Journey to Multifamily Millions

You Need More than a Tax Preparer, You Need a Tax Strategist! with Melissa Broughton, Ep 100

June 13, 2024 Tim Season 1 Episode 100
You Need More than a Tax Preparer, You Need a Tax Strategist! with Melissa Broughton, Ep 100
Journey to Multifamily Millions
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Journey to Multifamily Millions
You Need More than a Tax Preparer, You Need a Tax Strategist! with Melissa Broughton, Ep 100
Jun 13, 2024 Season 1 Episode 100
Tim

Today's guest is  Melissa Broughton, she is a co-owner of Busy Bee advisors, where she helps small business owners find financial clarity in their business through accounting and tax services.

In this episode, Melissa shares her inspiring journey from corporate accountant to small business owner, fueled by a passion for financial clarity in business, especially for real estate investors. Discover essential topics like the importance of proper bookkeeping, effective tax strategies for various types of investors, and understanding the critical IRS 750-hour rule for real estate professionals. 

Melissa highlights the importance of partnering with a tax professional who specializes in real estate to avoid costly mistakes and optimize financial outcomes. Gain insights into the unique challenges faced by accidental landlords and active real estate investors, along with practical advice on managing business finances.

But more than anything, you’re in store for a whole lot of positive energy and great conversation!

Episode Topics

[01:08]  Meet our guest, Melissa Broughton
[03:32] The Birth of Busy Bee Advisors
[08:44] Navigating the Pandemic Together
[13:31] Advice for New Real Estate Investors
[21:08] The 750 Hour Rule and Real Estate Professional Status
[26:20] The Importance of Specialized Tax Professionals
[30:58] What is one red flag every investor should look out for?
[31:51] What is a myth about the real estate business?
[33:22] Connecting to Melissa 



Notable Quotes

  • "There's a ton of opportunity for our firm to provide bookkeeping, accounting, and tax services." — Melissa Broughton
  • "There was a comfort in the fact that one plus one is always going to equal two." — Tim Little
  • "You want someone who actually enjoys doing the thing, especially if you don't." — Tim Little
  • "I am a very entrepreneurial spirit. I've always been drawn to helping people with business plans." — Melissa Broughton
  • "Keep separate accounts for your separate properties. It's just a no-brainer." — Melissa Broughton
  • "Set up a business email as well. It helps to present that more professional image." — Tim Little
  • "I call those the accidental landlords. They have this property that wasn't intended to be an investment." — Tim Little

 

👉Connect with  Melissa Broughton


👉 Connect with Tim

Subscribe, Rate, and leave a review here 🌟
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/journey-to-multifamily-millions/id1634643497

Show Notes Transcript

Today's guest is  Melissa Broughton, she is a co-owner of Busy Bee advisors, where she helps small business owners find financial clarity in their business through accounting and tax services.

In this episode, Melissa shares her inspiring journey from corporate accountant to small business owner, fueled by a passion for financial clarity in business, especially for real estate investors. Discover essential topics like the importance of proper bookkeeping, effective tax strategies for various types of investors, and understanding the critical IRS 750-hour rule for real estate professionals. 

Melissa highlights the importance of partnering with a tax professional who specializes in real estate to avoid costly mistakes and optimize financial outcomes. Gain insights into the unique challenges faced by accidental landlords and active real estate investors, along with practical advice on managing business finances.

But more than anything, you’re in store for a whole lot of positive energy and great conversation!

Episode Topics

[01:08]  Meet our guest, Melissa Broughton
[03:32] The Birth of Busy Bee Advisors
[08:44] Navigating the Pandemic Together
[13:31] Advice for New Real Estate Investors
[21:08] The 750 Hour Rule and Real Estate Professional Status
[26:20] The Importance of Specialized Tax Professionals
[30:58] What is one red flag every investor should look out for?
[31:51] What is a myth about the real estate business?
[33:22] Connecting to Melissa 



Notable Quotes

  • "There's a ton of opportunity for our firm to provide bookkeeping, accounting, and tax services." — Melissa Broughton
  • "There was a comfort in the fact that one plus one is always going to equal two." — Tim Little
  • "You want someone who actually enjoys doing the thing, especially if you don't." — Tim Little
  • "I am a very entrepreneurial spirit. I've always been drawn to helping people with business plans." — Melissa Broughton
  • "Keep separate accounts for your separate properties. It's just a no-brainer." — Melissa Broughton
  • "Set up a business email as well. It helps to present that more professional image." — Tim Little
  • "I call those the accidental landlords. They have this property that wasn't intended to be an investment." — Tim Little

 

👉Connect with  Melissa Broughton


👉 Connect with Tim

Subscribe, Rate, and leave a review here 🌟
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/journey-to-multifamily-millions/id1634643497

[00:00:00] Melissa Broughton: In order to qualify as a real estate investor, you have to prove that you've spent 750 hours or more in a calendar year, working actively in the business. And that's one of the, that's one of the big things that we really talk to those types of clients about. And, The avatar, if you call it of that accidental landlord versus the person who's an investor involved in hundreds of properties is very different. 

[00:01:08] Tim Little: Hello, everyone, and welcome to the journey to multifamily millions. I'm your host, founder and CEO of ZANA Investments, Tim Little. And on today's show, we have Melissa Broughton. Melissa is a co-owner of Busy Bee Advisors, where she helps small business owners find financial clarity in their business through accounting and tax services. Melissa, welcome to the show.

[00:01:30] Melissa Broughton: Hey, thanks for having me today.

[00:01:32] Tim Little: Yeah, it's great to have you. So I will be getting into Busy Bee Advisors in a little bit, but before we go there, can you please tell me a little more about your background and how you got to where you are today?

[00:01:45] Melissa Broughton: Sure. It's an interesting story. I went to college just like so many other people did. And I was pretty clear that I knew I wanted to do something in business or finance. I come from, what I like to call, a long line of bookkeepers and accountants. I remember, gosh, my mom says I was probably three years old, but she was a bookkeeper at a bank back in the day when everything was manual. So I remember actually sitting. underneath her desk and watching the paper trails from the 10 key calculators, coming over. So I guess you could say it's it's in my blood, but,went to college and got my, my, my degree in accounting and, Of course that transitioned to me, or I guess I shouldn't say of course, but that transitioned me into, working my way up in a corporate America. And the last position I held in corporate America was for, I was a controller for a mid sized manufacturing company. And I found myself working60 hours a week and sometimes more. What the pain point of that was for me was my, my oldest son at the time was a sophomore in high school and our youngest was, he was little at the time and I just felt like I was missing everything. between work and the commute to work, uh, I felt like I was either always thinking about somebody else's finances or driving to the location where I would be getting to think about somebody else's finances. So an opportunity presented itself. I left that position and had the opportunity to really reflect and figure out what I wanted to do. My husband, who is my business partner now, at the time had just finished nursing school and so he was ready to launch his career and it became this opportunity for us to switch and for him to be the, maybe the primary breadwinner for the family. And,I went out for a run to clear my head and I fell. And I say I fell and people are like, oh, okay. But I fell and I broke my jaw. I shattered the majority of my teeth. Um,it was a fiasco. We like to joke that we definitely purchased our dentist's, second home and probably a boat for him, if not assisting him and paying for several of his children to go through college with what, what my mouth fiasco caused us. But, through that time I was, I was, I was in that place of being forced to just be still. I couldn't really do anything. I couldn't talk much. So in my mind, I got to formulate this kind of ideal business plan. And I launched in 2017 and we saw just this growth. we were experiencing probably a 20 percent growth month after month. There was just such a need for, small business accounting, small business tax services, especially in the focus and realm of real estate professionals. And real estate investors. And I just. It's always a group that I've been incredibly passionate about serving simply because you have such a varied background of people that are drawn into this space, especially in the investor's space. So you may have people that have tons of business experience, That jump into it and just want to be advised on how to pay as little in taxes as possible. and those people are always lovely to work with. But then you also have people who have come from totally different backgrounds. Maybe they inherited a property. And they're ready to purchase another property, or maybe they just, just completely stumbled into the field for one reason or another. So there's a ton of opportunity for our firm to be able to provide not only bookkeeping, accounting and tax services, but also to educate those clients. And that's what we're passionate about. So yeah.

[00:06:08] Tim Little: Yeah, and that's an awesome story. I love how you walked us through that. And there's a couple of things I wanted to hit on. So I owe it. I always find it interesting when I'm talking to people and learning more about their background, the impact that their parents can have on what they thought they wanted to be, what they wound up being. And for you, it sounds like you saw your mom doing this thing. And that got into your head too. For me, It was similar, but different. So my dad was a TV repairman and my grandfather was also a TV repairman. Unfortunately, that field did not exist by the time I was graduating high school. but he moved on to managing at different stores and stuff like that. So I was still able to garner some of those lessons, but I didn't have that clear path that like some people have where they get to see it firsthand and are able to apply it in their own right. Which it sounds like you got.

[00:07:06] Melissa Broughton: I did. I did. I was really, I was really lucky. I was very fortunate. The thing for me that hit you at a really young age was that math just makes sense to me. And there are a lot of people that are very numbers phobic, like they want nothing to do with it. They don't even want to be taught anything about it.

[00:07:28] Tim Little: But for me, There was a comfort in the fact that one plus one is always going to equal two, right there. It doesn't change. You don't have the variables like you do if you're, I don't know, working in a creative field or, or something along those lines. Yeah. And that's exactly why we need people like you, right? you want someone who actually enjoys doing the thing, especially if you don't. and that's a, that's especially true in business too, right? When we're looking at partnerships and I'm sure this is the same for you and you can talk about this, you find complementary skill sets. and in real estate specifically, someone might be great with the numbers, whereas someone is much more person. personable and outgoing and that matchup, works out great. Talk to me about how you guys started Busy B and actually, came together as partners on that business and what that looked like.

[00:08:25] Melissa Broughton: So it's another really awesome, in my opinion, awesome story. And it's funny because when you have both of us on, because we've been on several podcasts together, we actually host our own podcast together. We're pretty good at not stepping on each other's toes. But when it comes to our story, we both get really excited about it. So he was a nurse, as I mentioned earlier, in 2019. So right before the big pandemic that shut our whole world down, he's, in this healthcare field. Now we of course didn't know, just nobody knew what was going to happen, right before the pandemic. So he's working in the nursing field. It's December, beginning of December. And because he was a nurse, he was either on call every holiday or the day after every holiday. So we never could really make any plans around the holidays. and my business at the time was picking up, incredible momentum. And I said to him, we had been invited by friends to go out for New Year's Eve. And I said to him, you should quit your job and you should come and work with me. And I, I think I probably just asked at the right time. It was probably at the end of him working a double shift or something along those lines. But. We kind panned out the numbers and we figured out that it really did make sense. and I really sold him on the quality of life and being there for our kids and all that stuff. And so he, he gave his notice to the, facility that he worked for. And he actually had a background in finance. His was more construction focused. Uh, his family had owned a family construction business. So he was familiar with the numbers and familiar with the tax side of things. And essentially he went back to school, Got his,took some classes to get his license, passed the exams he needed to, and decided that he would focus on the tax side and I would focus on the bookkeeping side of things. That took us about, I don't know, I'm going to say about six weeks, 2020, which is when the pandemic happened and the whole world is shutting down. And it was this crazy, know. It was almost as if I had a crystal ball at the time when I asked him, which I of course didn't know what was going to happen. But, it was a pretty neat thing to be able to weather the storm of the pandemic together.

[00:10:54] Tim Little: Yeah, and that's interesting. Whenever you guys, come together and talk through big decisions like that, right? Because I think that is a pretty big decision when you're talking about one person completely changing their career field. And I want to hear more about the risk calculus that went into that, because I'm thinking, that's a pretty, high demand job, relatively, steady income compared to the much more entrepreneurial side of starting your own business. What were your discussions about risk in that scenario?

[00:11:29] Melissa Broughton: So it's interesting that you put it that way because I am very entrepreneurial spirit. I've always been drawn to,even when I worked in corporate America, always been drawn to helping people with business plans and the whole thought around working for myself or somebody working for themselves, even as an investor really excites me. My husband is completely the opposite. He is your ultimate, He is your, like you laugh, but he is your ultimate company man. Like he is the guy who says what needs to be done. I'll do it. I'm never going to call in sick. I'm never going to, disappoint. You tell me what's expected and I will do it. But that's very different from having the entrepreneurial spirit. So for him, the first piece that I needed to, I don't know, prove was that. Was that what we could afford? To continue our lifestyle at this, in the same way that it was. And what I was actually able to point out to him and COVID bit me on the butt on this one, but was the fact that we would have this ability to travel and to go all of these places with our kids when they were on breaks and stuff like that. So the world got shut down, that threw things for a loop, but, it, proving out the money really. Put his mind at ease and seeing that we had, I had a two year at that point, track record of steady growth in business. And by adding him as the tax component to it, it opened up a whole new realm of income possibilities for us.

[00:13:13] Tim Little: Yeah. And that makes sense. And in your defense, I don't think you could be faulted for not taking into account a possible pandemic. So Right.that's fair.

[00:13:22] Melissa Broughton: wasn't seeing that one coming.

[00:13:24] Tim Little: So I think it's helpful to talk through the different needs at different stages of a business. And I think a lot of the people listening right now, they probably have really, One to two single family rentals, right? And so what do you recommend from a bookkeeping or tax perspective for someone who's in that situation, just getting started on their I'd say real estate investment journey.

[00:13:51] Melissa Broughton: Sure. And that's a really good question because the advice and the conversations that we're having with clients who are at various stages of their, let's say, investor journey or their real estate career are there similarities, but there's also a lot of differences. I look at those kinds of newbies or those people who are at that very, that entry level, maybe somebody who's inherited a property. Cause we meet a lot of those people where they just have this, Oh, I'm now,I'm now a real estate investor. It wasn't something I set out to do, but I have this property that was turned over to me that I inherited and I get to either sell it or do something with it. Let's take that person and put that person in the bucket with somebody who's actively purchased, maybe their first or second property. The biggest thing, and this is a, it's a, to me it seems like a no brainer, but maybe it's not. You don't necessarily need to hire a bookkeeper at that point. and in fact, in most cases we really tell clients that it's an expense that they can save on at that point. They can generally keep track of things themselves Honestly, in an Excel spreadsheet, if they want to, embrace technology, they can use something like QuickBooks online and there's ways to separate out the properties. But by gosh, keep separate accounts for your separate properties. It's, it's just, I don't know. And I think any tax person listening to me out there is probably agreeing, but I think investors. aren't yet embracing that this is a business for them. They feel like it's almost a hobby. It's a side thing. And if you get audited or even just when it comes to tax time, by not having separate accounts for your personal and that property or for the individual properties,you're just asking for problems down the road. And,you're What is it? Cutting off your nose to spite your face? You're, you think you're saving some time in the short term by having one account for everything but pulling those transactions apart, It's really complicated. It's complicated for your tax professional, but where we've really seen people run into trouble with that is if they get audited, because if you're running everything through a personal account or your personal credit cards, and it's being commingled, you go through that audit and we've seen agents just disallow. everything. And you can go through the fight. You can hire a tax attorney and you can fight it and you'll probably win. And I say win with big air quotes. Because you'll end up paying that, that tax attorney probably as much, if not more than what your tax liability would have been. So keep separate accounts.

[00:16:44] Tim Little: Yeah, exactly. And it's that whole ounce of prevention thing, right? Like how much does it cost you to set up a business bank account? Virtually nothing. How much does it cost to open a business credit card? Virtually nothing. But those are like the two simple steps that you could take to avoid all those expensive problems that you were just talking about.

[00:17:05] Melissa Broughton: It's so true. It takes you, maybe an hour of your time to go down to the bank. I know nobody gets excited about going down to the bank to open up an account, but,worth the time spent early on to do that.

[00:17:18] Tim Little: Yeah, and I don't know about you, but I would also recommend that people set up a business email as well. It just helps to present that more one professional image, but two, it helps with that separation. And again, it doesn't. Cost anything in many instances, you can get, paid business emails, but if you just want to start it at Gmail, it's not that expensive and it goes a long way towards professionalizing and also at least creating, I don't want to say a facade cause it's not fake, but the perception of it being a business versus a hobby like you talked about.

 

[00:18:33] Melissa Broughton: I think, we've certainly owned other businesses and sometimes when you're, we'll talk about passive investors. Soon. I have a feeling, but sometimes when you're a passive investor in a business, it does feel like a facade when you're opening up a separate account or you're creating an email address for it. It's a true business, but because you're not, actively putting your blood, sweat and tears into it every day. Sometimes it doesn't feel like it's a real business. So yeah, that the email address is true. That's an excellent idea.

[00:19:10] Tim Little: Yeah, and like I think what you were getting at with those folks who like to inherit, I think of the accidental landlord. Someone who either inherits this property or maybe they moved, but they wanted to hold on to it, as a rental and that's the first or maybe they had a divorce or whatever the case is, they have this property that wasn't intended to be an investment. but now they find themselves. in the situation where they are a landlord. So I call those the accidental landlords. And that's mad, I imagine when a lot of people are seeking you out and say, Hey, what do I need to do?

[00:19:45] Melissa Broughton: And sometimes when clients have that conversation with us, we're incredibly honest with them because we'll tell them straight, out of the blue, that you may end up wanting to sell all of those properties after you talk to us. It's not that we're wanting to talk you out of this business, but if that wasn't your intention, especially for the accident, I love that the accidental landlord, if that wasn't your intention when you started out, it's not a turnkey at least not right out, right immediately.  It's not a turnkey situation. So there's work and there's time that it takes.

[00:20:21] Tim Little: Yeah. And some people may get lucky when those properties take off like gangbusters and appreciate like crazy. But again, if they didn't go into it as an investment, there's going to be just as many properties that are not cash flowing at all. And it almost becomes more of a liability than anything else.  and so I think that's what you're hitting on there. So let's switch gears. Let's talk about someone who decided to take this thing a little more actively, a little more seriously. And. Say they're a general partner now on hundreds of properties and they're raising capital from passive investors. What did those folks, those syndicators, we usually call them, what did they most need to consider and what mistakes do you most often see them making?

[00:21:08] Melissa Broughton: So there's this interesting little loophole in the IRS tax code, and it's called the 750 hour rule. I, of course, can't remember the exact number of the tax code. I apologize, but it is a real legitimate thing. And essentially, if you're an investor or a passive investor, you're pretty limited on the things that you can write off, right? So if you're involved in If you can imagine, and we have several clients that are in this,the situation of what you're talking about, where they're receiving a K one at the end of the year for hundreds of thousands of dollars. And you can imagine that if you're limited on what you can write off, it can certainly affect your tax liability, right?  So It makes sense sometimes for those people to be able to classify themselves as a real estate professional, which they would be taking an active role in versus just a passive real estate investor. And that's a, I don't, I hate to say trick, but it is, it's a loophole. We'll call it a loophole trick that freaks people out. in order to qualify as a real estate investor, you have to prove that you've spent 750 hours or more in a calendar year, working actively in the business. And that's one of the, that's one of the big things that we really talk to those types of clients about. And, The avatar, if you call it of that accidental landlord versus the person who's an investor involved in hundreds of properties is very different. you hit that and I'm gonna say anybody who's on the passive investor side. Really needs to make sure that they're working with a tax professional, maybe not a bookkeeper, but definitely needs to be working with a tax professional because there are lots of different things that if they're not handled correctly can trigger an audit. There's also things that you just wouldn't know. that you could push on and that you could take advantage of. And so there's just, there's money as far as deductions that you'd be leaving on the table. So that's the place where you really want to make sure you've hired a professional and that you're not trying to do your taxes yourself.

[00:23:29] Tim Little: Yeah, and we could, this can certainly get very advanced very quickly once we start talking about real estate professional status, because, of course among real estate investors, it is coveted,and something to shoot for. But there are very important caveats like you talked about. One being the minimum number of hours and correct me if I'm wrong, you also need to have more than 50 percent of your income. of your income coming from real estate. is 

[00:23:56] Melissa Broughton: So that varies from state to state. And there's  other things that kind of can,can make that a null point. But yeah, there are some states where 50 percent of your income is coming from real estate. And then, you know, so if you really want to go down the rabbit hole on that, which we won't, I'll just say this, there's different things. If you live in a state where that's one of the qualifiers, we'll say there are different things that your tax professional can do to present the information in a way for that to legally work and you to still be accepted as a professional and take full advantage of the tax code.

[00:24:35] Tim Little: Yeah. And Melissa is amazing at her job, but I don't want to oversell that piece because a lot of people, most people in fact, will not qualify for real estate professional status. I don't want people to think that it's easy. Oh, I did some work on my properties, so I'm a real estate professional now. It's. It's not that straightforward and there are certainly some. Real caveats that are big hurdles to overcome for most folks. There are some people that will certainly qualify. I have qualified in some years and not in other years. so that's where it gets complicated. The only thing that I'll say again, So that we can jump out of the rabbit hole is why it's so coveted is because of the benefit that it brings. Say you have a two person household like me and my wife, who's on the corporate side, right? And say she makes decent pay, six figures, and. It's highly taxed if I get that real estate professional status and have significant depreciation I can not only you know, write down my own income But if we're filing jointly I can also write down her income which can make a huge difference from the more basic, only being able to write down the investments that we have.

[00:26:00] Melissa Broughton: Sure. And even if those write-offs can kick you down to a lower tax bracket, that's a huge difference. But yes, I'll agree. Let's get out of the rabbit hole because I certainly don't want your listeners to be like, Oh my God, I can't. 

[00:26:16] Tim Little: no, I know. We may think this is exciting, but not everyone does. i think it's riveting. All right. And so let's talk about that third category that you briefly mentioned, which are those people who are strictly passive investing and I've done, Strictly passive investing too. And I don't think of that as a business. I think of that as just me investing. I got a K one in my name. but what are you as the tax bookkeeping professional, what are you thinking about for that person who is just doing strictly passive investing? They are a limited partner in, in some of these syndication deals.

[00:26:52] Melissa Broughton: So with each one of these categories, I feel like I could sit here and say, Oh, they're my favorite group to work with. But those people who have intentionally gone into real estate as investors, or at least at this point, they're embracing it. And it's not their full time business. They're not trying to push it to be their full time business. The biggest thing I can say for that group is it's definitely the time that you need to have a tax professional that understands real estate investing. If you're a high level investor, you can really get away with just working with a good, tax professional. But if you're in that middle phase, like what we're talking about where you're getting a K one, but you are an investor. You, you need to work with somebody who is almost a salesperson. specialist in the field of real estate and investing because there's so many nuances and it's not that we're pushing anything. It's not that we're taking advantage of the tax code, but we understand and we know the tax code as it applies to your industry. and that's really important. And we've seen the difference. we've seen the difference when we've had, clients that, own multiple properties. They sell one of the properties. It's not tracked correctly for depreciation. And yes, we can go back, of course, and file an amended return, but there's costs associated with that. And it just, you deserve to be working with somebody who knows your industry. That's what I'll say as far as that goes. It's also the time to either hire a bookkeeper, Or to,to actually make an appointment, with yourself and make a commitment with yourself to be doing your bookkeeping for this business. That's not really a business, as you said, on a monthly basis. If you wait until the end of the year, what we've seen is there's just tens of thousands of dollars that are missed on deductions. It's like cramming for an exam. Yeah. you'll pass the exam. Yeah. You'll be able to file your taxes, but do you really absorb the knowledge and do you really get the full benefit? No, you don't. You forget about things. Tracking your mileage is something that's important at this phase. I find that a lot of investors that are somewhat in that passive investor phase they're still involved with their properties, but they don't realize that they can track their mileage and that can add up quickly. And, it may even be time to look at depending on what that K one total is to look at, becoming a corporation so that you couldn't, and I don't want to go on down on a rabbit hole on this one, but so that you could actually through the corporation, put yourself on payroll and help to offset some of those taxes. so there's a lot of different things that happen at that phase.

[00:29:50] Tim Little: Yeah, and I think the thing that I want to foot stomp the most about what you said is finding a tax professional who just understands real estate in whatever respect that you're doing it in. because I've seen the difference between the two and when you have to educate your own tax professional on some of the benefits of real estate, it's probably embarrassing for them and it's really frustrating for you. So that's the point where you need to sever the relationship and find someone who does this on a regular basis. And if it's someone, a tax professional. Who has invested in real estate themselves. They're probably in a better position and had better incentive to understand and know. You know what they should be looking for and looking at

[00:30:41] Melissa Broughton: Absolutely. Couldn't have said that one better myself.

[00:30:43] Tim Little: all right, Melissa hey, we do have to transition to the turbo round. So I'm gonna ask you three questions that I ask every guest we have on the show and I just asked for a quick honest Answer. Are you ready?

[00:30:55] Melissa Broughton: Yes.

[00:30:56] Tim Little: All right. What is one red flag? Every investor should look out for

[00:31:00] Melissa Broughton: one red flag. I'm going to answer this maybe a little bit differently, but definitely be checking your K one to make sure that the amount that's reported on your K one is the same as what you've actually received. If you're an investor, what you've actually received is payouts. We've started to see an uprising on Misreported K ones. And I don't want to say that it's done intentionally. In fact, I'm sure it's not done intentionally, but why would you want to be overpaying on taxes for a clerical error?

[00:31:32] Tim Little: Yeah, no, I think that's completely fair because we catch mistakes from the higher level accountants who are doing the k1s Ourselves that need to be corrected So each of those investors should be doing the same thing and actually looking at the k1 To make sure that everything is accurate.

[00:31:49] Melissa Broughton: Yep.

[00:31:49] Tim Little: right second question: What is a myth about this business that you would like to set straight?

[00:31:54] Melissa Broughton: Oh, that it's easy to make money. We'll just say that. That's my favorite myth about this industry, that anybody can be successful and make money as a real estate investor. I think that's a huge myth.

[00:32:07] Tim Little: Yeah, it takes You Work and by work, I know, you have to study deals You can't just throw money at something or someone and expect it to make money every time you have to do your own Due diligence as well completely agree. All right, final question. What does success look like to you?

[00:32:25] Melissa Broughton: I'm going to answer this one in person. So success to me, Looks like being able to work a schedule that revolves around my life, not my life revolving around work. It's all about that work life balance. And that's been what my husband and I have been committed to since this company started in 2017.

[00:32:49] Tim Little: Yeah, that's awesome. Yeah, it goes to a similar vein of what a lot of people come on here They talk about, time freedom And I think that balance is part of that freedom because you're choosing, you know How much you want to work you're also prioritizing, what you think is important which is huge. All right, Melissa, I have to admit, I'm a little disappointed that Eric couldn't join us. I know it would have been amazing to just have that double whammy of you two on here, but it was awesome having you here. Please tell our listeners how they can get a hold of you. And if there's anything else that you'd like to share with them. Awesome.

[00:33:22] Melissa Broughton: So I would like to share one other thing. I meant to have it,I meant to have it out and ready when we started the call. And I got so excited about talking about being at different sides of the country with you that I forgot to grab it. But, I just published my, Oh, it's backwards. It's always funny when it's backwards on camera, but I just published my second book. It's called the four hour bookkeeper. And this book is actually dedicated really specifically or was written really specifically with those, those small, maybe that accidental landlord in mind, or even that investor who's on the investment side, the people who don't need to hire a bookkeeper. and it breaks down exactly what you need to do when you need to do it into, four hours a month. That's my pitch for that. And I would love to send any of your listeners a free copy of the book. If they're interested, they can feel free to email us. And I'm sure you'll have the email address in the show notes, but it's a info@busybeeadvisors.com. And we'd be happy to schedule a consultation with you or send you a free copy of our ebook. 

[00:34:30] Tim Little: we'll certainly have all that information in the show notes, and I may take you up on that book as well, because I will, We'll admit that's one area of my business where I haven't been as diligent as the is the bookkeeping So I could probably benefit from that. But 

[00:34:45] Melissa Broughton: I'll send you a hard copy so it can go to your bookshop and back.

[00:34:49] Tim Little: Oh, there you go. See that's smart business acumen right there. All right. Melissa again, it's been great having you on. This has been an awesome conversation. I look forward to considering continuing to see you do big things on your journey. Take care

[00:35:02] Melissa Broughton: Thank you.