The Wit & Delight Podcast

34 - The Benefits of Creative Practice with Jill Elliott

November 13, 2019 Wit and Delight & Jill Elliott of The Color Kind Season 1 Episode 34
The Wit & Delight Podcast
34 - The Benefits of Creative Practice with Jill Elliott
Show Notes Transcript

Today on the Wit & Delight Podcast we're talking about creative habits and how to bring creativity into your everyday life. I'm speaking with one of our Wit & Delight contributors, Jill Elliott, who is the founder of The Color Kind. She is also a creative consultant, strategist, writer, and artist curating a life around design and intentional living. Jill has 20+ years of experience in the creative field and was formerly a chief creative officer for a global fashion brand. She is a dear friend of mine and is someone I've come to look up to and admire. I've loved hearing her point of view on how life can unfold and how we can find our way through the act of creative practice.

In this conversation, we talk a lot about getting out of our head, getting busy with our hands, and using creativity as an outlet and a way to connect with our inner child and look at what's possible for ourselves, not only as people but also as creative thinkers.


RESOURCES: 

The Color Kind website

Kate:

[inaudible] . *intro* hi everyone. Welcome to a very special podcast episode where we are going to talk about creative habits and bring creativity into your everyday life. I'm here talking with one of our wit and delight contributors. Jill Elliott , who is the founder of the color kind. She is also a creative consultant, strategist , writer and artists curating a life around design and intentional living. Jill has 20 plus years experience in the creative fields and was formerly a chief creative officer for our global fashion brand. Jill is a dear friend of mine and someone who I've come to not only look up to and admire, but I've really loved hearing her point of view on how life can unfold and how we can find our way through the act of creative practice. We talk a lot about getting out of our head, getting busy with our hands and using creativity as an outlet and a way to connect with our inner child and look at what's possible for ourselves, not only as people, but as creative thinkers.

Kate + Jill:

Okay. Here's my interview with Jill Elliot , founder of the color kind. Jill Elliot , how are you? Hi Kate. I'm good. Good. I am so happy to have you with us today. You're the first contributor that we've had on the podcast and I know that there are a lot of people who are excited to put a voice to the writing that everyone has loved so much and really get a sense for your journey and how how they can kind of bring more creativity into their everyday lives. You are, you're calling in from Dallas, right? Correct. Awesome. All right , well some backstory here at Jill and I met Jill when I was consulting for fossil and Jill is amazing, multifaceted, creative thinker and incredibly smart and someone that I've looked up to for a really, really long time. So it means a lot that she's with us and I'd love if you could tell us a little bit about your life and career and kind of how you found yourself to a point where you are really looking at the way, way creativity can really enhance other people's lives.

Jill:

Sure. I'm so excited to be here Kate I love what you do with Wit and Delight. Obviously I've been a fan for a long time and especially the podcast. So me , creativity has always been a part of my life from the time, you know, if you think about both of us as moms, we know that creativity is something that you just come out and you have. Our kids are into art, the way they look at the world. As I got older, as a student and a professional, I spent a lot of time taking art classes and then really honed in my career on the creative side of the fashion industry. I spent 20 plus years doing everything from visual merchandising to concept development, art direction, styling. Really anything that I could get my hands on that was creative, that also drove the business side of fashion and it was fun. It was exhausting. I did it for a long time, but I really had gotten away from having a creative practice of my own as something that I did for fun. It was something I did for work and it paid the bills and I loved it, but I was really missing it from my personal life. And then about four years ago I was going through some big personal shifts. I was, I was chief creative officer at fossil where we met and had a big crazy job. I was going through a divorce. I had a three year old daughter that I was trying to figure out how to single mom at four and I really felt this pressure to keep it all together, which I'm not sure why that's a thing and that's not what we need to talk about today. But I've had all this pressure to be okay at home. So my daughter didn't see any of the trauma that I was dealing with and to be fine at work, I was doing therapy and yoga was doing meditation. I had started journaling, I was trying everything I had read that might be helpful in processing trauma and grief and kind of releasing it from my body, but none of it was really sticking. And then one morning my daughter was gone and I was cleaning up her pants from the night before and I kind of sat down and started painting on a whim and some things stuck. I started craving more of that and carving out some space to do it every day and that's how I kind of found my way back to being creative, not just for professional life, but also in life and started to research and realize some of the benefits that it can have.

Kate:

Interesting. How did you, what were some of those immediate benefits that you began to feel? Was that something that you kind of just intuitively felt kind of connected to or did you find yourself feeling like you were processing things through the act of keeping your hands busy? Tell us a little bit more about what that feels like.

Jill:

Sure. I think at that point in my life, what I was looking for in meditation was a place to be kind of quiet and come to my center and calm. But I was really bad at meditation then and for some reason making art my found the same benefits that I think you're supposed to have in meditation. I was able to quiet my brain because my hands were busy doing something. I'm such a visual person who responds to color and shape in any form. So I think practicing that a little bit everyday brought some happiness and joy and it brought some quiet in . It brought some common and it was the one thing in my day that didn't feel pressure. I wasn't doing it for any outcome other than just to have a few minutes to do it. I did end up showing somebody my work just to keep myself accountable. But it wasn't for critique, it wasn't for approval. It wasn't for any reason than just for me to have that space and time. And so those were some of the immediate benefits that I felt like that first day it just felt like kinda home. Like this is calm and this is what I've been needing to do. Yeah .

Kate:

And do you think it was because it was a one thing just for you, you know, in a life where you're answering just so many people, which life just becomes more complicated. The, especially as we, as we grew up as women and maybe it feels like we'd take on, you know , even more roles you bring on mother and matriarch and you know, and you're running a team is that is that sort of sense of I have no one to answer to but, but me?

Jill:

For sure. I think as a mother and all those roles that we do take on, we also spend so much of our time scheduling and to do listing and taking anything fun out of life because we have to be as efficient and productive as possible. Right. And this was the one space in my day that it was like, I don't have any, I don't have any outcome except to just sit and see what comes out and it was for me, something I was for sure struggling with and have for a while is that I do value myself as a worker, as being productive and that simple shift of inviting something fun and almost playful into my life started to show up in other ways that I could do that too. It connected me to being a little bit more spontaneous so I definitely think it was just the one place that I could kind of let go and see what happened. Was that sort of like the instigator towards kind of just feeling more comfortable with, with the unknown or with just the simple act of doing, being the goal versus what it, what it means or what it brings , or what the longterm gain is? I think there's this idea that we only have so much time in our days that every moment needs to be squeezed for as much juice as possible. That we should always be, you know, compounding our time to be living towards something else and that I think that that thought in general, it can be kind of a trap, you know? And maybe that's why somebody , people that I've talked to have, have had a hard time with the idea of doing nothing. It's something we've been talking a bit about, you know , this past two months on , on wit and delight and this idea of creative time, you know, it's sort of like this extra thing or maybe it's like how do I uncouple this idea that if I'm going to be creative it means I have to perform or if I have to do something new, I have to do it the best.

Kate:

What advice would you have to people who might not necessarily have that immediate like pull towards, Oh this is just for me, how can they kind of move past this idea that this needs to be something that needs to be tracked or cumulate in a job or turn into sort of like another big passion of theirs? How do you kind of take the stakes down and make it about the doing versus the what it means to be doing?

Jill:

That's a good question. I think first you have to be doing something that you really love. For me, it was painting and making art because I love color and shape and visuals, but it's not that for everybody. Creativity has so many definitions. The definition of creativity is really about learning and connecting new thoughts and new processes. So you can take that into any medium. It could be dance, it could be cooking, it could be taking photographs, it could be going on nature walks can be creative if you're taking time to see new things and connect new thoughts. So I think the first step is to think about what you really love and it's probably already in your life. If you love eating out and trying new restaurants, taking a cooking class might be a good thing for you to do. If you love going to a museum, trying to figure out what you love about the museum. Is there a certain artist that you want to maybe learn to do color theory and the way they do? For me, that's the first thing is finding the thing that you like because if you're sitting down to do something that you love, you're going to carve out time for it. If it feels like one more thing, that creativity needs to be on your wellness checklist and another task, that's not the point, it's not going to help. So I would start there figuring out what you love and maybe it's going to take you a minute, you're going to try a few different things and then beyond that I would commit to starting small so for me that meant 10 to 15 minutes a day, five by seven card. Sitting down to a blank canvas is really overwhelming but if it's small, it's like I just need to make a few marks and see what happens. It's not a big deal. 10 to 15 minutes know we're all crazy stretched for time, but with the iPhone we can also track how much time we're spending on social media and other things. I dare to say we all have 10 to 15 minutes to sit down and do something away from the phone for a minute. Just do it, have fun with it and if you're not feeling it that day, do it anyway because sometimes the days that you p ush through are the days that you might learn, the best thing I know I've sat down a lot of times t he p aint and thought I don't have time to do this today I w ould have so many things I had on my schedule or I woke up late and I missed the time this morning so trying to cram it in. But those are the days that I needed it more than anything because they centered me and kind of brought me in to the present moment. So as I did get through the rest of my day, I was a little more aware and in my body and kind of even a little bit freer. So I think sometimes the time we think we don't have is really when we need to make the time to do something.

Kate:

And that's such a fun way to think about. It's not fun cause it's uncomfortable cause it, but it's that, that feeling of discomfort or that feeling of like resistance that is actually, or your brain and your body is saying, you know, this is, this is, this is the sign you need to say that you need a bit more space for yourself or that this practice is going to matter more because I think we just, we kind of immediately want to tamper that but we go towards the thing that kind of is the opposite of what we need. Whether it's, you know, getting on Instagram or for workaholics it's pounding out an extra couple of hours at works or kind of kind of fill that void. But we often seek out relief in , in the wrong places and it's so counterintuitive that the thing that we are resisting as a thing sometimes that we need the most. Another thing that I think is interesting about what you were saying is looking at the things that you already enjoy in your life there I think that sometimes we take for granted the things that come easy to us or sometimes we take for granted those small moments of joy or I was looking at how to improve or where we lack and so looking for, you know , moments of either talent or abundance within our life as it exists is kind of a shift in thinking. Where would you suggest someone starts with kind of figuring out what inspires them? Would it be sort of taking it like making a list of things you're grateful for or things that maybe you enjoy doing as a kid? Is there sort of like some journaling prompts or ways that people could kind of say like what should I take on first? Sorry, this is probably like a question. It's not on the list.

Jill:

No , that's good. That's a good one though . I think it's, you know, a lot of times journaling is a great path to that. You can start , for me, I would start to journal things that brought me joy during the day. So it might be a conversation with somebody. What was that conversation about? Why was I so engaged in that? I know you might meet a stranger at a party or at a work event and they have a hobby that you want to dive deep in and find out more about that. A lot of times where your curiosity is taking you in conversation on Instagram, people that you follow, look at your feed. Are you following all musicians and no artists? Are you super obsessed with all the food bloggers or the street style stars? What is the thing you're naturally gravitating to in your life and craving more of that and today you might just be a participant in it, but following that curiosity path and figuring out how you can be more active in it, I think is a good place to start. It's around you. Everybody's got something that they're curious about and they're really passionate about. They haven't, we haven't all tapped into it to figure out how to bring a little bit of that into our life and what that means, but I feel like one of the great things about social media is how connected you can be to so many forms of creativity. All around the world and then listening to that, figuring out why that is meaningful to you, why you get joy from following that account and liking their photos and is that something that you want to invite into your life in a small way?

Kate:

I love that. The just looking at who you follow, that's such a great, a great way of looking at how you've kind of sometimes subconsciously found certain genres. Interesting. I want to do that for myself. I know it'd be a lot of decor, but there's probably a lot of stuff in there that I haven't even really tapped into, so I'm going to go and do that after this. Okay, so how would you help someone or what suggestions would you have to move past any like fear or emotional blocks you might have in the creative process? I think sometimes we think either we were either told like, no, you can't pursue that as a kid or you're not good at that, or your free time should be spent to be productive. In what ways? Maybe you can list off maybe some benefits of this or something. The basis for first aid types who are like, you know, I need to know why this is going to work, but what blocks have you seen people had that have kind of gotten in the way of, of taking on some, a hobby that is really about just doing something you enjoy?

Jill:

The first big block, and I'm sure that you hear this all the time, is people believe you're either born creative or you're not. And they, and again, going back to how we were as kids, every single one of us did something creative. We made mud pies, we colored, we had imaginary friends, we built forts, all kinds of things that are truly rooted in creativity. Every single human that is on this planet is creative, but over time we've unlearned it and our inner critic has gotten really tough. She thinks, well, gosh, I haven't done that in so long. Why should I even start? I'm never going to be as good as X, Y, Z. But again, going back to the root of creativity, it's about learning and participating, being a student. So removing the expectation that I'm going to sit down and paint or cook a meal and it's going to be good. The first time has to go away. Getting into student mindset of being a novice, a beginner, just wanting to learn for the process is the very first thing that you're going to have to do. And you have to be okay with it being bad. I make mostly bad art that nobody ever sees, but that's not the reason that I'm sitting down and doing it as I cook. There's always something I'm throwing away every week because I wanted to try something different. I have a backup plan, but you know, I'm learning as I go and that's the point of it. So I think figuring out for us type A's who do measure our day as in productivity. This is going to break your brain a little bit because you have to step away from that and you're going to measure success in, you know, one of the things that I do when I teach workshops now is we come into this space with the meditation, notice our breathing, and a lot of time I'm teaching moms at the end of the day, they've just gone through a full day with their kids, pass them off to the husband just for the bedtime crunch, run in a little bit to this space and they're overwhelmed. So taking a few minutes to come into our center with a breathing exercise and then notice how we're breathing at the beginning of our practice and how everything at the end of our practice, even in a 10 minute daily practice, you're going to feel that shift in your breath and you're going to start to notice things that maybe you're not measuring how good the meal or the art or your dance is, but how you feel. Do you feel more present ? Do you feel more connected? Is your breath more calm? Do you feel ready to tackle the rest of your day? That's really what this practice is about is the 10, 15 minutes that you're spending to do something creative is for you to kind of give you life and um, some calm and joy to go into the rest of your life and tackle the big things on your to do list. We're not all going to shift gears and be full time artists and creatives. Very few of us are ever going to do that. And that's again, that's not the point. It's really just about the connection that they can bring to you.

Kate:

It's crazy how, you know, you just, you immediately or at least made the system that I've been working through is that if it, if it doesn't fit into something that I can do really, really well, I shouldn't do it at all. And , and right now I'm learning how to play the guitar and so that's something I'm sharing anywhere. I mean I think like it shows up at some points, but I was like, I need something that is challenging, that's going to take time that I have to like physically I can't think about anything else. Like I'm just looking at the way my hands are moving and trying to, trying to get out of my, out of my way and just let myself practice notes and in play. And I found is that this in particular is really showing me where I overthink because as soon as I start critiquing the way I'm playing Blackbird, it's just taking me forever to learn. I start messing up more and it's like, it's sort of this like this long meditation on like the monkey mind of the way that I kind of just self sabotage by like being a critic and it's uncomfortable. So would you say that kind of , sometimes part of this process when you start out is about kind of reframing the discomfort of unlearning? You know, maybe maybe our own way that we critique how we, do you think that it takes time and I mean how long should we kind of plan on, you know, kind of like not having fun to get to the point where we're starting to really enjoy it.

Jill:

So I think this is a great question. I think you know , it's going to depend on how you define fun. It is uncomfortable for sure and it's going to be, you know, I'm S I've been doing it most days for four years and I'm still uncomfortable. There's still days that I sat down and I have no idea what I'm going to do, but I've figured out some tricks to just go back to on those days and repeat something that I've done before. And again, it's not for anybody but me, so it doesn't really matter. But turning off that critic and really figuring out how to get in the flow, which I think is what you're talking about, when we can turn off the overthinking brain, we can find the flow and we can just be in that moment. It is easier to play the song or paint or to get through the 10 or 15 minutes. And I think if you would commit to it for a week to 10 days, you'll notice enough shift in that and enough of that flow coming into the practice. Right. That for me at least I was hooked. Oh my gosh. Yeah, that, that's, that's so great. And just so would you say that consistency is a huge part of just kind of exercising that muscle? Is it sort of like, like exercising to get like into that flow? 100% I think at the beginning I wasn't so regular. I would do it for a few days and then I would kind of go away from it. But I think it's like anything you're doing, fitness, meditation, anything. If I'm to really get the benefits from it, you do need to commit to it most days. I think every day is a little impossible. It's one more hurdle, like I'm not creative and then I have to do it everyday . Neither of those things are going to happen. So you just walk away from the table so you don't have to do it every day. But if you can do it more days than not think the way that your brain gets trained into it, you'll start to crave it and build it into your day and you won't even really notice that it's a thing you're doing. Interesting. So do you have , you've like found ways to make it easier for you to jump in. Do you have like do you practice at the same place every time or do you have like your materials set out? How do you kind of like dig down that barrier? French entry . So I started with 15 minutes in the morning with my coffee before my daughter gets up because I found like for me, if I can do it first thing before my house is awake, it's a lot less likely to get derailed. I keep all my supplies and I'm a drawer in the kitchen right by the kitchen table. So I start the coffee, grab my supplies and go from there. I also only work when I'm doing, I'll work bigger if I'm doing a piece for fun later, but for my daily practice, I work on only five by seven cards, so it's great. Again, it's really small. Some days I'm done in three minutes because I'm just drawing dots, you know? That's all that I have the capacity to do and that's okay, but I stay really small. At the beginning I only did watercolor because it's a super easy medium to get in and out of. It doesn't take a long time to set up as I've been doing it longer. Sometimes I do collage now. Sometimes I do guash. There's other techniques that I've gotten interested in and tried to bring into the practice as I'm learning a bit more, but I think to me it's being consistent with the time that you do it. Setting a timer and having something that's really small. If it's, you know, if you're cooking, maybe the first time you're cooking, it's not the whole meal, it's that you're taking a stab at a new appetizer or a side dish. Just something that's approachable. Maybe I shouldn't have started with learning Blackbird by the Beatles.

Kate:

I was wondering , it's all wrong. Wonder no water. I still can't play it . Totally . Well so funny. No, I think that that's, it's like I was just having a conversation with someone about this, like why is what you're doing? Why is the small thing not good enough for you? Right. You know, like I just have to be this big huge like hairy thing that you're, you're accomplishing. You know, it's like we kind of forget that it's so small things. They have to be good enough for us first until we can kind of like get to the bigger thing. Especially when it comes to stuff that takes time, like if it's weight loss or if it's like starting a new hobby or if it's just like reframing the way you think about your finances. Like all of this. It's like, I think these are my , these are big fundamental issues that people kind of talk about for decades because we look at the huge problem and we think like, well, unless I'm solving it today and if I'm solving it well then it's like then I'm not going to do anything. And you're like, that's that all or nothing thinking kind of really does kind of sabotage what we're thinking. So. Okay. So when you do your workshops, like what types of people do you find kind of like transformed the most in those practices? You , you mentioned moms come in kind of kind of coming in. Are they at a point where their kids are, you know, really demanding, like kind of what, what transitional transformations have you seen in them as they've kind of committed to working with you?

Jill:

I think the two things that I've seen is it's all moms to this point that I've worked with. And for them, you know, whether they're working or stay at home. This practice that they came into that day is literally the only thing that they are doing for themselves that whole day. It's the only time that they've sat down without somebody else needing their attention and needing a problem to be solved. So it's really amazing to see what happens in that space. I talked about the breathing. They kind of calm down and come into their center. They leave a lot more calm and mindful than they came into this space with. Depending on if it's a group that knows each other or just a workshop that I'm putting on that anybody can come to. What I've found in the grips that I'm doing like a girl's night end where it's a group of your friends, the level of connection and depth that they go to in conversation is something that they always talk about when they leave because they're in a space that they're holding for themselves. That's starting from mindfulness. The conversations they're having are about purpose and what they want to be doing more of in their life and what they want to be inviting in. It's not the typical girls night out. Things that we all go and complain about work and complain about kids and all the things that we get in the habit of doing, which is good. There's a place for that too. I'm not tearing that down, but I think this just opens up a deeper level to go with your friends and then they build on that in further conversations, whether they're doing creativity as part of that practice or not. Oh, that's so interesting (speaker 1). Yeah, that was something I really wasn't expecting was that, but that was an outcome that I think is so exciting to me and I'm happy to explore it because I think that's something that is really missing. We're more connected than we ever have been as a society with social media. And we can talk to anybody in the world at any time, but yet we don't have these deep connections with a core core group around us that we can be vulnerable and we can, you know, talk about what we're scared about and what is on our mind and figure out how to walk through those problems together. And that's been an amazing thing to be a participant at the, when some of that is happening.

Kate:

Yeah, I've noticed that in our cookbook club too, that conversations are always different. They're always really interesting and that like , I feel like we're always, all of us are kind of sharing something that we maybe didn't know either about each other before or we're talking about, you know, what we hope for or like maybe where we want to go. And it's all positive. Like there , there isn't gossip, you know? And I , it might be because we are kind of showing up to a place where we've like all tried something new and we've all kind of failed a little bit, you know? Yeah . And some kind of way. So interesting. So do you think that maybe someone, because we are kind of missing these deeper connections, would you recommend maybe starting a creative practice with, with someone or maybe with a, with a group of friends, like a , you know, ladies drawing night or how could someone kind of bring this, this idea of a creative practice into their own lives or maybe into their own, you know, group of friends?

Jill:

I think it's great to start with friends. I , when I started, I had a friend that was doing it with me. We were sometimes practicing together, but a lot of days we were just texting each other pictures, almost like an accountability partner. So she also had been, you know, creative her whole life but had gotten away from it. And I said I was, I had started doing this and we both committed to it. So it was a great way to start. I think the, if you have a group that has similar interests, getting a group together, like your cookbook club would be something so interesting. It's easy to host. If you, you know, for me a lot of times what I'm teaching in the workshops is not art. I'm not teaching, Hey , we're not doing a still life. We're not all making the same thing. I'm just putting out materials and inviting you to do something that you want. And that's a great easy way to sit down and come to it . For some people, some people are overwhelmed by that, so you might need to find a local class that you can all go take together or a class on Skillshare that you could put up on your laptop and watch the first 30 minutes of it. And then you guys all do your practice and still have the connection. I think there's so many ways that's a great idea that you could come to it and it just kind of depends on the mood of the group. I think the way you guys have done cookbook club where you're picking a book, so there's some shape around it helps it be accessible to people and I really encourage you at the start of a creative practice to also have some type of, even though it's a free play experience, having some boundaries, whether it's a restricted color palate , a size limitation, a medium that you're going to do, maybe you're only going to work with words. Maybe you're going to write a hundred words, whatever your thing is. Having some restrictions helps turn off that monkey mind and make you overthink what you're doing and really just get into the habit and not judge it.

Kate:

That's actually something I found in my, my own a hundred days of creativity, which I'm still continuing to do. Even after the those a hundred days was I started out and it was like, Oh, there's so many decisions, right? It's like there's all these colors I could pick. What medium am I gonna use? What size is this going to be? And I realized that because in my day I'm making so many decisions, small decisions all the time, I just needed to be simple. So like I just said, I'm going to do, you know, this, this pallet on this paper and I'm going to, I did word associations, so I did like, you know, the two , like a sort of a , an emotion that I would like list at the top than I do all the, all the different words around it. And I needed like a physical object. And then I like sketched based on that. And I learned that on Skillshare. And it was like, I just, I looked at what other people were doing and I looked for classes. And this is just so great about being a color kind and skillshare and stuff like that, is that you're , there's so many resources where if you just sort of look at how to make it simpler for you to get started. And at least for me, I, this is, it's different for everyone, but I just, I was just over so overwhelmed by how many decisions I had to make just to like put a dot on the paper. You know? And I think sometimes you don't realize how many decisions you're making in a day until you sit down to do something that's supposed to be fun and you're like, Oh, one more decision. You know? And so I just, it's sort of a tangent, but I just, I think that that, that is such a great suggestion is for looking at how other people step through the process and then mimicking and learning and giving yourself some constraints. So you're just focusing on the thing and nothing else is about like, Oh, maybe I should try this, or maybe I should completely throw out what I was working on in favor of this medium. And I did that for awhile . So it takes a lot of strain and it's at the end, it's worth , you know , color, kind is great. And you know, and just making sure that you're, you're kind of setting yourself up for success. Yeah. What has your creative practice taught you about yourself? How have you changed in the past four years?

Jill:

So much. I know. So during that four year period I have left corporate world and I'm not gonna blame that on my creative practice, but it definitely was something that kind of opened up my eyes to maybe doing something different with my life. I think the act of having a creative practice, it brought me some confidence that I'm still not an artist, but the practice and going from student to seeing my skills improved for years and it made me excited to learn again. And while I was in a job that I loved at a company that I loved , I hadn't been learning in a while . I hadn't been having to reinvent myself and solve new problems. And so I stepped away from that career and have started, you know, still do some consulting in the creative world and then started the color kind and, and building out services that go along with that. And now I really do credit being confident in my ability to learn something new and to figure it out as I go with a lot of time spent in that creative practice because you're building problem solving skills, you're figuring out problems every day in this 10 to 15 minute practice that then you're like, okay, I already solved a problem today. Even though it's simple and it just was a color palette that I'm super happy about. It builds your confidence . Another big shift for me is that, like we've talked about a couple of times for I'm a type a over Dewar over-schedule scheduler. I used to be crushed at night looking at how many things I did not cross off my list and this practice of inviting some fun and some play that doesn't really have an expected outcome has been so freeing for me and I now have gotten to where I really, really, really scaled back my to do list to three things that need to be done on a day. They're the three, you know, big things that I need to do for whatever season my life is in right now. It's summer and my work is scaled back a little bit. And connecting with my daughter is big on my list cause we have a few weeks, you know, until we go back into the crunch of school. But really having that creative hub , it made me embrace kind of the joy and the fun and a little bit more of the spontaneity that I don't typically allow into my life because it doesn't fit with being super productive and type a and so, you know, things like that for me have been finding something I'm interested in and not overthinking. Signing up for the class or the workshop, just going to it or a friend saying, I have this other friend that's creative in this certain way you should meet them. And you know, a few years ago I would have like, gosh, do I have time to meet another friend? I would've researched them. Now I'm just like, Hey, so-and-so thinks we should meet. Let's go get a coffee. And finding these new connections and new people that are also on a creative journey has been so inspiring to me. And then I think the last thing I've learned is, is um, you know, talking to people like whether it's UK in your a hundred day journey or the work you do on with delight or some of my friends that are trying to find space for themselves. This is really focused me on wanting to build a community and share this work and what leading a creative life, the benefits that that can bring to your life. When I first started this, obviously it was just for me, I was in the middle of like a life transition and I needed something that was just for me. The further I get into it and the more I talk about it and the more people are interested in it and ask questions, I want to help bring this to more people in an accessible way. You know, again, it's not an art class that you need a big list of supplies to come to the table and do it. It's just something that I want to invite you in, whether it's through a workshop or through reading content online and you creating your own practice that you can explore and learn the benefits for yourself, kind of remove some of the rules and expectations that we have around life and I'm really excited to figure out how I can continue to help others find that path for them as well.

Kate + Jill:

It's gift such a gift. It's so fun to watch. I mean, just watch your evolution and to see, you know, more lightness and in your life through the more, the more that you've been following this calling. We've gotta get you up here to do a workshop at studio 125 for sure Minneapolis can do that, but okay. So where can everyone find you and sign up for workshops or just get, get more of the Jill Elliot color kind stuff. Where can they find you? So they can find me on my website at the colorkind.com and we're building out the workshop and class schedule for fall, so that should be up soon. They can also follow me on social media and I'll post any upcoming classes and anything that's going on there as well so that you can join the fun. Great. Thank you so much for sharing everything with us and opening up your life and helping us find more ways to not only be creative, but appreciate the small moments of joy in our lives. Thank you, Kate. I'm so glad to be here. Yeah. Okay. Thank you, Jill . Thank you.