, when they came back out there, once he saw the look on their face, their kind of excitement, he grabbed the head and flipped it over with gusto and slammed it on the table to show that it actually was a legal kill and he got to keep it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I've probably heard that story from Larry 20 times Every time I talk about it. Time I pointed at sheep he's like.

Speaker 3:

Let me tell you about the time I stuck it to the Canadian government.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, he was very, very, very proud of that. In fact, I've people every time I have the video on and I'm talking to people on this podcast and they see that thing like, oh, why don't you tell me the story of that sheep? And I'm like, well, that's not mine, but I'll tell you. I'll tell you about my this guy, larry, who hated the canadian government. That's awesome, oh man, all right, what else do we got?

Speaker 3:

uh dylan, talk about the first elk you killed, or I think it was the first elk you killed with uh, with larry, I know that's a good one sure it was, uh, I don't know, maybe year three or something like that which, uh, start to wear a person out, start wearing me out, like, like steven, you got one in the second year and I don't know I was. I was feeling a little bummed about not getting anything. But we're in eastern washington and we switched to muzzleloader at this point. Muzzleloader, no sights. We do have a sabbat, um and you got like real quick.

Speaker 1:

Talk about how you guys picked your unit, Cause I think I think it's important to share. I think it's important to share how you guys picked your unit for muzzle loader.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so we both put in for um a cow tag and we both got drawn and it turns out that we accidentally put in for different units. They were units that were right next to each other.

Speaker 2:

They screwed up they bordered each other and so, um, and we just we just missed that. I mean, one of them's name was their names were really similar, and so we just kind of missed that. And so what we decided to do was we were gonna there's the road that ran right down between the two, and we decided we were gonna like camp right near the road so that you could hunt on one side of the road and I could hunt on the other, because we had those tags so I've heard this a bunch of times.

Speaker 1:

I've never asked this question, which is who, uh, who was actually the person that got the tag in the correct unit and who was the person that got the tag in the wrong one?

Speaker 2:

don't even don't even know. I think we were just there. I mean, I don't think we were like this is the right one and this is the wrong one.

Speaker 2:

We were just picking a unit and you know, we picked two different units and we thought we were picking the same one, the one that, the one that we ended up killing all the elk, thought we were picking the same one, the one that the one that we ended up killing all the elk that we killed was the one that I chose, but that doesn't mean it was the right one. It just happened to be the one that we found the elk in.

Speaker 1:

Gotcha All right, all right.

Speaker 3:

All right, sorry I interrupted you, dylan. We had spike over the counter, so we had the option in either one, for one was to shoot a cow, one shoot a spike and whatnot.

Speaker 1:

Oh, gotcha Okay.

Speaker 3:

We switched to muzzleloader basically because that first story just to get away from hunters really wasn't our style. Even if there was a lot of elk and a lot of good I don't know harvest statistics I just didn't want, I didn't want my hunt to be affected by other hunters. It kind of ruined the whole vibe of it. And so muzzleloader was interesting to us, which had in washington a lot less hunters than bow hunting, which I think is, I guess, common in lots of states. But that's how we got into it. It was first year doing that. Of course you got to be pretty close, of course, open sites and all that.

Speaker 3:

And uh, we're hunting, evening hunt and uh, I don't know, stephen might have been a couple hundred yards away from me in another, another field, but just you know, general, same side of the mountain, and we get up there to our spot and take the best spot we can and with the wind and and all that, and you sit and my dad's uh sitting next to me we've got kind of a tree, dead tree. That's makes a nice place for me to to to put my gun on. We sit, I don't know, I think we actually got up there too early because we're there at least an hour or so and I look I hear some snoring, like snoring. I look over and he's like not even facing the direction where we're hunting anymore because we're going to get a hint. We really like stood it for a while.

Speaker 3:

It's pretty boring sometimes with a gun, let alone not having a gun, and and it's you gotta be quiet, it's not like you can be up there bullshitting with me. So he eventually kind of falls asleep. He's like four feet from me and what? How old would he be? Maybe 60 years old or something at the time? Yeah, maybe, maybe young, close, maybe 58 or something like that. Um, and so I'm being diligent, trying, trying to pay attention. Pay attention, it's a field. It's a field, still a field. There's a bird. It's a field.

Speaker 3:

And it's getting right to the rice. It's singing songs in my head, trying to keep attention there, and all of a sudden it wasn't a field. It was a field with two elk and one's like 30 yards from me and I got a beat on it easily and I thought for a split second. It's like fuck, I'm about to pull a 50 millimeter black powder rifle while my dad is dead asleep like four feet from his head. What am I going to do? I can't.

Speaker 3:

I can't say hey, buddy, like there's a short I know I have, like potentially three seconds it walked in the field, it paused the whole broad side for the dylan to shoot his first elk. It couldn't get better. So I took the shot um off a little bit. My dad just jumped out of the skin. What is happening? What are you doing? What are you doing? It's like I shot an elk. It's like I don't see any fucking elk. It's like well, it's gone now oh shit, I love that story it was.

Speaker 3:

He was, uh, it took him a while to settle down and everybody's kind of whispering because you know, I'm sure I shot the damn thing. It's like it would be hard to miss at this distance and I am perfectly leveled on this log, but Frank can't see in the bush, so we're going to give it a half hour before we go start tracking it. And it was only, I think, 15 minutes and we hear a boom and I'll turn the story over to you, stephen, because you're the rest of that story.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, so I'm sitting in the nest, which is the place that I went to hunt when we left you in Barefield, and it was the first time I'd ever hunted that spot and it got its name, the nest, because there's like these little trees that you kind of sit and kind of feel like you're sitting in a nest. Anyways, I hear Dylan's boom, and I know it's him because he's the only one up in the general vicinity of me and it was close, and so I know it was him and I'm like awesome, um, dylan got something. And then I think it was minutes later, because an elk ran directly into my spot and I didn't know what to think. I didn't know, did Dylan miss? And this is the elk that he was shooting at? And now it's here, but I only. I mean, mine was about 90 yards out and I had to take a standing shot and I shot it from 90 yards out and similar like mine disappeared.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, there you go.

Speaker 2:

Thanks, Dylan. Anyhow it goes running off, but I can hear it kind of crashing, so I'm pretty sure it went down. And then, uh, did we have radios where we try?

Speaker 3:

how are we communicating? Where were?

Speaker 2:

we. What's that?

Speaker 3:

I think we did have radios. That time. We tried a few different things, but I think we had radios. I sure was confused of why I heard the shot, but so eventually though I might've no, we talked on radios, and then we then, we met up yeah.

Speaker 2:

So we we finally ended up meeting up and we realize I think we even talked about it over the radio we realized that we shot two elk, that we both shot different elk, and we're like, oh shit, it's dark, we have we're miles up this hill and we now have two elk that we need to clean and carry out of here, and Larry's probably not going to help.

Speaker 2:

And I've never cleaned an elk before yeah, so pretty much I cleaned two elk um, but man, by the time we were done it was like one in the morning just cleaning the two elk, just be addressing them. Yeah and we're like dude, I don't think I could carry. I mean I could. I think we decided to carry what we could carry down and then we were going to come back up that night yeah, right no no, if you remember.

Speaker 2:

So when we found that spot we thought it would be closer if we drove up to the top, because we thought it was closer to the top, and so I ended up, we drove my truck up to the top and then hiked down to the spot, and then, once we got there, we realized that it was way closer to the bottom than it was to the top, and our hunting camp's down at the bottom, or at least down at the bottom and up a little bit, and so we decide that the best move is for me to hike by myself at one in the morning in the dark, back up to my truck, which is about a mile and a half and about 1500 feet of elevation.

Speaker 1:

So hard hike, geez with any meat, or just just by yourself.

Speaker 2:

Just by myself, I think I threw, yeah, yeah, just running on pure fear. Um, and I think I had like we probably took the back straps or something. So I I had some small amount of meat with me and so I'm hiking like up that mountain with my pistol in hand like just scared shitless I think I was like I think I was singing gangsters in paradise, because I just wanted to make noise so that if there was any bears around they would run away.

Speaker 2:

And it was the only song that I could think of that I could just like sing out loud. And so we get down, I drive the truck around, I pick them up, and then Dylan and I are like are we about to hike back up there and carry down this elk? And it's like both of us were like dude, I couldn't. I couldn't do it if I tried, like I don't even think it's, I've got it in me. And so we were. We just decided that we were just going to leave them and wait till morning. And both of us thought that like we're going to hike back up there tomorrow and there's going to be like two half Elks with just big bites taken out of them.

Speaker 1:

Meanwhile. Well, larry's been at the camp since like 7 pm, right Like just enjoying himself.

Speaker 3:

I remember that there was a point that I'm certain where you know I'm just jacked up on adrenaline and like we're going to get this elk out because we've got to save all the meat. And you're right, some animal's going to eat it.

Speaker 3:

And the ad was like no fucking way, you two are packing out two out one elk, let alone two elk right now, and I feel like I was super annoyed by that just like you get annoyed at your dad, no matter what he says, even if he is right and so I was determined I think he, we argued about that while you field dressed him and I pretended to help. Um, yeah, and he, I kept determining like well, we'll just do this, we'll just say you're not taking it and nothing's going to eat it. I've done it before. Maybe something will chew on some of the guts. You're going to be fine and you're right. I swore we like really screwed something up and, uh, nothing happened. They were fine the next day yeah, hiked back up there.

Speaker 2:

there wasn't even like maybe some birds had pecked at them, but that was it. Well, that's awesome. And then Dylan and I proceeded to carry two elk all the way down that mountain, while Larry, I think he went up there with us the first trip and carried like one of the hides back down in his backpack. And then, when it got to the bottom and unloaded, art and Dylan and I had two heavy packs I think we took, like we each took a hand hind quarter on that first trip down, which was, you know, like 75 pounds in each of our packs. And then he's like thinking that's how heavy?

Speaker 2:

it was, yeah, and we get down to the bottom, and then all right, we're like all right, let's go back up, and larry's like no, you guys go ahead, I'm just gonna hang down here. So me and dylan went up. Uh, what's crazy is we only went up two more times. We were able to get two elk down that mountain in three trips, which is pretty crazy. Yeah, I think the last trip down, Dylan, I think we had. We both had a hind quarter and a front quarter.

Speaker 3:

Woof, yes, there's either that or do another trip up for a lighter weight and we just kind of like took a lot of breaks. Yeah, that was silly.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's like the backpacks we were, you know, felt like the arms of the backpacks were just going to rip off because there was so much weight on them. But yeah, that was the two elk story. That was a rad trip, that was a good one.

Speaker 1:

That was a good one. I love hearing the when you fired dylan and and scared the out of larry what does it seem to do?

Speaker 3:

you know, we're almost gonna like stop and edit. We forgot that, like with his early stories, as he kind of like says elephant, first he, he talked uh pretty highly of his hunts up there in canada and that he was referred to as the great white hunter, and he would remind us that that's as nipple, never mind you. He never bought a gun hunting because he didn't want to pay the extra fee, the state fees.

Speaker 1:

But he would ask for respect and maybe to be referred to as the great white hunter he sure did, he did, he certainly did and and I think, steven, you tried to claim it one time because you actually shot an elk with your bow and he's like, nope, didn't count, I'm still the great white hunter like I'm the only one.

Speaker 2:

No one else gets to be that well we had that.

Speaker 3:

This one's so silly I haven't run into, maybe, michael, now that you're so avid in the hunting stories and hunting and whatnot, but and I think, yeah, you were quite with us on these hunting trips yet. But we, uh, we were hunting once and yeah, it may have been like our second year or something before. We had like moved to muzzleloader and it's a war zone with, like here, like a ton of damn shots. Um, you're almost making like a ton of damn shots. Um, you're almost making like a strategy of, well, maybe those hunters will chase them off the mountain over there. It's just too many hunters out there. We don't see anything, we don't get anything, and it's past, it's like 10 am, you know. So there's sort of a question of well, maybe I'll do a sort of slow walk back to camp, take a nap and then prep for the evening hunt.

Speaker 3:

And I get a radio from him. I don't know. He's off by himself with a camera or scouting for us. I don't know exactly what he's doing. He's like hey, you need to come over here. What's up when?

Speaker 3:

Like, where's over here, kind of grumpy because I didn't get anything in the morning. And so he tells me and it takes a bit to navigate. We didn't have like good gps or anything like that and it's like I'm back here in these. Uh, he went up and walked out into the open so I could see him, but wouldn't quite bid on my way and he wouldn't tell me what's up. He's like come here, trust me, you just need to come here. And he walks back into like thick bush. Like I don't know why he got in there. I found out later. He just, I think, got kind of lost and ended up in some thick bush and he walks up and there's a dead elk on the ground with like three or four bullet holes in it. Like you know, and I had heard people with semi-automatics earlier, I just like hated this place and people like not taking clean shots, and so many hunters or whatnot.

Speaker 3:

And I looked down and I'm like what's going on? They're like, well, yeah, it's not, it's not our elk, anyone come around. It's like, nope, it's gonna let like, let the quiet kind of sit there for a while, like, okay, well, let's go back to camp. I don't like, I don't know how to find a hunter, to find his elk, and it's not my fucking elk. It's like, yeah, you know what, though no one's gonna find this elk. Okay, so we go back and forth like this for a while. It's like tell you what? You try to find a blood trail from this thing in these thick woods. And I've been here.

Speaker 2:

I'm gonna stop you for a second. So this is the trip. Just michael, that, um, that brian was on. It's the only time brian ever came hunting with us, and brian is dylan's other brother-in-law, yeah, and so brian's there. It's me, I think it's just the four of us. Maybe daniel, my brother, was there too, I can't remember, but, um, yeah, so we're all four of us just standing around this elk just trying to decide what to do continue to go through the same thing.

Speaker 3:

Eventually I just like he convinced me. He's like look, before I called you, the shots had stopped for an hour and then you got here an hour later, so it it's been two hours. Yep, this, no one's going to find this elk here. So he's like we don't have to tag it, but it's going to rot in these woods. And I go back with the moral sort of story of it for a while. But I started to kind of come around and like shit, maybe we shouldn't let it waste. And then Steven comes up and you had to go through the same exact like yeah fuck this.

Speaker 3:

There's no goddamn way I'm going to tag.

Speaker 2:

This is not my elk yep um yeah, and we did your thing. We did exactly like dylan said. We kind of all walked around in a circle, um larger growing circles, to see if we could even find a blood trail, so that then we could try to backtrack it back towards where the hunters were. And we couldn't find a single drop of blood within like 50 yards of that elk. That's crazy.

Speaker 3:

Another hour went by and so eventually one of us maybe it was me like reluctantly put a tag on that elk, and Stephen reluctantly started cleaning it for us.

Speaker 1:

Goodven elk number three.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I did yeah you know, it just was different. You know, usually where we shoot an elk there's there's sort of a feeling of sort of respect for for the elk and then a celebration for ourselves. This was just kind of awkward and quiet. I don't know if we even drank whiskey back in camp that night. It just felt a little weird.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we were all just moping around. We were moping around while we were cleaning it. We were moping around while we were loading the truck. We just kept looking around. It's like if another hunter comes and says this is his elk, we're going to give it to him because it's it's. You know, it's not ours, and it's like we took our time just in case someone came by and just nothing, yeah, and like we got back to camp and I think we're like cooking the heart and just like sitting there weirdly looking at each other.

Speaker 3:

I think it was later, that trip, that my dad's nickname changed from, and you coined him Stephen. You changed it from the Great White Hunter to the Great White. Finder oh man, he hated that, he did.

Speaker 1:

He was too good for years. Oh man, that's too funny. Oh shit, um, here's go ahead dylan, no, go about.

Speaker 3:

Like do you guys remember he also had he repeatedly brought up innovations in hunting, like elk hunting inventions that they're bad ideas, and he would bring them up and we would have to go through these ideas each time. Like one was could you train an elk to be your pet and ride it in the woods? Train an elk to be your pet and ride it in the woods. You wouldn't have to hike up all these mountains. They could haul it out like a horse and he'd go as far as like well, I suppose you'd have to put hunter orange on it or you might get shot and like you would take it to further details. Like that it's not, it's not the concept that needs it further discussion? Um, or he had another one. It's like what we need. He's like you know, maybe this is a dumb idea of us walking quietly through the woods. I mean, sometimes the elk are quiet, but sometimes they're noisy as all hell and you think they're all scaring each other in the woods. Maybe it's our shoes. What we need is elk hoof shoes, so we'll sound like an elk that's right oh

Speaker 1:

shit, that's too funny, yeah that sounds like larry and for the listeners. Larry was a I mean, how would you guys put it? He built things for a living, right? He had ideas he's an inventor. Yeah, he's an inventor type um and some of them were great ideas, but none of them.

Speaker 2:

While in the elk woods it sounds like no, yeah, all bad ideas in the elk woods that's too funny.

Speaker 1:

Um, here I've told this story on the podcast, which is actually, uh, dylan's first bull, right, um, and I'd like you guys to tell that story because Stephen, you and I were together, and then Dylan, you and Larry were together. So I think that that would be a fun story to tell, outside of my perspective.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's kind of fun how it joins up, I guess I mean it was a hunt of a lifetime for me. Again, eastern Washington muzzleloader. My dad was there, we put in, we got organized enough to do a group bull permit and got drawn. So all three of us were drawn right in a pretty good unit and so we decided we're gonna hunt 10 days.

Speaker 3:

Uh, I think we're on the whole season basically, if that's what it took. And the first night we got out there they were uh, bugling like bugling all night, which I don't think any of us really had that much experience with that. I had never really I've heard like a bugle here or there, like I've heard bugling and really being in the rut it was awesome I'm gonna, I'm gonna interrupt real quick because

Speaker 1:

that first night. I remember waking up that next morning to go into the woods and everyone's like how'd you sleep? And I'm like they were bugling all night. I couldn't sleep a wink and both of you were like what, what are you talking about? And I'm like I was the only person that was up all night hearing bugling literally all night long, and neither one of you both of you just slept right through it. But yeah, they, they bugled all night long. That was the craziest thing I'd ever experienced yeah, that's true.

Speaker 3:

I think maybe I went to the bathroom once, but other than that, it's you that told me to be googled. All night I slept soundly.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I slept not at all because because larry snored so bad, which we can go into how we fix that problem at some point.

Speaker 3:

But let's keep going so, um, pretty excited, pretty excited about our prospects, on opening day and went up to a spot that we had kind of seen a confluence of trails and I don't know, maybe been hunting eight years at this point and, you know, not killing it every year, like not not getting an elk every year by a long shot. So first feeling like a b12 shot and excitement for hunting. But morning goes, no elk. No elk comes by. That's fine. We got lots, lots of time and so it's kind of a newish part of the gmu. So I drag my dad along and we walk up some area and I can hear the bugling in the distance. It's quite a bit of ways, ways away. As we walk, just kind of hunting one valley to the next, goodness, don't feel like heading back to camping. I was getting to you towards midday by now, so usually I feel like it was, I feel like.

Speaker 2:

Feel like it was like 10 in the morning. So the morning hunt was kind of over, but it wasn't quite time to go back to camp yet. It wasn't lunchtime.

Speaker 1:

Well, you and I had gone back to camp, you and I had breakfast.

Speaker 2:

We did, but we had kind of gone back out. That's right you were going to, so you thought it was hard to stay at camp when they had that happening, but we had kind of gone back out.

Speaker 3:

That's right.

Speaker 1:

That's right.

Speaker 3:

You were Googling too, so you found it's hard to stay at camp when they have that happening. And I'm not getting close. My dad and I aren't getting closer to them, we're kind of heading off, as far as I can tell, at the same pace as me, maybe faster, and I say to my dad.

Speaker 3:

You know this doesn't make a lot of sense, but I want to see if I can catch him. You know this doesn't make a lot of sense, but I want to see if I can catch him. Like, maybe there's enough of them. I want to get as close as I can. I don't have preconceived notions of loudly sneaking up on a bunch of elk, but it's either that or go back to camp. So he's too slow and so I'm kind of dancing around. It's like you know what. I'll stay right here. So I set him up with food and water, had a kind of half-assed conversation about navigation and how he could get back to camp. I'm not sure he could have. Um, I'm glad the weather was good, no chance, um.

Speaker 3:

And so I left him there and I put my rifle over my back and I just hit out on a jog to like at least get closer, um, and I'm I'm getting on them. I can tell that it's getting louder. There's still a ways away and but I can tell they're up on the ridge now. I'm like shit, I'm gonna feed up this ridge, okay. And so I start hiking up there and I pause and I look and there's two cows at the top looking at me. It's pretty exciting like, oh shit, I'm real close. They sound far away but maybe they're over the ridge. So they go run off and book it up up to the top of the ridge. And now I'm starting to get the feeling of like, oh, should I be going quietly, because I'm going to spook the whole thing and ruin it and go run 20 miles off on the other hand, they're moving, so it's like maybe it's all or nothing.

Speaker 3:

And I've heard stories of like, when they're in ruts, maybe they could give a shit about you, right, you could just sneak up on them. So I decided to book it. So I move in and I spook a bull off, maybe 50 yards to my left. God damn, it fucked it up. I could have gone slower and got to it, but anyway I keep going. Slower and got to it, but anyway I keep going. And uh, now I'm coming down a ridge and I'm pretty close, close enough to determine oh, there's at least two bulls bugling, there might be three and uh, and then I hear them hitting downhill, and so at one point I was running downhill jump, this is not like the door.

Speaker 3:

I'm not advising anyone to elk hunt like this, believe me, I can't imagine doing it again. But I'm trying to get closer and so I'm running down a hill, like leaping down a hill, and I pause and I see them coming down like a freight train, just like dust and bushes and whatnot, and there may be 100, 200 yards from me. I'm like, oh, I'm so close, close, but it's really thick brush, so stopping doesn't make sense. And uh, man, my heart was really beating during that. It was a really like primal feeling. So then I had crossways to where they're at. They're kind of staying more still. I'm getting real close to the point where I can smell them and I'm wondering like I don't even see like 10 fucking yards, but like, how close can I do? Six?

Speaker 3:

I really need, uh, what do you call it when you have a knife on the end of your rifle bayonet I need a bayonet here, if I get it and, uh, right by then I heard a bugle that was way closer than I thought, and then one that pissed off one uphill and they came down with its harem, um, crashing through it. I actually had a thought there for a second of like getting run over by them. But I can now see the dust, I can't see them and they're just on the other side there. And so I decide, okay, I'm going to kneel here. I can see maybe 20 yards in this one lane. It's about as good as it's going to get back here. I'm just going to be still for a bit.

Speaker 3:

Maybe they'll come up my way and I don't know, maybe I did it for 10 minutes or something like that and this huge damn six by six trumps right up broadside, 20 yards from them, and I shoot them right in the heart. It was nothing like from a kneeling stance, it was easy shot right there and and it runs off and I just sit down to let it do its thing. But maybe, like a minute later I hear across the Valley not too far, too close, frankly another shot, and I'll turn it over to one of you guys to finish the rest of the story well, let's take a quick pause.

Speaker 1:

So you left larry sitting on a stump, do you guys remember? The videos that larry took sitting on that stump remember he never has a gun, never has a gun, never has a gun with him. But what was in those videos?

Speaker 3:

What was in those videos?

Speaker 1:

Oh, elk it was herds of elk. He had a video of like 50 elk running at like 40 yards from him.

Speaker 3:

I actually got him in front of me right now. I'm watching it right now.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah, he was just like look at that and he's just like literally just pointing his phone, taking his videos, sitting there not doing a thing, just just as it's one with a rock. Yeah, yep, absolutely. Yeah, there's so funny. Just left in there. And then, also where you guys were earlier in that morning, we had a game camera and the biggest elk, even bigger than the one that you shot, walked by that game camera about an hour after you left it, so it just happened to be a surplus of elk that particular morning.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and there's one of the pictures of that elk is bugling, so he was one of the ones going into that fight that Dylan just happened to be in the middle of.

Speaker 1:

Yep, yep, and I saw that elk at some point. But, stephen, why don't you start your story from the beginning of the morning, and then maybe we'll meet up when Dylan fires?

Speaker 2:

Sure, yeah, so, uh. First of all, like when Dylan told me that story of him running through the woods with his muzzleloader in his hand, I always picture um Daniel.

Speaker 1:

Day Lewis at the beginning. Don't give him that. Don't give him that he's already got a song yeah, dude for sure.

Speaker 2:

Man just running through the woods and all of a sudden stops and shoots an elk as it's running.

Speaker 2:

That's the picture I have in my head so yeah, so we're hunting and I think Michael and I are hunting on the other side of the road, from where Dylan is kind of back in this brush and yeah, and so, like, like Michael said, we went back to camp, but we just we'd already hunted. We kind of walked back to camp. We went and grabbed some apples and we were going to go like spread them around in this other area that we wanted to hunt. It was called the bog. There just happened to be like a boggy area up on the other side of the hill, and so we're up in there, um, with some apples that we had and we're like just playing kind of baseball with them, like you'd pitch one up in the air and I would smash it with a stick and we're hearing these bugles like an applesauce, yeah the bugles sound.

Speaker 2:

They're, they're bad bugles, and so we're like that's those hunters. They suck they're. They just keep talking back and forth to each other and we're sitting there thinking is like these, these guys are sitting here bugling at each other.

Speaker 1:

They're not even like neither one of those is an elk, never mind, this is october, right?

Speaker 2:

so like it's not huge, bugling september, october is not huge, you know, yeah, and so we're just sitting there talking those stories and then and hitting um, apples with bats, and then all of a sudden, one of the bugles was a good, good bugle and I was like, dude, there's, I don't know, a person that can make a bugle that good. That was an elk. And so we both kind of just like jump up and grab all our shit and start running towards that bugle, and I think we each had like 20 pounds of apples in our backpacks too.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and we're, we're running and we get to where we can see the other slope, which is where that bugles are coming from. And we glass and we see this bull that's bugling. He's got mud all over the side of him and he's running right towards where we're hearing the other bugles. So we're like holy shit, there's like a a big bullfight about to happen, um, and so we're just tearing ass running down the slope that we're on to get to the roads that we can run up the other slope. And similarly, like I think you had had a, didn't you have a knee problem, michael?

Speaker 1:

I. It was like my first time doing anything after an Achilles rupture and having surgery. That's right yeah.

Speaker 2:

And so when we get to the road, I'm like he's like, dude, I don't think I can run up that hill.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so I'm going to go credit. I made it about a hundred feet up that hill and was like Nope, okay, well, I tried. Okay, give me a little bit of credit, okay, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So you try, but at some point you you holler at me and you're like I can't run anymore up that hill.

Speaker 2:

And I'm like, okay, well, I'm going to keep going and you just go and walk, like just skirt the hill or walk straight sideways, you're not having to run up it. And so I had run, and I ran almost to where Dylan was, because when I heard the shot I was at full run and it sounded like it was 20 feet away from me and I hear just these, this blasting of elk running through the woods, and I know what it is because I'm so close, and so I'm like one of them is absolutely going to run by me. All I've got to do is stand right here and I'll get a shot. And it turns out like they ran in every direction except the direction that I was from them, like nothing came by me. I'm just sitting there in the woods by myself with like 50 yard shots all around me and there's 40 elk in the woods and none of them go by me. Um, and I'll turn it over to michael to tell his part of the story. Yeah, I'll tell another part yeah.

Speaker 1:

So here I am in my mc hammer pants running down the road right because I can't go uphill. Just the the slope killed me and I'm just jogging. I'm like I don't know what I'm doing, Like these guys didn't teach me shit. The only thing you guys told me was if I shoot my muzzleloader, first thing I should do is reload it.

Speaker 1:

So I'm running, I'm running, I'm running, I'm running, and then I hear boom. And next thing I know there's an elk standing front of me at like a hundred yards. So I pull my muzzleloader up, I'm breathing heavy and I and I looked down the site you know open sites, right, iron sites and all I see is an elk with a Davis tent, like a big wall tent, directly behind it and I'm like I can't, I can't take that shot. I was like I don't know if somebody's sleeping in, I don't know what's going on, but I can't shoot this shot.

Speaker 1:

And and that was the bull dylan, the huge one on the camera that we had, the bigger of the bulls. I mean, he was, I don't, it was at least a six by six, I don't know, but he was bigger than the one that we killed. And he just looks at me, stops for a second or two and I'm like what am I gonna do about this? I can't do anything about it. And he runs off. So I run, you know, the 50, 70, 80, 80 yards down that road to where he was, and I look into the brush to where he ran in across that road that I was running down, and uh, and I hear something behind me, so I turn around and well, god damn it, there's another bowl right there.

Speaker 1:

So I'm like, okay, it's uphill, it's about 60 yards. I pull my muzzle loader up. He's just standing there and I take that shot. And that's the second shot, dylan, that I think that you heard right, and so I think the next thing that I remember is dropping. I have a little container to keep all my black powder dry. I open that up and I drop everything. So I'm like digging through the grass trying to find my black powder, trying to find my sabbats, and I'm just like panicked, don't know what's going on. I just shot at an elk and this is like my second year I think you guys were angry at me because we do this tag on my second year um, and a truck drives by. I'm literally in the ditch on the side of the road trying to find sabbats and gunpowder. They were maybe 30 seconds away when I fired and they just drove by, didn't ask any questions.

Speaker 1:

They drove by while I'm like yeah nothing, just while I'm scrambling in the ditch next to the road trying to get, get all this shit, um, and so I don't know what to do, so I just run straight to where I shot it, and that's when I think I hear you, dylan holler, and so I'll throw the story back to you yeah, I can't quite remember what it is like.

Speaker 3:

It's confusing because you shot an elk and I believe you and I certainly shot an elk and I know the elk is 50 yards from us. It's laying down now it's dying, it's taking his like last breaths. So, uh, you and I sat there for a bit. It's kind of a interesting moment to share.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to take us back just a second man. Sorry, but like I remember, this is really. This is something that I remember very clearly is you yelling who's shooting? And I hear your voice and I go, dylan, I shot an elk. And we're just screaming in the woods because that's what you should do immediately after killing an elk, right? It's just screaming at each other. So you yell who's shooting? I yell I'm shooting, dylan, because I can hear your voice. I know it's you and I'm like, ah, I shot an elk. And then you go. I shot an elk. And then you go, I shot an elk. Then you go. I have no idea where mine is. I'm like I'm standing where I shot mine. Come to me. Eventually we end up finding each other. We're just completely. Neither one of us has a clue what's going on. We're sitting there talking to each other.

Speaker 3:

Go ahead. I remember that. I think I know those because we don't wear hunter orange and muzzle loader and it just was so close and I'm scared of idiot hunters so I was like didn't know it was you or whatnot. That's right, I remember that, yeah but yeah so we came to each other. We're trying to sort out what happened, right, but we know I think at that point we found the elk. We know it's dying off, yeah.

Speaker 1:

So we're standing there talking and I'm like I shot it right here. This is what it was standing on this game trail. And then you look down the game trail, what I don't know 60 yards, and it's standing there, just standing there, yeah, and we're like what do we do? And you're like I need to go get Larry. I left him in the woods.

Speaker 3:

I don't know how long it's been. I don't know how far away I am.

Speaker 1:

That's like all you can think about is like we're I'm looking at this, I'll get still on its feet and you're like, oh shit I went how long ago did I leave?

Speaker 3:

and he was like I didn't stay there till it died. I wouldn't got larry before before it died.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you were like you stay with this thing. I want to go get larry right. I remember sitting with you for a bit having a conversation around like it dying, and I was just both kind of acknowledging like man hunting, you know, we need, we need to eat meat. Um, it didn't want to die. This is just sort of the reality of the thing and, um, a little respectful moment of it and then that's right. I remember it's like I better get my dad uh, so I did find it stay put showed me his pictures. He was like really excited to show it to me because he's thinking what an idiot right running off in the woods of the goddamn elk right here. So he's pretty excited to hear when, uh, we got something. But then we got up to the elk and it's got two bullet holes in it because you and I shot the same damn elk yep, we did, we did which I've learned since that moment awkward

Speaker 1:

in the state of washington. Technically that's my elk. I know that you got the rack, but in the state of washington and oregon it's the last shot if it's still on its feet.

Speaker 1:

Last shot, uh, in fact some hunters follow hunters. I was talking to um cody rich. He's a he's a big hunter out of oregon and he's actually had this experience like three different times where him or a buddy shot an elk and somebody else shot it afterwards and the legality of it is this last hunter to shoot it while it's still alive gets, gets yelled. So I'm just saying yeah, I mean it kind of makes sense right, because what if?

Speaker 3:

what if the shots were like identical, like I? Don't know you gotta have, you have to have something to pick it. Well, I'm just, I'm gonna remember that next time I go hunting with you guys, I'm gonna just, if I hear you shot, I'm just gonna find that elk and shoot it right before it dies there you go there you go, and I'm glad you didn't look it up, because you and I sat there negotiated for a while.

Speaker 3:

I think we logged it out that I probably made I my shot was in the heart and yours was a little off the heart and mine was long and yours was heart. Yeah, you did they were both kill shots but yours.

Speaker 1:

You didn't need mine, that's for sure I didn't need yours.

Speaker 3:

That's how we logged it up, or either that or we used kindergarten rules, which is like I saw it first. Yeah, we shared the meat, but this was a trophy, so if we were sharing the meat, there wouldn't have been any real issue. But someone gets the antlers from this beautiful bee, so it was an awkward discussion.

Speaker 1:

That's right, and this is also the first that steven didn't fully clean, because while you were gone I was like steven, I feel like I should start this thing, and so I started it and then, dylan, when you got there, you finished it. So steven was still, that's right, majority of it, probably 51, but the rest we did some work on this particular elk yeah we did.

Speaker 3:

we did some work on it and remember there's another one which we don't need to go into the story. The trick is, if you get sick of cleaning the elk, just feign ignorance for a bit and Steven can't stand it because he cleans them so fast. He just gets in there. He's like I don't know how do you do it, steven.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you guys tricked me into that a bunch.

Speaker 3:

Well, I guess the biggest thing to me was I didn't start near camp. I chased this elk all over the damn hills and there sure are a lot of stories of like then the elk's way back there and you got to pack it out, these things. They ended up somehow on the same hillside about maybe what would, maybe, maybe 400 yards from our tent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

On a hillside on slippery grass, and this was a big animal, I don't know. What do you think that thing weighed?

Speaker 2:

700 pounds, 800 pounds. Yeah, yeah, 700, 800.

Speaker 3:

We took that thing and we walked back and drove my truck. Or maybe it was your truck, Stephen, no, it was.

Speaker 1:

Larry, at that point you were sitting back with Larry. He walked to get the truck because we were about a mile down the road and drove it up. And while Larry was getting the truck remember that tent that I almost didn't shoot but had the shot at those boys came back for midday and they were hollering at us. Remember they were like what are you boys doing up there?

Speaker 3:

And we're like we shot an elk.

Speaker 1:

They're like you guys shot an elk next to our camp and I'm like you guys have no idea. I basically an elk ran through your camp.

Speaker 3:

Right Drove them nuts. They right drove them nuts. They've been hunting all day. It's like, yes, right outside there. Well, yeah, you know that elk would have been a lot of work to path out and we would have left a lot of meat there, but we slid that thing into. We actually had to slow it down sliding down the hill and it slid right into the back of the truck with no effort.

Speaker 1:

I think it hit the cab just a little bit like yeah, I think I think there were six of us, because those guys came up and helped, right.

Speaker 2:

So the six of us slowly slid that thing right into the truck bed, yeah and the slope of the hill just happened to be the perfect slope that when you back the truck up to the hill, the tailgate just bumped the hill. So, it just slid right down in there.

Speaker 1:

I just remember Larry being in the truck while we were doing that being like good job boys.

Speaker 3:

This is how hunting's done, just like like like he wrote the script to what just happened yeah, that's right, these photos in the cabin raw, I forgot I had them really high resolution. But yeah, we hung that elk up hole in camp on day one. We actually had. I think, steven, you had to like re-rig things because it looked the head was like on the dirt, uh, but it was a pretty prominent spot so we got a lot of looky-loos coming by and looking at it for a while yeah, and that was the first day of our 10 day on eight.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, but we didn't see another elk the rest of the time that's right, but we did see a beehive.

Speaker 1:

You want to tell that story?

Speaker 3:

holy shit it was that same trip. What a weird thing happened on one trip.

Speaker 1:

It was the same trip, yep um we.

Speaker 3:

So I got drunk that night and slept in and let the guys but after that yeah.

Speaker 3:

I guess we, uh, after that, we I helped you know scouts and whatnot and take some pictures. So I came out, um, at least in the afternoon hunts, and we had some cameras around and I had put this one up and I remember thinking when I put it up, I put it up and I think I'm the tallest and I reached up high and I remember thinking, oh b, oh weird. And then that's it. Well, it's time to go get retrieved the camera. And now maybe it's warmer out than when I put it up. But the roots of this tree are a wasp hive and the thing it's not like it's an easy release. You got to like undo straps on this thing. So we kind of see what we're up against. I put it up there, um, I think that's how we decided I had to take it down no.

Speaker 2:

So I think what was happening is we went, we went over there to get it and I don't remember if it was you that was to get it down or if it was me but we start getting it down and then all of a sudden, like I get stung by a bee, and then your dad gets stung by a bee, and then we kind of run out of there.

Speaker 2:

And we realized like, oh, there's some bees flying around, that very specific thing. And we were like, well, I've been stung already, larry's been stung already, dylan, you got to go get it because you haven't been stung yet.

Speaker 3:

I'm a blind dog.

Speaker 2:

That's how it went I took it raw.

Speaker 3:

So I go get it and I think I might have stepped on the root or whatever. It was like a log.

Speaker 1:

It was a log that you stepped on and the log dropped.

Speaker 3:

I'm trying to get it off. Right, I'm trying to get it off, but I'm getting bit like I'm getting stung a couple times. I'm working fast but I end up with humming. I can hear them and I forget about the camera and I run away and swat at them and I've never had an experience like that, like they were attacking me. So I start running through the woods I can run pretty fast and then I'm running downhill. Then I'm running downhill like jumping over logs, making pretty big bets on my agility to get rid of these things, and they are stinging me like I'm standing still. And I ended up. I think I screamed at one point.

Speaker 3:

I ended up actually getting like pretty afraid. It was kind of a primal feeling and had this like little voice, it's like a little realization if there was a cliff, I would jump off of it, like that's that's. And I had the realization and I sat down. I was like, well, we're not going to get to that point. So I just sat there and swatted him with my sweater and whatnot and they stung the shit out of me until they were satisfied or dead, I don't know.

Speaker 1:

Is that what happened? I was actually not there. This is like the two days that I went back to town. All I remember is Larry had the whole thing on video. Do you remember that?

Speaker 3:

Yes, yeah, he thought it was funny too soon. I guess it was pretty funny, yeah, everybody else it was.

Speaker 1:

It was the funniest video I've ever seen because it's like you for two seconds and then it's just. Then it's just woods. You don't see anything, but you hear you screaming and that is all that video was was a picture of the woods and you screaming yeah, and larry and I are laughing and then the more dylan screams that we're like uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-oh, like we.

Speaker 2:

We were laughing for a while and then all of a sudden we realize it's like this, is it's not actually funny? He's getting really fucked up, um, by those bees and and then we didn't know what we, what could we have done? Right, like, we're trying to figure out. Like, what do we do? Flapping me in the face, yeah.

Speaker 3:

What are we going to do? Yeah, I don't know, man, they sure owned the bees. My eye sealed shut in a couple, in an hour or so. By face. The pictures looked like I was I lost a UFC fight.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I thought about going to the hospital just like. I don't know can something happen if I get stung that much? Um and for about a couple of years if I heard like a house fly, you know, if there's a fly in my truck I damn near drive off the road. I was so scared of anything that buzzed after that yeah Understandably understandably.

Speaker 1:

That was crazy, oh man. And then?

Speaker 3:

we. You never got the camera down so we still had to get it down. Right, yeah, right, yeah. Then we dressed you up. Somehow you lost the bag well.

Speaker 1:

So I still have photos of this and I'll put this on my instagram. But, like, we were like how do we get back here?

Speaker 2:

and so you guys went to town and I don't know if you remember this, steven, feel free to take over, but you bought tupperware and a bug bomb we had the temporary temporary and we bought a bug bomb and we duct taped the bug bomb and then so I drew the short straw of like putting the bug bomb over the log. And so the idea was is like um, so I put on every bit of clothing that I had, like jackets on, I put gloves on and duct tape the sleeves so that my hands are in there. And if you guys remember, we had this like salad plastic salad thing that came it was kale salad team it was kale chips we're in this little plastic square tub Kale chips.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Cheddar flavored kale chips.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and so we poked holes in it, not big enough for bees to go into, and then duct taped that to the hoodie of my jacket so that, like I could see through it. This was our idea, right, like I'm bee proof and I'm going to walk in there. This was our idea, right, like I'm bee proof and I'm going to walk in there. And so I go to do this and I'm fucking hyperventilating in this thing Cause I can't breathe worth of shit.

Speaker 2:

And it's fogging up, it's fogging up so I can't see either. And so I'm walking in there to like set this and I do it. I go over there and I set this bug bomb Tupperware over the top of the log so that it's like spraying it down in there. And this is like this is going to work. It's going to kill all the bees. We're going to be fine, yeah.

Speaker 1:

And I get that, and at the same time, Go ahead, go ahead.

Speaker 2:

No, no, no, that was the end of mine.

Speaker 1:

I think I walked over to you and you started helping me get out of my yeah, yeah, and the same time, dylan, you're not willing to leave camp.

Speaker 3:

You're like fuck, fuck that. No, I'm not going anywhere near that camera.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you're like you guys figure it out or leave it, I don't care. I'm not going anywhere near there, but we come back the next day, steven with a bb gun right and we start shooting the tupperware thinking maybe well, no, we're just like if they're alive, if we shoot the BB gun it'll fire them up and they'll start floating. So one of us, like we're 30 yards right, one of us has binos and the other one's shooting the Tupperware with the BB gun trying to see if the bees exist still or not.

Speaker 1:

And they fucking do. And so now we've got a pissed off hive of bees again, like, well, well, shit, what do we do? So go back to camp, and the next day is our last day. And we're like, oh, we have to get it before we leave. And uh, I think I think the logic was like dylan, you just refused to do anything involving that hill, which made enough sense. Yeah, larry, I don't think larry was still in camp. I think larry's like dylan. My son got a bull elk. I'm going back to drink wine at home.

Speaker 1:

Steven's like I'm not tall enough to reach it. I'm pretty sure you were tall enough to reach it, steven, you just didn't want to do it. Yep, exactly HR hoodies, necks, waists, you know, ankles, everything duct taped. I don't think I went with. I might've had like a pair of like shooting goggles that I threw on over my eyes, but I walked in there and first thing in the morning, when it was still cold, and and and just basically unzipped it and walked off. No harm, no foul. Thank God, because I wasn't even there when you boys did that. So I felt pretty.

Speaker 1:

I don't know, pretty screwed over having to undo it Did it saved the day. I don't know about that. Did you have that video? That?

Speaker 3:

Larry took of you running through the woods or no, you know, I bet my mom was somewhere. I don't think If you sent it to me I'd probably delete it, and I was there for a little while. I bet my mom goes somewhere. I don't think if he sent it to me I'd probably delete it. I was there for a little while.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, that's one of my, my favorites.

Speaker 2:

I just remember Larry showing everybody that when he came back to Seattle to shit during the little break.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, Well, what other stories do you guys have?

Speaker 1:

That was a fun trip. All that happened in one crazy trip. What else? Do you have anything else that you want to share about larry?

Speaker 2:

well, I've got a story. It was a couple years before that, but in that same area. We're maybe like 100 yards further up the road from there and it's just me, dylan and Larry and this one year we were back in there hunting and it was so effing cold it was, I mean, like it was well below zero, and we didn't go out there prepared for that. And you know we have the big tent that has a potbelly stove in it, but it's a burn band year so we can't have a fire and it's by far the coldest year we ever had and it was the only year that we couldn't have a fire. It's by far the coldest year we ever had and it was the only year that we couldn't have a fire. What we decided to do is we decided to go into town and see if we can find some stuff to keep us warm. All we have is our sleeping bags. They're good sleeping bags, but they just weren't good enough for that weather.

Speaker 2:

We go to this um thrift store and we all buy like we buy them out of old blankets, so go back to camp. And then I bought a um, a little heater, like a little propane heater, but it wasn't powerful enough to heat the whole tent. It would only kind of heat up my area. That's hilarious. Kept trying to steal it from me. Um, but the but. So we're all bundled up, we were all. When we go to bed, we're all in our sleeping bags with like five or six blankets that we bought at this thrift thrift store over each of us, all still freezing, all just kind of miserable all through the night. Except me, I've got this little heater buddy that's heating up just my general vicinity. But yeah, I just remember Larry complaining the whole time that we were out there and it was that cold.

Speaker 3:

And snoring the whole time too oh yeah, well, I'll tie I always wake up and say did I snore? Yes, man story. Every time what are you asking the question?

Speaker 1:

do you guys remember when we figured out how to stop him from snoring? No no, okay. Well, one year somebody brought a joint in washington at this point marijuana was legal and we brought it and larry smoked a bunch of it and that night he didn't snore, and so from that point forward we made him smoke every night before he went to bed like, well, there's hilarious, he didn't have to like smoke a lot he just took one puff before he laid down and, for whatever reason, that was enough to stop his snoring and we all slept better every night from that one night, yeah, yeah, and he'd be like I don't even want to smoke and be like you're fucking smoking larry.

Speaker 2:

We're gonna make you take this joy, I don't want to be high. Right now it's like smoking anyways oh man, that was too funny I forgot.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome oh man, I hit up I, dude, I've got a funny story about larry in the grocery store. Okay, this isn't one story, this is every time we went to the grocery store. But he would just be walking through the grocery store with us and he had no idea what to do. It's like he'd never been to a grocery store before and he'd just be kind of waddling around behind Dylan or just wandering off and we'd be like Larry, go get some coffee. And he'd come back with enough, a 12th pack, enough coffee for one day. And we'd be like, dude, we're, what are you doing? Like, get enough coffee.

Speaker 2:

You'd be, like, oh, what do you mean? I'd like go get us some chips and he'd come back with like one bag of chips like for himself. Like larry, come on, man, like you're not helping, you've gone a half hour. Yeah, oh man, every time we went hunting we'd just have me and Dylan would have to do all the shopping, and then we'd have to find Larry at the end. That's too funny.

Speaker 3:

He started out as like our like mentor and super helpful. I don't know what we've done without him. And then he just got progressively less useful but over time. Time till his name was the great white finder.

Speaker 2:

But uh, yeah man.

Speaker 3:

He was always uh, at his best, I think, hunting like oh yeah, it's funniest and you could tell that the stresses melted away.

Speaker 2:

He was at his happiest uh, on the hunting trip for sure absolutely absolutely so glad to have had him at all of them too, man, every time it's such a blast yeah, yeah, absolutely, I, it's, it's.

Speaker 1:

I remember the first year he wasn't there with me and it was uh, it was a totally different experience.

Speaker 2:

So, yeah, oh well, yeah, me too yeah, that's what hunting stories are about.

Speaker 1:

Right, just remembering the the best of times.

Speaker 2:

So hell yeah you guys have any more stories or?

Speaker 1:

we're gonna call it here. I mean, you guys tell me I think that's about it.

Speaker 3:

You know there were some stories he told from his hunting on repeat, um, and I like loosely remember him but like I'll share, uh, another short, I'll share him, see, if you want him. Um, you know he talked about being disciplined and up early and like steven said, like walk in the dark a long ways, be in the dark for a while by yourself, stay away from other hunters. But one time they just drank too much and screwed opening day, it was like, and they woke up hung over and just felt like ashamed, just like shit, like what are we doing this? We get drunk any night. God damn it.

Speaker 3:

Well, let's head out there. Uh, because they didn't I guess they weren't camping that year they're just like waking up early from cochchran and driving out there. So I think he said it was around noon, and they just kind of get into the national forest and there's an elk right there, just on the side of the road, and they get out of their truck and load their gun I don't know, maybe it was loaded, I don't know and shoot it and they were home by like 1230.

Speaker 3:

That sounds like a good old timer story. Yeah, so I didn't necessarily learn.

Speaker 1:

That actually reminds me. It's a. It's not a larry story, but I'm going to share with you guys because I haven't told you you too, this story. I've mentioned it on the podcast before. But my neighbor, his father, had a moose tag in Minnesota and they went hunting and they drank too much and they really didn't hunt very much. Um, ended up coming home wasting the tag and so they're driving home and the gentleman's passed. So I'll you know I don't know what the statute of limitations is for someone who's passed, but they were driving home drunk from hunting a moose, and they hit a moose with their car. It just completely obliterated the moose. So what they did is one of the guys hitchhiked to town, bought the cheapest truck they could find, came back, put the moose in the back of that truck and then just drove home and left the other truck on the side of the road.

Speaker 1:

What I know I've been trying to get a vehicle yeah, they just left the vehicle and then just bought a new one, and we're not talking to like a nice vehicle. He went to town about like a 500 beater that he would think would take the moose home. Um, I'm still trying to get the, the hunting buddy of that story, the guy who didn't have the tag on on the podcast, but he's, he's hard to find, uh. But yeah, it's just those, those old-timer stories of like waking up too drunk and then just driving out shooting something and being done with it. It's just those. Those are classic stories absolutely.

Speaker 3:

my grandpa, who might have been only a handful of words, he's ever said to me hunted moose in Saskatchewan. And I asked him it's like, oh, grandpa, it's like I'm young, right, probably 10 or something you hunt moose. How do you hunt moose? Well, you walk along out in the field in the snow and you find some moose trail. I'm like, yeah, then you follow the moose trail for most of the day.

Speaker 1:

I'm like, yeah, trail for most of the day, like, yeah, there's a moose at the end of it and you shoot it and then he just walked off, didn't laugh, didn't start. It's like walked on, it's like good talk. Yeah, thanks for the sage advice. Yeah, oh, man. Well, dylan, you got any more of larry's stories you want to share?

Speaker 3:

otherwise we'll wrap this thing up man that's it for now. Man really appreciate you. Having us on that was a lot of fun. I'm on those all again and some great memories.

Speaker 1:

Yeah it was a lot of fun. So thank you guys for coming on At this point. I don't know if you guys want to share your social handles Most people do but you guys definitely don't have to. We could just walk off into the sunset and have our favorite Larry memories and say goodnight.

Speaker 3:

I don't really have a social thing that I'm trying to build.

Speaker 1:

That's kind of what I was thinking.

Speaker 2:

Alright, guys, yeah, I don't even know my Instagram, call sign or whatever.

Speaker 1:

Call sign. It's probably better that way you can find Steven on Adult Friend Finder at.

Speaker 2:

Great.

Speaker 3:

White Finder yeah, and.

Speaker 1:

Dylan, you're on Grindr right, so that's where you can look for him. All right guys.

Speaker 1:

Thanks again, I appreciate you guys. All right guys, that's it. Another couple stories in the books. Again, I want to thank Dylan and Steven for coming on the podcast. It was really nice to connect with them. Haven't hunted with either of them in a while, since we've all been moving around a little bit, but it did feel very much like we were in our old hunting camp just shooting the shit and having fun with Larry. Only this time he couldn't defend himself, so I hope you guys enjoyed. I hope you guys kind of understand who Larry was, because he was quite the character and he had a big effect on me. Beyond that, guys, thank you again for 100. I really do appreciate it. Hopefully you listen to every single one of them and here's to 100 more. Also, we are doing a big giveaway. You can find out who the winner is on Instagram and if, hey, if you have some stories or if you want to remember someone and you have stories about someone that's passed away for you, reach out to me. I'd love to have you on the podcast.

Speaker 1:

Thank you all very much. Now get out there and make some stories of your own.

Hunting Stories Podcast Episode Celebration
Elk Hunting Stories and Adventures
Larry's Hunting Tales
Muzzleloader Elk Hunt Adventure
The Elk Hunting Dilemma
Innovative Elk Hunting Ideas and Adventure
Elk Hunting Escapade in the Woods
Elk Hunting Trophy Dispute
Bee Attack and Cold Camping Trip
Memories of Hunting Trips
Sharing Stories With Guests and Larry