More than just mindfulness

The Yoga of Meditation

November 05, 2019 Season 2 Episode 44
More than just mindfulness
The Yoga of Meditation
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
The Yoga of Meditation
Nov 05, 2019 Season 2 Episode 44
Robert Mitchell
The Yoga of Meditation
Show Notes Transcript

The Yoga of Meditation

Meditations by Robert Mitchell of the 2020 Meditation Project
https://2020meditation.com

References:
The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali - Swami Satchidananda
Bhagavad Gita - Stephen Mitchell
Inner Engineering - Sadhguru

Supporting Blog Article is on the 2020Meditation.com blog: https://2020meditation.com/blog/f/chapter-6-of-the-bhagavad-gita---the-yoga-of-meditation



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Speaker 1:
0:00
So today I'm going to cover yoga. And so just out of curiosity, who who's done does or has done yoga? Almost everyone. Okay. So if you look at the history of yoga, I have no doubt that it's kind of 2,500 to 3000 years old when it was first written down in about 2,500 years ago, something like that. It was written down really in two places. One is a book called the Bhagavad Gita, which I'll come to in a moment. And the other is a book called the yoga sutras of Patanjali, which are seen to be the roots of modern yoga. So here we are in a yoga studio, so it's very appropriate. And if you go back and you read those, it says nothing about what you would expect it to cover on in either book. If you look at modern yoga, so if you came here, what you would see is a lot of people engaged in a meditative exercise basically. And that the amount of focus on exercise and the amount of focus on meditation varies from person to person and also from teacher to teacher.
Speaker 1:
1:41
If you went along and you saw some people practicing yoga 2,600 years ago, they'd be sitting and meditating. So in the yoga sutras or potentially there are only 12 acinars and asada is oppose in a site like the cow or the cat or the plow or whatever it might happen to be that none of those existed. They were all seated. The whole purpose of it was to assist meditation. So if you read the bag of ad Gita, which is very probably an originating text, I suspect that it actually predates the yoga sutures or potentially because there are commentary. Whereas the bag of ad Gita is a story, so it's very likely who have been passed down orally or even written down prior to the earliest written accounts that we're aware of. Sanskrit is 400 years old, so we're only talking about 2,500 years ago. So the bag of add Gates or might have been around for a long time before that. And the Bhagavad Gita is a fascinating book. It's in the center of one of
Speaker 1:
3:00
the two great texts. The ad is, it's called the Mahabharata and it actually refers to a battle and in this battle it's the battle to end all battles in the war to end all Wars between these two great Dennis cities. And so if you imagine thousands of warriors and two ranks of elephants stretching as far as the eye can see in each direction and in the center you've got this no man's land, which are if, if you were to walk out there, unless you were specially protected, you'd be killed instantly. But the protagonists in the bag of add Gates are all quite well protected because the chariot driver is Krishna and interestingly is we're going to learn something about the link between English and Sanskrit words here. Krishna means the same as Christ. It's the manifestation of the divine God had on earth on Easter. Clarify. I am an agnostic, I'm not religious person. I'm just explaining what the, the text says and in the chariot is our Juna and what Christina's doing is teaching our journey yoga. And if I just open up Kindle and we go to the bag of ad Gator, then in there are various chapters and one of them is the yoga of meditation. So Krishna explains that yoga is various different concepts. There's a thing called the yoga of renunciation. Now when
Speaker 1:
5:04
Gandy wrote about the Bhagavad Gita, he was writing about,
Speaker 2:
5:11
yeah,
Speaker 1:
5:12
there's chapter, which is the yoga, the yoga of renunciation, where you separate your actions from the outcome.
Speaker 2:
5:22
[inaudible].
Speaker 1:
5:24
Okay, so what he says here in it was, this is Krishna speaking to our junior. He says, the regular resolute in yoga set surrender results and going perfect peace. So in other words, what you do is you, you decide what your actions are going to be. You stop expecting an outcome and you focus on the actions themselves. He says that's the way to go in perfect peace and the IR resolute, those that attach their actions to an outcome, uh, bound by everything they do. That's what that means. If you've got a lot of expectations, that's the story of your life, all your expectations, delivering what you want. And that's a story that will go on forever, so then he explains how to meditate. This is nearly 3000 years ago closing his eyes. That refers to him because in the bag of had Gator yoga was the philosophy of the Indian warrior cast closing his eyes, his vision focused between the eyebrows.
Speaker 1:
6:37
Interesting that making the inbreath and the outbreath equal as they pass through his nostrils, he controls his senses and his mind intents upon liberation. When fear, desire and anger have left him, that man is forever free. This is the apex of the meaning of yoga is to separate yourself from the outcomes. It doesn't stop you from performing the task as well as you possibly can, and this is key to meditation. If you're meditating for an outcome, forget it. Forget meditating for an outcome. You're meditating to become familiar with your mind, familiarity with the mind. That's all it is. If you want to reduce your stress, make your mind calm and still and clear like a mountain pool. Always be mindful and present. That's just going to get in the way. That's the bag of ad Gita. Another text is the, you know, the searchers of potentially and the here, the concept of an astronaut is introduced into world literature. It says, Hey, an astronaut is a steady, comfortable posture. So Asana means the posture that brings comfort and steadiness.
Speaker 1:
8:15
So what's happened with modern yoga, what you see if you were to come here and and watch the Yogi knees practicing, is everybody will be on a kind of spectrum between an almost pure meditation and an exercise, which can often be uncomfortable, especially if you just start and everybody's fitter and more flexible than you. You know, another book that's worth reading, which is everybody's favorite yoga guru. This guy called sad guru at S. S a D. H not sad as in unhappy, sad as in a saddo, which is like a wandering teacher in India. So you go get, go into, you see these ciders wandering around and they look more than anything else, like new age travelers, kind of Indian food actually. And new age travelers are a British version of sad dues. He talks about yoga. He is a great teacher of yoga. Here's what he says about yoga. So Hatha yoga does not mean standing on your head or holding your breath. It's the way that it is done that makes all the difference. They talk here about how when he taught Hatha yoga, the students experienced calmness and liberation and bliss, and why is it that when you go to a yoga studio, you don't experience
Speaker 1:
9:57
this bliss? Where is it? And he say, you know, people have experiencing tears of ecstasy. He says, because the yoga is being imparted as an end to itself rather than as a preparation. The Hatha yoga, which is what most yoga students practice when they're doing that [inaudible]
Speaker 1:
10:23
he said in the world today, he brings peace for a few health for others, but unfortunately it's a painful circus for many. This can be fine for someone whose aspiration is only piece in health. But if you're looking at yoga as a means of transforming yourself, half the yoga needs to be approached in its classical form. The key to it is that effectively it's a meditation. So modern yoga is all an aid to meditation, but when you practice of yoga become so much a part of you, it becomes a meditative exercise. But that takes a fair amount of time to achieve, I would say longer than if you just sit down to meditate. So why would you get, would you get the same gains from practice? Maybe some people would. Maybe some people would. But I think that would be a pretty small group, which is what he clarifies here. Say it brings this piece to some people, but for a lot of people it becomes a difficult practice.
Speaker 2:
11:39
[inaudible]
Speaker 1:
11:40
so that's an insight into the origin of yoga, what it really is, and also an insight into the modern interpretation of it, which is sometimes useful, but sometimes often unhelpful actually. How does that impact the meditation practices? What we've, we've taken the key concept, which is the recognition that seeking to gain an outcome intervenes in gaining an outcome is as this is your trying. So how do you avoid trying, and there's all sorts of semantic, um, information from a variety of sources about this. But I've as ever simplified it. What you do is you replace trying with waiting. Yeah, stop trying and instead wait. And what you're waiting for, what you're waiting for is the sound of the bell moving through time. So you'll, what you're doing is you're noticing the sound of the bell moving through time. Let's do that again. Just waiting calmly. As you notice the sound of the bell moving through time, just do that once more. You'll just notice in this tiny, tiny little sliver of time because the, the bell rings for about 15 or 20 seconds, but you were only aware of a tiny little sliver of time about 300 milliseconds. So it's like watching the second hand move on the clock.
Speaker 3:
15:13
I think if you either close your eyes or look down past the tip of your nose, you can notice all sound moving through time. You can notice the movements in the room moving through time. You can notice my words
Speaker 4:
16:06
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
16:07
and if you notice your belly just at the point where the belly meets the chest, you can notice the belly rising and falling. And this is where we practice the waiting. You're waiting for the belly to rise and fall as the bellies falling. You're waiting for it to rise.
Speaker 4:
16:48
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
16:48
as the belly rises, you're waiting for it to fall
Speaker 4:
17:11
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
17:13
and if you place your tongue gently up against the back of your top teeth, you can also notice the coolness and warmth and the nostrils
Speaker 4:
17:39
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
17:51
so while you're breathing in, when the breath is cool, you're waiting for the end of the in-breath. And then while you're breathing out, you're noticing that the breath is warm. You're waiting for the end of the out-breath. And while that's happening, you know, noticing the breath moving through time. The same as what happens when we're listening to the bell. And then whatever thoughts there are, if you have an internal dialogue, there are a lot of things happening in the internal dialogue. There's the meaning, there's the words, there's the inner sound. Because if you're listening to the words of your dialogue, it must be an inner sound. And the words in the mind, I'm moving through time. So if you take charge of your inner dialogue and you can repeat after me,
Speaker 4:
20:13
[inaudible] pay in your mind. I'm witnessing my
Speaker 3:
20:28
thoughts
Speaker 4:
20:33
moving through time
Speaker 3:
20:44
and now stop repeating in your head. And all of this is here all the time. The movement of the breath
Speaker 4:
21:05
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:05
the rising and falling of the belly.
Speaker 4:
21:12
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:13
the coolness and warmth.
Speaker 4:
21:19
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:19
the sound
Speaker 4:
21:27
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:27
words
Speaker 4:
21:31
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:33
and do your thoughts.
Speaker 4:
21:48
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
21:48
and there's something else as well. There's whatever is aware of that.
Speaker 4:
22:00
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
22:00
notice that you can notice your thoughts.
Speaker 4:
22:10
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
22:10
in the same way. You can notice my words.
Speaker 4:
22:43
[inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
23:31
no notice the feeling of being pushed into the ground. Uh, the sense of your body weight, your connection to the energy that's connecting you to the planet,
Speaker 4:
23:46
gravity
Speaker 3:
23:50
and how it feels. Your balance. Notice your balance. Notice your body. Notice that you're aware of where your hands and legs are, whether you're back straight, if you play Cheryl, if you're sitting out, you play your elbows by your sides and find the most comfortable and stable place to balance your head.
Speaker 4:
24:20
That's yoga.
Speaker 3:
24:23
An Asana is a comfortable, unstable posture. And you're doing that so that none of the external experience interferes with your awareness of the internal experience. And so you have all of these tiny, tiny, tiny, minuscule elements of your present moment experience.
Speaker 4:
25:07
Sound, faults. What coolness and warmth come for all discomfort. Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing your jaw back in the sides of your neck and shoulders,
Speaker 3:
25:50
tongue against the back of the top teeth gently in contact with the sharp part of the button teeth. Well, if you're an experienced meditator, not everybody find this easy. Bring your awareness to the space between your eyes. No test that spot. Many different sensations in the body. They all change except for that place. When you notice the space between your eyes, you notice your internal experience and your external experience at the same time.
Speaker 4:
27:22
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
27:22
it's the way we balance the inner and outer. Just being aware of that space.
Speaker 4:
27:48
[inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
27:49
and you can be a brat aware of your body moving with the breath
Speaker 4:
27:58
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
27:59
and at the same time aware of whatever sounds there are
Speaker 4:
28:06
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
28:07
and what's happening around you.
Speaker 4:
28:18
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
28:18
so lots of experiences. Notice if you bring weight into them. So you were just witnessing them. They change. So I'll just leave you for a few minutes. What you focus on is totally up to you. Space between your eyes call missing warmth or thoughts, sounds the belly rising, unfolding
Speaker 4:
28:52
[inaudible] it makes sense. [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
29:00
and from time to time your mind will wander. You'll notice and you'll just come back
Speaker 4:
29:07
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
29:08
when a focus on one of those elements of your present moment as you notice it moving through time and to assist you every so often I'll just quietly sound the bell just in case your mind drifts off.
Speaker 4:
30:00
[inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
32:15
yeah, mine's busy. And you're noticing the belly rising and falling using your inner voice. You just saying your mind rising, falling as while you're using your inner voice for this, you can't be chattering away. Just repeats and your mind rising, falling,
Speaker 4:
34:06
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
34:07
breathing in, noticing whatever you can smell and taste, the sensation of setting, feeling of being pushed into the ground, and then your very, very own time. When ever you're ready. Gently return your attention to your surroundings. Lots of reasons that people give up. Meditation quite high up the list is they say their minds are too busy. So what is there to stop your busy mind intervening in your awareness of the breath, for example? Nothing. There's nothing to stop your mind intervening. Let's say you've got uncomfortable emotions. There's nothing to stop the uncomfortable emotions from intervening. And the reason for that is because that's what it's designed to do. It's designed
Speaker 1:
35:17
were all of your experience, all of your external experience, your day, the experiences you have, the people you know, the problems you have, your neighbors, your career, your boss, your mother-in-law, your daughter-in-law, your son in law, your
Speaker 3:
35:35
partner, the white van
Speaker 1:
35:38
drivers. There's nothing to stop that entering your experience. Okay? And that's by design. And there's a word for it in yoga according to
Speaker 1:
35:55
sad Sadhguru. And the word is [inaudible], not [inaudible]. So what Avastin is, is a smell. This is what he explains what you consider to be your personality. The bundle of traits and tendencies that you are is because of the information that you've gathered unconsciously. These tendencies have been traditionally described as fasteners. And the word fastener means a smell depending on what type of garbage is in the bin today. That is the kind of smell that will emanate from it. Now you can see why he's everybody's favorite guru. Depending on what type of smell you emit, you attract certain kinds of life situations to yourself. For example, if you sit down and you notice your resentment at some outcome, somebody done something white van driver cut you off. A light
Speaker 2:
37:03
[inaudible]
Speaker 1:
37:04
boss has been unfriendly, um, partners at a tantrum, whatever it happens to be. There's resentment. You sit down and you notice this fastener, which is actually what it is. It's like a, it's like a backdrop to your day. You know, are you having a great day? And somebody comes along and messes it up and they can mess it up because it's hanging around. It doesn't go anywhere. So you don't have the tools to process the thing that's happened. What meditation does is it just sits you down and it says, Hey, you are in, here's all the garbage of the day. In fact, if you knew the meditation, at some point you're going to experience all of the garbage of a lifetime. And it's purpose is for you to learn how to be aware of it. Oh, there's, there's that bit of resentment because that person made me feel this way to be able to sit through it. Very important not to make it an endurance activity. So let's say you're really suffering. Don't sit in your meditation and suffer, but notice that you're suffering and come back and meditate at a better time. Always fix your roof in the sunshine.
Speaker 2:
38:33
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
38:34
so you want to, not when you're feeling most stressed, but when you're feeling most powerful, because that's the place that you will learn to get comfortable with your inner experience. And that's the place you'll get. Learn to get comfortable with the rough edges of interactions with other people. It's actually what it's all about. You notice what's in you that you've seen in other people and you notice in other people what you see in you. But we don't know that's there because we've never looked. But when you meditate, there's no way for it to go. So this is, this is like a a wash, rinse, repeat cycle for all of the vast learners of your life. And it takes years cause it's taken decades to collect the garbage and it has to be taken out of the bin and dispensed with one piece at a time. So subsequently it's going to take a while to clean it all. And the the best way to work, I mean, what he's talking about here actually is uncomfortable emotions. The best way to work with uncomfortable emotions is through comfortable emotions, enjoyable emotions, gratitude, compassion, kindness.
Speaker 2:
40:12
Okay,
Speaker 1:
40:17
these are the things that will help you to do the wash, rinse, repeat cycle on whatever's happened today. Whatever anybody said to you, whatever's happened in the past, whatever you've accumulated over a lifetime wash, rinse, repeat, wash, rinse, repeat. That's each meditation session for awhile comes that the way to use the comfortable emotions is through practice of loving kindness, which is a thing called metabolic. Now I'll teach it to you. So if you get comfortable, some of you know this, but it has to be practiced. Compassion. I have to practice it over and over and over and over and over again because our culture is going be selfish, be selfish, be selfish, be selfish. To cope with that. We have to be compassionate, be compassionate, be compassionate, be compassionate. So this is how we do it. You just get yourself comfortable and come back into this place
Speaker 3:
41:35
in the sound of the bell, which is also the same places in the breath, which is as also the same place that is between
Speaker 4:
42:08
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
42:09
words and between your and so just get comfortable, stable, and comfortable. Posture. AV is comfortable for you. If you're sitting, it's useful to have your elbows by your side and look for the most comfortable and stable place to position your head on top of your spine. No, it's the breath rising and falling. And what we do is we capture our thoughts. Yes. So most of our thoughts are spontaneous. They arise in our experience. We're sitting quietly and there's a thought. There's another thought. Another thought. So what we do is we capture them using the inner voice and we repeat this mantra. All the mantra is, is something that we say in our mind. You can challenge it, but we don't do chanting. Yes. When you're saying cause you want to be able to do it anywhere. That's why we don't pitch on too. I mean you can chart anywhere. Yeah. You'll get plenty of space on the bus. If you did. And what you do is you're saying your mind, may I be well, may I be happy my, I find peace of mind.
Speaker 4:
44:24
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
44:25
may I be well
Speaker 4:
44:29
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
44:30
may I be happy
Speaker 4:
44:34
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
44:34
well I find peace of mind.
Speaker 4:
44:40
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
44:41
there's a little switch on the side of your head. It's got two channels. I am an FM. I am is against me. F M is for me. What you're doing here is you're getting that dial. You're clicking it from against me. It's a for me.
Speaker 2:
45:04
May I be well, may I be happy
Speaker 3:
45:13
my I find peace of mind. You just repeat that.
Speaker 4:
45:20
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
45:21
and at first it's just words.
Speaker 4:
45:28
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
45:29
notice that the words in the mind or in the present moment,
Speaker 2:
45:36
my [inaudible] Bay.
Speaker 3:
45:43
Well, notice them moving through time
Speaker 2:
45:47
my eye, be happy, my I find peace of mind.
Speaker 4:
46:43
[inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
46:43
and now bring to mind whichever being it is what comes closest to giving you a warm feeling, let's see, is it could be a friend, it could be a partner, could be a member of your family, could be a neighbor, could be a colleague, could be another creature. Your Pat
Speaker 4:
47:13
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
47:13
you hold that being in your mind, the imagery or them of them or the sense of them and you say in your mind, may they be well, may they be happy. Wait, they find peace of mind.
Speaker 4:
48:32
[inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 3:
48:50
and that brings to mind a difficult person, not your arch enemy. Just somebody who's irritated. You said something or did something thoughtless or inconsiderate, something near Italian, pushed in front of you in the queue was snappy or rude or unhelpful. What a tiny little thing. Hold that person in mind and saying your mind. May they be well, may they be happy. Maybe they find peace of mind. Maybe they'd be, well, maybe they'd be happy.
Speaker 4:
49:36
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
49:37
may they find peace of mind [inaudible]
Speaker 1:
50:38
and then bring yourself to mind again. Whatever image you have of yourself, however you see yourself, whatever arises when you think of self, me either I am, whatever that might happen to be. And you say your mind, may I be well, may I be happy, may I find peace of mind.
Speaker 4:
51:10
[inaudible]
Speaker 5:
51:34
all right Karen and say Jen snake and say,
Speaker 1:
51:40
allow yourself to be aware of your surrounding
Speaker 4:
51:47
[inaudible]
Speaker 1:
51:52
and when you separate yourself from outcomes, you do this in meditation by waiting notice. Notice I didn't tell you what you're waiting for generally. Yeah, so what that does is is the mind becomes focused in the present moment because it's waiting to know what it's waiting for. Waiting to wait. I teach meditations that are infinitely more complex than that have done and you come, you wait for your thoughts, they go quick. What's the next thing you're going to think? Wait for it quick. What is it? What's it going to be? The thought, if that doesn't silence your mind, nothing does in the bag of ad. Gita. Nice. Say that we separate ourselves from outcomes. There's the action and there's the outcome. It doesn't mean your life is pointless. What it is is let's say your outcome is to go and live in the United States. So there's loads of things that you know, so I need, I need the sort of job that would get me a visa.
Speaker 1:
53:01
If every day when you go in to work is going through your mind, I need to be really good at this job because otherwise I'm, I'm not gonna get my visa. I'm not going to get your mind will make your life a complete misery because every little look from your boss or your manager or your trainer or whatever it happens to be is mixed with your expectation. If it goes away and you say, well, here I am, I'm doing this job and now I'm going to do it to the best of my ability for its own sake comes a different thing. You've separated yourself. So that that was the, that was the message of the Gita here, which probably came later in almost undoubtedly. So in the yoga sutures, but tangibly in the commentary by Swami SA titch and Amanda who's the author and a very, uh, renowned Hindu scholar. If you detach yourself completely from all the things you've identified yourself with, you realize yourself as the pure eye. So what is the pure I as the PRI is only ever a question, your noticing your thoughts, what is it that's noticing the thoughts? That's it. The answer isn't an answer. It's a question. What is it that's noticing my thoughts, noticing my emotions, noticing the breath, noticing the present moment
Speaker 1:
54:43
with everything. Yeah. Body thoughts, expectations, goals, desires, wants, needs, likes, dislikes, beliefs, everything.
Speaker 1:
54:58
We get connected too. If we, the more we become aware of that experience of being the witness of our experience, the PRI, the less it matters. And it says in there that when you realize yourself as the pure rye, there is no difference between you and me. Yeah. So the separation that we suffer from in our culture where people are different. Your all different to me, your role separate from me. You've got different goals. I need to compete with you on this. Something to be gotten from you, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. There's suffering, right? If you want a bin full of Vaselina, that's where it comes from, but you can't indoctrinate yourself into feeling connected. All you can do is recognize that each sense of separation is suffering. The same thing, more separate. You feel, imagine you feel separate from everyone. You know there's just you against the world.
Speaker 1:
56:15
How does that feel like at the other side, let's say you're part of a closed, loving, caring group of people who all die for each other. How does that feel? You get to choose, all right? You get to choose with everything you do and everything you say and, but you can't indoctrinate yourself, right? I must be compassionate. I must stop saying those things. I must stop doing that. I must not see myself as separate. All you do is you look, is it? Where is it? What is it? What is it that's witnessing my experience? That's, that's yoga, this, this is yoga.
Speaker 1:
57:00
And the fastener, that's the suffering. So they say yoga is union. Yoga has the same route in the same way that Christ and Krishna, same root yoga has the same route as yolk. And the yolk is what you put on a Bullock to make it pull a cart. And the reason you do that is because it's painful for the Bullock to not go where you want the car to go. So what you do is you pull the rain, it causes the bullet, the pain on one side of the neck, and it moves over in that direction cause it doesn't want it. It's uncomfortable. So what is it Uranian with its union, with the universe. And what it's telling you is one thing your suffering is because you aren't following the flow of life. Instead you're trying to go your own way. So the union is the union with the flow of life, the suffering you experience, the unsatisfactoriness, the vast centers that's you pushing against the yoke can do it for awhile, but eventually you'll give up. That's yoga in a nutshell.
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