Smorgasboarder

Mark Ranucci - Swimming against the mainstream

April 05, 2019 Season 1 Episode 18
Smorgasboarder
Mark Ranucci - Swimming against the mainstream
Chapters
Smorgasboarder
Mark Ranucci - Swimming against the mainstream
Apr 05, 2019 Season 1 Episode 18
Smorgasboarder
Show Notes Transcript

Today we talk surf business and entrepreneurship with Mark Ranucci... About what it means to be a part of a collective, the Surf Collective specifically.  In the space of two short years this united front for independent surf businesses has been able to attract the likes of some 70-80 grassroots exponents of Aussie surf culture spanning some 38 different categories from surf apparel to accessories, photography, art and even surf workshops.

Links on the Smorgasboarder website.

Speaker 1:
0:10
Hello smorgasbord us and welcome once again to the smorgasbord of podcast. I'm your host Dave Swan. Today I talk with Mark Run nichey about uh, what it means to be a part of a collective, the surf collective specifically and how in the space of just two short years, this United front for independent surf businesses has been able to attract the likes of some 70 to it. Grassroots exponents of Ozzy surf culture spanning some 38 different categories from SIF apparel to accessories, photography, art, and even surf workshops. Surf collective was essentially born of a desire to help support and protect Australia's surf in culture. Realizing how much the industry had changed since his childhood in the 70s and now dominated by multinationals and they're mass produced products found a macro nochi connected with a number of independent Ozzie surf brands with the idea of giving them a greater voice by bringing them together via an online platform. These are products not found in the mainstream surfery Talus, each of the businesses has their own unique story behind their brand. I must admit, I was personally in thrall to gain an insight into a business we see as very similar to our own being smaller spotter and pursuing a similar model, one that supports smaller independent grassroots surf businesses. One that's offering up an alternative to the norm. So hopefully I've peaked your curiosity. Enjoy my chat with macro Nucci from the surf. Correct?
Speaker 2:
1:55
Yes.
Speaker 3:
2:01
One of the main things I wanted to ask Oscars, it was interesting looking at I suppose the evolution of surf collected because yeah, when mark and I started smorgasbord or you know, 10 years ago, we, we then made the decision, the conscious decision not to approach the big three surf brands. And there wasn't, yes, it's sheerly because we had anything against them. We didn't want to, one of the Potter alternatives aside, well we want to be a little bit different. You know, what that alternative and we wanted to have that point of difference. So when you open the mag, you didn't seem the same old spread of Billabong and quicksilver and the like and all the sponsors [inaudible] you're out. So when we first came in shift collective, you know, my immediate thought was for is someone who things are side by side, someone who's looking to yes for alternatives. So yeah. Yeah. So what, what prompted you, I suppose to make that move, which Seth collective and indeed to get into the surf industry because industry to you.
Speaker 4:
3:11
Correct? Yeah, I'll look, I guess, um, you know, having, having been a sub for a while, he's, you know, you've got a set of shops and yet you see that it's largely, except for a few this, this lie to you all the same stuff. But when, when you go actually dean this, there's a whole bunch of interesting people doing a whole lot of interesting stuff. Um, and I think, I think the world is changing generally, not just in that, but you know, people are going to farmer's markets these days to buy their food and, and um, you know, wanting to know where it's from. So we thought, well, why can't we do that with was the surf industry by providing an alternative. And I'm rather than someone has to go, go looking for so smaller brains if they'd like to buy for, let's put them all in the one spot. Hmm. Then hopefully, hopefully everyone will benefit from that because you know, people, you know, someone was a organic surf wax company trying to plug stuff likes online. People don't really shop that way. You know, they'll, they'll go looking for some bodies' or a t shit. And then on the white hat they'll grab some stuff like, so yeah. So we sold that will put them all together.
Speaker 4:
4:30
Well let's, let's say it can help everybody. So, um, you know, we started off a couple of years ago with about a dozen brands. Um, we've got over 70 on there now. Like categories. Yeah. Yeah. So I mean it's good, you know, and they're all, we make sure that we, we write up the story for what he was know, cause we think that that's best, the connection that people want and, and appreciate to know who they're buying from. And a little bit about what they're up to. So yeah, it's been, it's been good. It's been really, really nice from my point of view to be, I'm dealing with a whole bunch of small businesses that are really passionate about what they do and enjoy what they do. And, um, you know, it's, yes, it's good
Speaker 3:
5:23
to that end is that, you know, cause I've often heard you speak of, you know, your desired or protect the grassroots shift culture. It'd be good to get your explanation. Is that what you perceive to be the grassroots CF culture? Is that who you are?
Speaker 4:
5:40
Well, I guess there's different, you know, like I think all the big brands that probably still, you know, if you're into your competitive surfing and, and, and, um, all that, then that's probably, you know, your version of grassroots cause that's what you're into. And, and, and that's, that's cool too. Um, but I guess we were just trying to get back to, um, yeah, the, the smaller, smaller brand people that are looking for something a little bit different. And, um, back to what it was. I mean, you know, Billabong, ripcurl and all those guys went, I haven't been big all the time. Um, you know, they, they started off in sheds down in talky or over, they were, and you know, um, I've written the wife I guess for the last 30 or 40 years, but become, become big companies and most of them are based in the states now.
Speaker 4:
6:35
But, but um, yeah. So yeah, I guess, I guess we just want to try and make that connection and I guess that's what we believe is probably grassroots by just bringing that connection back rather than just bright colored ads that sell all of the stuff, I suppose to a lot of those kind of smaller businesses. And you've touched on it before, you know, what's, what's one of the main advantages I suppose, of joining the collective? You know what, yes, she's seen those kind of businesses. So yeah. Well, we do our own advertising as you know, through we had some small spoiler and other places and happily hopefully finding them, uh, uh, a customer that they haven't done, haven't got at the moment and, and just all fired by default. You know, like I was saying before with the surf x example, you know, people might be copying online to buy whatever it is, but you know, they'll say something else and, and they'll, they'll, they'll Mecca Sal, you know, caught by accident really I guess.
Speaker 4:
7:42
But, but um, yeah, that might be online in Boston. Yes. And finding vice or, so just providing hopefully as you know, as we outrageous gets bigger, um, you know, people will sell more stuff and you know, most of it, probably 90% of the brands that we have on our site, they're all just sideline businesses at the moment. You know, that they're just a side hustle and, and most, you know, all those, all those side hustles will, all the people want to do it as their main game because I love it. But now they need to sell a certain amount of stuff to make it their main game. And so I have to will help that. Um, you know, we're finding we're selling quite a bit overseas these days as well, which is good. I think the Australian surf culture probably, you know, it's something that is aspirational to someone's sitting in, in an office in London. Yeah. Fine. Or the U S or whatever. And yeah, other than that, probably close to a quarter of the stuff gets sold overseas at the moment. So hopefully we're helping these small brains get non overseas as well. You know, that's, and we, you know, we have never talked episodes yet, so hopefully you, once we start doing that will help a bit more as well. So yeah. That's fair. What it's all about.
Speaker 4:
9:05
You've touched on that collective voice, I suppose, to help promote the brands and other otherwise that you have these kind of grassroots businesses. Um, well we're, we're, um, we're sort of putting our money where our mouth is, I guessing in what we're doing with our local high school. Um, you know, um, and Tufts that'll encourage other people to start small businesses as well. So what high school is this initiative? Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's right. Yeah. So when we approached the local hospital Banjo high school here in Avalon and um, you know, sits in the hit multiple, you know, be good to try running gates. These, these kids, I'm a bit better, I'm not sure what, what class might be a business studies class, but the idea was to get the kids to come up with a circle that it's product and then do they learnings around that product.
Speaker 4:
10:05
So anyway, the headmasters suggested the UTM Business Studies class would be a good one. Um, we've done it for two years now. Um, and um, by, see, I'll go in and speak to the kids during the year and we've had other people come in to talk about branding and marketing and stuff like that. And then the end of the end of the year, we put together a little shark tank of some of the local brands that we have on our side. And, uh, it's an evening thing. The parents come along and, um, and the kids give, give the pictures to us and we pick a winner and we put up 1000 bucks to get them going. So, um, and then some of those, I think of sort of one of them collective, is that right or, yeah. Yeah, we've got to, we've got two brands now on collective, um, by, by hospital.
Speaker 4:
11:03
Kid started two years ago. It was a girl that wanted Lilly. She studied up cuddle up stopping company. So she's making, um, wax cones that made out of recycled skateboards. They're selling really well. We've helped her to get into the [inaudible] store in Byron Bay as well, so she's selling in there as well. And, and um, and yeah, it's, it's, it's a good little thing for her and she's, you know, she's saying how, how it can work and she's looking at doing other products as well. Then last year, a kid that wanted it, he started a little company called sweet hand planes, so he's making headlines out of recycled, uh, plywood.
Speaker 4:
11:47
And so, yeah, you know, so, but they'll be, it's a great way to engage the local kids, but it also, you know, um, absolutely right about it and think, well, why can't I do that? You know, I'm 25, I'm not at school, but hey, you know, he's, he's a, he's, he's a, he's an avenue that it is possible. And you know, through the joining the collective, we can potentially sell some stuff. So, yeah, I suppose fostering creativity, fostering it. Yeah. So that's the idea is to create some opportunities for people. You know, we, we get approached and most of the people that have joined us has been approached to start with. We had to go approaching people, but, but most of the last, you know, 30 or 40 of US people approaching us and it's great, you know, as long as it's, it looks like a good product and they're serious about it and, um, you know, it's, it's a good thing.
Speaker 4:
12:43
So, yeah. You know, that's another thing that we're really, really about, you know, trying to, trying to create some opportunities for people and what's, what's been some of the feedback from, from guys involved in the collective, it was obviously, but that core and its built and now people are coming to you. So, yeah. So I'm from the collective voice. What's being some of the feedback, you know, what are the, what are they saying, you know, you know, some fell more than others. You know, it's just the way the ones that are, the ones that are selling more I think are probably pretty grateful. If, you know, they're um, they're saying that a benefit of it, you know, and it's not just, look, yeah, we sell stuff for them, which is great, but it's also, you know, why to get their brand out there. I'm sure that, you know, some people will probably hop online, find them at our site and buy stuff from them direct.
Speaker 4:
13:45
Just this is life, but that's okay. And, and, um, and also just the white, you know, Google works, you know, the, there are more places they're going to get higher up the rankings and I'm sure just bubbling with us and it'll help them as well. So, um, cause I've also noticed some established shape is quite well established schools or John. Yeah, yeah. No. So the surfboard, the surfboard shapers, we, we, we don't actually sell surfboards, but what we've decided to do is look, you know, with without the surfboard shapers would, we don't have this industry really. And uh, we, we don't want to see, um, you know, which one to support the [inaudible] that that is the grassroots of the, of the game, isn't it really? So, so whilst we don't sell surf boards, we do, we do put up stories about various stripers on our site just as content and, and um, you know, as part of, part of that, we just cited people on the site know, I feel like the, the guy's story going and contacting direct and grab yourself a surf board, you know,
Speaker 3:
14:58
t shirts or anything like that.
Speaker 4:
15:00
Oh, not well, a lot of them don't do it. We do with McTavish tell me she's gone into gone into the, the, the peril game so we could do with them. But, um, but no, the other ones that we have on, they're done in a puff from maybe a couple of tee shirts or something like that, but now we don't really have, we're happy to, but it just happened.
Speaker 3:
15:22
It's a bit hard to do the boards through there too. Yeah, yeah.
Speaker 4:
15:28
Yeah. It is probably an, and we don't really, yeah. It's not really about making money out of surf boards for us really. It's more just to promote them and tell people you're a good story about what could work a surfboard shaper is doing and that's all they'll go and get themselves accustomed. I bowled rather than something out of China. Yeah, I guess that's know.
Speaker 3:
15:50
I mean, touching on that thing, all the money, which is interesting because obviously being in business everywhere, I'll tell us and played it, you know, you need to, you know, be there to make a dollar unless you are scrolling. Yeah. Um, so what is it that you get a collective kind of get out of representing all this grassroots Brat?
Speaker 4:
16:16
We, we make a percentage out of the sales, you know, so, um, some things, some, some products and some, um, uh, done by, by dropship. So we'll, we'll make the sale, the, the, um, the brand. We'll send the product out and, and we'll just clip the ticket on the way through. Um, other, other things. Um, we'll buy wholesale and things that we think will sell and um, a bit better. We'll, we'll buy wholesale and type of risk on that. And then we'd make a normal retail margin on that. So because the, the, the margin isn't that much when we're doing the drop ship star thing. We're just, we're trying to also do a bit of both, I guess to try and increase our overall margin. But also what got us starting buying stuff is that we've done a collaboration with a local cafe and Avalon. And so we've,
Speaker 3:
17:13
how does this make you grind a couple of times?
Speaker 4:
17:19
Alright. So, so yeah, so we, you know, by doing that, we had to buy some stuff wholesale anyway. So, um, so it was all bit by bit more. And so, yeah, I mean that's a whole other world that is, but, but, um,
Speaker 3:
17:33
that was interesting because obviously you've got the online presence and that was one of my questions. You know, I was interested, you know, what the reason was behind, I suppose, establishing that bricks and mortar kind of shop from that at the sneaky drawn with the online presence. So was it just to give people, I
Speaker 5:
17:50
suppose I, I touch and feel of some products or,
Speaker 4:
17:53
yeah, yeah, I'll look a bit of both of that. You know, it's, um, it's been working really well. I mean, look, will at him on nine is a great little cafe in a lane way. And Evelyn, um, and he's a mad keen surfer and a good little cafe in. And so we were chatting one day and I said, look, you know, wouldn't it be cool to make this into a bit of a Surf Shop Cafe? Oh yeah. You know, that'd be awesome. You know? So, um, so it was, is exactly what we've done. So we've put a whole lot of surf gear in the clothing, wetsuits, hand planes, wax, whatever, you know, sunscreen, um, in the shop and turned it into a little social cafe. And, you know, we were thinking it will make your paying the rent, I'm buying the gear list, let's go halves on them, on the profit, on the surf stuff, which is fair.
Speaker 4:
18:42
Um, and um, it's provided him with a point of difference, you know, suburb that's full of cafes. Um, so a lot of surfers like going there, it's his, his coffee sales have definitely increased quite a bit since it's changed into that, that model. It provides us with, you know, a shop front and, you know, people can say what we're about actually touch and feel of stuff and you know, providers is another sales channel I guess. And um, and yeah, it's, which worked really, really well. And um, it's something that we'll, we'll, we'll think, we'll probably try and do again if it was on the Rock, the rock cafe to do it with. So, um, yeah I did, cause I think, look, you know from a cafes point of view, they're all competing. Every suburb's got a bunch of cafes. Hey you can provide a point of difference and another income stream for the cafe as well. Then it good for us as well. So it's good for everybody. So I think, I think we're going to see, I think in retail we're going to see a lot more of that Aurecon bricks and mortars got to, got to change with the times a bit. You know, it's, it's getting a bit boring and you're going to have to force people off the land to come into your shop these days. So.
Speaker 5:
20:03
And speaking of which women talking about retailers, what's the reception or should I send the blowback being prom? So retailers, the big boys, the big three, you know, what's, what's there. Has there been any reaction?
Speaker 4:
20:21
No, nothing. Not now. I think we're, I think we're probably so small from a point of view that it doesn't really matter yet. But yeah, I'll look. We have no, nothing at all, nothing on the retail side of things. I suppose the interesting because
Speaker 5:
20:40
perhaps have been trampled on the northern beaches for, for a while, it's more or less nearly devoid of sib shops, isn't it?
Speaker 4:
20:49
Lux? Surprisingly, surprisingly. It is actually,
Speaker 5:
20:52
which is really, yeah, it's really very limited tech shops. Why suggests that there is, there is a change report, isn't it? Really? The lane
Speaker 4:
21:08
think so. Yeah, I think so. I think, you know, what doesn't matter what, what type of retaliatory in nature these days. I think you'd need to be doing something a bit different to, you know, to attract customers, keep them interested and keep them coming back. So yeah, there's some surf shops that are doing a great job with that, but um, others that not that out. So, but then that's, that can be said for anything, you know, any, anything from you, you know, any clothing shop or a Kebab shop, they're still stuck in the 70s you know, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, a lot of retail it's got, it got us to change a bit. I think so. So, you know, I guess from our point of view with we're trying to provide something different, sell a story that that's, you know, that nothing hits a nerve with people, you know? And um, hopefully we're helping a few people along the way and helping customers find something different and feel good about supporting a small business. Yeah, yeah. People are more conscious about what they're doing generally. I think venture, again, my, certainly my belief
Speaker 5:
22:27
right and wrong, people are looking for, yeah. It's not to say anyone's doing anything wrong. That's more or less what's more is none. It was kind of saying, well it's not that the other media doing anything wrong, it's just we thought why offer up more on the same? It's do something that's a little bit different.
Speaker 4:
22:47
Yeah, I think it's working everywhere. Like, you know, we've got a local farmer's market and Mario would, and it's like, it started off as this tiny little growers market and it's, it's absolutely packed full of people every Friday and it's on a Friday. It's not even a convenient day, you know, like people are at work, but then place pumps because people sick and tired of buying packaged veggies from the big supermarkets I guess. So they want to go and speak the, the butcher that's actually grown the lamb and you know, um, you know, it's, it's, yeah, I think, I think the world's changing, you know, and I think hopefully, hopefully it is changing because I think the next generation are a lot more in tune with all that too. By the way. I think we'll be living in, in better hands and then wait, in what way did, cause they're, they are more interested in that. And, and you know, most of the brands that we've got on there, a lot of them are just young people, you know, quite, quite young and they're thinking about the, and their, you know, the footprint, the carbon footprint and the wanting to recycle. And I mean, uh, it, it's, it's there and their mind, you know, when we were growing up, wasn't, wasn't even, it wasn't on the radar at all day.
Speaker 5:
24:03
It seems the refreshing objects, you know, like talking about knowing where your produce comes from, we are going to be your tee shirts come from lawyer Bespoke, handmade. And to that end obviously you know that the surfboard shapers, you know, you can get, you know, the, the computer cut out or you can get the article, it's all nice copy or they want that the hand and I ended original.
Speaker 4:
24:45
Exactly right. Yeah. It's a good thing
Speaker 5:
24:52
to that end. I suppose a lot of the brains that you represent, as we've said there are emerging brands, grassroot experiences fall over. What happens is that a big brand comes along to they collective and as well, I don't want to be on it.
Speaker 4:
25:08
I had to knock anyone. Yeah. Well the front of the cornea, it's this really small, small Brian that might only have say one or two tee shirts to offer and you know, it doesn't sound too committed to it then. Yeah, we will, we will tell them to come back when they get a bit more of a range or you know, and have been trying a bit harder. Um, in terms of the bigger, the bigger brands, um, yeah, that's my, that's I've got a site. It's a, it's an interesting one. Um, so probably the, the biggest brand that we've got on our side would be the critical slide society. Um, uh, tcss which are great. Lots of side little brand, but it's not that little anymore. They're a great brand via very art focused, decent, a lot of interesting stuff. And we've got them on our site. We, you know, we're, we're buying wholesale from Nice guys, but, um, mmm. Yeah. Which we've just recently made the coal that would probably just too big for us now. I think that you can buy their stuff just to, you know, at, at general paints now what I found out just recently and they, they, you know, they're not going to get any advantage being with us. We'd better off supporting someone else really. So, um, so yeah, we've still got some stock obviously, and we'll let that run.
Speaker 4:
26:39
But yeah, that's probably a bit too big. So, um, but, but you know, even though probably, you know, some people haven't heard of them, but, but I think they are getting from, from our point of view, probably a bit big. So, yeah. Um, yeah. So we, we do want us, you know, w whilst they're still absolutely categorically come into what we're about because our at catch phrases is, you know, independent Ozzy brands and they're definitely an independent Ozzy brand. Um, but, you know, we're probably better off helping someone else and that's what we see ourselves as doing is trying to help people. So, so yeah. So we'll, um, that's, yeah, that's, that's probably where we're drawing the line, I guess.
Speaker 3:
27:23
Yeah. And obviously I see the measures [inaudible] brands that they represent now, if I counted correctly, but something like the, I'd categories, is there any limits or was there any time that you'd had to say, well, we've got so many in that category, we can't take any more or no, or, you know, giving people more icicle grinder offering, or is there any limits?
Speaker 4:
27:54
What I want to end up with too much stuff. Like, you know, um, you know, then, then, then I don't think anyone wins because, you know, if a website becomes, um, too hard to navigate and make a decision on something, I guess that's, that that becomes tricky. So, yeah. So yeah, we don't want to, we don't want to become a t shirt shop. You have just thousands and thousands of tissue say, yeah, we are sort of, you know, but, but we'd, like you said, we do have quite a few categories and as long as it's ocean inspireds and so, you know, so we, we do sell some jewelry, you know, it's all ocean inspired jewelry. It's, you know, silver pendants of a surf fin or it's made from stones that have been collected from, from the beach. Um, or you know, um, something that, uh, you know, a surf wood, wood, wood way. So, so we have, you know, expanded like that was good. Obviously organic sunscreen on there.
Speaker 3:
28:57
No notice. That sounds great. And then is there any you categories you're looking to develop or categories or, cause I've noticed you have a sunscreen that jewelry. There's photography.
Speaker 4:
29:07
Yes. Photography. And, um, yeah, look, I bought and house in Philadelphia yet when she wanted to, someone could come up with some really good, um, circle bags. That's a hard one. Hm. You know, we had a great little brand there from WIA doing it. Um, you know, she, she was finding a bit bit, bit hard. Um, but I guess with surfboard, so it is a bit hard because there's just that many shapes and sizes isn't it? And so for a small business to, to um, okay. To have enough of a range to, to offer. Mm hmm. Yeah. So, um, yeah, that's something that we're looking, looking for that. Um, yeah. But yeah, look, we're pretty up month as long as it fits within what we think forms the surf culture and yeah, we're happy to run with it.
Speaker 5:
30:06
I'm not as to your involvement with the loss of surfer, dude. I was curious to know
Speaker 4:
30:12
a little bit more about how that came about and what, you know, what's the motivation there? Yeah, well, um, the guys that surf aid actually by the morning coffee at the sneaky drawn to the Avalon, they're officers are just up the road. So we got to know them and, um, and you know, they have, they approached us about selling the merchandise because they, you know, they, they had merchandise t shirts and caps and so forth that they were trying to sell, not just to raise some money, but also to, you know, raise some awareness I guess as well. So, um, so yeah, we, we're based in Vienne place that you can go to, to buy online to buy SurfAid merchandise. So it's a direct link from their website to our side. Um, we, we, we hold there, their merchandise, we, we send it out when we sell some.
Speaker 4:
31:09
Um, and then all the money goes back to SurfAid. Um, you know, so if I do some amazing stuff in Indonesia, um, started by bio surfing doctor that was over there, but, you know, this isn't the story that they do a lot of great stuff. So we were absolutely stoked that we can do that for them. And, and, um, try and help them in a little way. And we've also had, we've also had one of the, one of are the brands that are on our site, designed a long sleeve tee shirt for them last year. So that's sold really well and all the money for that went winter certified and we'll probably try and do some more of those collaborations.
Speaker 5:
31:53
Interesting. So you're, you're not online, I suppose giving them that collective voice, but you're also helping them make connections within the industry.
Speaker 4:
32:02
Yeah, yeah, that's right. And it's just an opportunity for them to give back as well. So, you know, it's, um, I think it's good. It's good to give back and help. Um, especially the causes like certified. Um, and yeah. So yeah, it's great that, you know, when the brain's camp tell yeah, we can, we can organize it. Yeah. Do a design for you and the sold really well and um, yeah, we'll try and do a bit more of that. So it's good. You know, some were pretty, we feel very lucky that we can do that to certified and they're a great bunch of people to deal with and they're doing some fantastic things. So yeah, it's just,
Speaker 5:
32:48
I suppose, making those connections and all that, how you kind of keeping in contact or what's the form of communication when you're talking with all of these brands? Is it just, is it you're doing it on the road or was it mainly over the phone or was it
Speaker 4:
33:05
African mal or if there, cause they're all ran Australia around. Glad that they're, that they are made from Wwi. Yeah. They're all over the place. So yeah, it looks at me. Yeah, we've got a few that are local that we do. We keep in contact with the, you know, there's probably, you know, see for a coffee with or whatever, you know, and others at that time, some that we've never actually met, you know, but, but we've spoken with and emailed with and obviously, you know, send orders to and um, yeah. But it's, um, oh look, you know, it's early days for us for leads. It'll become more known and more popular and people will sell more stuff and make a better living out of it. And, and you know, the big great that it was going so well that we could afford to, you know, get them all together and the one place that'd be awesome.
Speaker 5:
33:59
But with that said, you say it totally dies, but it's a, it's a phenomenal achievement. Like I said, it's close to 80 brands. What would it be? How many years the Seth, right. You've been going there?
Speaker 4:
34:11
I'll probably two and a half I think. Yeah. Which is incredible. Get that core group and then
Speaker 5:
34:19
be attracting the lights of another 30, 40 brands. And it sounded like a matter of years old.
Speaker 4:
34:26
Yeah, yeah. I guess, I guess, you know, the, the uh, proof is in the pudding, you know, as long as we can get our story out there and get more people to the website and you know, more people supporting these small brands and um, yeah, that's, yeah, that's the challenge that we face. I guess.
Speaker 5:
34:54
Just just keep, keep going along and keep supporting grassroots and any, any particular clients kind of going for
Speaker 4:
35:02
yeah, I'll look. Yeah. Um, yeah, there's definitely the, you know, the star performers, that's still more than others. Um, and um, which is great, you know. Um, but um, yeah, we'll just keep on going, keep adding brains. We'll, we'll, we're still doing the high school project again this year. That's, look, that's something that we're really passionate about and, and it's, um, you know, it's just been, um, you know, my, as a kid going through high school, I was so wanting guys in my studies and, and so some of these cubes, but some of these kids, and it's really great to see. The headmaster came up to me after one of these shark tank nights sang, you know, it was just so good to see these kids engaged in this subject. So if some of the kids that are in the class spend way too much time in my office because he had, you know, up to now, good.
Speaker 4:
35:55
And they would just, they'd got update. I spoke, they did their pitch. And it's just amazing. You know, and so, um, yeah, I would look as a great thing and it's something that, you know, going forward, we'd love to do it with other high schools around the country, but, you know, it's all time and money and hopefully as we grow, that's something that we'd love to roll out a bit more of that, you know, it goes right back to our grassroots really of what we're really about and, and to, to, to engage kids in, in something like that and showing them that they can, you know, this is what it takes to make a business and learn about that and put that in our plant, that seed, you know, I'm sure I've learned to kids that we've got started now. Um, you know, the, you know Louie that's doing the, um, the blacks combs, you know, she's what she'll be doing year 12 this year.
Speaker 4:
36:50
And um, you know, she, she, we've got her into the metallic store. She wants to get into some other stores and it's a great product that sells really well. Hopefully she will. And, um, you know, once he's at uni she would have more time to spend on it. And you know, I have to be a good little business for rashes. It's just refreshing to see businesses like she'll striving to do more than just make a dollar, you know, collective things. Yeah. Yes. I guess it's trying to stay true to what your path I guess at the end of the day. So yeah. So anyway, I have to, we'll do a bit more of that and you know, we've, we've got a few other things in the pipeline that we're looking at doing to try and expand our reach a little bit. We'd would really like to put a bit more focused in the northern hemisphere.
Speaker 4:
37:48
We haven't really spent any money, ton of money, but we're already selling quite a bit of stuff there. So they're this, you know, it'd be great to, I think, you know, as small little Australian brands that can really leverage off that that Ozzie surf culture that I was so ordered regarded all around the world, you know? And is it like coming from the states or the large? Mike was salt and stuff to a guy in Austria last week. Now we've not only is a winter over there, well you know, just gone with that. But it's a landlocked country, you know, you know, but the guy is probably sitting at his desk dreaming about beaches in Australia, you know, and I mean, let's face it, most Europeans do, they get here and they come out here and they fall in love with the place. You know, um, probably more is developing too.
Speaker 4:
38:44
I mean, we received a photo the other day from a couple of surfers in Muni know, sending fight off them. Reagan slogan is that we sold a bunch of stuff to Germany. Spain's been really good. France, the UK. So look, you know, probably be for us, probably similar to to America in terms of sounds. So, um, but yeah, you know, I think, I think it's, you know, people have, they are interested in the algae Aussie thing, you know, so we, so there's the definite opportunity to leverage, offset and get more sounds for these brands overseas. And, um, you know, long term, you know, at the moment we're selling 20%, that fleet will be more like 50%. You know, at some point in time there's no reason why it shouldn't be. And is anyone doing anything similar to you? This shift collective of salt? I find fence something, something.
Speaker 4:
39:59
I can't remember the name of it, but it's something similar. Not Quite, but know they in the UK this, that's that he's selling a whole bunch of small UK brains. Not that they really, uh, it's been a while since I've seen it, but they wasn't really pushing it too much, but, but they did have a whole lot of interesting small UK brands on their side. But um, yeah, I'll come show there's a lot of smaller American brains as well, isn't there? But, um, but yeah, you know, I think, um, I don't think what she's done is phenomenal.
Speaker 4:
40:36
I used the brain, which Brian Child over there because there's three of you. Yeah. So I've got, um, I've got my, my brother and a good mate of mine is sort of a marketing expert, an old high school friend. We've been best mates since high school. Um, they both helped me a little bit with more, um, most, you know, good to bounce ideas off and talk about stuff. And it's good to have, you know, three brains to bounce things off and discuss things, get some feedback from. And so that's more what that's, yeah, it's, it's good. Um, yeah, so that's, that's, that's, you know, that they don't work in a day to day, but, but they're, they, they are, they are for help. So yeah, it's a system support bice and somebody is, and it's good. Good, good to have. That's true. And
Speaker 5:
41:34
that's been an absolute pleasure. I really preset you're Tom and great to get it.
Speaker 4:
41:39
So to be with you guys with, I came up and saw you when I first launched, I think it was, um, all the, all the magazines. It was like, well, you know, this is like a no brainer. It's like such a perfect fit. We're both doing the, you know, the alternate type surf thing. And it was a perfect match for us. So for us, like I said in good, it's not just saying it to be
Speaker 5:
42:13
Gracie is doing anything wrong, it's just, it's good to offer off.
Speaker 4:
42:24
It's more than just everyday stuff. Culture rather than the competitive surfing staff or it's just, yeah, that's, it works well.
Speaker 5:
42:33
Yes. That's kind of a region pop. It was possibly competitive set. We would've said absolutely not. We just straight in media comms event and it was this like, Whoa, why Capa? Moreover let's look at other aspects of sacking that people have a genuine interest in. I think that's what's really interesting about your site. He's back, there's a little bias about people love the stories behind the stories behind the people. Why are they doing it and how they are doing it. And I think that's, that's probably what we saw is what was missing from the industry. And what's in it for me, I think you've touched on are perfectly in a retail.
Speaker 4:
43:24
Yeah, that's fine. I think in that same game, and I think that whole, that whole surf, you know, culture is drawing a lot. Like, even now you see ads for, um, a retirement village or a health fund and they're showing some older guy surfing. You're not trying, they're not showing someone playing golf anymore. I used to, I used to show you should have them walking down the Gulf coast, but you know, they have the, and I think, I think it is becoming more of a s you know, the spice of the people are a lot more active than what they were 20 years ago. They all took crew, you know, and yeah, I think that people are taking up surfing and later in life or going back to it after, you know, 30 years of being out of the water. And so just, just by virtue of that, I think it's becoming a much bigger market. So for, for, um, for that type of Surf, that type of surfing on, that's not, not necessarily into the competitive stuff
Speaker 5:
44:24
too. I'm sure you know, particular businesses involved you people lot can be accomplished. One of the oldest sprays, it's true kids at school developing the right kind of things, all that. So it's not only the producers, but it's your audience. It's quite the too. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Oh, that's fantastic. Really appreciate your time.
Speaker 2:
44:58
Okay. Cheers. Bye.
Speaker 1:
45:09
Well, I hope you enjoyed my chat with mark. Run nichey, one of the founders of the surf collective. You can check out a whole heap of great Aussie independence if businesses@surfcollective.com dot. Are you a big thanks once again as well to podcast sponsors. Boq bedroom in the spirit of independence. Boq bedroom is also independently managed by co owners and sunshine coast locals, Sam Archer and Marcus Henderson. The guys run a tight ship and together with the whole team deliver exceptional personalized service and that's why we banked with them. Remember, if you want to read more about interesting SIF personalities, you can do so by going to our website smorgasbord up.com dot a u. You can download a copy of the digital magazine, read it online, or even grab yourself a home delivery subscription to the physical mag. Speaking of which the latest edition issue 45 has just landed. Cheers Smoger exporters. Get out there, get amongst it. Chicken next week.