More than just mindfulness

Meditation the Modern Way

May 04, 2019 Season 1 Episode 32
More than just mindfulness
Meditation the Modern Way
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Meditation the Modern Way
May 04, 2019 Season 1 Episode 32
Robert Mitchell
How to learn to meditate in a way that enables you to build a sustainable practice
Show Notes Transcript

In this podcast, Robert explains why he teaches the meditations he does teach and why he teaches how he teaches. There are three key elements of teaching meditation: the teaching methodology, the meditations and the way that new meditators are encouraged to meditate.

In this Podcast, Robert provides some insight into his training methodology, how he uses Kaizen, a process of continuous improvement to improve the training and to introduce new practices. He then explains how meditators can do the same as a way of building a personal practice.

Meditations are: the meditation of no meditation for sound and for the breath, following the breath, counting the breaths, labelling the thoughts and labelling the quality of thought.

Speaker 1:
0:13
So ty is meditate in the modern. Why lock high alluded to before I started. What I actually means is my why. Well, the way that I teach now anyway, I operate a process of continuous improvement. If I encounter a practice, it doesn't matter what it is, I'll try it out. I've been meditating for quite a while now. I think I'm a pretty good starting point for something that's a new meditation or a new day to day practice. If I think it's worthy, then you know I run several sessions a week and often I get a session with just experienced students, so we'll try out on them and then I'll elicit feedback and the way that I do that, it's just by asking open questions, how was it? Tell me what happened and say then if their experience is similar to mine, then there's a level of consistency there. Depending on what it is, I might introduce it into my courses and my training and as a result of that, what I've taught as changed and the most obvious change that I'm sure you're all aware of is that I used to focus a lot on following the breath meditation and now I focus more on the meditation of no meditation as just an example of how this works.
Speaker 2:
1:46
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
1:46
it isn't just the meditations that I've been focusing on. I introduced a sleep program into the courses
Speaker 1:
1:58
and there's a new area of focus. As a result of that, I do a little bit of an explanation about sleep. I explain all the meditations that help you to sleep and how they work later on in the course. What we can do is review people's progress if they've engaged in it. And one of the things that I do in the regular meditation classes and smaller courses is I explained to people where you can use this to to sleep and you can do it. Use that to sleep. And of course every so often I do a session just on sleep. And so if you go on the more than just mindfulness podcasts, can't remember the session number, you'll find one there. It's all about sleep. That's a why that I've learned of something that I need to teach to benefit my students. And then the other thing of course is, is the whole way that I approach it, the methodology you could say and the methodology started off as, and I, here's this following the breath, you do that.
Speaker 1:
3:08
So that's why us, as far as most meditation teachers go, you either do the following, the breath or you don't. If you don't, you don't get the benefits. If you do, you do. And then they might introduce another couple of meditations but isn't as simple as that because the mind's not simple on choice is not a simple thing. So there are a whole load of influences on a choice. There's your intuition, there's your instinct instinct huge. When all of these things are in conflict, instincts will take over. This is why, you know, people panic in situations is because their instinctual responses takeover. Then there's intuition, which is basically we've learned to respond in a particular way and then there's habit, which is something that we do over and over and over again. And then there's emotion. And finally there's our intentions. This is why changing habits are so hard. Going in a new habit or stopping an old habit is probably the most difficult thing that human beings do in their lives.
Speaker 1:
4:25
The result of that, there's a new science of habit formation, and so I've studied the salient points and so introduce these from time to time. So as you can see, there's a change to the methodology as well. I started off as just saying to people, okay, you have to do the following, the breath. I still say that, but I don't just leave it there. It's like you know, up to you, take it or leave it. Because of all of these other influences on our life, it's really difficult to sit down, meditate for 15 minutes every single day doing something like following the breath and there's all sorts of consequences. To that. It's actually a rocky road just in itself. Of course, there are all sorts of other influences arise in, in our lives that might make it impossible for us to maintain a practice.
Speaker 1:
5:20
So in addition to just sign to people, there you go. You do these meditations, these are the meditations you do. And here's how I teach you. As well as that, I spent a long time trying to soften the practice. So for example, only 15% of new meditators can sit down and do the following. The breath meditation find that it calms their mind. That means for most people, it makes your mind busier. Now, less important because that's why you're there. You're there because your mind's busy. Everybody knows meditation calms their mind. So people come along and they learned to meditate because they want to calm their mind. So if I give them a practice and their mind becomes busy getting the opposite of what they want, so I learned that certain. Other than that, it's how you shouldn't the I refer to as the supporting meditations. And that's a reflection of how I meditate. The supporting meditations help to calm your mind better than the following. The breath following the breath is a pivotal practice. It's important.
Speaker 2:
6:25
Okay.
Speaker 1:
6:26
There was a change there. As I introduce the supporting practices and I also found as many ways as possible, I've softening the practice so that it's less uncomfortable because it can be an uncomfortable experience meditating depending on the contents of your mind. Let's say there was a graph and you had the people with a happy minds at one end and you had the people with the unhappy mines at the other end, it's far more likely that someone with an unhappy mind is going to come and learn to meditate. What that means is a bringing the baggage of their unhappy mind with them into their meditation, and so how do we approach that? This was the thrust of what I taught.
Speaker 2:
7:14
Okay,
Speaker 1:
7:14
but recently having spent some time on the science of habit formation and also having refocused on frictionless meditations, which I'll actually meditations, this is the meditation of no meditation that I'm talking about, which we'll do. What that does is it, it's a frictionless experience that gives you a little bit of mindfulness and also a little bit of meditation. So there's a bit of meditation in there and there's a bit of mindfulness and the meditation of no meditation, especially in the moment meditation of no meditation for sound.
Speaker 1:
8:04
And that the science of habit formation tells us to successfully introduce changes into your life. The most useful way to do it. And it's not that you can't make a big change, it's just that it's more difficult to make a big change. Instead you can make small changes. So these are what they call micro changes and there are whole lots of things that you can do to help you to initiate on mine. Tying those changes and build them into a stir sustainable practice that benefits you and it doesn't really matter what you are applying it to. It all works the same way. So there's our manufacturing process known as Kaizen. It's actually a quality improvement process. And what it consists of is making small changes that are so small that they appear to have no real benefit, but that something's slightly better after you've done it.
Speaker 3:
9:16
Okay?
Speaker 1:
9:16
And if you can identify Kiai is Etienne, this is what Toyota used to become, probably the most successful moment manufacturer in the world. And you can apply Kaizen to your life by making small improvements. And I apply it. So what I teach, I make small improvements that I can roll back. I might introduce a practice for that one class where I've got experienced students and then if I don't get a satisfactory response from them or I don't get a satisfactory response when I teach it in a class full of mixed ability students, then I'll stop it. So it's a small change. And so as a, as a result of that, the whole thing gets better and better. But this is the same when your working with your own habits.
Speaker 3:
10:12
Okay?
Speaker 1:
10:13
What you need to do is to introduce small habits.
Speaker 3:
10:19
Okay?
Speaker 1:
10:20
So you can introduce these small habits into your life, small changes. And then I grow in the big changes. And there's a thing called habit stacking. So this is part of the new science of habit formation.
Speaker 3:
10:37
Okay.
Speaker 1:
10:38
The most useful thing that you can do if you don't have one, if it's possible to do what to do it, it isn't always possible to do it is to have a morning routine. So just out of curiosity, hands up. Anybody who's got a morning routine, most people are forced into it through work. Yeah. For those of you that don't have a morning routine, have a look at having a morning routine for its own sake. And the reason for that is that you can then make changes on the back of it. So let's say you get up, you make your bed, you have a shower, you clean up the kitchen, you have your breakfast, you check your emails, whatever it might happen to be. You could do that in any order. Tragically, in our culture, most people wake up in the morning, check their emails, and it just goes down hill from there. Right?
Speaker 1:
11:35
Oh, Cup of tea. Oh, there you go. See, that's, yeah. What ever happened to tease maids, did they still open? I don't know. I thought that was just such a wonderful invention. So there you go. Um, there's, there's, I'm going to buy myself a teasmaid. I'll let you know how guess on if there is such a thing. So then you, you press this button and there's this cup of tea. So that's part of your morning routine. Now the way that the man, the human beings work is, like I said, there are so many influences on us driving us to do certain things, but habits pretty high up the list, you know, to be fair, instinct comes before habit and intuition can override habit as can, you know, structured rational thought if there is such a thing, I increasingly believe that it's actually an illusion. Intention.
Speaker 1:
12:38
Intention is a useful thing, but building, it's building a small habit on the back of a routine is the best way to do it. If you have a good habit. So let's say you make your own breakfast and you put loads of Nice, you know, good stuff for your light. Spinach, for example, in your breakfast, which is what I've been eating for the last five days, spinach for breakfast among other things and so there you go. So you've got this good habit. Now if I carried that on and I actually, I don't see any reason why I shouldn't probably going to carry that on, it's not going to be a little faster. It will become a new way. So there I am, I get up in the morning and I cook my spinach and that's good for me and there's a little bit of a boost from that.
Speaker 1:
13:32
They'll feel good. I've, I've, I've done this thing that's benefits my health. So what I need to do now is add something else to it so I could do a bit of yoga. There you go. That's what's known as habit stacking. Once you build one micro habit, you build another one and then you've got a routine and you can add habits to the routine. If you don't have a routine is very difficult to build regular practices and if, if it's if your morning routines too crowded, have a look at some other times of the day and build a routine in there. What are the things you do when you get back home? What are the things you do when you walk out the door? You know what, what the things you do when you arrive at work, what are the things you do when you arrive at certain different places and this, this having this, I do this, then I do that.
Speaker 1:
14:32
Then I do. That is the most useful way to add useful habits and quite apart from anything else, you then have what's known as a cue and this is the key to developing a new behavior is the cue. It's the trigger that reminds you that now is the time to do this thing. Don't rely on time unless you are somebody who's just a total clock watcher that just works from their diary. And they have their calendar and some people are like, ah, but if you're not, don't rely on time. Do rely on something like location. So when I'm here, then I do this thing because then you'll you, while you're on autopilot, he'll still do it and then it takes, it could take years to build the habit. It doesn't matter. We perceive a lot of things to be binary. I'm on my diet, I'm off my diet, I'm exercising, I'm not exercising. And actually nothing's binary really. Well there's, there's, there's, there's, there is binary stuff, but it's very, very simple. Most of the things in the universe is so complicated that it's not one or the other. It's lots of lots of different options.
Speaker 1:
16:01
So that, that's all a bit of information on how you can actually get the practices into your life. And then of course, what practices do you do? I am still of the opinion that following the breath is the single most useful use of time as a meditation practice. So we're going to do that today to get into the practice of meditation. The meditation of no, Meditation's the most useful practice you can do and then there are a handful of other most useful practices.
Speaker 1:
16:41
It can be used in a number of different ways to help you to build a practice cause that at the end of the day, that's all I want because once you're doing it, it makes the, it makes the changes, the process makes the changes to your thoughts, emotions, responses, reactions, behavior, our beliefs, all of that. When I say change in a your beliefs, it isn't so much that the explicit things in life, the things that you've thought about change, it's that we're all burdened by a lot of unhelpful beliefs about the way that the world is and first of all, you're discovering them and then you discover they're not true and then you become unburdened. That's the path of meditation. This is I an exercise rather than a meditation, which is why I call it the meditation of no meditation. And then the same way that I refine everything else, I've refined the way I teach it, I now teach it as a a process of waiting because that's closer to what it actually feels like.
Speaker 2:
18:02
Okay.
Speaker 1:
18:03
And what we're waiting for is the next sound.
Speaker 2:
18:09
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
18:10
And the advantage of that, of course, is if there isn't the sound, it doesn't matter. We're still waiting for it.
Speaker 2:
18:19
Okay.
Speaker 1:
18:20
And the next sound of course, can be anywhere. So there's traffic outside, there's the occasional airplane, there's movements in the room, there's movements in the building, there's people outside from time at the time, as the sound of my voice, there's the, you might be able to hear your breath and all you're doing is listening for the next sound, whatever that might happen to be and wherever it might be. That's it. When a sound arises, it listen for the next sound. So we're just listening. And so there's very little instructions to this, so there's no way to get it wrong. Really. There's no right or wrong way of doing it. My whiting and listening, waiting and listening for the next sound. We're not fighting against our mind. Doesn't matter if the mind's busy. It doesn't matter if the mind wanders. This isn't a concentration exercise. There are no goals, there's no expectations, so there's no way of getting it wrong. Something we can all do. Just waiting and listening for the next sound.
Speaker 2:
20:46
Yeah. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
21:35
Why not? Why not foster pout in the mind? Let it do its thing. As long as we are aware of what the next sound is going to be all the time, that's the only thing we're doing. Staying aware. The next sound might be, and then we're going to move our attention to noticing a movement. It's the movement of the ballet as we breathe in and out just at the top of the ballet. Just at a point where the belly meets the chest, tiny little movement,
Speaker 2:
23:02
which is
Speaker 1:
23:04
the belly rising and falling. No, just, yeah, just allowing yourself to be aware of it so it's not deep concentration. Again, it doesn't matter what the mind's doing, how busy the mind is. If the mind wanders, none of that matters when it just staying focused on the belly rising and falling. And if you wish to assist that process, what you do is as you're breathing in, he's saying your mind rising as you're breathing out, saying your mind fallen. So if he got our busy mind, you might want to hijack the busy mind
Speaker 2:
23:54
and use it
Speaker 1:
23:57
to sign your mind rising,
Speaker 2:
24:00
Colin.
Speaker 1:
24:07
Well, Devin is in that tiny movement in the belly count. Notice the sensation. You might need to put your fingers there and notice the belly rising and falling.
Speaker 2:
24:52
Hola. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
25:11
And so now if you place your tongue up against the back of your top teeth and I feel sad, anxious, put your elbows by your side and make sure that your head is balanced as comfortably as possible on top of your spine. So you find the point of maximum. Can't comfort elbows by the side. And you'll notice in the breath in the nostrils now, and you can do the same thing here. You can sign your mind rising and falling. As you notice the breath in the nostrils,
Speaker 2:
25:47
rising, falling,
Speaker 1:
26:09
doesn't matter if your mind wanders and if your mind wanders, all you do is you come back and notice the breath.
Speaker 2:
26:17
Cool. Inbreath warm out process. If you wish.
Speaker 1:
26:36
You're saying in your mind, rising,
Speaker 2:
26:39
folding,
Speaker 1:
27:15
cool breath in. Long breath out.
Speaker 2:
28:03
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
28:04
Doesn't matter how many times the mind wanders. Mind wanders a thousand times gently, patiently, compassionately. Return your attention to the breath a thousand times when you come here, sign rising and falling in your mind throughout last. This is following the breath. Cool breath in, breath out.
Speaker 2:
29:45
Hi.
Speaker 1:
29:47
So breathing in, noticing what you can smell, taste and the sensation of being pushed into the ground by gravity. And then when ever you're ready and your very own time,
Speaker 1:
30:15
Chen, they return your attention to the room. Multiple mine does is it sets up a competition. And we started with meditation of nine meditation for sound, which helps to calm many people's minds, not everybody. And then we went on to do the meditation of no meditation for the breath. So we're just noticing the belly moving and then we moved over following the breath. And the third thing that's different about the following the breath is there's an instruction and the instruction is when you notice your mind has wandered, you bring your attention back to the breath. So what the mind did you see is from that incorrectly? Totally, totally incorrectly. This, it couldn't be more wrong. We all did juice from that. That the purpose of it is to stay focused on the breath. And it's not, the reason that we chose the breath is because it's so neutral and because it's so neutral, it's not very compelling. And so the mind keeps wandering.
Speaker 2:
31:24
Okay?
Speaker 1:
31:25
It's a little bit like saying to somebody, let your mind do whatever it wants to do.
Speaker 2:
31:31
Okay?
Speaker 1:
31:32
But if you say to the average modern person, let your mind do whatever it wants to do. It'll go into a spiral about trying to figure out what it thinks it wants to do. What's good? You know, should it, should I be doing this? Should I be doing that shit my mind be doing this shit? My mind be doing that. So you've actually made it worse. If instead you say, notice the breath and the mind just does its own thing, why do we want the mind to do its own thing? Well that's the purpose of meditation. We want to become familiar with the mind. So let's say you got a new neighbor and they're scary, new, scary neighbor
Speaker 1:
32:11
until you actually speak to them, you actually don't know. I might just look scary, right? And then when you speak to then they might come across a bit scary as well. And there's always a temptation to just avoid them. But of course we all know human beings being what they are. If you keep contact with the neighbor in is useful a way as possible. I mean I'm going to go and invite yourself around for a cup of tea if there a scary neighbor. But what will do is you'll say good morning and all this kind of stuff and bit by bit by bit by bit, you'll get familiar with them and then eventually you'll become comfortable with them.
Speaker 3:
32:50
Okay?
Speaker 1:
32:51
So that's the purpose of meditation is to become familiar with the mind and then to become comfortable with the mind. Um, well, well, it's less about being familiar with the content, what we're thinking, the, the contents of the thought. So let's say you have a thought about sunshine from the perspective of meditation. It's irrelevant. It could be a thought about sunshine. It could be a thought about fire engines. It could be thought or thought about Tobago. It could be a thought about Norwegian politics,
Speaker 3:
33:30
the, the
Speaker 1:
33:32
meditation where we're indifferent to the content. You know, might have a slightly different approach. If it's a really on satisfactory thought pattern or something like that, there's something that you can do. Fair enough. But most of the time what we want it to do is to keep playing on the cinema screen of the mind. We want to just carry on the movie of the mind, um, while it's carrying on, we're getting familiar with it. And you learn what the patterns are and you notice yourself responding, reacting. You'll notice your behaviors, your notice, your thought patterns. You notice how compelling they become, how deeply embedded you'd get in it. You'd notice if it's helpful or if it's unhelpful and you're just learning about the mind, the, well, I call the currents of the mind because the mind is so complicated. It's impossible to describe it as a fundamental elements of the mind.
Speaker 3:
34:47
Okay.
Speaker 1:
34:48
But largely it's a complex thing. And so currents in an ocean, they might move one direction. One day I might move another direction another day. And there was lots of things that have an influence on them.
Speaker 3:
35:03
But
Speaker 1:
35:03
as a good sailor, you're able to identify the currents, oh well I'm in this current now, or I'm in that current. And you know where it takes you. If you're not an experienced [inaudible], you're in a current, you don't know where it's taking you. And that's a scary thing.
Speaker 1:
35:21
So the whole purpose is to become familiar with the mind. And we do that by observing it. And the way we it observe it is by following the breath. That's why it's so powerful. And then what happens? Everything that happens in your life pops up to play on the internal cinema screen of the mind while you're doing following the breath. It doesn't matter what it is. Could be things from the past, could be worries, could be fairs, doubt, shame, anger, blame, guilt. It could be joy, happiness, desire, fun, whatever it happens to be. Whatever there is in your experience, you'll notice the emotions, you know, it's the thoughts of the memories, you know, it's the little scenarios you create in your head, the story, it's, it's a, it's a story and you're listening to the story and after a while you get used to the plot and you become comfortable with it. And to an extent you're able to influence the story. So we don't have absolute control, but what we do have is influence
Speaker 3:
36:39
and not theirs.
Speaker 1:
36:43
What, why we do the following the breath
Speaker 3:
36:46
in a nutshell.
Speaker 1:
36:49
So now we started off with the meditation of no meditation for sound, which is pretty frictionless for almost everybody. And then we did the meditation is no meditation for the breath. And then we did two things. One is we moved our attention to the air in the nostrils and the other is we added an instruction on the instruction was that when the mind wanders we come back and notice the breath and that pendulum effect of noticing that your mind's wandered over and over again. That's how we try and mindfulness. We experienced mindfulness because we've noticed that our minds are wandering over and over and over again, so become experts in noticing that the mind's wandered.
Speaker 3:
37:41
Okay.
Speaker 1:
37:42
Less steady practice is that you can do, you can do the meditation of no meditation wherever you are. For instance, I am doing it now so I'm talking to you guys but I'm listening for the next sound and you can be listening to me and listening for the next sound as well so it's totally flexible and you've got the magic meditation of no meditation for the breath. If you are a new meditator, I suggest that you spend time doing the meditation of no meditation for the breath and for those people with busy minds, you can use the, it's a mantra older man for his, his, his words we use in our head when we're meditating. So the mantra of rising and falling and then there's the following, the breath meditation. What am I noticing? The breath, mind wanders, bring our attention back to the breath and you could choose either one of those or you could do all three and you could do them in any order you want. The older I taught them today is useful because it eases us in. Sometimes sitting down and noticing the breath. The difficult thing has a a little set of meditations that you can fit into your life somehow or another. You can always start with meditation of no meditation for sound, two minutes of that at some point during the day and you know in some regular routine somewhere, it doesn't have to be every day. And then we've got what I call the supporting meditations. These are meditations that I've introduced to help people to calm their minds.
Speaker 1:
39:38
And it's like turning the volume down. You know, if there's a volume of the mind, these meditations help to turn that volume down.
Speaker 3:
39:51
Okay.
Speaker 1:
39:52
And so the single most useful one is a meditation called counting the breath. So this is counting the breaths. We're just noticing the breath and we count each in and out breath we use, use out inner voice, use the mind [inaudible] on the in breath we say one and amines outbreath two three on the in breath, four on the outbreath up to 10 when we get to 10 style at one again count and one on the in breath till when the outbreath free on the in breath form the outbreak up to 10 it's a 10 star one. Again, when we lose count, we start at one so let me, oh the gets a 10 all we've lost count and we've noticed we come back to one again, sorry, w all days to teach this as our traditional meditation. So it's useful to sit with your elbows by your side and your head is comfortable as possible. On top of your spine.
Speaker 1:
41:01
If you're sitting out, if you'll align down, that's fine. Just make yourself comfortable. You may choose to keep your thumb and forefinger tips in contact. The Chin Moodra. This assists in relaxation and it helps us to focus on our physiology and you're just noticing the breath rising and falling and your mind. You're counting the breakfast. You say one on the inbreath till in the outbreath. Three on the in breath for, on the outbreak I thought to 10 gets a 10 star one. We'll lose count star at one, so I'll begin and end this meditation with a bowel. It says about a thousand years old. It's called counting the breaths. Yes.
Speaker 2:
41:54
Okay.
Speaker 1:
44:59
Okay. And breathing in, noticing what you can smell and taste and hair. The sensation of setting an annual fairy gently was Hanuman sanctions for the run.
Speaker 1:
45:25
Sorry. Almost half of new students falling, but that calms their mind. That's the most useful single practice for people with busy minds. Possibly the meditation of no meditation for sound might be more useful in terms of calming the mind. But counting the breaths is, is a typical formal meditation practice is that if you're going to build a formal practice, that's the sort of meditation you want in your toolkit so you can sit down and calm your mind. And of course it doesn't calm everybody's minds. There's a big chunk of people for whom actually their minds get busier when they do the counting, the breath meditation. So for that group, what I do is I teach the labeling, the thoughts meditation. Now remember when you do these meditations, been coming along for a while and you know them, if it's one that you're uncomfortable with and you don't fancy trying out, again, you don't have to do it. So you do your own thing.
Speaker 1:
46:40
Uh, I'm aware that a lot of my more experienced students come in, sit down and just meditate and blissfully unaware of everything that I say for an hour. Uh, and that's fine because they might be doing their own thing. And that's perfectly valid was group meditation. It's about being in the space where the group that makes the difference, not really the teacher. So the meditation that works for a lot of people for whom counting the breath doesn't work as a way of calming your mind. Remembering that the purpose of it isn't to calm our mind. The purpose of it is to witness our mind to become familiar with our mind. But it's got side effects. So we're gonna use that usefully. And the other meditation is the labeling, the thoughts, meditation. So what I'll do is I'll do two meditations on the labeling, will do labeling the thoughts, and we'll do labeling the quality of thoughts, which is a different beast altogether. And there's something that I've devised. So labeling the thoughts. What we do is we were in the same way that we were waiting for a sound earlier. What we do is wait for a thought.
Speaker 1:
48:07
So there's an element of listening. It's almost as if we're listening for our next thought, because you don't know what it's going to be. It's going to pop up. You don't know when. It might be straight away, it might be constant. Some people have a constant mental chatter, other people, their minds relatively calm and then it gets busy and they're busy mind days and quiet mind days and so on and so forth. So you're just waiting, listening for thoughts or eyes. And when a thought arises, what you do is you would label it and labeling is noting in your mind using a word. The word you use is thinking. So you're sitting there waiting for a thought. When we're looking at wherever the thoughts come from, everything's got a place in the universe and thoughts exist somewhere. Where are the thoughts? So we're white and for the thought we're looking at wherever the thought comes from, that might be helpful. Some people not for others, don't worry too much about him. Waiting for thoughts is best white for a thought to our eyes. Thought arises and we say an our mind thinking and then we go back, wait for the next thought. Now the thought pops up. We say in our mind thinking, go back, wait for the next or thought. And we repeat while whites in for thoughts thought arises, label it thinking using Erin a voice. Kobeck white for another thought and repeat. It's priced successful. In the next few minutes, this is called labeling with thoughts.
Speaker 2:
51:10
Okay.
Speaker 1:
51:29
Now what we're gonna do is we're going to white for thoughts except this time we are interested in what sort of thought they are because we've got four different labels for different qualities of thought. And the labels are fleeting as for a thought, it just pops up not seeing it before. It's one of the common go thoughts, fleeting repeating. It says the thought that just keeps coming back over and over again. Fleeting, repeating, persisting as a thought that takes the parking space up in your head and it just stays there. So there's a thought. You wake up in the morning, there's a thought, you go to bed at night as a thought. That's a persisting for fleeting, repeating, persisting. And finally there's powerful thoughts that draw your mind so them that you can't extract yourself from, and they're compelling. So that's fleeting. Repeating, persisting or compelling. And don't worry if you get it wrong. It doesn't matter if you get it wrong. It's not about getting it wrong or right. It's about the way that we wait for thought. We're waiting for thoughts, slightly different way now because we have to be alert to what sort of authority is a fleeting thought is a repeating thought. Is it a persisting thought or is it a compelling thought? There's practices for the next few minutes. It's called labeling the quality of thoughts.
Speaker 1:
54:39
Are you saying team assisting or compelling? I don't know. Just let your mind cofree just let the mind do whatever it wants. Oh, wherever at once. Noticing the breath, the same wherever you can smell. As you breathe in taste and the sounds around you in the sense of sitting and an awareness of where you are in the room, gently return your attention to your surroundings. So that last practice, the labeling, the quality of thoughts, uh, that's a serious sleep inducer. And what it does is it, it, you are actually looking closer at the origin of thoughts. Young thought that thoughts were actually dreams that come out into our awareness. And there's this very interesting because the dream us has thoughts.
Speaker 3:
56:56
Okay.
Speaker 1:
56:57
The dre, Marcy is basically like us. It's, it's, it's not aware it's in a dream, but it's in different indistinguishable from the external os.
Speaker 3:
57:12
Okay.
Speaker 1:
57:13
So the way I might experience is simply that if we get, if we do that last meditation and you're looking, or my mind is very calm and I'm looking at thought, waiting for thoughts to arise, trying to be as close to the arising of a thought in my awareness as I can. It is a dreamy place without a doubt. And the way I see it, just my personal experiences as if one of these dream thoughts pops up and then once it pops up, it gets a little bit of momentum and distinguishes itself from the general ocean of thoughts and dreams and words and emotions that makes up the subconscious mind, which is actually all of the mind really depending on how you want to define mind. So that's a really useful practice for many people to help to calm their mind, cause it takes you to this happy dreamy place, which is the origin of thought. Okay. So those, those are, those are the key meditations that I teach at the moment. That's what I call meditate in the modern way.