More than just mindfulness

Mastering Meditation Week 6. Too Busy to Meditate

March 07, 2019 Season 2 Episode 6
More than just mindfulness
Mastering Meditation Week 6. Too Busy to Meditate
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Mastering Meditation Week 6. Too Busy to Meditate
Mar 07, 2019 Season 2 Episode 6
Robert Mitchell
Learn how you can effortlessly begin a simple and sustainable practice without struggling against a busy mind and without needing to find the time in your busy life.
Show Notes Transcript

Listen to this podcast to learn how you can effortlessly begin a simple and sustainable meditation practice without struggling against your busy mind, and without needing to find the time in your busy life.
Meditation teachers have historically given new meditators the opposite of what they want.
You want a calm mind but you soon become keenly aware of the frantic nature of your mind as you try to learn the strange new practice of meditation.
You are already overwhelmed with tasks, appointments, priorities and activites and the meditation teacher gives you yet another thing to do!
There is however, fortunately, an easier and softer way. Along with the mental practices and the disciplined training methods learned from Buddhist and Hindu monasteries and temples, we have also imported from the East the brilliant concept of Wu Wei.
Wu Wei is a Daoist concept that is usually translated as the ‘action of no action’. Wu Wei is actually the practice of using the forces of the universe, nature and the mind to bring us to where we wish to be, instead of applying the typical Western bull-headed method of trying to bend reality to our will through force and pressure.
Using Wu Wei, and having learned a key meditation practice from the great meditation teacher, Mingyur Rinpoche, Robert has developed, and now teaches ‘The Practice of No Practice’. The Practice of No Practice Is an Effortless and Frictionless meditation training method that removes the stress induced by our typical modern goal-oriented and willpower-based approach.
The Practice of No Practice is a combination of the Meditation of No Meditation and the Four Tens Meditation taught in a way that overcomes out typical Western black and white approach to learning.

Speaker 1:
0:01
So today's topic is too busy to meditate.
Speaker 1:
0:09
I've taught meditation about 1700 times in the last five years. I teach fairly regularly. On a busy week, I'll do seven to 10 classes, some of the most structured, most of them I sit down and I don't know what I'm going to say when I sit down and one of the first things I do is is I ask people if they got a meditation practice, if they've meditated and if they've got a regular practice. I've always asked those questions since I started teaching just by getting a show of hands. What I've noticed over the course of the last five years is the response to that question. Have you meditated and generally speaking now it's 60% of every group and then the next question is, do you have a regular meditation practice? The response is 5% of the group on average. It varies. What's happening there is the everybody's trying to learn meditation. The way that I tried to learn meditation and eventually did it. I started meditating in 1988 and I didn't have a practice until 2008 2009 and I don't want you to have to wait 20 years to build a meditation practice. What goes on? What happens in the modern mind?
Speaker 2:
1:39
Hmm.
Speaker 1:
1:41
I, I'm very fortunate and I am aware of my mind.
Speaker 2:
1:48
Okay.
Speaker 1:
1:49
It's just as simple as that. There's no other way to put it. The mind has compelling processes in it. It isn't so much thought. It's difficult to describe. There's a combination of thought when if I just refer to thought as the inner narrative being a voice. Not Everybody has an inner voice. Some people, their thought consists of symbols. There's only, as far as I can tell, one researcher who has spent the time to understand thought, so I've been dredging through the literature and it, it's incredibly poor when it actually comes to what is thought, what thoughts arise in people's minds, what does it look like? How is it different from one group to another?
Speaker 2:
2:50
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
2:50
This is the key to being human and the amount of research that's been done on it is very limited. Or there's this researcher by the name of Archie Holbert who written a couple of books on this and he's developed a process that consists of beeping people during the day and then them writing down descript describing the contents of their mind and some of the insight is spectacular about, it doesn't seem sort of been adopted because it's perceived to be subjective. To my mind, that's an unhelpful distinction now because of all of life is subjective, right? So we just give up. No, but anyway, it hasn't, doesn't seem to have gone much further. I have as much insight into people's minds as anybody else and a lot more than many because I speak to my students about the contents of their minds because I need to understand where they are if I'm going to guide them in their meditation practice is not everybody's the same and that contents of the mind is what causes people to want to meditate and ultimately putting busy, busy schedules to one side. We'll get to that in a moment. Ultimately it's the contents of the mind that stops people from maintaining a regular meditation practice.
Speaker 1:
4:39
So it's a catch 22 you also got the same catch 22 with how much time do I have? And there's this concept called margin for change it, you know what a margin is? Is is a piece of paper and the bits around the paper that's blank, especially on the left hand side usually. And what you do is you put your additional information there. So it's a bit of extra space that you can use if you've filled your entire page up with writing, there's no space, so you have no margin. And that's what he's like with life and it's a perception, do I have time to do this extra thing? And unfortunately the way that meditation's always been taught, it's been taught in the traditional way. It's very difficult for people who've learned it, the traditional way to teach it a different way. But I've learned that learning it the traditional way took me 20 years.
Speaker 1:
5:43
So let's throw that out the window and find other ways of helping people to build a regular practice. And it needs to be a regular practice because you need to get to the point where your mind is calm enough that you can be aware of your inner experience without it becoming overwhelming. That's the contents of the mind that makes it difficult is this, it tends to be, to my mind, not. I used to think just thoughts and emotions, but actually there's a desire for action as well. These are the most compelling in our processes is the, I must do this thing. I must say this to somebody yet say we had a difficult encounter with somebody and you want to speak to them about it. Whatever the problem is at, there's the need to do it. There's the fear of the outcome and then there's the mind constantly creating some scenarios.
Speaker 1:
6:50
I'm going to say this. Then they're going to say that and I'm going to say this and they're going to say that it creates like an inner ply in the mind. I've got a name for that. It's called rehearsal. Sometimes the power for rehearsal is, is incredibly compelling. If it can't be resolved satisfactorily in the mind as a a consistent element of your experience. So let's say you're going to have to step out your comfort zone to tell somebody that they're being an ass. This is probably the most difficult thing that people do in our culture, especially because we've got a culture of politeness and we don't know what the outcome's going to be, how they're going to respond, because they may never have been told not to be an ass before in their entire life, but you need to do it. So there's just an example.
Speaker 1:
7:46
The mind is going to go crazy over that one. It's going to go repetitive over and over and over again. So then what happens is you sit down to meditate, your mind becomes calm, and this modern mind monkey mind, modern mind call it what you like goes into overdrive. So actually you're getting the opposite experience to the one you want. You're meditating to calm your mind, and it becomes deluged with the very material that you're meditating to reduce the intensity and duration of. Here's a little quote. I'm reading a book by a great meditation teacher called MINURA Rinpoche. I kind of 85% of what he talks about is the, is a fully signed up Buddhist monk travels around the world, but he has more of an insight into the Western mind than many other meditation teachers, Westerners and otherwise. And so he's written this book called the joy of living and in it as this quotation, never a truer word was said. He says, ultimately happiness comes down to choosing between the discomfort of being aware of your mental suffering and the discomfort of being ruled by it.
Speaker 2:
9:19
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
9:22
You either become familiar and comfortable with it or it happens to you
Speaker 1:
9:32
and it's always going to happen to you anyway. We're not going to become then gurus where our mind is from the time we wake up to the time we go to bed clear and still and calm like a mountain pool and no aggression or abuse or criticism can ever affect us. That's never going to happen. But what will happen is the threshold goes right down. Really does. It's still there. We could, we got our buttons, but once in a blue moon, all right, that's where we want to be. You want to respond proportionately. And we have a tendency not to do that. That's where the mind comes in trying to resolve this. It's going round and round and round trying to, to, to make it consistent with what it perceives to be the rest of your experience. So that's the thing that gets in the way of meditation is the thing that causes you to meditate in the first place. And then it isn't actually about time. It's about your, your sense of a margin for change. You got a place you don't want to be to get comfortable with it so that the place you don't want to be becomes comfortable and hat. So how'd you do that? Well, as what I need to show you.
Speaker 1:
10:55
So there, there, there are a number of meditations that I've reconstructed into a practice.
Speaker 2:
11:06
Hmm.
Speaker 1:
11:06
And true, confusing Robert Fashion, I call this the practice of no practice. So your hair to learn the practice of no practice. And the practice of no practice, of course, begins with the meditation of no meditation,
Speaker 2:
11:24
right?
Speaker 1:
11:26
So what we'll do is the meditation of no meditation. And so for those of you that are new to the group, this isn't a traditional meditation in, in the typical way, you can sit however you're comfortable. It doesn't really matter. It's more useful if your feet are on the floor and if your eyes are closed because it's a exercise rather than a meditation. But you don't have to do that. You can. The, the idea of this is, is actually for you to be able to do it anywhere, which is a kind of little bit of a clue as to what the purpose of it is.
Speaker 1:
12:17
And what it consists of is a process of listening for the next sound. Now this is something that you do all the time. You're not aware of it. So let's say you're walking along the high street and your mind's wandering, you're thinking about what you're going to do or you're doing one of these rehearsal things. Oh, you're reconstructing some experience from the past. Those two areas, those were human beings, spend most of their mind reconstructing the past and rehearsing the future and there you are, you're, you're doing that going round and round in your head. Pizza bike mounts the pavement behind you, your subconscious, which is constantly scanning your environment, identifies that and identifies it as a threat and you respond physiologically your responding to this process which is happening that you're not aware of and the process is that all sound all around you. It's been collected by your brain.
Speaker 2:
13:39
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
13:40
The pattern of the sound. There's been matched with the brain's memory of all sound and it is looking for
Speaker 2:
13:56
threats.
Speaker 1:
14:00
That's also, I'm looking for rewards and it's, it's, it's, it's listening out for your name being called and so on and so forth, but largely it's scanning your environment for threats. So if you watch your cat strolling across the lawn, cat looks like it's chilled, relaxed, and there's a rustle in the bushes and it stops, freezes in a nanosecond and turns towards that sound.
Speaker 2:
14:27
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
14:28
it's looking for Predator or prey, friend or foe. Basically that's what you're doing as well. And, and you're doing it in that order. Predator or prey, friend or foe.
Speaker 2:
14:49
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
14:50
So what you're actually doing
Speaker 2:
14:52
when you listen for the next sound
Speaker 1:
14:58
is what human beings are designed to do and what you've done your entire life and in pretty much every animal with his does. And the reason that it's listening for the next sound, it's because the only Predator that matters is the next predator. The fact that there was a Predator yesterday, if your mind is on the predatory Viet yesterday and you're hearing switched off, you will not survive.
Speaker 2:
15:34
Okay?
Speaker 1:
15:35
So despite the fact that you're thinking about yesterdays melodrama or whatever, at my app and the bay, you'll subconscious.
Speaker 2:
15:46
Okay?
Speaker 1:
15:47
It's picking up all of these sounds and wearing a wonderfully sound rich environment here.
Speaker 2:
15:55
Okay.
Speaker 1:
15:55
Chapter in the whole way. Buds cohesion and airplane traffic. Cars. Dogs barking movements in the room. Sounds of my voice. Oh, you're doing is whites. And for the next sound, when you hear a sound, you're not doing anything with it because by the time you've identified it, reconnect to the next sound. So this is what we do. We just listened.
Speaker 2:
16:57
Hmm.
Speaker 1:
17:05
Just listening for the next sound, whatever it might happen to be. There's no way to get this wrong.
Speaker 2:
17:35
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
17:37
There's no such thing as a bad meditation of nine meditation,
Speaker 3:
18:03
last name. And we're really fortunate that there's chatter in the background because what you're hearing there, those voices, it's the hub. We can't identify the words. So all we hear is the sound of voices, which is a very calming thing, isn't it? It's interesting.
Speaker 2:
18:52
Okay.
Speaker 3:
18:53
The chatter of voices around us, when we can identify the words, it's calming. And so the hubbub of the voices is part of the hubbub of the sound of the present moment.
Speaker 2:
19:15
Okay.
Speaker 3:
19:16
And by waiting for the next sound, you notice that sounds pass. They arise, they subside. It's like a constant flow of sound. And the other thing that's happening is the sound of my voice. And one of the things you'll learn from this is to recognize that you can listen to the next sound and you don't need to listen to what I'm saying. So ignore my voice.
Speaker 2:
20:29
Okay.
Speaker 3:
20:29
And listen for the next sound. Interestingly, when we do that, we're still able to understand what's said
Speaker 2:
20:54
right.
Speaker 3:
21:01
And so we can extend the practice.
Speaker 2:
21:07
Also listening full. The next word,
Speaker 3:
21:33
sorry, my voice shall speak commerce part of the hubbub of sound of the present moment. Nothing more, nothing less. Each word is just another sound arising, subsiding. If you place your thumb and forefinger in contact, just the very, very, very lightly, the fingertips as lightly as possible. So likely you could slip a cigarette paper between them. Just leave them there when we continue to just listening for the next sound and the next word, bearing in mind that the words are just another sound.
Speaker 2:
23:18
Yeah.
Speaker 3:
23:29
Uh, no test something else that's arising in your awareness.
Speaker 2:
23:37
It's your fault.
Speaker 3:
23:44
So into the spice, our mind, into the spice of the mind.
Speaker 2:
23:55
There are sound wads and thoughts.
Speaker 3:
24:08
And we can listen for the next sound
Speaker 2:
24:13
word or fault.
Speaker 3:
24:27
So this is just waiting. We're not doing anything. They haven't given ourselves a job.
Speaker 2:
24:38
We're just waiting. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
24:44
For the next sound
Speaker 2:
24:48
was will fault
Speaker 3:
25:16
all the time. The thumb and forefinger very gently, very gently and contact. And so if you listen to the sound of my voice,
Speaker 2:
25:36
yeah.
Speaker 3:
25:38
You'll notice,
Speaker 2:
25:42
yeah.
Speaker 3:
25:43
The silence
Speaker 2:
25:48
between the
Speaker 3:
25:58
was and you'll notice that you can listen for that same silence between your thought.
Speaker 2:
26:13
Yeah.
Speaker 3:
26:14
And between the sounds. So that's what waiting for a sound is, is listening to the silence. That's what whites in for authorities is listening to the
Speaker 2:
26:44
silence
Speaker 3:
26:47
as we wait for the next thought. And as well as that, you can notice something else happening. If you bring your attention to the top of the belly, the point where the bally meets the chest, you're able to notice the breath causing the ballet. Toronto's one fall and you paint, you can be waiting for the next breath. So as the Bally's rising, you know, wiring for the ballet to full on the police falling, you're waiting from the buddy to rise. Just 2010 no doing no goals, no expectations, no wrong way to do it. Just waiting for the next thought, a nice sound, the next word, the next breath, and you can notice the breath in the nostrils. I was just the coolness of the in breath, warmth of the out breath. As you breathe in and out, it's uncomfortable for you to do this. You don't have to do it. It would just go back and note, say movement of the ballet, one in every 20 people pretty consistently finds noticing the breath uncomfortable in the Austral so you don't need to do with it.
Speaker 2:
30:23
Okay?
Speaker 3:
30:23
You just notice the movement of the ballet or your note saying thoughts arising. Sounds wait for the next sound. It doesn't matter.
Speaker 2:
30:34
Yeah,
Speaker 3:
30:35
but for everyone else. Then I seen the cool cooling bro and the warm out breath and there's no instructions. It doesn't matter if the mind wanders. Doesn't that Meredith,
Speaker 2:
30:52
it gets busy
Speaker 3:
30:59
waiting for the next breath. Why is st for the night's thought
Speaker 2:
31:15
sound? Yeah.
Speaker 3:
31:26
When you breathe in, know it's what you can smell.
Speaker 2:
31:30
You've been taste the sensation of setting and in your very own time when ever you're ready, gently turn your attention to the room.
Speaker 1:
31:52
As we progressed through those experiences, for most people with a busy mind, the mind's tends to get busier. So what you're discovering is the practices that the mind is Karma with and the practices that he's busier with. And if you've learned to meditate the traditional way, sit down a set time for a set period of time noticing the breath. So that last meditation is called following the breath and it's the one that I traditionally used to teach in every session. That's how we become aware of our, our presence in the day. The breath is the why into the present moment that's most accessible for most people. And you may not even be aware that you do it, but it's a very common thing for people to take a deep breath when they need to reset their internal state. So their internal states on satisfactory, no breathe in, maybe even psi.
Speaker 1:
33:02
It's very, we know it, it's part of our genetic programming to do that. And so if you're going through the day and you notice that the mines being powerful, come back to the breath. You might have to do it over and over again. But don't worry, you're breathing all day anyway, so you're not doing anything extra. Which brings me to how do you get this into your day, how you have this. So as that practice that took about 15 minutes, something like that, 20 minutes, how'd you do that? What you do is this, it's useful to do it in this order because we've, we've, I've got to teach the 15% of people that can add extra practice into their day. What you do is you write down a thing called an implementation intention. I've mentioned this already in this series, but I'll cover it again. I'll cover the whole thing here.
Speaker 1:
34:01
Write down each morning and you choose the time you're going to do it. So, you know, each morning after I brush my teeth, each morning after I step outside the door, connect it to something that happens that's known as a cue. Alright? So we've learned that new habit, the new science of habit formation tells us that saying, I'm going to do something at a certain time is a lot less useful than saying I'm going to do something when something else happened because the Q becomes a trigger. And if we do it a few times, the Brian helps to associate it in our minds. So you write that down and you say when you're writing, it's called an implementation intention. Every morning at, you know, after I've done this thing, I will spend two minutes doing the meditation of no meditation. That's where we're just noticing the next sound waiting for the next sound each morning at specific, after a specific activity, I will spend two minutes doing the meditation of no meditation for sound. So if out of this group you all did that, 15% of you would do it and the other 85% wouldn't. And what would happen is during the day at some point, or maybe even the next day, you know, think, oh, I haven't done my meditation and no meditation.
Speaker 1:
35:43
And usually when we're adding new habits, what happens is we then start beating ourselves up in the hope that that's going to motive isis to do it.
Speaker 2:
35:57
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
36:00
and sometimes I might work. Sometimes it might not, but we're not going to do that. When you, when it comes to mind that you haven't done this thing, so I had a student the other day side because when I teach this in the courses, I just give them the implementation intention as she looks at me and she said, I can't even add two minutes to my day to do something so clearly her, her monkey mind, her modern mind brought that to mind during the day. Well, what we want to do is this. When that happens, when it pops into your mind that you haven't done it, that's when you're doing it
Speaker 2:
36:50
right.
Speaker 1:
36:53
When reminding ourselves, we use that cue and you can listen for the next sound wherever you are and whatever you're doing because you're doing it anyway. Just becoming conscious of something that's happening and notice that you can be listening. So somebody and listening for the next sound.
Speaker 1:
37:20
I can be talking and I am right now, I'm listening for the next sound because I don't have to think about what I'm going to say. In fact, that's on that fifth of noticed. Nobody ever does. It just comes out. It's comes from largely the same place as the inner dialogue. You know, there's a little voice in our head, that little voice that most most people experience, not everyone. And then there's the, what we say, it's largely the same source, slightly different. There are more filters on the external voice, thankfully, than the internal voice. Imagine if you said everything you thought you'd be in an uncomfortable place. Right? So that's the thing that's fundamentally different is we've learned, it's, it's not structured speech, it's still arises from the subconscious, but it filters out and we've learned, we can't say this. You can't say that. It'll and learn more things. You can't say as he goes through your life. Interesting. In modern life, society's adding more things that we can't say now as well there. That's the only difference is this filtered version of the end of voice, which is what we say. And then there's the unfiltered version of the inner voice, which we don't articulate to others. That's happening. If you want to do this whole practice, it's all going to go onto a podcast.
Speaker 1:
39:13
If you do the meditation of no meditation for sound, because it's frictionless for 95% of people and it can be done at any point, you then have a practice. And that's the most important thing is to get a practice of some sort into your life, no matter how disorganized it is, but not by pushing. But by allowing your mind to remind you to do it. Cause that's what it's doing. When you notice you haven't done your implementation intention and you, you're going through your day and you think, oh, I haven't, I, you know, I didn't do my two minutes this morning. That's when you do it. You've then got this practice in your life and you think, well that's not very much is it? And the answer is, well, it's two minutes more than you were doing the previous week. Right. And so where do you go from there?
Speaker 1:
40:16
Let's say you add, you know, two minutes the next week or the next month and another two minutes the next week or the next month come the end of the year. You've got quite a significant practice. Yeah. And it will have found its way into your life in the areas that benefit you the most will all the areas that you have, the time you're able to fit it into. And it will more than nautically become a, a regular practice. So rather than sort of, you know, try and cram 15 minutes in every morning and not doing it and then dropping out altogether is this false dichotomy that the way that we teach creates is you're either meditating or you're not. You're doing your 15 minutes or you're not. So therefore, you know, it's, is this is part of the illusion of success and failure. There's no such thing as success and failure. Even if you did want to clap, clarify life as success and failure. Most of it is spent somewhere between those two and with a combination of them, right? And the one of the beauties of life is if you want to clarify it as a set of successes and failures, no matter who we are, we're all failing somewhere, right? So that's more helpful. Way To look at it is you're finding a way to pull it into your mind.
Speaker 1:
41:45
So there's a meditation practice that you can do without spending any time on doing it. So here's another one. If you want to get yourselves comfortable, this is a, well, I call the four tens meditation. It's a relaxation meditation. It's useful to put your thumb and forefinger in contact, your comforts, most important thing, especially if you've got a bad back or something like that. So you sit however, however it makes you comfortable. But if it's all the same to you, if you place your elbows by your side and find the most comfortable place to balance, yes, your head on, on your spine and with the thumb and forefinger, very gently and connection. What you do is you place your tongue up against the back of the top teeth.
Speaker 2:
42:44
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
42:45
And do you notice the sharpness of the bottom teeth because of the overbite. And you'll notice in your breath rising and falling. Oh, she'll begin and end this meditation with a bell on, on each out breath. What you do is relax your eyes. So we're relaxing the forehead, eyebrows, eyes and cheeks, letting the tension now on the out breath was breathing in. The body becomes more alert. Breathing out, hope becomes more relaxed. So we use using that natural relaxation to help us relax. The eyes say, it's like having an invisible my sausage, fingers moving down, eyebrows, eyes and shakes. Letting out a little bit more tension on every out breath. When you do this at home, you count up to 10 out breaths. And I'm breathing in normally tongue still up against the sharp part of the teeth just so you're of it. Relax
Speaker 3:
44:32
in the mouth and the lips. Joel and the throat. And again on the out breath, just letting the tension out. Tightness, pressure, stress. We're releasing it. And again, if you're at home, what you do is you count this 10 out preps. Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing the back and sides of the neck on the shoulders. Check your posture, elbows by the side, head balance comfortably and on the out breath. Relaxing the back and the science of the neck
Speaker 2:
45:41
on the shoulders
Speaker 3:
45:54
cam into 10 out breaths. When you're at home and you do this and then breathing in, normally breathing out, relaxing the hands. I noticed that they are already quite relaxed because of the connection of the thumb and forefinger. That's the one of the side effects of this. It's called the chin. My dre, why don't we connect to her thumb and forefinger and you're letting all the tension out of your hands. Now on the out breath again, a home counting 10 out perhaps. Huh?
Speaker 2:
47:03
Okay.
Speaker 3:
47:05
Again, breathing in, noticing what you can smell and taste and the sensation of sitting and the feeling of your feet. Pain pushed him to the floor.
Speaker 1:
47:30
There is a meditation that actually takes time, so I had to you. How'd you get that into your day? If you've got no time, what you do is you do it when you get to bed. So this is beditation get to bed at night before you go to sleep. It doesn't matter whether you sleep well or not. If you sleep well you you're going to drift off halfway through it. Maybe you might get to the end, you might not. It doesn't matter. So this is time that you don't use. If you find it difficult getting the sleep, you'll find it helps to relax you so you know it's and you're not using any time. So that you've got two practices that you can introduce into your day and you don't need any time for either of them. So even if you think your life is pram packed, then there practices that you can bring in Eli.
Speaker 1:
48:38
If your mind's very, very busy for 95% of people, the first meditation's frictionless and the second meditations quite good. Don't worry about if you do use it to try and get a slate. Don't worry about the mind. Just let it do its thing. One of the things it has to do is, is to move you into a dreamy state anyway, move you into sleep. And, and that is, it needs to be churning away to get you there so you don't worry about it. It does its thing. It all you're doing is relaxing. You're saying to yourself, well, okay, so I might no be able to sleep. I can meditate. And it's just as useful because it sleep is all about recovering our energy and meditation's all about recovering our energy. I'll send out a message this week on all the social media which said recharge yourself as often as you recharge your devices.
Speaker 1:
49:39
Okay? So those, those two things, they are part of the practice of no practice that I'm teaching now. And that the idea is frictionless way to bring useful practices into your life. And then once they're there, you get, you get the benefit of it. Once you see the benefits of it, which doesn't take very long, then you're more likely to adopt more practices. And you know, you find your way into having a useful practice, even if it's just in all of these times when you're actually not doing anything, you know, commuting and sleeping and all of that kind of stuff, that's fine, but we need to do that.