Mocktails Or Messy

Fernando J. Garcia: From Notre Dame to New York Unraveling the Threads of a Designer's Journey | EP7

March 06, 2024 Ryan Frankowski & Kelly Mizgorski Season 1 Episode 7
Fernando J. Garcia: From Notre Dame to New York Unraveling the Threads of a Designer's Journey | EP7
Mocktails Or Messy
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Mocktails Or Messy
Fernando J. Garcia: From Notre Dame to New York Unraveling the Threads of a Designer's Journey | EP7
Mar 06, 2024 Season 1 Episode 7
Ryan Frankowski & Kelly Mizgorski

Embark on a sartorial journey with Fernando J. Garcia, the visionary behind Monste and co-creative director at Oscar de la Renta, as he weaves a narrative of ambition, culture, and creativity. From the architectural halls of Notre Dame to the vibrant energy of New York City's fashion scene, Fernando's tale is a testament to the power of passion and the influence of roots. Underneath the shimmer of sequins and swish of silk, we uncover a story of hard work, family values, and the drive that propels someone from dreaming to doing. Fernando's insights offer a look behind the curtain of Fashion Week's whirlwind and the intricate dance of bringing a collection to life.

Strap in for a masterclass in personal style and the transformative power of clothing, as Fernando champions the art of dressing to express. Forget the fleeting whims of trends; here, it's all about clothing that sings to your soul and steps that stride with confidence. We also mix it up with a discussion on mocktails and the evolving relationship with alcohol, stirring a cocktail of thoughts on lifestyle balance and cultural idiosyncrasies. Shifting to the psychological palette, Fernando paints the challenges of new environments and upbringing, crafting an intimate portrait of the influences that shape our very fabric of being.

In the creative kaleidoscope of fashion, we discover the rainbow that is collaboration and the shades of artistic vision against the canvas of commerce. Fernando opens up about the synergy of criticism and growth, sharing the spotlight with those who push us to refine our craft. And sprinkled throughout are anecdotes of friendships that glisten like gems in a cityscape, the unexpected joys of apartment hunting in NYC, and the liberating power of shared vulnerabilities. Come for the fashion, stay for the profound reflections on creative careers, the delicate balance of work and personal life, and the strength found in embracing our fears.

Send us a Text Message.

Mocktails Or Messy podcast
IG: @mocktailsormessy | TikTok: @mockmess
Watch | YouTube Mocktails Or Messy
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Featured | #11 of Best Local Podcasts: FeedSpot


Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Embark on a sartorial journey with Fernando J. Garcia, the visionary behind Monste and co-creative director at Oscar de la Renta, as he weaves a narrative of ambition, culture, and creativity. From the architectural halls of Notre Dame to the vibrant energy of New York City's fashion scene, Fernando's tale is a testament to the power of passion and the influence of roots. Underneath the shimmer of sequins and swish of silk, we uncover a story of hard work, family values, and the drive that propels someone from dreaming to doing. Fernando's insights offer a look behind the curtain of Fashion Week's whirlwind and the intricate dance of bringing a collection to life.

Strap in for a masterclass in personal style and the transformative power of clothing, as Fernando champions the art of dressing to express. Forget the fleeting whims of trends; here, it's all about clothing that sings to your soul and steps that stride with confidence. We also mix it up with a discussion on mocktails and the evolving relationship with alcohol, stirring a cocktail of thoughts on lifestyle balance and cultural idiosyncrasies. Shifting to the psychological palette, Fernando paints the challenges of new environments and upbringing, crafting an intimate portrait of the influences that shape our very fabric of being.

In the creative kaleidoscope of fashion, we discover the rainbow that is collaboration and the shades of artistic vision against the canvas of commerce. Fernando opens up about the synergy of criticism and growth, sharing the spotlight with those who push us to refine our craft. And sprinkled throughout are anecdotes of friendships that glisten like gems in a cityscape, the unexpected joys of apartment hunting in NYC, and the liberating power of shared vulnerabilities. Come for the fashion, stay for the profound reflections on creative careers, the delicate balance of work and personal life, and the strength found in embracing our fears.

Send us a Text Message.

Mocktails Or Messy podcast
IG: @mocktailsormessy | TikTok: @mockmess
Watch | YouTube Mocktails Or Messy
Listen | Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.
Featured | #11 of Best Local Podcasts: FeedSpot


Speaker 1:

This is Mocktails. Are messy with Ryan Frank off ski and.

Speaker 2:

Kelly Misgorsky.

Speaker 1:

This is our oldest friend, the New York, fernando J Garcia. Welcome to Mocktails. Hi, thank you for having me.

Speaker 3:

I'm very excited to be here.

Speaker 2:

Oh, fernando is a fashion designer. He is the founder of Montsay, co-creative director of Oscar D Laurent Ah he said that I'm the oldest.

Speaker 3:

And oh, there she.

Speaker 1:

I want to say one of my longest friends in New York it's not how we treat our guests. You're very busy this time of year and can you give us a little insight on what's going on?

Speaker 3:

We just wrapped up everybody calls fashion week, but it is Four times a year for us, regardless of it being faster week or not, and it's always chaotic. Very Exciting for the design team because you get to see the fruit of the labor's. You know, when you work on something for a very long time, and for us it's like three or four months a year. It's painful but it's also very rewarding to put it out there and I'm I'm launching Oscar today after I launched Oscar Montsay last week, so Rewarding for both teams.

Speaker 1:

I know that you are a Notre Dame graduate and today I'm wearing my Notre James sweater. I don't know if you could see it.

Speaker 3:

I can see it, I'm just going back for the games. But very close to my heart, I think that my closest friends are still my friends from Notre Dame.

Speaker 2:

You actually studied architecture at Notre Dame. What was the pivotal moment that led you to the fashion industry?

Speaker 3:

I actually always wanted to be in fashion. I just didn't have the guts to do it when I was Studying architecture. It was a good way for me to convince my parents to do something slightly creative. That wasn't totally okay. Then I went to Notre Dame. I worked really hard to get into a good school in America. I remember like the focus that I had when I was in high school when I realized that I needed to get into a good school in order for me to like Get the best possible like future for myself. And it wasn't that Notre Dame connected me to anything that led me to fashion. There was a set I Surrounded myself with you know free thinkers, people that understood that in order to like be happy and You're away, you had to pave your own career. Nobody else is gonna do it for you. And it led me to believe in myself enough to Internship at Oscar, and then I worked my way up.

Speaker 1:

That's pretty impressive. I mean, I'm growing up Outside of the US and then you really had that dream in mind to go to one of the best schools for not only architecture but most impressive programs across the board.

Speaker 3:

I am very proud and I think that it is apparently like Memable help Notre Dame people are about how proud they are, like like no one asks and then they go. I went to Notre Dame Is. It is something really close to my heart. I am very proud of it and I definitely had a focus on a good school and that was the right choice.

Speaker 2:

Now. Do you mind telling us a bit about your childhood and your background before Notre Dame?

Speaker 3:

Sure. So I was raised in the Dominican Republic. I came from a family of Spanish people, so my life as a kid was split between going to Spain in the summers and the aspirational American dream that my parents had for themselves by going to New York on Christmas. So it was very like divided between, like you know, honor your past but look towards the future and and, yeah, me and my sister is always clicked with the city and Making it here. So I was very like early age like determined for me that I was going to find a way to live in New York, and Notre Dame was the most perfect way to like navigate myself in Americana Culture before I came to New York.

Speaker 3:

I think they would have been probably a little too aggressive of a transition between the Dominican to New York, and I hate to call it Notre Dame University a transitional phase in my life, but it was. You know, like it helped me. You know, surround myself with like caring by very ambitious people, and I feel like the caring part of it Like was dropped as soon as I got to New York. Everybody here is like aiming for what they want, and so that's how I was brought up and I got you.

Speaker 2:

I was wondering if you could give us some styling tips. So what is your advice for an hourglass body type?

Speaker 3:

Can I be frank. I think it's more about the person's Individuality. If anybody takes an answer from me without knowing you, that's the wrong answer. I think it's about expressing your individuality, like, at the end of the day, what Fernanda Garcia tells you to wear is not gonna make you feel as good as what you feel like wearing. It is important for you to feel that you're expressing what you like about yourself and what you like to put on. It'll make you feel better than anything that I could say. That will make you feel flatter.

Speaker 2:

That's the best answer.

Speaker 3:

And that's like a very like, like I don't know cheese the answer, but it's just honestly the truth. Like I wear black every day and they fun of every day. You, but nobody, will be able to be like Fernando. You're going to look great in the new Bo-Tag of a Net collection because it's full of this color and all that, and I'm like I'm sure that will please you but it won't please me. I am surrounded by so much energy and color and excitement in my life on a daily basis. I'm very blessed and I could care less what I put on my body. So, because I have so much other fulfillment, I want to be a blank slate because of how much like information comes to me every day. So when I like, just like, soak up everything else, that's a cool answer.

Speaker 2:

You have some, you're good at this I know, have you, I am yes.

Speaker 3:

Thank you. I'm not obviously like prepared to do this often. I was late Like forget it.

Speaker 1:

Did you get your cocktail that you recommended?

Speaker 3:

No, I didn't have time, I just ran through the door.

Speaker 1:

See now, if you were coming to the studio, we would have had one ready for you. I'm drinking the.

Speaker 2:

Aperol Spritz. Yes, with Aperol Spritz's.

Speaker 1:

We want to cheers to Fernanda for coming in. So I'm doing the mocktail equivalent to the Aperol Spritz. It is a New Zealand sparkling brute, de-alcoholized. And then we have the Aperol equivalent, wilderton. It's a non-alcoholic botanical spirit. Now, fernanda, I'm curious you ever dabble with the mocktails, or is that like something that is like not in your vocabulary?

Speaker 3:

No, I've tried it. It's definitely something new and they're impressive. And the bad cred that they have for not being, you know, cool because they don't have alcohol. They're very enjoyable, so I'm a fan.

Speaker 1:

In my New York days. What five years ago it felt like every night it was happy hour. Think, whenever I transitioned to the LA lifestyle, everybody was so much more health conscious.

Speaker 3:

There is nobody that can knock down how amazing it feels when your brain is refreshed. Yeah, nobody. So I understand the New Yorker who will put down the LA person, but I think that there's nothing that can be replaced with feeling really fresh and I think that you know you don't have to be totally sober. There can be a balance, you know. So it's good to have a little bit of fun Actually with your.

Speaker 1:

I'm with Fernanda on this one, you, to be able to accomplish so many things that you have. You're not boozing like we used to, maybe in our early, like twenties.

Speaker 3:

It has to do a little bit with my upbringing. I will credit my or lack of a better expression non-American parents for this. Sorry, but they were never considering alcohol as something that needed to be prohibited and because you never had that, you know prohibition, it was never considered the devil, it was just around and never attempting to me growing up, because it was never something that I wasn't allowed to do so as a kid. That kind of like thinking is important because when I got to Notre Dame, like I had a glass of wine or beer before I got to Notre Dame, but there was this thing called and I'm sorry to my Notre Dame family, but there was a thing called diso. As a freshman, do you guys know what diso is?

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 3:

I've heard of it.

Speaker 2:

I've never heard of that.

Speaker 3:

So diso is disorientation as opposed to orientation.

Speaker 2:

Okay, when you enter a college.

Speaker 3:

Yes. So in Turtle Creek, which doesn't exist anymore, I was told, which is the first immediate off-campus campus, meaning where there's no jurisdiction for the ND law. That's where they took all the freshmen to get them wasted on their first week or two or month of Notre Dame. I'm going to go in trouble for this, but whatever, I'm sure it's obliterated and no longer existing. But yeah, they would just like take the freshmen to like bond with them, the upperclassmen, and they would like just like force us to drink. And I remember that was the first time I like puked and I was just like what is this culture where drinking is like the first thing to think to do when you get to the school? I wasn't raised the way to drink alcohol. I think it's just another beverage and everything in life should be, like you know, balanced.

Speaker 2:

It is very psychological, I think sometimes.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I feel, like the fact that we were so restricted in the United States, like it would be more desirable to do something that was restricted.

Speaker 3:

I wasn't told not to drink when I was growing up, so it was in my eyes as a child. When you're told, don't do that, that's the first thing you want to do so I was just like never told.

Speaker 3:

I was told don't sleep with girls and I'm like honey. I took that to the grave. I'm a gay man. Now A year or two ago I went through a little bit of a sad phase and I was never that kind of person that went through like depression, but I did and I can find you and I can mess up with your progress with that. So that would be my advice is to keep your closest friends aware that when you're sad don't let alcohol around you.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for sharing that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, everybody goes through hard times.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I can relate, I think, having a death in my family I kind of was pulling on the drinks.

Speaker 2:

Okay, let's lighten up the mood now. So I like how you said you go to work with like the all black, because it's a blank slate. What's inspiring you through your design?

Speaker 3:

For Laura and me, it is usually, first and foremost, something that we haven't seen Very much, probably like you guys, right, like, there's new blood out there to interview. I don't know anything about this type of person or field and I want to like discover it. Same thing goes for us, like, whenever we see everybody's collections throughout the year, and I myself have gone through the revolving door of you know, going through a nostalgic phase and, oh, this nineties moment needs to be relived. We all are saturated with images and there's an instinctual thing that happens with a designer where they're like I miss this color. I haven't seen this crop top. I remember this sweater from my childhood. Like, and all of these things every season are refreshed in your mind and it just forces you to just like dump it on a piece of paper or talk about it with your team. Yeah, and something new comes from that.

Speaker 2:

What do you think we might be seeing more of in 2024?

Speaker 3:

No, I'm not. I'm not Nostradamus, it's not like that. I have to say that I'm Because I want more G-Different.

Speaker 3:

It's just much more in the present moment than you guys might think Like. I just had a conversation about the new collection today with my team and I got really excited and I got inspired from the words and reactions that they had over this idea and how to make it innovative and fresh and fun. And it happened within an unprecedented you know one hour meeting that we didn't even know we were gonna have today and yeah, so like within a second, which wasn't planned in my day today, I have like 10 different images. I have like 10 different roads to go on for the next collection and you know eight of those will fail and it's really fun. Also can be expensive to have all those failing roads, but when the two of them are left, that are amazing.

Speaker 3:

That's the new collection. That's the thing that everybody in your team and your sales team and your design team and your CEO when the left and the right side of the brains of the company are in the sink in what the vision is, then you have a way to have a career. You can't just be this artist. It's like sketches on the side and paints and whatever and things that everything is gonna sell on its own. No, you gotta motivate your sales team. You gotta think about how the hell you're gonna produce it. You better know how this is gonna get to the stores and ship on time. So it does take a lot of like chipping down to get to that like core of the collection where everybody in your company and your team agrees. That's the way for it.

Speaker 1:

Who is always challenging you, laura?

Speaker 2:

To your partner.

Speaker 1:

So you guys are a good ying and yang that kind of understand each other but are very different.

Speaker 3:

When you find somebody in life that, no matter what profession, can spit it at you with all of the heart in the world and your feelings are not hurt, you better grab on to that person. Yeah, because that person's gonna make you grow and make you improve, and if they receive it as well, then you're set. Laura and I met in 2009 when I graduated from Notre Dame, and I met her because I had an opportunity to meet Oscar. I showed him some sketches and he offered me an internship, but he insisted on me meeting this girl that I didn't know at all called Laura, and I was like why are we talking about this random girl? Anyway, he had foresight and understood that there was going to be an interesting dynamic between the two of us and it works. Like. It doesn't mean that it's always gonna work when you have a gut instinct, because she and I are very different, but it worked. We were strong enough to deal with harsh criticism, which is a lot to say, because not a lot of people can handle that, and I love harsh criticism.

Speaker 1:

I do too.

Speaker 3:

Especially coming from people that love me. Yes, I really really do it, actually my gasoline, so yeah. So she and I were just like addicted to that energy that we had for each other, and we were at a very big little time in our careers where we both needed that.

Speaker 2:

That's amazing. Yeah, that's kind of what we're trying to do.

Speaker 1:

We feel that ying and yang, what you're describing with your partner and just trying to navigate the beginning stages.

Speaker 3:

You both have very similar like cores. I think that as long as you guys have a similar goal and differences of opinions, it'll be a really fun ride.

Speaker 1:

Do you feel like you butt heads a lot, or Every day?

Speaker 3:

Every day, okay yeah, no, I mean I bring out the differences of opinion is really important. Like you guys are gonna be bored to death if you guys are too similar. So I want you to make sure that you both value each other's cores and have similar goals, but you better make it fun and interesting, otherwise it's just gonna be like a mirror. That's why Laura and I have been able to like make our lives like exciting at the same time, because we surprise each other every collection with like our new ideas and I have to say it must be similar to what like couples are like when they keep their sex life interesting. Our sex life is our work. Yeah, so if you bore me and I bore like, I better like spark up and like make it fun.

Speaker 1:

Now, speaking of your sex life, who's the lucky guy? Who are you dating right now?

Speaker 3:

I'm dating the city Okay.

Speaker 1:

Okay, carrie Bradshaw, I felt like there was this Peter Pan effect when I lived in New York.

Speaker 3:

You just it still exists.

Speaker 1:

It still does.

Speaker 3:

Okay, I think that I Think that it is very attractive to me when anybody has a passion like you guys have and not very many do like and so they all have. It is like insatiable need to stay young forever and To me that's like not that, not that sexy by mom. That's with you.

Speaker 1:

I got out of a five-year relationship and I am so happy to be single and I don't really see like the desire to be in a relationship anymore.

Speaker 3:

I think you need to do whatever your god tells you, but I also think that, um, yeah, I've if, if something like knocks me off and I'm gonna be like the sotted by that person and I'll give her the shot. There's a lot of Peter Pants.

Speaker 1:

Yeah Well, and you don't want somebody to slow you down.

Speaker 3:

I wouldn't let them get in that far. It's just that it's boring.

Speaker 1:

I totally understand that.

Speaker 3:

Here's somebody else come to me and say, oh, I wish I had a creative job. I'm like get something fun for yourself. Yeah, go out and do something about it, do it, you do it.

Speaker 1:

I was just thinking like everybody's, like, oh, I really want a creative job, and I was like, well, the only problem is your corporate job is Holding you back because you're getting used to that Regular income that might be, you know, more important to you the money.

Speaker 3:

And if it's important to you, then I think that you should celebrate that. I actually think that it is offensive for people that like, let's say, as an example in finance, say, oh, I wish I was doing something more creative. I'm like bitch, you tell me like all four houses, and you are probably happy and you're just like saying that because you want to say that. But I think that you should Reverse this and celebrate whatever it is that you're good at and and live a happy life and set up complaining about it.

Speaker 2:

I feel like you're really making my brain like tick right now, like you've just been saying so many impactful things that not everybody yes, that like people don't really.

Speaker 1:

It's like it almost is like common sense to you, but I don't think it's common sense to the rest of the world and we want to know, we want a little insight on you know how to inspire us and other people to get to that level.

Speaker 3:

I think that as long as you just like, don't lie to yourself about who you are and what you're good at, people become very attractive to people. It isn't an embarrassing thing to say that you're good at pole dancing. It isn't an embarrassing thing that you to say that you are a fanatic of or like whatever it is that you find it to not be Appropriate for today's like world to be successful at.

Speaker 3:

Forget that so you think, only fans is not a bad idea, if it is whatever God has given you, and those are your tools, and I will never be someone to Machiavelli judge you, because that's what you are meant to be in this planet for.

Speaker 1:

Who inspires you?

Speaker 3:

You too.

Speaker 1:

Don't why.

Speaker 3:

Who inspires me? I think that the women in my life. I think that People that lives are true selves. You know, I'm a big fan of the film industry and I adore and become friends with a couple of very talented actresses and and it's a hard job to be in that world and I Relate in the competition and in the constant need to stay fresh and the insatiable need to be relevant. So those are the people that keep the wheels turning, even on a weekend are the ones that inspire me.

Speaker 2:

So do you mind sharing like what looks have helped to find you?

Speaker 3:

Looks as far as like my work.

Speaker 3:

Yes what were the most like what mums and my design career. I remember when I did this Photoshop for Oscar and I was still his assistant and I found a picture of some like jewelry on a book and I photocopied it and scanned it and I put it on a Paper doll that I printed out and I showed it to him and it was a jewelry collection and I think that was 2012. It was the first time that I like influenced his collection as a whole and it became the jewelry themed collection and I was young, I was I was in my 20s and it moved me to the point where I was like, oh, I think I can like do this, not just like make one little dress for him or, you know, help the celebrity or whatever.

Speaker 3:

Like I can do this that is that is, that was in 2012 and after that, developing a new brand with Laura Marie, discovering who we are because artists outside of a brand. Having Selena Gomez, who was having a moment to have that time where our first collection of a brand new brand without any help from anybody, just heard, just choosing a brand, new brand out of nowhere and Wearing all of it. That was another defining moment. And then after that, I think that, like dressing and a wind tour for the 2020 Met Gala or 2021, whatever it was for the Met and only two other designers I've ever designed something for Anna for the Met. I Think those three benchmarks were big.

Speaker 1:

I do remember Seeing you when I was working at a house, was doing interior design in LA, and I saw you actually Going into the house of one of the people you were working for and I was like Fernand. And then my colleague was like shut the fuck up, you don't scream out of the window like you. Yeah, it might be your friend, and it was just so funny and I was like who was it? It was Paris.

Speaker 3:

Oh, paris. So Nikki is my best friend. She is an angel that came in my life and she lives in New York. Yeah, I see her all the time. She is an angel because she came into my life at a point where it was overwhelming for me and Laura.

Speaker 3:

You know, we were assistants, behind the scenes people, and when we got the job it was a lot. We were flown everywhere, we were told to go to every party and meet everybody, and I was 28 years old, right, imagine. But Nikki, similar to me, was just like hiding in a corner of a party, and I wanted to hide in the corner of party too. And so we've been like attached at the hip since, because she had a little bit more know-how and still hated everybody, I think, and so we just couldn't stop laughing with each other and so, like Laura, she became another lifeline and we're there for each other, to support each other. I've seen her kids grow up, literally from the belly to seven years old. She's one of the most important people in my life and so, yeah, I see Paris often thanks to her, but she's for the reason why I'm still here.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, definitely, it was just like. I mean, I do find Nikki so interesting, how she just could care less.

Speaker 3:

No, nikki cares, but we also understand that energy, with a very busy life that we both have, has to be spent intelligently with the right people, and we are very devout, very loyal to those people. So I needed a little bit of guidance in the beginning and now, thanks to her, we're both there Nice.

Speaker 2:

That's a true friend, any friend that stays with someone through their pregnancies and all those different stages of life.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, I was with her for all of her pregnancies. I was even with her when she told me that she was pregnant on the last one. I was the first person she told I'm very much in love with her family and very much in part of it. Yeah, the sun is going down and I feel like I'm getting dark.

Speaker 1:

You, are, yes, you are, we're losing you. Perfect, there he is.

Speaker 2:

So when did you move? You said, you just moved to your apartment.

Speaker 3:

I moved like two months ago but Fashion Week took over and I haven't done anything to it. So it's a bit of a blank slate and I'm going to start getting stuff and paint and make it more me.

Speaker 2:

What made you choose your apartment?

Speaker 3:

OK. So a funny story is Nikki found this apartment she lives two blocks away from me and when I showed her something that my other bestie, jesse, who is my realtor and closest friend, is hunting down an apartment for me and he found something really good for me, maybe like a 20 minute walk from Nikki's apartment, and when I told her in the group chat with Laura that I was like closely finding something around there, she goes within 30 minutes, types and finds something and she's like, what about this one? And I'm just like, but she just went to that building. She's like, well, go see this one. And I'm like, ok, so I go to it. And this is it, and it's two blocks away from her apartment.

Speaker 1:

That is the best when you're so close that you could be like. There's no excuse to not get together. All right.

Speaker 3:

And so Jesse knew the building, he closed the deal, and now that's Brian.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the last question I have for you is what would you like to know about us? We just like to ask that.

Speaker 3:

My friends came over a month ago and love board games and I'm leading to a question, I promise. But what they did with one of mine, which was the Jenga game, the tower was unprompted. They just deassemble it and they start writing things on each key and I'm like, what are you all doing? And what we're going to do is assemble the tower and whoever picks out a key has to answer the question on the key, and so it's a combination of naughty questions and probing and whatever. But one of them was really interesting to me and it's stuck in my mind and I think that what I want to ask the two of you is one of the keys that I got in the Jenga board, which is what scares you the most.

Speaker 2:

Mine is so generic, it's failing, but what Just anything that I do like this podcast, just that we fail and it goes nowhere, and that's that.

Speaker 3:

Well, I think that you'll probably learn something if you do fail, but I doubt that you will. It's a very like. I feel like it has such positivity. I would be surprised if it does.

Speaker 2:

Oh, thank you.

Speaker 1:

I'm just one of those people that just jump on to this, jump onto that, not being able to be sustainable or independent.

Speaker 3:

And what do you both think about your answers?

Speaker 1:

Similar.

Speaker 2:

It is similar and I feel like saying it out loud, like yeah it's like it does do something.

Speaker 3:

To say it out loud yeah, yeah. It's like cathartic almost.

Speaker 2:

I'm not scared anymore.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, exactly the point.

Speaker 2:

OK, well, that was so cool. What actually?

Speaker 3:

When I was when I was asked that question in the Jenga game, I was surrounded by, like the people that know me, the best right, and saying whatever I said out loud made me less scared of the scary thing. So that's my giveaway today is anything that is standing in your way. As soon as you verbalize and scream it, it becomes a little smaller.

Speaker 2:

That was super cool.

Speaker 1:

You are. Do you have a book in the works? No, I have too much shit going on to do a book, but you do have a distinct laugh, and I know from the moment I met you. I love that.

Speaker 3:

You are so cute. It's like an aggressive high pitched one.

Speaker 1:

It's like a comey. It's like a comey a stand up comedian laugh Like. So maybe that's the next venture for you.

Speaker 3:

Oh, no, no, I respect them too much. That's too much for me.

Speaker 2:

We do appreciate so much you spending your precious time with us and allowing us to do this interview with you. This is fun.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, fernando, thank you so much for being on. Mocktails are messy. I would love to get you a mocktail next time, or a cocktail, whatever you decide. I know you're a busy man, but we will definitely see you in New York.

Speaker 3:

You guys have fun and thank you for having me.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for an undone, so thank you for listening. This is Mocktails are messy.

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