Mocktails Or Messy

Carson Kressley: Spicy Q&A, Style and Sass - From ranch life to Television Personality | EP10

March 26, 2024 Ryan Frankowski & Kelly Mizgorski
Carson Kressley: Spicy Q&A, Style and Sass - From ranch life to Television Personality | EP10
Mocktails Or Messy
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Mocktails Or Messy
Carson Kressley: Spicy Q&A, Style and Sass - From ranch life to Television Personality | EP10
Mar 26, 2024
Ryan Frankowski & Kelly Mizgorski

Carson Kressley, the king of style and sass, graces our podcast with tales that span from his "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" escapades to his latest hush-hush venture. He's not just a fashion guru; Carson is a storyteller whose life experiences—be it the wisdom from his parents' work ethic or the kindness learned at Ralph Lauren—have shaped him into the beloved personality we see today. Revel in the nostalgia of his career beginnings, chuckle over his anecdotes from the treacherous world of celebrity dating, and get an inside look at his leap of faith into television, which came with a surprising safety net from his old boss.

Strap in for a game of "Mock Or Mess", where Carson and us playfully speculate on the drinkers or the mocktailers of our favorite stars, from the legendary Elton John to the illustrious Jenner sisters. It's a riotous ride through the mocktail and cocktail landscapes of Hollywood, sprinkled with Carson's personal run-ins with celebrities his deep connection to his new horse, War Eagle.

As the conversation winds down, we touch on the profound impact of Saddlebred horses and the importance of finding a supportive tribe, especially within the LGBTQ+ community. We also take a heartfelt journey back to Pittsburgh, reminiscing about Carson's early days there and how the city has transformed over the years. Our parting words brim with warmth and gratitude for Carson's presence, as we invite you, our dear listeners, to continue this journey with us. Come along for what promises to be an exciting next chapter of adventures.

Send us a Text Message.

Mocktails Or Messy podcast
IG: @mocktailsormessy | TikTok: @mockmess
Watch | YouTube Mocktails Or Messy
Listen | Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.
Featured | #11 of Best Local Podcasts: FeedSpot


Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Carson Kressley, the king of style and sass, graces our podcast with tales that span from his "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" escapades to his latest hush-hush venture. He's not just a fashion guru; Carson is a storyteller whose life experiences—be it the wisdom from his parents' work ethic or the kindness learned at Ralph Lauren—have shaped him into the beloved personality we see today. Revel in the nostalgia of his career beginnings, chuckle over his anecdotes from the treacherous world of celebrity dating, and get an inside look at his leap of faith into television, which came with a surprising safety net from his old boss.

Strap in for a game of "Mock Or Mess", where Carson and us playfully speculate on the drinkers or the mocktailers of our favorite stars, from the legendary Elton John to the illustrious Jenner sisters. It's a riotous ride through the mocktail and cocktail landscapes of Hollywood, sprinkled with Carson's personal run-ins with celebrities his deep connection to his new horse, War Eagle.

As the conversation winds down, we touch on the profound impact of Saddlebred horses and the importance of finding a supportive tribe, especially within the LGBTQ+ community. We also take a heartfelt journey back to Pittsburgh, reminiscing about Carson's early days there and how the city has transformed over the years. Our parting words brim with warmth and gratitude for Carson's presence, as we invite you, our dear listeners, to continue this journey with us. Come along for what promises to be an exciting next chapter of adventures.

Send us a Text Message.

Mocktails Or Messy podcast
IG: @mocktailsormessy | TikTok: @mockmess
Watch | YouTube Mocktails Or Messy
Listen | Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.
Featured | #11 of Best Local Podcasts: FeedSpot


Speaker 1:

This is Ryan Frankofsky, and.

Speaker 2:

Kelly Msgorski, you are listening to Mocktails or. Messy. Today's guest is one of our very own, from Pennsylvania. He was one of the original five on Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.

Speaker 1:

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, which was Emmy nominated. He was a host on how to Look Good Naked. He was a contestant on Dancing with the Stars. He's a judge on RuPaul's Drag Race. An author, an equestriana.

Speaker 1:

Equestriana.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's like an equestrian. Any guesses?

Speaker 1:

I'm guessing you said it was my friend. You reached out to them, rupaul Andy.

Speaker 2:

Cohen. No, we are here with none other than the one and the only Carson.

Speaker 1:

Kressley. Oh, my God, is that, mr Kressley? Oh?

Speaker 2:

my gosh Is he here, he's here. He's here.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for the drink.

Speaker 1:

Of course, it's the least we could do for you taking time for your busy day to talk to us, Kars.

Speaker 3:

No worries, look how professional you look with your set and your lighting. I'm just in like a messy old Four Seasons room in Texas.

Speaker 1:

You have to tell us what's going on. I tried to do my little research, but I can't figure you out. You're always doing something new.

Speaker 3:

I can't say Working on something, and of course you know they're like don't post, don't tweet, don't talk, don't blab. So I can't say but it's all fun and it's wonderful and I'm here in Austin, texas, and I love it. Where are you guys? Are you in Pittsburgh?

Speaker 1:

We're in.

Speaker 3:

Pittsburgh, pennsylvania. I have to get out there. I hear so many great things about Pittsburgh and I have some friends who moved from Philly because I'm a Pennsylvanian as well. It's on my list. It's only like a four hour drive, so I need to pop on the turnpike and pop on over.

Speaker 2:

Get on out here, we can show you around.

Speaker 1:

We'll give you the five star treatment, and this is my co-host, kelly. We go way back 20 years in the making.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's nice to meet you, Carson.

Speaker 1:

Likewise, I have to ask you did you come up with this dress for the job you want, not the job you have?

Speaker 3:

Oh, you know what I actually stole, that I have to give credit where credit is due. That was the thing we said on Queer Eye a lot, but I believe and it's a turn of phrase that's been around a long time. But I first heard it from Ted Allen when we were doing Queer Eye for the Straight Guy OG version circa 2003. We're always talking about you know how to dress these guys and I remember you know he had mentioned, like in a production meeting, that he always, you know, had written about this in Esquire and I was like I am stealing that, but I always give credit. So cheers to you, ted Allen.

Speaker 1:

I don't know if I told you I am doing the mocktails. This is from the open road. It is a olive oil martini non-alcoholic, five calories per serving size. The whole can zero sugar, zero carbs. I mean this is like an A plus. That looks amazing that is so good. I've been just kind of dabbling with sobriety for some time. You know, we'll see how long this goes.

Speaker 3:

I know I have been thinking about doing that as well. I went for my physical and I was, you know, I was like, oh my, I need to lose 10 pounds and whatever. And he's like, oh, you could just stop drinking. And I was like what? But I have been dabbling about it. It's just cocktails and wine, and when you're out to dinner it's very hard to stay in areas where it's not, you know, kind of like super present. So I get how challenging it can be, but I might try it as well for, like, just a little cleanse thing.

Speaker 2:

I'm actually going to be doing it for the next two months, having a cocktail today. But, actually Ryan's going to be my mentor and I'm going to see how it goes, because I lose a little bit of baby weight.

Speaker 3:

Well, congrats on the kids. Yeah, thank you. How old, are they?

Speaker 2:

Five months and three years old.

Speaker 3:

Oh wow, so they'll be in boarding school soon.

Speaker 2:

I would love that.

Speaker 1:

Carson, you were in boarding school from a very young age.

Speaker 3:

I was, and look how perfect I turned out.

Speaker 1:

It's fine. I know I was going to say you definitely have this inspiration on so many different levels. You're constantly involved with the new project. When I first met you, it was on the Food Network with Rachel Ray and it was like America's worst chef.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we were doing promos for that worst cooks in America and, yeah, rachel Ray was a mentor and Anne Burrell was a mentor and we did that fun promo shoot where, like I think we were in a kitchen and we're all, like you know, using the wrong things to cook food with, and was I in a hazmat suit.

Speaker 1:

You know what? That's how we shared our first unofficial COVID kiss, where you were in a hazmat suit and you were like. You were like hey, you better, just like calm down, young man. Like you know, I was trying to get a little French in there.

Speaker 3:

I know a little frisky and I said, oh no, safety first. And that was so fun. That was a long time ago.

Speaker 1:

That was like that was in 2016 or 2017. When I was in New York, that was in 2016 or 2017 when I was in New York.

Speaker 3:

Yes, 2016 or 17. I thought it was pre-pandy.

Speaker 1:

You were like one of those magical people on set where most people are like I can't be bothered with you, I can't deal with hair and makeup, and you were making friends with everybody, like the production assistants, the director.

Speaker 3:

I was. I think it's you know. First of all, I love any kind of commercial shoot, like a promo or an actual television commercial. There's so much fun Uh, they've got so much creative there and there's a million people. I'm just like a kid in a candy store because I'm like I get to do this and I'm getting like this is my job. So I'm still very, like, excited about, um, the excitement around filming anything. Um, so I'm always very excited about the excitement around filming anything, so I'm always very happy to be there. And also, you should make. This is like anybody who works in showbiz. You should always make friends with everybody on set. They are there to make you look good and if you're a real jackass, they can also make you look terrible. So why not be nice and friendly? Because everybody has the same goal, which is to make you look good. So why not be nice and friendly? Because everybody has the same goal, which is to make you look good. So be nice.

Speaker 2:

That's great advice. So what is the most common misconception that people make about you?

Speaker 3:

Oh, I think the most common misconception is that I'm super judgy, which would make sense because I mostly judge people or things on television. Makes sense because I mostly judge people or things on television, um, and that I'm like, very like, um, oh, the other one from queer I. They're like oh, you're the bitchy blonde fashion queen. I'm like no, I am not. I'm sassy and salty, but I'm not bitchy. That's very, very different. So I think one would be that I'm, you know, very like highfalutin and you know, have to be fancy all the time, and those people have not seen me muck out a dirty horse stall. That's not a figure of speech, that's a real thing. And I'm totally not judgy. Sometimes I'll see people like at the grocery store or something like my God, what are you wearing? But that's very fleeting and then I just get on with my day. So I'm not judgy and I'm not bitchy.

Speaker 2:

So we cleared the air there. What has influenced you the most in your life.

Speaker 3:

I mean there's many influences. I think my parents have been a huge influence in like a work ethic. And Ryan you were talking about, you know you're always on the go, working on 80 million projects. That comes from like I know how blessed I am to have the opportunity, first of all, and then I watched my parents working really, really hard. Um, you know they're small business owners, so I know there's like never a day off and you've always got to be working and when something has to be done, it just has to be done. So I get that. And also probably growing up with horses, which is a big passion of mine. That's also like you know they need to be fed every day, they need to have their stalls cleaned. Sometimes, you know, drama happens there's a medical emergency, like on a holiday, like it's just the reality is that you have to always be ready to work with them. So I think that has given me my work ethic.

Speaker 3:

And then, I guess later on in life, one of my most amazing influences was working with Ralph Lauren. I'm still a fan and you know it was one of my first jobs in New York when I moved there as a young person, right out of college and I learned so many lessons, not just about fashion but about a sense of urgency, like get things done as soon as you can. That's a big mantra in the fashion business because it's literally about what's new and what's next and staying ahead of the curve. I learned a taste level there. I learned that you can still have a big company and be really successful but be nice to your employees. I learned so much at Ralph Lauren and from Ralph Lauren that I really credit that company and their culture and Ralph himself with so many lessons that I took forward into television and then I still, you know, kind of keep in my back pocket today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I like what you said. You were like, hey, I got this opportunity to work on Queer Eye with the straight guy, but you were a leap of faith because you're like I don't know if I'm gonna have any dental insurance.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I love how you say that.

Speaker 3:

Again, I had a fantastic boss at Ralph Lauren In 2002, somebody at the office said, oh, you should do this show called Queer Eye. I was like where is it? And they're like it's on Bravo In 2002, I was like what's Bravo? A nonstick cooking spray? Like I didn't know anything about Bravo and they only had the actor's studio, which was wonderful, and reruns of the Metropolitan Opera. It was not a top-of-mind network at that point. And when they said, you know, let's make a pilot, we did in Boston in 2002. It went really well, I had a great time. My boss said you know, you can take two vacation days. I did, she was great and I really thought nothing of it. And then, like like a year later, nbc had purchased Bravo, they were kind of rebranding and they said, hey, we want you to do this show. And I was just like, oh my gosh, do you even have dental insurance? Because, like, they want you to quit your like great job.

Speaker 3:

Um, for I think it was eight episodes. I think we were making maybe around like maybe $4,000 an episode, but I don't even think it was eight episodes. I think we were making maybe around like maybe $4,000 an episode, but I don't even think it was that much, um, so like 20,000 a year. It was a daunting decision, yeah, but again, um, there are certain people who made it easier, and I credit my boss at Ralph Lauren, who was just like, listen, go, try it out. If it doesn't work, we'll hire you back, and I was like, who gets that kind of treatment? So again, thank you, liz Paley, thank you, ralph Lauren. It's not lost on me to be grateful to those people that actually allowed me to do this.

Speaker 2:

Well, it seems that you're on the run a lot and you're very busy, but what do you like to do with your free time?

Speaker 3:

I love to do and listen to the Mattel's or Matt's Ryan and Kelly podcast. I love to travel. It's a big passion of mine. I grew up showing horses and traveling a lot, you know, in and around Pennsylvania, so that maybe planted the seed that I was a bit of a gypsy. Pennsylvania so that maybe planted the seed that I was a bit of a gypsy. And then I've traveled all over the US and now I'm starting to do some more international things. I just went to this amazing island in Brazil called Fernando de Noronha and I'm going to Portugal this summer and I love a good beach. So travel is. You know, if I have free time, I'm probably going to be going somewhere.

Speaker 3:

And then my other big passion is interior design, real estate and art and antiques and while I'm here in Texas for your viewers, if you like, to flea market and thrift and antique hunt. There is the most amazing. I wouldn't call it a festival because it's huge. It's thousands of vendors. It's called Round Top Texas and it happens every spring and every fall and there are thousands of acres of antiques and it's like a train car load of candeliers from Belgium or giant rusty chickens that you could put in your front yard, or, you know, vintage chanel and hermes that have been turned into like really cool army jackets, like everything you could ever imagine, both new and old, for your home, and also a little bit of fashion. Is that round top?

Speaker 2:

that sounds great. So our viewers would like to know what is the worst date that you've ever been on Our viewers would like to know what is the worst date that you've ever been on.

Speaker 3:

The worst date? Okay, this one springs to mind. I once had a celebrity date and celebrity dates are really weird because I don't know, I always feel like the other person is like I'm more famous and it's awkward and I'm a little like fangirly and I'm not not going to name a name, but this was a famous um we're going to say a famous news personality, um, and invited me to dinner and I just assumed it was like a romantical date. And we went to one of my favorite places in Chelsea called Lizzie and it was probably like in 2004 or five and I sat down and I was like kind of like you know the butterflies of a first date and this is fun and exciting and I happen to love going on dates Like I know a lot of people hate dating.

Speaker 3:

I love the like learning process of like finding out about the person and the hope that actually it could be something like that's very exciting to me, that actually it could be something like that's very exciting to me. And we both sat down and we're like opening our menus and we're thinking about what kind of delicious pasta we're going to have and I'm ordering a drink or a wine because I'm, you know, wanting to get romantical, and then the date says, oh, I think my boyfriend's going to stop by, and I was like what? And that really puts a damper on a date when they say their boyfriend might stop over. So I guess it either was not what I thought it was, or maybe they have that arrangement, which is totally fine, but I was not what I was expecting and it was real womp womp in the dating scene real womp womp in the dating scene.

Speaker 1:

I notice a lot of people nowadays have these like open things and, like you know, it's kind of like it's a mixed bag anymore.

Speaker 3:

Not all the gay dating sites. I thought they were dating sites. I guess they're just hookup sites and I guess I'm just very old fashioned. But there'll be somebody cute on there and I'll be clicking and swiping and then I'll be like wait a minute, who is that person in your photo? Is that a wedding? And I'm just like you're already married. Leave some for the rest of us.

Speaker 2:

So how to look good naked was groundbreaking in promoting positive female body image. What is the advice you have for people out there struggling to feel good in their own skin?

Speaker 3:

Oh, that's a great question. I loved working on that show. It got so much positive critical acclaim and I really truly think it was kind of before its time, because now we're so accepting and realize that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. Kernel that, I would say, is most important for men, women, everybody is do not compare yourself to ads that you see on television, to models you see on runways. They don't even look like that. Most of the ads are airbrushed, Things are doctored.

Speaker 3:

So trying to compare to a standard of beauty which is totally arbitrary, by the way, like there shouldn't even be a standard of beauty which is totally arbitrary, by the way, like there shouldn't even be a standard of beauty I think that comparison there's an old phrase comparison is the thief of joy, I think.

Speaker 3:

And like, if you're looking at what everybody else has, there's always going to be somebody with more. There's always going to be somebody who has a different, what you think is hotter, body type, whatever younger, prettier, Don't compare, um, but celebrate the things that are great about you. And I always say to people and it's something I learned from that show Um, if you have like a gorgeous selfie or a photo on your phone where you're looking absolutely banging and hot. Um, you should print that sucker out and slap it on your bathroom mirror, Because when you have those doubts about like, oh, am I attractive, you can just look at that photo and be like, absolutely, I have the potential for being really hot and I shouldn't forget that. And I think that's just a great little like physical exercise to remind ourselves.

Speaker 1:

You know what To piggyback on that? I remember this at your Christmas party years ago, I brought a date with me and you made them. They were having a bad day I don't even think you knew, but they just were not feeling themselves. You were just like as soon as I got in, you kind of pushed me to the side and you're like, oh, who's he? And you gave him a big hug and a kiss. And I was like, oh, who's he? And you gave him a big hug and a kiss. And I was like Carson, you just made his day.

Speaker 3:

And I didn't even have my hazmat suit on, so he was so brave to get that close to me. To me, if I'm having a party, of course I'm going to embrace everybody, because I want people to feel super welcome in my house and also to feel like they can kick up their heels and have a fun time. So that's just. You know how I roll at a party. I think I have very good taste in almost everything and I have very good taste in friends. I've also here's a little celebrity name, dropping advice.

Speaker 3:

When Queer Eye first came out, I became friendly with Sharon Stone. I don't know how, but somehow she called me and we, you know, started talking and I remember one time she said you know, don't ever forget about those friends who you chipped in to buy pizza with. Those are your people and living in New York, as you know, it's a challenging city. Everybody's super busy. You know, when you're young you don't have any money. So I still have all my original friends, like my core group of people that I found, or found me when I moved to the city in 1991. So I think that's why I have a good group. And then I, you know, if I'm having a party. I'm always going to layer in like new friends or celebrity friends, but that core group of really solid, amazing people is always going to be there. So I do cheers to my friends because they're really good.

Speaker 2:

Cheers to good friends. So, Carson, if you were going to be thrown out of your home, what is one item that you would grab and take with you?

Speaker 3:

Oh gosh, that's a great question. I'm very sentimental and I love, you know, memories and warm fuzzy things, so probably just like my favorite photos of family and my favorite horses that I've had over the years, because everything else you can kind of just, you know, you can buy new clothes and get a new phone or computer, but those memories and those artifacts, like special things, are very important to me.

Speaker 2:

That's so sweet.

Speaker 1:

Do you need like a five minute break?

Speaker 3:

Because, I was going to order you another drink, but you know? No, I can't. It's only four o'clock here. I'll be tipsy by dinner. It's only four o'clock here, I'll be tipsy by dinner.

Speaker 1:

So the game is called Mock or Mess. Now you know who is like the mocktail drinker, the non-drinker, and who is the messy that likes to get a little messy, dabble with the booze or, you know, could be edibles, whatever it may be. I'm going to give you a couple lists of people celebrities. Okay, you're going to have to guess Are they a mock, a mocktail drinker, or are they a mess and like to get a little messy with the booze?

Speaker 3:

Okay, yeah, let me have it.

Speaker 1:

You ready to go? Okay, elton John, is he a mock or a mess?

Speaker 3:

I think he's a mock. I think he's been sober for a long time. You nailed it you know you're out and just feel like I've known that about him for a long time okay, the next one is kylie jenner kylie jenner, doesn't? She have the 818 tequila brand, so I feel like she um is uh, not a mop.

Speaker 1:

I think she's enjoys a cocktail she, she's a mess and you know what. You actually nailed it, but I got to correct you 818 is Kendall Are you getting your are you getting your Jenners or your car Jenners? Mixed up again.

Speaker 3:

The only problem I have is Kendall and Kylie, and I always get them confused and I'm I'm just never know.

Speaker 1:

So okay, mocker, mess Shania Twang, oh we love Shania.

Speaker 3:

Um, I feel like a woman. Um, she's amazing and I have had the chance to work with her. Um, I feel like she would enjoy a libation.

Speaker 1:

She's actually a mock.

Speaker 3:

She's a mock tailor but I don't know how long yeah, yeah, um zach, interesting.

Speaker 1:

It's like you said, like sometimes people just want to do it to like lose a little you know pounds or be a little healthier.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, zach, zach, efron oh, he is so ripped and on such a health kick I think he's a mock you nailed it.

Speaker 1:

That was too easy. I know it doesn't. He have like evolved. He went from like high school musical to this like man I know, I know, like a man man like he ain't no little boy anymore. I mean, I guess he's done a couple other show. I mean, you've probably met him, didn't he just overnight become jacked?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, he's gotten really jacked. And you know who else is really jacked it's Jake Gyllenhaal. I digress, we're talking about jackpot celebrities.

Speaker 1:

But Justin Timberlake, is he a mock or a mess?

Speaker 3:

Well, I feel like he would enjoy a cocktail. I feel like he also has a cocktail. I feel like he also has like a liquor brand.

Speaker 1:

Maybe Does he Nailed it I don't know about, but that does sound familiar.

Speaker 3:

It sounds like he would have some kind of something. Bradley Cooper mock or mess. Oh my God, bradley Cooper is so gorgeous. I love him. He's so good in Maestro.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to say he's a mock, just because he seems very, got everything organized in his life. He is a mock, he talks about it. Twenty, nine years old, giving up alcohol and realizing that he needed to do it if he wanted to be alive.

Speaker 3:

Oh really, Wow. Well, good for him. I didn't know that story.

Speaker 1:

I've been like following him and I. That was something that really stuck out to me whenever I was trying to dabble with being a mock tailor ed sheridan ed sheeran ed sheeran I was like did nicole sheridan have a baby named ed, who's sober?

Speaker 3:

um? Ed sheeran, I feel like, well, he's from ireland, um, he would like a sport of of, uh, uh, a pint of the guinness, um, but I'm gonna say, I'm gonna say he enjoys a cocktail you got it.

Speaker 1:

You know you did. You dissected that properly, carson he. He is the Irish guy. It's hard to be Irish and be mocktailing it, I think, so it's possible. The last one I have is one of my favorites, mr Sam Smith. Is he a mocktail or is he a mess? And I shouldn't say mess, but like to get a little messy.

Speaker 3:

I think he's a mocktail. I don't know why.

Speaker 1:

I'm just just that's the first thing that's coming to mind as I have a sip so I know firsthand he is a mess, but not a mess just likes to get a little messy.

Speaker 3:

I I used to work at revolver video bar and foo bar in la I think I've seen him at the whatever that um bar is next to the abbey. It's called like the cloister on the chapel.

Speaker 1:

I think I've seen him there yes, the chapel, chapel. I'm sure when you go to these places like, you kind of have to keep a little bit of like distance because people would just be bugging you and wanting to take your photo. I.

Speaker 3:

I usually wear a hat and then I just go with my friend. You can wear, like bopping on the dance floor, especially if it's at chapel and we don't really have any problems, and if they're hot I'm like, yes, sir Rebob, let's take a photo, because that's a good way to meet people.

Speaker 1:

That is so true, but we do really want to hear about your horses, auburn, or is it?

Speaker 3:

Warhead, one of my new horses. Yeah, his name is War Eagle, and they come with a name.

Speaker 3:

And I was like, oh, is this something like terrible? I need to like Google what a War Eagle is because it could be something awful. And it is the and I'm not a southerner and I'm not a football fan, but if you're from the south and you like football, you know that war eagle is this like chant they do at auburn football games and they, I think they have like an eagle that flies over the football game. It's very confusing because it's not their mascot, which is something else, is a tiger, I think. But then they have this additional thing that they do, which is the war Eagle. It has a chant or a song or something. So so his nickname is Auburn and he's very, very sweet and I just got him last year and he's still pretty much a baby and I saw him this weekend, I saw him Friday where he lives in Kentucky and he definitely knows me as the the carrot lady. I don't know if they figured out I'm a man yet and um, he's really really great for learning how to compete together you're so funny.

Speaker 2:

I love that okay, so standard, standard bred horses are your favorite horse breed, correct?

Speaker 3:

They're actually saddle bred horses. Oh OK, and I also do have a standard bred. Those are more like race horses and they're fast. And then the saddle breds are like the peacocks of the show ring, like the supermodels. They have like gorgeous hair and they're very extravagant the way they move and they're exotic and they're real. Like if Naomi Campbell was a horse she would be a saddlebred.

Speaker 2:

Love that.

Speaker 3:

Could you tell us a little bit?

Speaker 2:

why they are your preferred breed, your preferred breed.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think because they're the most elegant, they're super smart, they're super athletic. I think because they're the most elegant, they're super smart, they're super athletic, they're very showy. So I think outgoing people who like a lot of razzle, dazzle kind of respond to them and I love all horses, but that particular breed has always drawn me and they're incredibly beautiful. So I think that was it. No-transcript. They actually had ponies and when I was like 13, I was like okay, enough with the ponies, I need an actual horse. And since this was kind of an adjacent breed, that is, um, the breed that I fell in love with and I I've had them since I was a kid and now I'm 54 and, um, I still have them. So I've had them for like 40 years.

Speaker 1:

And I cannot believe you're 54. So what's your secret? Do you just not have kids? Is that it?

Speaker 3:

Oh, no, Cause that's supposed to be like. You know, if you don't have kids, you have less stress. But uh, I'm usually pretty like high strung and and stressy and anxiety ish. But um, my secret is, um, I do like to have fun. Um't, really, I don't like exercise that much or like push myself, but I'm a big everything in moderation person. So I'll have a drink, I'll have some fun, I'll work out a little bit. I try to. Honestly, I think it's sleep and water, and if you can get those two, you're going to be in great shape.

Speaker 1:

Amen to that. I mean I've been doing a lot of sleep and water recently. I feel like I can feel myself again.

Speaker 3:

It's really hard in television production because you know, like television or print media, the job takes, however long the job takes, and you know, sometimes you get to work at seven in the morning and you leave at like two in the morning, you sleep for five hours and you go right back at it. It's super exhilarating because that reminds me of like styling fashion shows in Milan, like we would, you know, work all day, go home to the hotel, sleep for an hour or two, um, three hours is like my thing, like if I can get three hours I'm okay, um, but when you get the full eight, you're just like oh my gosh, this is like totally different, like life is.

Speaker 2:

Life has changed what were you like as a child? Could you tell us a little bit about? Like little Carson?

Speaker 3:

oh, that's a great question and, of course, um, I was still very fashionable and my mom was really into clothes and still, you know, she's like the only person at her diner in Allentown that has Chanel earrings on.

Speaker 3:

But it was the 70s and we always had like the 70s. People wore crazy outfits, Like if you look at like the Jackson five performing or the Osmonds, everybody had like a neck kerchief and a polyester vest and a printed silk shirt and bell-bottom pants and funky like Dior boots. Like it was a very expressive time for fashion and that fashion even translated into kids' clothes. So I have pictures of me like my kindergarten picture. I'm wearing like a paisley silk shirt with a collar open, like Saturday night fever, and like a polyester blue vest with like top stitching and I have painted pink fingernails.

Speaker 3:

Um, so I was always like experimenting with like makeup and lipstick and clothing and dress up and I was lucky that I didn't have a mom or dad that was like, oh my God, take that off. Like I literally have the proof that I went to school with nail polish on. That did not make things easy in school sometimes, but it was never a problem at home and I realized how blessed I was to have parents like that and they were, like you know, Lutheran, like Pennsylvania, Dutch farmers and business owners. They were not, like you know, progressive artsy, like college professors or anyone like that, but I just I'm so proud of them and so happy that they just kind of let me be me.

Speaker 1:

Thank God because, honestly, carson, you are inspiring. Inspiring, and I just think a lot has to do with your upbringing. I mean, you seem like your family really like allowed you to kind of be yourself and it took your career off, and I mean I, I just, I admire that yeah, thank you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I owe a huge um debt of gratitude.

Speaker 3:

I know how lucky I was to have, you know, great parents like that and I moved to New York, found my tribe even working at Ralph Lauren. You know you try to be professional but on photo shoots I was like the class clown and I would you know have like 55 pairs of socks that we were going to do a shot of and I would run across the field and pretend to trip and they would go flying through the air and Bruce Weber would be chuckling and laughing and I was like, oh my gosh, this is so fun. So I was always an entertainer and I think you know the environment allowed me to be myself and then, of course, queer Eye happened and that was kind of like a perfect playground to be exactly who you were, because now, for the first time, your job and the people around you are actually encouraging you to be exactly who you are and being gay and being out and being different was actually a great thing and it was encouraged and it was kind of part of the job.

Speaker 1:

Have you ever dabbled in the lady pond?

Speaker 3:

In the lady pond. I have not dabbled in the lady pond, I have. Um, I made out with one of my horse show girlfriends. Her name is lana and she was gorgeous and blonde and has, uh, had big curly like glenn, close fatal attraction hair and, um, she was really into me. And then we made out and I was like yeah, no, this is not for me, no offense, um, and that the that is the only toe that was dipped in the lady pond. Just a toe, that's so good, just the tip.

Speaker 1:

What question do you have for us?

Speaker 3:

Do you have for us? Oh, my question for you is what inspired you to do the podcast? And I think so many people like would like to do things like this, but they just don't get it done. You know, and I'm one of them like, oh, I should have a podcast with Tom Felicia and we've talked about it and talked about it and we never do it. And I'm so impressed by people that actually do it. You get the equipment, you have the fancy mics, you have a set, you have lights. Like how did you, um, what made you think of doing it and how did you actually get it done? Because you're actually doing it.

Speaker 2:

I love spreading positivity. Our mission is to normalize non-drinkers with drinkers and spread some mocktails or messy love.

Speaker 1:

We're trying to normalize sobriety with drinkers. Some of my best friends are party animals. I went to Penn State, lived in New York. I was a party animal myself and was a heavy binger, and it wasn't serving me anymore. Like you, you have moderation, which I admire.

Speaker 3:

I don't think I have moderation in my DNA, just after I had been considering, like you know, being sober for like whatever, like three months or a month or a January, I've been more aware of it and I do think that there's definitely a stigma, as much as with, like people who overdrink, but also with sobriety, and people are like, oh, you're sober, like if you were out at a restaurant or a bar. Sometimes it would raise an eyebrow. I think that's changing and thanks to you and people normalizing it and it's not you know something weird or scary I definitely feel like there's a change of foot in that so many more people are sober. It just sounds so intense, like I'm sober, like even the word is like sobering. Yes, yes, I think it's, I think it's changing and I totally get it, but I do.

Speaker 3:

The other thing is and I saw somebody on a podcast, I think, talking about this that alcohol is so ubiquitous. It's not like, you know, you go to a restaurant and people are like smoking weed or doing other things, but alcohol is omnipresent and it's such a part of our culture and it's like oh, we just signed a business deal, let's drink. Oh, you had a baby, let's drink.

Speaker 1:

Like it's very much part of society and it's hard to navigate it. So I'm thrilled you're doing what you're doing unapologetically, because I think in a lot of ways I was covering up who I was drinking to try to fit in and now I try to feel like myself out again and I think for the first time in 33 years, like I feel like I'm figuring out who Ryan is.

Speaker 3:

Right, amazing Congratulations. Um, I think that comes with age too and like also like just a little bit of exhaustion of trying to put up the front all the time that you're eventually just like. You know what. This is too much work. I'm just going to be who I am and people can deal with it, and it serves you better and makes you happier and healthier, and if certain people don't like it, they probably need to not be in your life anyway.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, have you had to cut off anybody out of your life?

Speaker 3:

Um, I think as you get older, you realize and you know, I said I was 54.

Speaker 1:

Um and we're born on the same day, Carson.

Speaker 3:

I know November 11th that's why we're so special but I think that as you get older, you realize like time is precious. Your schedule is full. I don't I really want to edit things that don't serve me. I think you said that that's a great turn of phrase, and but I'm also very loyal, you know, and if I had a friend, like in the third grade, I have to be friends with them for the rest of my life, like we were friends in the third grade and I've had older friends that have been around for a long time and I don't think I could ever like not be friends with them. But then they're not like my kind of people anymore and maybe their politics are really rotten or, um, maybe you hear that they're like talking shit about you behind your back.

Speaker 3:

It's okay to edit those people out of your life and I heard a great I think maybe it was Oprah. It doesn't mean that those people become your enemies. It's just that and this was the phraseology used I just don't want them to sit at my table, meaning like I'm not going to spend my quality time with them. That's so precious. But I have no problem with them, it's just sometimes you just need to make some editorial changes to your friend group that benefits you and your peace of mind, and just, I'm all about editing Like that's my mantra for 2024. Saying no to things that don't serve me or that I don't want to do, which was a big thing I'd always be like yes, yes, yes, and preserving my peace of mind by editing things out that either don't serve me well or aren't good for me.

Speaker 1:

I love what you say editing. Yeah, I think that's a big one. You know we're editing this.

Speaker 3:

you know episode, we're editing this friend, we're you know editing our friend group, we just want to cherry pick the good stuff and let the other stuff fall by the wayside.

Speaker 2:

Love it. I'm all about that mantra, but we so much appreciate you being here today with us, carson. We really value your time and we appreciate you sharing your time with us.

Speaker 3:

Thank you, I had a great time. I enjoyed my martini. It's all empty now and we'll see you again soon, I hope, in Pittsburgh, In Pittsburgh.

Speaker 1:

Yes, we look forward to it. I know Pittsburgh's not your cup of tea, but it might be. I haven't.

Speaker 3:

I really have never. I've been once in like the 90s when I worked for Ralph Lauren to shoot a Kaufman's ad for Ralph Lauren to shoot a Kaufman's ad and I haven't been back since and that was like on the South side when that was just starting to like get cool. So I need to come back for like a 20 year visit and check it out.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much, Carson. We adore you. I love you guys.

Speaker 3:

And thank you for having me on the pod.

Speaker 1:

Bye. You can watch us on YouTube. All you have to do for us guys is hit that subscribe button. That's all we request of you and love that you're supporting our show. Cheers oh, that is really good.

Carson Kressley Talks Fame and Misconceptions
Influences, Work Ethic, and Self-Acceptance
Mock or Mess Celebrity Game
Saddle Bred Horses and Sobriety
Exploring Pittsburgh After Two Decades