More than just mindfulness

Mastering Meditation

March 14, 2019 Season 2 Episode 8
More than just mindfulness
Mastering Meditation
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Mastering Meditation
Mar 14, 2019 Season 2 Episode 8
Robert Mitchell
meditation, mindfulness, guided-meditation
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode Robert condenses the key elements of the Mastering Meditation series into a one hour session.
Robert explains why we meditate, what meditation is, what mindfulness is and guides you into a meditation that gives you a frictionless introduction to meditation,  the present moment, your mind, thoughts and how our inner and outer experience can pass calmly through our awareness.
This experience softens thoughts and the usual focus of the mind on the past and future bringing it into a calm, still and relaxed present moment.
Robert then goes on to guide the following the breath meditation and explains how it works to return us to the present moment. 

Speaker 1:
0:09
Mal medis haitian monstering meditation is just doing it. That's all you need to do and you need to do it reasonably regularly. Um, you know, there's an ideal of meditating every day. It really helps some people. So all of the regular students that I have, I've been teaching here in Bromley for five years and I started at Saint Mark's church and Bromley south and there's still, it's still got a handful of students who still come along from them. So they've been meditating at least five years. And some of my students had been meditating for a long time before then. And what that happens is that they discover the, their day he changes completely. If they meditate in the morning, they have a good day. If they've done, they have a bad day and uh, it's, it changes their experience of life. That's one of the many, many reasons to meditate. It's important to explain what meditation is.
Speaker 1:
1:15
You're here, you're here a lot of more, read a lot of information about meditation. Most of it is completely uninformed. You know, I, whenever I do pick up an article, I haven't actually bought a news paper for five years now and I haven't watched the night's television since 1997 but you can't get away from the news for example. And so it's got a taxi down today for one reason or another. And the guy decided to, you know, and so there's all about parliament and Brexit and stuff. So it's impossible not to know what's going on. Um, but that put, putting that to one side from time to time students sale. Here's an article about meditation. So I'll go and look it up online and generally speaking, it's totally uninformed. So I would take no notice of anything in the media at all ever. If, if I encountered the journalist that knew about meditation, then I'd recommend them. Uh, so similarly with books, most I, I as I developed my practice and
Speaker 1:
2:37
got more into teaching, I wanted to learn more and more. And so I'd buy books on meditation. Yeah. And they're all for the bin, except for one, possibly two re reading the second one. Now, the one to buy is, is a book called the restful mind. And it's fantastic. I have never had, you know, you, you recommend books to people who say, Oh, you shouldn't book get this. But when people are honest, some of them will say, yeah, it's great. Someone will say, oh, it's bunk this. I've not had anybody say anything other than it's great. And it's written by a Buddhist monk, so that if you want information on meditation, that's where to get it. So let me clarify what meditation is. Meditation is any practice where we're observing our inner experience now, if meditation's all the meditations that you could do the size of this room, the meditations I teach at the size of my fist, it's, it's, it's a tiny subset of what people call meditation.
Speaker 1:
3:46
And there are a lot of things that people call meditation, aren't really meditation, but there you go. You say this is all part of the, you know, there isn't a definition for it and people jump on a bandwagon and all that kind of stuff. So the meditations that I teach fall into two categories, really. You know, I do the occasional other meditation or teach the occasional other meditation as well, but they're either mindfulness or gratitude practices. So the thing to remember about the gratitude practices, they aren't actually necessarily about gratitude there, about focusing on are more comfortable, more enjoyable inner experiences. And, and if we, if we develop these practices, we can learn to elevate our mood at well, which is a very useful thing in these days. Uh, among other things and, and you know, I teach courses on the courses. One out of every 10 peoples tell me, my life has changed because I am doing these practices. So it more than anything else, it's a change of perspective.
Speaker 1:
5:02
Um, so that's the gratitude side. We, I won't, I won't be covering that today. Today I'll be covering the mindfulness meditations and mindfulness is the undistracted awareness of the experience of the present moment. It's, it isn't an absence of thought because thought is part of the present moment. This isn't his, all the misconceptions. Um, actually probably the primary misconception is that meditation and mindfulness of the same thing. Mindfulness is an experience we have in our day. Meditation is the training. It's how we train ourselves to them. Mindfulness. Mindfulness is the undistracted awareness of the present moment. So if I'm thinking one of two things can be happening, either I'm so deeply absorbed by my thought that I'm not aware of my surroundings, which is what we call mind wandering. And we have very reliable data from a brilliant study, which tells us that in the modern world we spend 50% of our lives with our mind wandering. And some of us obviously a lot more because you know, if he, I think the average person's probably working or they're looking after a family or whatever it might happen to be. And so they're, you know, they're spending a lot of time doing things and they're thinking about what they're doing and focusing on it as not mind wandering. Mind wandering is when you were absorbed in an experience. So mindfulness is being aware of your experience rather than being absorbed by it.
Speaker 1:
6:50
And you're, you're aware of your inner experience, thoughts and emotions as well as your external experience. Sense, perceptions and what you can see, hear, smell, touch and taste, balance where you are in the room, how cool or warm you are, how tired or alert you are, how relaxed or tense you are. I mean, if you look at it, there's the Arrow actually an awful lot of senses and we don't think about most of them, but when we're plugged into our present moment and we're aware of the sounds, the smells, the tastes, or even just one part of that, that's mindfulness. As long as we're allowing that experience into our present moment. And so the problem is, is that this mind wandering is quite a compelling thing, right? Uh, every so often I meet somebody who says, my entire life I've been able to focus my mind away from unhelpful thoughts and, and uncomfortable emotions.
Speaker 1:
7:58
And now that x has happened where x is some adversity and that can be retiring, that can be children moving away, that can be, you know, illness, injury, disability to yourself or your loved ones or whatever. It can be changing jobs. It can be something like that. What's happened is that the, the mind starts to wonder and it tends to wander to unhelpful places. So let me use a newspaper analogy as I mentioned it a little bit earlier. One of my hobbies is reading the headlines for newspapers. And you know, you go to say an or a petrol station, just before you go into the petrol station, they've got this big square plastic trolley with perspex windows on it and is the newspapers and you can see all the headlines and they're all competing for the most shocking headline because the reason is, is the psychology of it.
Speaker 1:
8:58
It will get your attention. Whatever's the most shocking headline will get your attention. So Daily Mail wins this competition almost invariably. Um, and what that is, is that displays an element of human experience known as negativity bias to two big meshes in the human mind. The modern mind. I might cover biases in my next, uh, series. The modern mind series by us. Number one is confirmation bias, which is that every new thing is interpreted. So that confirms what you already believe. And if you actually wasted your time listening to politicians, that's what you see. So you get to politicians, there'll be an event, politicians will, I will say, this confirms what we believe. And then politician be, we'll say, this confirms what we believe and this is what we all do. So confirmation bias is part of being human, but also negativity bias with threats always Trump rewards for our attention. They have to because it's a survival trait where the children of many, many, many, many
Speaker 1:
10:12
generations going back 2 billion years to the first life on earth where our ancestors have been alert for the presence of a threat and have managed to avoid it and survive. So whenever we perceive a threat, that's where our attentional go. Similarly, if we're in our mind, if we perceive a threat, that's where the mind's attention goes. Not all the time, but pretty consistently. Um, so the information from this study proves that beyond doubt and actually sodas, anecdotes, you know, you chat to people and I say I'm in a privileged position to speak to people about the contents of their mind. And it is. So it's not uncommon for somebody to find this situation where they're dwelling unhelpfully on unhelpful thoughts. Now our culture doesn't really explain the mind. It doesn't even begin to explain the mind, the thoughts you've got emotions.
Speaker 2:
11:27
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
11:28
And say if you, if you look out thought in psychology textbooks and you're looking for a definition of thought will come up with something like, oh, it's a cognitive process. So if you go and look up cognitive process of sales thought,
Speaker 2:
11:41
yeah.
Speaker 1:
11:45
Because thought is subjective. You can't see somebody else's thoughts, you can't measure it. So subsequently, psychology hadn't really bothered with thoughts, although there's one specific research and called Halbert who put buzzers on people in it, buzz randomly during the day, and then they would write down their inner experience. And we can see from that something that I preach, I've learned anyway, which is, is some people have a repetitive in a dialogue. It's a voice. It's my voice generally. Um, or that can be somebody else's voice. It's very normal for many of us to have many, many voices. So having, you know, if you imagine your, you're remembering a discussion you had with half a dozen people yesterday, well there's seven voices and if you're commenting on it internally, that's eight, right? So don't worry about that. That's fine. Um, hearing voices is only a problem if you believe them to be actual real living entities in this moment, which is, is a, is a unfortunate mental disorder.
Speaker 1:
13:00
But you know, having voices in your head is a very common thing. But if you look at the results from Hilbert Studies and what I've learned is there some people, constant chatter and there are other people, there isn't really much chatter. Thoughts tend to consist of, or any chatter talks then tend to consist of images in the sense of something. So again, think of a person's name, right? Say their name in your head. So for those of you that can, he'll say their name in their head. Now think of that person without saying their name and in your head. So that's the other end of the scale. And it's that everybody is somewhere between this.
Speaker 1:
13:43
So the thing that intervenes the most in the present moment is our own mind. And the way it intervenes is through mind wandering. And it tends to my mind wander to unhappy places. So then what's happened is, this is when meditation teachers teach, they've probably fallen into this same trap themselves of trying to silence the mind and wanting the mines to be calm and still and clear like a mountain pool. And they there then judging and comparing each experience with is my mind calm and clean, clear and still look a mountain Paul or isn't it? And if it is, and it's unsatisfactory. And the main reason people stop meditating is because when they sit quietly, they notice the inner voice more than before they'd started meditating and actually give up wherever I go. I ask the shows of hands on these things in, in big groups and organizations and something like 50% of the people that I encounter have tried meditation.
Speaker 1:
14:59
And of that group, only 5% have a regular practice. So he puts probably talking about 2% of the population now meditates regularly. Half of us have tried and we can't keep it up and it's because of the way it's been taught. So now I teach it in a completely different way. I make it a lot more accessible and to begin to do that, what I'll do is I'll explain the practice. So there, there isn't much that you actually have to do to do this practice, uh, but it's useful if you put your feet flat on the floor because that changes your relationship to your environment. Completely actually changes everything. Just putting your feet in the floor and it's a listening exercise. I'll begin with a listening exercise on the listening exercise is a very specific sort of listening exercise. So as we're going to listen, you don't have to close your eyes. You can half close your eyelids and look down, pass the tip of your nose at the floor just so that you don't get distracted by anything that's going on around you. Or alternatively, you can close your eyes. And what we're listening for
Speaker 1:
16:26
is the next sound. See the modern mind finds a sound and sticks to that sound for a while. Might be a long time and then it moves its attention to another sound and stays focused on that sound and it tunes everything else out. But the ancient mind, which is what you'll be using in a moment, it's listening for the next sound.
Speaker 2:
16:58
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
17:00
And so is we say, yeah, there's airplanes, there's movements in the building, there's movements in the room, some soul work going on somewhere. So there's about hammering happening. That is the sound of birds as Ryan. And the thing to do is rather than finding a nice noise and listening to the nice noise become like a sentinel, like hill awareness is all around you for sound. You want to know what the next sound is and where it's coming from. Could be in front of you, behind you to either side above you and then a pulse. There's a sound of my voice. So this isn't a meditation. So there's no, there's no right or wrong way of doing it. So you can't get it wrong.
Speaker 2:
18:22
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
18:24
And there's no instructions. So for the mind's busy, their mind's busy. If the mind wanders aligned, one does. None of that matters. But it's just listening for the next sound and noticing that that sound can happen anywhere. What to help you. It might be better if you imagine that the room is dark, so you want him in a dark room, dark, unfamiliar, Roman, you're alone, so you're listening to every sound. Just waiting for the sound so we're not focusing on the sound. We're just waiting for the next sound to happen. More indifferent to our inner experience. Whatever emotions there are, there are what the thoughts are all they're all however comfortable or uncomfortable we don't. We're not interested, just listening, just waiting for the next sound, wherever it might be on whatever it might be. Just listening, just white time to time. You might notice your mind wander or you might notice that you're focusing on a sound or whatever. It doesn't matter. Just listening fall. The next sound, one thing you'll notice from all of this sound, it's a bit like a hubbub and if you walk in a room and lots of people are talking and you can't hear anybody's conversation, all you hear is the voices. That's a hubbub
Speaker 1:
22:23
and the present moment. In a sound rich environment, there's a hubbub. You're noticing time moving, a sound arises and you're waiting for the next one. Sound arises, waiting for next one. Sound arises. You're noticing the movement of time.
Speaker 2:
23:24
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
23:28
I'll help you notice the movement of time just by running this, by all notice the bail moving through time.
Speaker 2:
23:37
Okay.
Speaker 1:
23:53
And so you were probably focusing on the bell. Now listen for the next sound. Listen all around you for the next sound while the ballet is just happening in the background.
Speaker 2:
24:06
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
24:25
So there's less waiting for the next sound. Something you can do anyway.
Speaker 2:
24:33
Okay.
Speaker 1:
24:34
I was wireless. All of the other sounds as the sound of my voice.
Speaker 2:
24:44
Okay.
Speaker 1:
24:45
If you listen for the next sound, instead of listening to what I'm saying, ignore what I'm saying. Just listen all around you for the next sound and I'm what I'm saying just becomes part of the hubbub.
Speaker 2:
25:12
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
25:14
It becomes just,
Speaker 2:
25:17
um, now the sound
Speaker 1:
25:28
and in this you're also aware of your thoughts.
Speaker 2:
25:31
Yeah.
Speaker 1:
25:36
You're listening for the next sound. My words are rising. You're listening for the next word. It's all the hubbub and the thoughts that pop up too.
Speaker 2:
25:57
Okay.
Speaker 1:
25:59
And you can listen for the next thought. It doesn't matter what thought is. There's a next one. You're waiting for another thought. When a thought comes, it will play out. You might notice it and wait for the next thought was waiting for the next thought. Why infant? The next word, waiting for the next sound. All the same thing. Then the same way we're indifferent to the sounds. They're all indifferent to what I'm saying. Oh well my word so and like thoughts the, I'm speaking and then there's the old thoughts and you're indifferent to the thoughts. Just note. Send them rising and subsiding white and for the next thought, waiting for the next word, waiting for the next sound. And it's all just the hub of the present moment.
Speaker 2:
27:52
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
27:55
and so there's a thing that you can do with my words. It's too white.
Speaker 2:
28:06
Full next for the
Speaker 1:
28:38
next,
Speaker 2:
28:45
what
Speaker 1:
28:49
do the same thing with adults. You can sign your mind white full. The next
Speaker 2:
29:09
fold. Try it.
Speaker 1:
29:32
Then he'd come back to white for the next sound. Wait for the next word, listening for the sound. This one for the word. Listen for the thoughts white for the door and notice the hub can, I mean you were very young. Time gently return your attention to the room.
Speaker 1:
30:08
So what that does for 95% of people, the first part of it where we're waiting for the next sound listening for the next sound is a frictionless experience and it's something that you can do anywhere. Sorry, for instance, notice that you could do it while I was speaking. You could be doing it now or I can be doing it now. So I'm speaking and I'm listening for the next sound reason we can do that is because it's always happening. Get up in the morning, it's time you go to bed. Your brain is listening for the next sound. That's how if something happens around you, although you might be focused on something else, if something happens around you and it's a potential threat, he become alerted to it. You become aware of it. So your brain is processing constantly new sounds, matching them with its memory of sound. If it finds one that it sees to be or it matches it against what it seems to be a threat, it alerts you to it. He looked round, you already know what you're looking around that. So this is happening all the time and all we're doing here is we're plugging into that. Then the experience of listening to my
Speaker 2:
31:45
what
Speaker 1:
31:47
for most people when I extend them like that, the mind becomes silent. Why in for the next
Speaker 2:
31:58
word?
Speaker 1:
32:00
And then of course you've got your own thoughts and you know you, you might be at the constant chatter and all, you might be at the visual land.
Speaker 2:
32:13
Mm.
Speaker 1:
32:13
For those of us that can construct and inner voice in our mind, we can notice the same experience when we do that ourselves. So when we say an our mind wait
Speaker 2:
32:29
for the next though, there's a silence and we
Speaker 1:
32:40
might never noticed silence over many decades. And that's, that's where it can come from. If our mind is and thoughts rather if our thoughts or images, we can wait for the next image. We notice there's a lag between one on the other. So a saying that underneath all of this quite busy experience of being human is that there's a still calm silence in that. But at first we only get a little snippet of it. So now two things need to happen to be able to connect to this experience. The calmness, the stillness of the present moment.
Speaker 1:
33:44
One is the in a to meditate in a way that enables you to notice your inner experience. So listening for your thoughts or watching for your thoughts, waiting for thoughts to do that. And it's been a pretty good place because obviously if the mind's going tent and the doesn't, doesn't work. So here's one of the misconceptions of meditation. So meditation and some similar sort of thing for mindfulness, but the meditation. So meditation is a stress management thing. So therefore when you're stretched, you meditate wrong. You might its height when you're not stressed. It's the training. Yeah. So if I was going to, if I'm a tennis player and I'm going to go out on the court and Wimbledon, I don't go into the gym in the morning, right? Well, I actually want is to train when my body has recovered so that I can get the benefit of the training and you just get it deeply in your head. The meditation is the training. It's the training for the experience of mindfulness and to make the experience of mindfulness as useful as possible for you, as comfortable as possible for you. Look for the, for the silence, look for the stillness, look for the calmness and do it when you're feeling good.
Speaker 1:
35:13
So then to get there, actually get to people. Wake up in the morning and they're on autopilot the entire day. Nothing will break into their autopilot. Thoughts, thoughts, thoughts, the body drives to work. The body does the job, did it, did a, you might come home in the evening and look around you and think, well actually this is the first time I've been aware today. All the rest it, I've just done it, you know, is a, as an example. Um, you don't have to necessarily have a job for that. You just have to live. And what I call the modern mind and the modern mind is it is a mind of autopilot. You're just acting out one behavior, acting out and other behavior, acting out another valley. And then very, very rarely you sit down and think about this and ask yourself whether it's your, what you really want to do, anything I've got no choice.
Speaker 1:
36:06
So you go back to doing it, acting out, acting out, behavior, behavior, behavior and that's it. And then it's all over. So what we want to be able to do is to choose what our mind does as often as possible. And to choose. We need to be here, we need to be present in the present moment. So to get, get back to the present moment from the mind wandering. We need to train ourselves to do it. And that's the key. Mindfulness Meditation. So what I'll do is I'll teach you this mindfulness meditation, the easy way and easy ways to get as comfortable as you like and put your elbows by your side. Comfort first, Jose, in all of the posture that I'm going to you, feet on the floor, elbows by the side and your head comfortably on top of your spine. Just find the point at which it's most comfortably balanced on top of your spine as the head. There's the animal post asked the feet and what we're going to do is notice a movement on the movement in the same way that listening to the next sound is always there, but you've never really noticed it. Probably
Speaker 1:
37:31
no movement. It's always there but never, never really noticed it. Probably we don't notice these things because we live in the modern world and modern lives living in the modern mild and we're in the modern mind when just things we just don't know. It's because of that. And what this is is the movement of the ballet just at the point where the belly meets the chest.
Speaker 2:
37:58
Okay,
Speaker 1:
37:58
and it's there all the time, rising and falling. You might need to put your fingers that and I say, am I not? It doesn't matter. I tend to prefer that too, that sometimes I do. Sometimes I don't. I think overall I've got preference for just putting my hand on top of the belly. Noticing it. You notice the belly rising and notes in the belly fallen and that's it. So there's no further instructions. Just notes in that tiny little movement. I like Rodney saying belly falling. If you have a particularly busy mind, it might help if you, if you label the movement of the belly, you're noting it and to notice what you do is you say in your mind when the bears eat berries, Ryan let rising. When the bellies rising, you're saying your mind rising and when the bellies falling you saying your mind falling, rising, folding. Yeah. Again, there's no instruction so there's no way of doing this wrong. He can't get it wrong. And this is what I call the meditation of no meditation for the breath and the beginning of the previous practice where we're noticing the sound waiting for the next sound. I'll call that the meditation of no meditation for sound.
Speaker 1:
40:24
So what are you doing notes in that tiny movement. Now what we're going to do is move into a fully fledged mindfulness meditation. This is how we train our mind to come back to the present moment during the day. Breathing in and out through the nostrils. Watch the same as notes in the movement in the ballet except now, and I've seen the nostrils, if that's comfortable for you, if it's uncomfortable for you to just go back to the ballet teach teacher as if we're doing the last drops. If you place your tongue gently up against the back of your top teeth, you notice that you're naturally breathe in and out through the nostrils. And the second thing you know you're seeing the breath rising. I haven't seen the breath. Full line. And then you sign your mind rising on the in breath. Folan they out price, rising, falling. And if your mind wanders, when you notice that your mind's wandered, you're gently return your attention to the breath. That's it. Just know it's in the breath. Rising and falling. You could be saying rising and falling in your mind if you wish or not. Doesn't matter.
Speaker 1:
42:30
When you notice that your mind's wandered, come back and notice the breath. So this is 2,600 years old at least again. And then the meditation with a bell. I said cold following the breath and just practice it for the next few minutes.
Speaker 2:
44:29
Yeah. [inaudible]
Speaker 1:
46:15
Nice. I'm breathing in noticing whatever it is you can smell, what you can taste and then your very, very, very on time return your attention to the room.
Speaker 1:
46:40
Okay. So what you will have noticed there is the mind wandering and at some point you'll notice your mind's wandering and you come back, you know it's in the breath. Mind wandering, breath, mind wandering. The modern mind really unhealthfully decides because of its past experience that this is a competition to stay noticing the breath because like everything else in life, so competition, right. So this must be too. So you think as a compensation I need to stay focused on the breath. I'm noticing the breath and either my mind's really busy or my mind just keeps wandering. And so there are no good at meditation is rubbish. Like maybe it's just not for me.
Speaker 1:
47:30
And some of him, I would have been thinking this while we were doing it. And if you're new to it quite probably, but the magic happens when you notice that your mind's wandered. Let me give you some examples. Um, so drivers who drives in the group theory. Okay, so those of you, you don't drive. Trust me about this. You get in your car and you're driving along and then you look around you and you think are going the wrong way. It was less, it happens less with sat navs now. But you know, if you don't use the back in the days when there were no sat navs it'd be very common. You might end up driving quite a long way. You actually driving the wrong way. Here's another experience that we're all aware of, which is one of my favorite mind wandering explanations. There you are. Why am I at the fridge?
Speaker 1:
48:25
The Fridge, you've opened the fridge each don't know what you want. You don't know why you're there. You know it's wandered in from another room. You're looking in the fridge or you wonder from one room to another. You get to the other room and you've forgotten why you there. So you go back to the first room, right? Or you're reading a magazine or a book or something like that. You narrating it in your head, you're not writing all the words, they're getting ready to get to the bottom of the page and you realize that your mind was wondering. So you have to go back. So those are all examples of like the Aha moment that you recognize that your mind's wandered and you remember that your hair, it's like, here I am. Oh, I should be driving the other way. You know, what am I doing in this room?
Speaker 1:
49:12
Let's go back a heart, heart, heart, heart, heart. When we do the following, the breath meditation, what we want to do is to repeat that as many times as we can because what we're doing is repeating the experience of noticing the mind has wandered and in bringing our attention back to now. And if you do it enough, I say you do it. You do 1520 minutes of that meditation every day. Just say you were to do that. Most people don't for a whole load of reasons. So many of them. Nothing to do with meditation to do with just the mind. The life is going at a thousand miles an hour. Um, and, and you do 15 minutes a day every day. What happened is that you can start going around your day and you'll have that experience more because everything that you repeat often in the brain, the brain does that thing.
Speaker 1:
50:13
This is why you can drive. This is why you can walk. This is why you can do all of the things you do. You've learned through repetition. Yeah. One foot in front of the other one, you were a toddler old year bump back up again, one foot in front of there. Just keep going, keep going, keep going, keep having done it. And Juggle, catch, catch, catch over and over and over again. Learning to come back to the present moment. Mind Wanders. Notice back to the present Mondo moment. Mind wanders, knows his past to the present moment over and over again.
Speaker 1:
50:49
So that is how we train ourselves to become present. And then when we're here, a good way to be here because we don't know what it's like with, it's, it's an innate capacity to be present that we all have, but because of the modern life and the modern world, which just like act out one behavior acts out and other behavior at tower and other behavior, that's the end of that day and repeat groundhog day over and over and over again and then go on holiday and act out, you know, pool, beach, pool, beach, various excursions, wander around a museum, pool, beach, pool, beach, very sick, secured, sorry.
Speaker 1:
51:38
Mountains, Ski Ski, Barsky Ski Barsky Ski bar. I'm not knocking it. I think travel is a wonderful thing, but that you're just doing, you just find that you're doing the same things in, in, in various different places. Even if you're a solo traveler, walk buffs, ask map, walk, bus asked Matt, sleep in a fleet pits, meet some people, get drunk, walk, ask bath, bus map. It doesn't matter where you are, what you're doing. It says the same thing. So behavior, behavior, behavior and, and, and you know, the, the, the, the traveler in the exotic land, the reason, and especially when you're on holiday as well, the reason that you enjoy it more is because you are here more, but you're not here more for any other reason that it's all novel. And when it's novel you become more aware because there's potential more punnet of potential for danger.
Speaker 1:
52:36
And so if you're somewhere where there's a real potential for danger, your climbing the north face of the Eiger, you are totally connected to the present moment, but you don't have to cut, climb north face of the Eiger to be connected to the present moment or you need to do is repeat the following, the breath meditation every day. But most of us aren't going to do that for a whole bundle of reasons. So if lifescan at a thousand miles an hour fitting in 15 minutes a day of noticing the breath, which just becomes a kind of mind wandering exercise and remember, mind wanders to unhelpful places, generally it lacks a certain something that we expect in the modern world. So to make it easier for you, I have constructed a number of rules and there is all savvy, a purpose the have adopted from a great meditation teacher. The purpose of meditation is to become familiar with your mind,
Speaker 1:
53:41
familiar with it, slot a new neighbor. You want to become familiar with them so that when there's a problem, you know how I deal with them. Same with the mind. You want to become familiar with it so when there's a problem, if it, if it goes off on one, you got a strategy of some sort. You can intervene in the unhelpful ness of your own mind, which can be really unhelpful. In fact, it is not, can be. It is in the modern world, the most unhelpful thing in our lives is our own mind as we do all sorts of things to numb it. A distraction, escapism, comfort and pleasure. Yeah, I mean once, if you lose somebody you love, now people pop up and tell you to do something that keeps, keep yourself busy, distract yourself, distract yourself because we're not comfortable with the mind.
Speaker 1:
54:35
It's not, it's not something we want to deal with and, and it seems to have a mind of its own right. You know, you, you want to get asleep and it, it wants to stay up. Let's see it. You know, or you don't want to think about certain things and your mind's going there all the time. Well you want to remember something and it just refuses to remember stuff. But if I remember other stuff that you don't care about the stuff you care about him. I don't remember that. And so this is, this is, this is what the mind like you to become familiar with it and understand it. The currents I, the way I describe it, it's like an ocean and air currents in it. And there are currents that move towards stress and anxiety or fear, worry, anger, the resentment, et Cetera, et cetera. And there were currents that move
Speaker 2:
55:24
towards calmness.
Speaker 1:
55:30
And to get now is not a long way. Takes me a single moment. Listen to the bell. That was how calm the mind becomes. Notice how you're in the present moment. Notice how the modern world's dispensed with bells. Notice while we had them wake up in the morning on a Sunday, didn't do an Indian [inaudible], wonderful white, white cop
Speaker 2:
56:13
listening to the sound of the bell.
Speaker 1:
56:16
Instead, we've got got to do this. Go here, see this thing, see this person or oh, there's a message it did to data. So what we want that to be able to do. Two things. One, get back to now and when we get back to now we want to listen to the silence,
Speaker 2:
56:33
okay?
Speaker 1:
56:34
Between the thoughts and the mine. Mine's is gonna do its thing in the background.
Speaker 2:
56:44
Okay?
Speaker 1:
56:45
And we can dip into this. We can do it for 10 seconds. We can do it for 30 seconds. You can take a look at your mind. What? What? What's, what am I doing? Here's a little exercise. Notice the tension in your shoulders. Breathe in, breathe out, let it go. And just do that for the mind. And the way to do is listen for the next sound. Wherever you are, whatever you're doing, you'd just come back to it. Just checking in with your mind, but you don't check in with your mind. Bonnet. What am I thinking? Cause there was a thought. Instead you listened to the next sound. Listen to that sound and what faults there are there they are in the background.
Speaker 2:
57:32
Okay.
Speaker 1:
57:33
I don't, and I understand for some of us that the thoughts [inaudible] you know, they can be really compelling. They can be really unhelpful. Uh, and it can be really rubbish. But I believe absolutely the, if you can find a practice, gets it into your life.
Speaker 2:
57:55
Okay.
Speaker 1:
57:55
Do it in Hawaii. That's frictionless. Might the meditation and no meditation for sound. The meditation of no meditation for the breath. Do it a time when you are not under pressure because some days are and more and more pressure than others. Some weeks you're under more pressure than others. Some months you're under more pressure. Find the time when you have a little bit less of that stress and pressure. That's when to meditate. Fix our roof in the sunshine.
Speaker 2:
58:28
Yeah,
Speaker 1:
58:29
you're in control. So you get to choose. Do you choose what meditation you do, when, how long you do it for baby steps. Start with the stuff that works for you. That's nice. And easy. Don't grind out 20 minutes of following the breath. If you're hating every single moment of it, it will come in time. Instead, listen for the next sound. You're in control baby steps. Fix your roof in the sunshine and do less than you can. So if you didn't do 15 minutes of following the breath, do 13
Speaker 1:
59:07
if he can do 10 minutes to eight, I can do 20 minutes to 15 and that way there's never a problem and don't expect anything from it. The whatever you expect. This is the mind like I expect to get to sleep tonight because I get, I get up early in the morning, right? That's the, that's the salt. You expect something from meditation, you won't find it. You're just doing this to become familiar with the mind and that you'll note is that if something's scarily unfamiliar, the more you get to spend time with it, noticing it in a way that it's not uncomfortable for you, the more comfortable you get with it. So find the times where you're comfortable with your mind and meditate then rather than the other way round, meditating to make it comfortable. It's just time you're spending with your mind getting to know it. Okay. That's mastering meditation in an hour.