Business-First Creatives

Conducting Consistent Customer Research with Nadine Nethery of CAN DO! Content

August 01, 2022 Colie James Episode 9
Business-First Creatives
Conducting Consistent Customer Research with Nadine Nethery of CAN DO! Content
Show Notes Transcript

In today’s episode with Nadine of Can Do! Content, we are exploring the idea of conducting consistent customer research to fuel all the messaging in your business.  Basically letting your potential and current clients give you all the words you need to talk about your offer and attract other dream clients for your offers & services.

Nadine specifically identifies herself as a strategic copywriter and I adore anyone who puts strategy-first. This conversation fully covers the when, how, and why of customer research with a peek at how Nadine does this in her own business on auto-pilot.


Here are the highlights…

[00:18] About Nadine’s business
[01:13] Entrepreneur or Creative-First?
[02:40] What is Voice of Customer Data and why should we care?
[03:59] How to collect data from your own customers
[08:11] Providing value as a means to collect data
[09:42] What if you are a newbie and have very few clients?
[15:45] How Nadine is conducting consistent customer research on autopilot
[19:37] Making Customer Research a habit
[21:44] Making time to review and implement this data
[25:09] Nadine’s biggest fuckup in business and how her business changed
[27:35] Being consistent in your photography and systems
[30:06] Her offers, including the fabulous Audience Success Formula for your DIY peeps

Full show notes

You can find out more about Nadine here:
Visit her website
Follow her on Instagram
Learn more about her Audience Success Formula

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ARE YOU READY TO CREATE CONSISTENT SYSTEMS IN YOUR BUSINESS?

Dubsado VIP Experience: This is a fully done-for-you offer for creative entrepreneurs and service providers, which includes full strategy and implementation to provide each and every one of your clients with an amazing + consistent experience.  https://coliejames.com/dubsado-vip-day

CRM Blueprint - Dubsado Implementation Course for Photographers: This is a done-with-you group program option, specifically for photographers.  Go through the course at your own pace, implement the strategy and templates provided, but have the ability to ask questions and get 1:1 guided help during the weekly Q&A calls. https://coliejames.com/crm-blueprint-dubsado

Colie:

Hi, Nadine. Welcome to the Business-First Creatives podcast. How are you today?

Nadine:

Yeah, I'm fabulous. How are you Colie?

Colie:

I'm excellent. So for those that can't tell from your accent, you are on the opposite side of the world. It's currently 6:00 PM for me and it's 10:00 AM for you. So Nadine, why don't you tell us who you are and what you do

Nadine:

Yeah. So I am Nadine based in sunny, most of the time, anyway, Sydney, Australia. Um, I am a strategic website and email copywriter for women-led brands and, um, yeah, I am super passionate about helping those female founders. Um, write copy and build a strategic customer journey that helps them attract, delight, and retain their dream customers because that's where the magic lies. Right.

Colie:

Yes, dream customers. I like everybody on this side of the world says ideal client or ideal like all the time, but like, it really is your dream to work with clients that make you happy. So I do like dream client dream customer. Yeah. I might have to change my vocabulary. So we are going to kick off with my first question that I asked all of my guests. And that is, do you consider yourself to be an entrepreneur first or a creative first?

Nadine:

Yeah, it's funny you asking that because it has shifted over the years. So when I started, um, as a, this business, as a side hustle, just over five years ago, I thought copywriting was all about creativity and coming up with fluffy words that sound great, you know, as you do. Um, and then I, as I explored the big world of copywriting further and took course after course, um, I actually worked out pretty quickly that it's very strategic and umm 80%, I would say, comes down to the strategy and the research piece and 20% comes down to a natural flair for words and putting it all together. So I, um, have quickly worked out that I am more on the strategic side, which works me, really served me really well. And I will call myself a, an entrepreneur nowadays rather than a creative. So yeah. Funny how it evolves. Isn't that the start out and then go, oh, hang on.

Colie:

I mean, that's the whole point of this podcast.

Nadine:

I know. It's incredible.

Colie:

I do really appreciate that you gave me the 80 20. I mean, my math heart is to

Nadine:

Mm.

Colie:

right now. Um, so today we're going to be talking about voice of customer because this is your specialty as a strategic copywriter. And so, first of all, tell me what is voice of customer and why should we care?

Nadine:

Yeah. So voice of customer is, um, the language your audience uses to talk about their problems, your offer and the transformation that they're hoping to achieve by working with you or purchasing from you. And voice of customer data really consists of a lot of moving parts. Um, so you're looking at objections, things that are holding your dream customer or ideal customer back from buying from you. Also false beliefs that might be floating around in their minds are things that the media, society, they're friends and family are telling them about your offer and what you can provide. We also talking about pain points. So the things that are keeping them up at night, things that cost them sleepless nights and that they really want to fix. And then so important that transformation. So the happy place that they want to get to, um, in an ideal world and voice of customer encapsulates the way they talk about it. So the language they use, the words they use and how they package their thoughts. Yeah. In a way that is uniquely them.

Colie:

Okay. So let's start with me. I've, you know, I've been in business for 10 years and of course I have the photography side and now I have the Dubsado strategic side. Let's stick with Dubsado, cause I think that's a little easier. So I've had clients, how is it that I should approach getting that voice of customer data from them?

Nadine:

Yeah. So ideally I'm sure you are onto it, knowing you, ideally you should be asking very pointed questions when you onboard those clients. Um, then during the process as well. So, um, finding out, you know, the mindset shifts that are happening as you work with them, and then you need to check in with them as well. After you've worked with them to actually get those, um, hearty team, tangible outcomes that you can then turn into. Awesome testimonials on your website that you can share with people on social media, wherever you are trying to grow that trust in your brand and in your services. Um, you can also. Let's say, you know, you've missed that part and you have never really, um, surveyed customers and really ask them about the experience of working with you. You can also take that step back and backdate things. So you can send out a mass survey where you try to take them on that journey again. So help them relive that whole experience of working with you. Um, where you ask about, you know, objections that were floating around, um, doubts they had before hiring you, what made you that perfect fit? What makes you different to all the other Dubsado experts out there? The transformation that they, um, yeah, that they got from working with you and tangible results. Again, you want hard hitting numbers. Let's say they've tripled, you know, that the clients that booked with them, they have, um, doubled their prices and then people were happy to, um, you know, work with them. So all those tangible things make everything much more relatable. And while you're there, you're getting the language that they're using to talk about you, which again, helps you refine your office, tweak your copy on your website, you know, come up with, um, blog, post topics. Um, there really is no end to, um, how you can dive into that data. It's amazing.

Colie:

I think it's so fascinating because I think. Okay. So let's be honest. It might be me, but I've known that you should do it throughout the customer journey for at least a hot minute. But I think that if you had asked me this five years ago, like let's say just about my photography clients. I don't think that I would have thought to ask them well, but why did you decide to hire me when they actually hired me? I would think about doing that and like a post-session feedback form. But it's always comes down to, like, if you ask it at the end of the service, they may not remember exactly why they decided to hire you. So that's why it's so important that we have multiple checkpoints while we are working with our clients to get this sort of, you know, voice of customer data. That's so important because you want to get what they thought when they hired you. You want to get the feeling from when they were working with you and then, you know, 30 days. 60 days, 90 days out after they have fully implemented the service that you did for them, or they've actually got those bookings, they've got that actual transformation that they can talk about. So Nadine I'm so happy that you hit on that because I think a lot of the audience might think voice of customer is only done when the service is complete or in the case of someone not hiring you, that you're asking them why they didn't hire you right after they didn't.. But, I mean, I can actually see some value. Oh, I can actually see some value of coming to someone 60 days after they didn't hire you and be like, has anything changed? Did you hire someone? Did you get the transformation that you were hoping that. would be really interesting voice of customer

Nadine:

Very clever. Yeah. And see it. Might've gone pear shaped. So you might be coming in actually showing an interest and you might be able to fix the mess.

Colie:

So, yeah, not for my Dubsado clients, but like for photography clients, I feel like the follow-up is super important. And so like for my newborn clients, one thing that I do, but I also tell my students to do what I'm setting up their Dubsado and their systems is I say, Hey, if you've got a newborn client that inquired with you super early in the pregnancy, they may not have booked because they just weren't ready to book anybody. So I say that when they're about to enter full term, which, you know, 36, 37 weeks, you should send them an email. Don't mention your services. Don't mention, you know, if they hired someone, simply send them a nurturing email that say, Hey, I know you're getting ready to have the baby, your due dates right around the corner. I hope you find this hospital checklist helpful as you're packing your hospital bag or, you know, whatever it is that you can kind of add some value. And then if hiring a new, a newborn photographer just kind of fell off. Um, you know, the mega list of everything that you have to do when you're preparing for a baby, maybe they will come back around and hire you because you're the only photographer that thought to check back in, you know, months after they didn't hire you.

Nadine:

And see, showing a genuine interest again, even without showing up without a survey is yeah. Shows that you genuinely care about your customers and getting to know them intimately. yeah. And um, you know, you can find out how you can deliver value again, by researching, knowing the problems, the pain points that help you deliver extra value.

Colie:

So I've got lots of clients to interview, but what if I was like a newbie entrepreneur and I haven't had that many clients, I don't have a newsletter. Where is it that I should go to try to figure out what my potential client's pain points are or, um, you know, the problem that I could be solving from them?

Nadine:

Yeah. So don't despair. You still have plenty of sources. Um, it's I often hear from, um, customers will come to me clients who want to work with me that they haven't done any research because they don't have customers, which, you know, there is a workaround. So luckily with today's online world, there are so many places that you can, I like to call it snoop... in a non-creepy kind of way. Um, so you can literally listen to the conversations that are happening online. Um, you can start in Facebook groups, for example, so pinpointing the Facebook groups where your ideal customer hangs out. Um, so as a newborn photographer, for example, I would find my local, you know, mom community, um, and listen to the conversations that is happening in there. So conversations around photographers they've worked with potentially once they can recommend, um, that then helps you find out the competition, your local competition in the area too, again, find out your point of difference. What makes you stand out from them? What makes you different? How is your offer different, um, your positioning, the way you work that helps you shape your business, that is entirely unique to you. And it also helps you, um, yeah get into your ideal customer's mind. So Facebook groups, you can also use online forums. So, you know, slack, if you tracked down, um, channels where your ideal customer hangs out. Yeah, just simply listening and pick up the language that they're using to describe their state of mind. Um, their worries, as you said, that hospital checklist, you know, pack your bag checklist. That was, um, a great way to add value. And, um, it's probably something you could have picked up in those groups because people discuss, you know, all the things that need to be done before having a baby. So, um, yeah, snooping around online is fabulous. One thing I would say is don't use it as an excuse to copy what other people are doing. So if you find your competition and you know, you read the testimonials, you check out their offers, you do not want to copy. You want to use it as a way to find your point of difference and then really speak to that point of difference and how you are better, you know, more fabulous than everyone. Yeah.

Colie:

I mean, I, I think that it's one of the things that I've been talking about recently, um, from being in Facebook groups, like, like you said, local mom, Facebook groups, every time someone asks for a photographer. I respond and I don't use the word photographer. I say that I'm a local newborn and family filmmaker. And so if you would like to explore having video alongside your photos, here's a link to a few films that I've done. If you would love to discuss this, you know, here's my website. I decided probably a little over 18 months ago. Well, no, actually it was before the pandemic. So maybe two and a half years ago, I started doing. And someone said, but why are you doing that? When they say they want a photographer? I'm like, cause most people don't know you can get films. I said, and that's also making me very different than the other 30 people that responded to them and said, oh, I'm a local newborn photographer. I would love to take your pictures. I'm like, no, I have to stand out somewhere. So. And now me saying that I am an in-home photographer, especially for newborns, that isn't a point of differentiation anymore because there are so many people that offer in-home sessions. So now I lead with video because I am still one of the few people in my local area that offers films. So, yeah, I mean, and I definitely got that from just being around the local mom groups and paying attention to, you know, what all of the other photographers were responding. And I said, how can I respond differently?

Nadine:

Yeah, smart because you know, people buy into what makes it different and they don't want just anyone. And to be honest, some people will shop on price, but I reckon, especially nowadays people want a point of difference. They want, you know, special touch. So if you can, even in that first point of contact, stand out and really show that you understand them, but it's going to give you a real unfair advantage.

Colie:

Yeah, that is, it's something that I talked to a bunch of photographers about because I never responded to posts in Facebook groups for years, because of course in local mom groups, people are usually like, oh, you know, I want to hire a photographer that doesn't charge an arm and a leg that is literally like nails on a chalkboard for me. But I started responding to them anyways, because number one, when someone says they want someone that, you know, that isn't really expensive, you don't know what expensive is to them. So don't make that decision for them. Number two, um, I found that the people that were coming back to me were not the original people that posted. It was someone else that came in the group. And was literally searching like newborn photographer and then my post would pop up and then they would contact all the people who had responded on someone else's post and their budget wasn't the same. Or perhaps, you know, wasn't identical to the person that said, oh, I need that's cheap. so unless they use the word cheap.

Nadine:

cheap.

Colie:

I still post.

Nadine:

It's funny. The same goes for copywriters. You know, people want cheap copywriters. I'm like, Hmm. Caution. But yeah, but it's funny as you say, everyone attaches different value to things. So what is expensive to someone really? Um, you know, it's within budget and people are happy to, um, invest if they see the value in it, as he said. So if you can package it right. That's all right.

Colie:

And if you can just show the value, like you said, I mean a value without a sale attached people will just likely see you as the expert and go for that. So, w we've talked a bit about what voice of customer is. We've talked a bit about how you get it. And I think that I would be remiss if I didn't ask you about systems since I'm a systems girl. How is it that we can put systems in place to make sure that we are getting that voice of customer data that is so for our business?

Nadine:

So personally I use Dubsado in my business. I love it. It's literally. Yeah, I know But yeah, I'm not, I'm not here to advertise for your services, but it's amazing. Dubsado is, um, yeah, it's changed the way I do business just because it puts all the research components and taking all the right boxes on autopilot in my business. So I have set up, um, onboarding sequences and onboarding processes that mean as soon as someone signs a contract, they get asked all the right questions so I can then tap into those down the track. Um, same thing during our time they get another little following up to check in, see how they're going. Um, again, pick the language that they're using to describe the transformation, all those aha moments that are happening. And, um, yeah, then after same thing, Sorry, I think I've got it on 30 days at the moment, 30 days after working with them, I check in on, um, yeah. How their new website is going, how that email sequences going, what tangible, um, transformation and outcomes they've had. And that allows me to put together some really pointy, um, testimonials that I have on my website. And I'll share it on social media. I'm a big fan. So. I basically use every interaction with my customers to source new content and new social proof to, um, throw the trust in my expertise and my services and show my audience how they can, um, have the same within their business.

Colie:

Who can't do that for themselves. So we're going to talk about that in a little while. So, I mean, you kind of nip the bud. You've got a system going where you're asking them during each stage of your client experience in some way, for them to tell you how the service is going, tell you the pain points that they're experiencing. And for the most part, you've got this all done, on autopilot using your CRM, which is fabulous because even if you're not a Dubsado user, everyone, you can probably still send these emails out on autopilot with any CRM that you're currently using in your business. So please don't despair just because I'm a Dubsado user and Nadine is as well. You can still do this in the CRM of your choice.

Nadine:

And even, even in the old days, the painful days before CRM, where I did things manually, I don't know how I did it. Um, I had a Google form set up that I would link to in a manual email. So there are free systems out there. I know. Right. But, um, I did it. I still send it out at the right times, um, manually, but, um, there are ways to incorporate, you know, gathering all the right data, even without a CRM, it's a bit more manual, but it can be done.

Colie:

That's true. Um, I recently discovered Airtable. Not that we're going to go off on a tangent Nadine, but like air table is amazing for gathering customer client data, because then not only are you getting it, you're getting it all in the same place to where you can kind of look for those trends and those patterns for each question that your, that your client answers like as a group. So I will say. I'm finding that quite amazing as I'm asking things in my course

Nadine:

Yeah. How cool. Yeah, I haven't ventured into the big world of Airtable yet. One system at a time, right?

Colie:

I mean, one system at a time girl, one system at a time. So, and actually speaking of systems. So what is one system that you teach your clients that helps them

Nadine:

It's probably more a habit than a system. So, um, as part of my copy intensives, I do all the research for them. So most of my, um, customers, when they come to me, they think they know their audience. When in fact, um, it's more assuming, guessing. Yeah, they've never actually really done a survey. They've never spoken to them. Um, so we take a step back and, um, I put together a survey and I gather all that data for them and we systemize it all into buckets, into, you know, objections, pain points, um, desires. Um, and also false beliefs and then things about them that make them different. Um, and the funny thing is once my clients have that data in front of them, it's literally, you can see the penny drop, um, and what they assumed about their audience often doesn't necessarily alignwith where the audience sits, sorry, it's that misalignment. And once we have gone through that process, I'm trying to get them to stick with that habit. So incorporate regular surveys in their business. So they never really get stuck again and getting into that place where they assume and guessand you know, market really from a place of confusion and panic often. So yeah, the one thing I teach them is that habit to use every interaction with our audience, with our customers, as an opportunity to listen, to learn, to evolve their business, to look for new opportunities in their business, when it comes to new offers or refining the messaging on their website. Uh, there are so many ways to refine and improve your business all the time. Right? Because that's business, it evolves. So it's teaching them the habit to treat their audience like their biggest business tool.

Colie:

Maybe, and I just had a light bulb moment. You probably saw me. I was like, oh my gosh. So I just realized that the reason that I am obsessed with doing this is because that's what I've done with my photography business for years. So, you know, you go, you shoot this family or you photograph this family and you get these amazing images. And the first thing that I think before I even get home, Wow. That's going to make a really amazing photo on my homepage. So, you know, I would edit it and I would take that image and I would go ahead and slap it on our website. And I think that the one thing that I hear you saying, and I don't know if you actually tell your clients this, but I'm assuming that you do because you're awesome. Your website should not be static. It should not be something that you hire a professional to do and then you just leave it alone. Because every bit of data that you get from your current clients, from your future clients, can help you improve your website, improve your marketing, improve all of the messaging that you are putting out in the world. And so, you know, we shouldn't, we shouldn't live in a static world. When we get these amazing bits from our client, our first thought should be, how can I integrate this into my current messaging? And where should it go? And you should just have like some kind of document that allows you to go and make those changes. If not immediately, which I know that's not everybody's cup of tea, but like at least quarterly, at least by annually, you should have something on your calendar that says. Look at your voice of customer data, look at your website, look at your emails, and how can we improve the messaging so that we get the, you know, buzzwords higher conversions, better interactions with our clients, all those things that we all strive for

Nadine:

Yeah. It's as you said, we never stop evolving. And every insight really gives us those aha moments to keep tweaking the messaging and really speak more authentically to our dream customer.

Colie:

Do you find. That when people hire you to do the copywriting and the customer research initially, do you find that after you get it started, like after you do that really big dive into their customer research that your clients find it easier to then continue the habit?

Nadine:

totally because they've, they've had that aha moment. So it really gives them the light bulb moment to understand what is going on up here. So they could join that conversation that is already happening, um, in their prospect's mind. And it's, um, in a way de-mystify as the whole approach to copywriting. As I said, 80% research and strategy, and actually working out how all the pieces fit together. And when it comes to your customer journey, um, the pieces of information they need to hear to be ready to get from A, you know, potentially finding out about you for the first time to B, being ready to, um, give you that first, you know, thumbs up and sign up to your course or book you for them um, you know, photography services. So it is mapping it all out, knowing how they fit together, the pieces in the puzzle. And, um, how you can really speak to them to the core of what keeps them up at night and doing the research does it. And once you've got that big aha moment, all it takes, as you said, is tweaking things and refining things as you get new insights. Mm. Yeah.

Colie:

Nadine. my next question. Doesn't really flow from that, but it's okay. It's a question that I ask everyone. And it's my favorite question. And that is in your business in general, what is the biggest fuck-up that you've had either in your business, in copywriting, in voice of customer data, any of it, and, um, that cost you and what did you do to recover from the mistake?

Nadine:

it goes back to again, the early days of business, where you say yes to everyone and you work with anyone simply because you want to get your name out there and you want to add another customer, earn the money. Um, and when I first started, I, um, yeah, it didn't say no to clients who came to me with a long list of bullet points, where they basically mapped out the copy that they wanted me to write. So I started off as, um, a bit of an order-taker, I'd almost say, you know, because that's what you do, right. You're there to write, you're not there to offer your advice. And, um, I found out pretty quickly that I didn't enjoy working with those clients because, um, funnily enough, I did my, um, Gallup strength assessment not long ago, and my big strength is being strategic and being able to visualize the future, you know, how ideas can come together, how they can take shape. Um, so all that, all my strengths really didn't get tapped into because all I was doing is, um, connecting bullet points and giving them what they thought they needed, which often wasn't necessarily what they really needed. So, um, yeah, it really cost me a lot of patience. It caused frustration and it really didn't fill me with joy. So, um, ultimately I sat down and went, okay. Uh, let's say it how it is. I'm a strategic copywriter. So people don't hire me to give them what they want. They come to me with a concept and an idea, they know what they want to achieve, and then we work together to nut out how we can get there. So what it takes, whether they need an email sequence, how many pages on their website they actually need, because you know, the 20 pages they thought that will do the job, necessarily don't align. So it's actually working out, you know, what you need to not overwhelm your customer, um, to deliver all the right messaging. How do we fit it together? Um, also reminding people that no, you can't skip the audience research. You have to take that step back, because let's face it, um, you know, it comes with a certain price tag, but, um, yeah, if, if customers aren't willing to do the research and the strategy piece first then, um, yeah, I'd rather send them to someone else who might be more aligned with their budget, but it's, it's just, I can't work that way anymore. So it's, it's come more at a mental cost and mental price. Um, but yeah, it's been a learning curve to follow my gut feeling really and pick those customers who hire me as the expert rather than the order taker. Mm.

Colie:

intuition. I tell you what, I think everybody needs that on a shirt. I really do. Um, because you know, sometimes when we're sometimes when we're on a call with a potential client, a potential, Yeah. a lead let's go with that. We're on a consultation call and we're like, here, we're seeing these red flags, right. As they're speaking. And we're like, yeah, but you know, really need that money, but guys, all money's not good money. And as soon as you realize that and you find the power in saying, no, that's not for me, here are other people that will help you. And it's really interesting because you're the copywriter, right? And so for you, that non-negotiable is you must do the, the, the customer research. You must do voice of client. Right. But when I talk to like website designers, some of their non-negotiables is you must absolutely have a copywriter. Like I hear so many horror stories from website designers that are like, oh, you know, I worked with this one client and they didn't have a copywriter. And then like the whole project just went off the rails because they didn't have enough copy to get their messaging across. So I think our lesson here. Is that everyone should sit down and figure out what your non-negotiables are in order to provide the level of service that you want to provide and then work your way back. If those clients don't have it, if they're not willing to do it, that is the client that you probably need to say no to. And

Nadine:

Exactly. And as a mom of three, I've learned early on that, you know, those red flag clients, they start impacting, you know, your daily life. Do you not time because they keep emailing with questions and problems. So it's, it's really non-negotiable um, for your business owner's sanity to, um, have clear boundaries and really stick with them. Yeah.

Colie:

Alright, Nadine. I, I could literally sit here and talk to you forever. First of all, cause I love your accent. And second of all, because everything that comes out of your mouth is gold, especially when you use the word strategic over and over again. So if anybody in our listening audience wants to find out more about your offers, where can they find you

Nadine:

Yeah, so they can track me down on Instagram, had, Cando content. They can also head over to my website, candocontent.com and I have, as it happens, just released a, um, amazing, an amazing resource that can help you, uh, DIY your audience research. So get your head around, um, yeah how you can get that, all that vital um, audience data for your business, with the swipe files, templates, um, all the things you need to implement it in your own business as a regular habit, without all the fuss and pain that comes with it normally. So you can find that all on my website as well. Um, otherwise you can, of course hire me to do the whole thing for you, and then, um, turn it into copy that does all the heavy lifting for you.

Colie:

Yes. And actually, let me ask you a follow-up question because you and I know each other from like VIP day circles, but, so what is your current offer? Are you strictly VIP days? Are you extended projects? Like how

Nadine:

Yeah. So I have got, um, my use for a day service it's called. So that's for, um, clients that I've already worked with or clients who have done all the audience research before. So they've got all the data, they've got all the insights, um, and that is basically one day with me. Smash out, whatever, um, you know, can fit into that day. And I also have intensives. So they go across, um, a week where we then have, um, a agreed project in our sculpt that we nut out. And as part of that, I do the audience research for you. So before we kick off for that week, that's all done for you. I put the survey together, you get the email templates that you send out as is to your customer database. And then I sift through it all for you and make sense of it.

Colie:

I mean Nadine, so first of all, guys, I have seen the product that just got released and it is amazing. So if you have never done customer research and you're like, oh, this idea is really interesting. And I think that I should try it. You should definitely check out the product that may just put out, because it is really going to help you get going with the systems that you need to touch bases with your clients multiple times, to get the client research that is really going to help you move the needle in all of the places that your messaging exists. And guys, I want you to think about the fact that your messaging is not just your website. It's not just, you know, your social media. It's the way that you talk on your client calls. It's the emails that you send out. It's the stories and the lives that you do on Instagram. So everything should be cohesive and everything should be related to your customer data, because if one of your clients or potential leads has this pain point, has this thought, chances are a majority of them do too. So please go check it

Nadine:

Thanks, Colie.

Colie:

Oh, you are so welcome cause you know, I love you. All right, Nadine. Well, that was it. It was lovely having you on the podcast. I'm so excited for you and you know, all of the things that you were doing and thank you.

Nadine:

Thanks so much for having me. It's been a blast.

Colie:

day.