Just Two Good Old Boys

007 Just Two Good Old Boys - French Revolution!

December 03, 2022 Gene Naftulyev, Ben Stirling Season 2022 Episode 7
007 Just Two Good Old Boys - French Revolution!
Just Two Good Old Boys
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Just Two Good Old Boys
007 Just Two Good Old Boys - French Revolution!
Dec 03, 2022 Season 2022 Episode 7
Gene Naftulyev, Ben Stirling

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Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
Email: gene@sirgene.com Or dude@namedben.com
or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
Can't donate? sub to Gene's GAMING youtube channel (even if you never watch!) Sub Here
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StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Get EMP protection for your car using our code sirgene

Gene:

How are you today, Ben?

Ben:

I am sick.

Gene:

That's what you were saying. What, what, what happened?

Ben:

I have kids.

Gene:

Oh, that happened. Got it.

Ben:

Yeah. So my son my son,

Gene:

what do you got?

Ben:

nah, it's cold, but my son got sick after Thanksgiving and it quickly spread to my wife and my daughter, and I'm the last one to get it, but I got it. So if I send a little more nasally than normal, that's

Gene:

Oh, you didn't get a new mic? That's what, that's all it is. Okay, got it. Well, hopefully it's not painful for you to talk cuz there's plenty to talk about.

Ben:

Oh no, I'm good. Yeah. So the world's kind of gone on insane over the last week.

Gene:

Yeah, I mean, I've been just playing a a playlist of songs about the end of the world lately,

Ben:

dude, between Kanye Alex Jones and Twitter and Trump, Jesus

Gene:

like Ukraine doesn't even matter anymore.

Ben:

Well, it, it does because billions and billions and billions of dollars. But, you know, hey,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

I think Putin learned from from Reagan just bankrupt him the war.

Gene:

you know, Reagan did a pretty good job of doing that and I think that people often. Just say, well, Reagan won the Cold War, but they don't understand how and, and the how is by making the other side not be able to keep up financially, not with reality, but with the propaganda. And uh, I think the, propaganda in Ukraine has backfired in the US because you know, according to the US propaganda, the Ukrainians have been winning now for almost a full year.

Ben:

Well, I mean, it, it's, it's worse than that. Kiev just put out numbers on dead, and they said only 10,000 died, and over a hundred thousand Russians

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, that's a hell of a good ratio.

Ben:

even the defense Department said there's a, yeah, no, it's more like a hundred thousand each

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

which I, I don't think the Russians have lost quite that many. I, I, I think that the estimates are pretty, you know, I, I think they've probably lost, you know, close to that

Gene:

the official numbers from Russia is 21,000.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, I, I don't believe that number either. I think it's somewhere in between.

Gene:

Yeah. Well, either way it's certainly not a hundred thousand.

Ben:

no, not at

Gene:

But the more important part is they're willing to lose a hundred thousand easily.

Ben:

So

Gene:

not a problem for Russia.

Ben:

this was a conversation I you and I have had, and I had with some other people recently about the, the value of life and where we placed the value of life versus the rest of the world. And it was interesting to hear people's reactions. It really was,

Gene:

Yeah. And I think in the US the value of their own lives by people has placed extremely high compared to the rest of the world. The value of other people's lives, I think is probably a little higher in the US, but not nearly as high as the value of their own lives. See, a lot of other countries have a lot more of a sense of I guess it's us versus them because they're geographically like the populations are geographically separated, whereas the US is made up of immigrants. So there is really, other than Native Americans, I guess there's really no group that kind of considers the cohesion in the US to be anything other than political. You know, with exceptions obviously, but in a lot of ways people really kind of in the US I mean they like the US obviously, well most of the time, but. in a lot of other countries, the attitude is I'd rather die than give up my land to somebody else,

Ben:

Well, there, there is that, but, you know, we are a country of immigrants and a melting pot. So, which we've recently replaced with the salad bowl. And I'll, I'll tell you what I mean by that. So we started out as a country of immigrants and we came together through hardship. People were not always treated great. I'm not saying that, but we came together. So a great example is the Irish. The Irish were treated horribly when they came over and when they came to New York, they were absolutely treated as bad as any group could be. Now they're integrated, they are considered white, if you will. And

Gene:

white-ish.

Ben:

yeah, well, I, I, it depends on, I mean, if you're talking to Mylo and Ye

Gene:

other than that, I guess, yeah.

Ben:

gene at

Gene:

Oh, like, come on, everybody knows this. You got red hair, you don't have a soul.

Ben:

You know, my daughter is looking like she's gonna have a strawberry blonde hair. So

Gene:

I'm sorry.

Ben:

No, I've always, I've always liked her at heads personally.

Gene:

Well, I do too, but you know, I can like things that don't have a soul.

Ben:

anyhow. The point is the Irish are now integrated into, you know,

Gene:

Well, Italians were the same thing, dude.

Ben:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. But they still maintain their own identity, but they're still integrated versus now what we're doing with the salad bowl approach and what's happening with the immigrant community here in Texas, or Somalis tech Mexicans of Texas that don't speak English, setting up their own enclaves of their society and not integrating,

Gene:

Yeah. Well, the Somalis I think are a little more dangerous examples because

Ben:

Shia

Gene:

they're learning English, but Yeah. Sharia law, which in their minds is above US law.

Ben:

Absolutely. It, it's, it's holy, it's wholly writ.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah. Like that, that travels with them. And you know, United States has freedom religion. So people could say, well, what the hell are you bitching at? They're just practicing their own religion. Well, they are, except they're subjecting everybody, including people who are not part of their religion to be judged by that law. And I'll give you a concrete example of that. And this is from years ago. This isn't even recent, but when a lot of Somalis came over after the whole, you know, US incidents in Somali that we had no business being part of and the US started accepting a lot of Somali immigrants, Minnesota, as it often does, said here, we'll, we'll take them. And so there's a very large concentration of Somalis in Minnesota. Now, I would not say the Somalis are lazy at all. They're quite studious. And so within the manner of just a few years, the Somalis pretty much took over the taxi how do I put it delicately? The, the, the mob that runs the taxis it, it always seems to be run by one group of people and that group changes over time. But it sure as hell seems like there is a one centralized, ethnically diverse or ethnically unified group that seems to run the taxis out there. So when the Somali started running the taxis they, they decided to implement a rule, several rules, in fact that I remember. I'm sure there were more, but one of which is they did not provide taxi service to people that were either carrying. Or had alcohol in their breath

Ben:

Huh,

Gene:

because

Ben:

I mean, that's when you need a taxi the most.

Gene:

yeah, and as for their religious beliefs, they decided not to do that. The other thing is they don't consider dogs to be particularly clean. And so they would not provide any, and again, these are maybe you would say, well, so what, who cares? It's a small percentage, but you know, people coming in from the airport with a pet chihuahua in a little basket all of a sudden couldn't get a taxi back to their house. Now, maybe that serves'em right, because chihuahuas are horrible animals, but you know,

Ben:

I had a chihuahua as a kid.

Gene:

Oh God.

Ben:

Yeah, we got her in Oklahoma, so we named her Okie.

Gene:

Uhhuh. Yeah. Well, you just insulted all the Okies. And so this was a problem to the point where the, the city council had to threaten the loss of license for these taxis to get them to start actually abiding by the rules that the city stated. Or maybe it was a county. It's probably the county that included, you know, being, you know, providing service to anyone that wasn't breaking the law essentially. Like not discriminating based on who you, you provide service to. And then as a result of that threat, they there was a big taxi strike to where there was just no taxis running for weeks at all. So,

Ben:

And

Gene:

Uber came in

Ben:

the day.

Gene:

Yeah. Uber as usual saves a day by having the same people working now for themselves and therefore no longer organized. so anyway, the long story was all just to say that when it's not a melting pot, there are issues that end up happening for the population that was there previously.

Ben:

it. It's not just, I mean, it's both sides, to be honest with you. I mean, if you do not come together, you just end up with issues and you know, he, here's the deal.

Gene:

they also don't like rainbow flags.

Ben:

Fair enough. Yeah. I mean, they're having massive protests in front of school boards, all

Gene:

Yeah. But they did elect the representative.

Ben:

yeah. Han Omar

Gene:

And she doesn't like Jews.

Ben:

she doesn't like a lot of people.

Gene:

just like ye

Ben:

And there, there's some problems there. Oh yeah. Do you wanna talk about, yay. Now

Gene:

sure. Why not?

Ben:

dude has lost his mind.

Gene:

it's interesting cuz he's I thought what happened on Tim Poole was like, oh my god, this guy's nuts. But what I saw on

Ben:

wait for Alex Jones

Gene:

oh, hold my beer.

Ben:

Oh, Jesus.

Gene:

it, he literally made Alex have an expression on his face that I think a lot of other people have had when Alex was talking

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

and is like, this guy's totally nuts, isn't he?

Ben:

I'm gonna send you a meme that I found on no agenda social. That was hilarious. It's Alex Jones listening to Kanye, and he's got that expression on his face, and he and Alex's brain is going, I'm gonna get sued for another billion dollars.

Gene:

Uhhuh, Uhhuh,

Ben:

Oh, which by the, by the way, the judge in the Alex Jones case is a contemplating a what was it, two something trillion

Gene:

yeah. 2 trillion. Yeah. Mm-hmm. Why not? Let's just have Alex pay for Ukraine. I mean, that makes sense.

Ben:

Yeah. He he has filed for personal bankruptcy at this

Gene:

Yep, yep. Which we do was coming. That was pretty obvious. And

Ben:

Which, even if you think Alex Jones is the most abhorrent human being on the planet, he doesn't deserve what's what he's getting. He just doesn't,

Gene:

no, I. No, definitely not. I mean, there are plenty of people that I wouldn't mind seeing getting that, you know, Antifa types, but it's it's a lot of stress. He'll, he'll make it through just fine, but it's still a lot of stress.

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

He, my understanding is he did set up things correctly for himself early on to where everything is held in trusts.

Ben:

good. So what's your take on Kanye? What is he doing? Because I think this is very script.

Gene:

Well, I, again, you know, I'm not a doctor, I'm not gonna provide diagnosis, but he's so fucking bipolar, man. It's it's pretty obvious. His brain is working in a very different mode than a healthy human brain. I don't think this is an issue of he has the wrong information and we just need to let him know that no, Hitler was actually bad. I, I think that he literally has brain damage.

Ben:

I think he's being used. I

Gene:

that those are not mutually exclusive

Ben:

I, I agreed.

Gene:

I think they're using the, the complete shys like Milo are definitely using a, a black man with a a mental health condition.

Ben:

yeah. You know, something you said on unrelenting was that,

Gene:

a good podcast.

Ben:

it is, and I'm calling it out for you, but one of the things you said was that, you know, Trump has no shot at this point. I think that based off what was said on Tim Poole and the way Alex Jones went, everything else, it's really Hey, yeah, these are crazy. And if Trump will renounce him I, I, I think he could totally separate himself from that.

Gene:

problem is we have two years of mainstream media repeating this over and over that. See the ca guy, he's Trump's best buddy

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

Trump's idea of a black friend is a Nazi sympathizer. I mean, there's so many, I don't wanna call'em memes cuz the left doesn't know how to meme, but there's so many

Ben:

so I went, I went back and re-listened to that again and that, so Kanye and Trump are both very clippable because if you take a short snippet, you don't get the full context of what they're saying. And what you may have to do is look at two plus paragraphs worth of words to get the context.

Gene:

Mm-hmm That's cuz neither one's particularly good with their English skills.

Ben:

Fair enough. However, Kanye was not just saying Hitler was a good guy, is my only point in this, and I'm, I'm not gonna defend him, but I am going to say that that has been taken out of context.

Gene:

Yeah. Unfortunately he's provided so much video now to create the context. And the context is pretty, pretty clear here that the guy attributes all his woes to a demographic and that individuals that maybe he's got issues with,

Ben:

Well, and to be clear, I think you and I are the last to go to the identity politics front.

Gene:

right. But unfortunately, that's where he is at.

Ben:

He is, and

Gene:

And I think he's, he's probably, this is, I don't think this is a recent thing, dude. I think it's only recently in the media and it's recent that he's, you know, talking about it publicly. But

Ben:

well, I mean, he's talked about fair con and everything else, so, you know, I mean, he's definitely in that vein. You know, some of his comments about the Holocaust and everything else there are lots of things to struggle with. This is just not the hill I'm gonna die on. And it's you know, again, a group of people is a group of people, but that's not how you judge people. You judge people at the individual level. The right level of analysis is always the individual.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ben:

So are there Jews that do bad things? Sure. There's whites that do bad things. There's blacks that do bad things. There's Asians, there's everything else.

Gene:

right? I mean, that's the thing is if you wanna start stereotyping,

Ben:

There are lots of cabals out

Gene:

are murderers and drug cell dealers well, I mean, it's, if we're gonna generalize, that's what you end up with, is you're having stereotypes be representing entire groups and we're gonna ignore all the black people that actually have worked in industry and have created, you know,

Ben:

For the record, we're 18 minutes in

Gene:

yeah. Okay. So what difference does that make? So it's okay. And, and then Kanye couldn't possibly have actually gotten to where he's at and made as much money as he has. He's, because black people are incapable of doing that. I mean, that's, I'm, I'm using his logic here. It's like

Ben:

I, I fully agree with you,

Gene:

put the, the stereotype glasses on, and you look at the perception that exists, like what's the highest prison population? What's black men? Okay, well that proves that Kanye couldn't possibly be successful and he can't possibly have gotten to where he is at. He was just a pawn being used by other people probably to loan their money. That happened to make him look like he was right, Troy. And in reality, he really wasn't. Now, this is not my opinion. I'm just putting his glasses on and saying this is the perspective that he has of the world and it's clearly fucked up. But you, you know, I don't know how anybody can possibly defend him. I, I feel sorry for him cuz I do think he has a mental illness, but I don't understand like, he's leaving No, no door open for anybody to come to his aid,

Ben:

and I think that's on purpose. I think it's part of the script.

Gene:

but whose script

Ben:

Not his

Gene:

not his. Exactly. He's a black man getting used. What else

Ben:

Well, I, so here's the thing. I think Milo is definitely using him. I think Milo is a maniacal human being and is setting up. I'm sorry.

Gene:

He's a shaster.

Ben:

Absolutely. I think he is the driving force behind a lot of this. The end goal is still unclear to me, but I don't think Kanye is doing this on his own. Like I said to you last night the public window shift of this, my stepson is a huge fan of Kanye.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Even. He's like, what the fuck?

Gene:

Yep. Yeah, makes sense. So, you know, Milo, who I, I think is a not particularly smart guy, but he is definitely figured out a niche for himself and taken full advantage of. I don't know why people keep thinking that he's actually intelligent. I just don't see it. I haven't seen anything about him that suggests that,

Ben:

He has a large vocabulary.

Gene:

He doesn't really, if you, I guarantee you, if you, in fact, this might be a fun experiment, is just to take his appearance on anything, including Tim. Cass recently to do a speech to text and then look at the number of words Utiliz. Because what he does is I, I think a fairly common trick that some people enjoy doing, which is they, they've listened to a word a day cd, and then they just make sure that they use at least 30 words that are less popular and not utilized a whole lot in an hour of speech. And that absolutely makes them sound like, oh my God, look at his vocabulary. It's like, yeah, that represents 1% of his speech. The rest of it does not. And you compare that to somebody who's, you know, like a good writer or somebody that that's actually a a person with a large vocabulary. And you'll see that they're not trying to insert words that other people haven't heard of. They just use the most correct word to actually convey a thought.

Ben:

100% being specific with your language versus Yes, I agree. But one of the things I'd say is that gene, no one uses CDs anymore.

Gene:

I'm old I probably still have CDs. No, I don't have'em in the car anymore, but well, I'm sure I have some in the garage.

Ben:

Yeah. I, me too, dude. It's, it's all good. But I, I, and that may be the case that he is just that much of a shyster, but I think he is clearly intelligent because he is

Gene:

He's not dumb. I'm not trying to imply he's stupid, but I think people give him way more credit than he deserves.

Ben:

I, what I would say to that is look at what he is doing right now.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Okay? He's manipulating a billionaire into committing public suicide.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah. And I think the biggest thing you have to do is to get past morals, to be able to do things like that. I think the, for whatever reason, when he became the darling of the right, which I never understood either, it's like, what is it? Simply the fact that, oh my God, here's a homosexual who's espousing conservative thoughts

Ben:

that's not that rare.

Gene:

Yeah. It's like Dave Rubin's a

Ben:

the Log Cabin Republicans

Gene:

yeah, those guys suck. But if you look at guys like Dave Rubin

Ben:

literally

Gene:

but I'm Pump I think he's a much better example of a conservative gay man who is basically living the white picket fence lifestyle with a husband and kids.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

Dude doesn't sound gay. you

Ben:

Well, Milo's the flamboyant

Gene:

Yes. He, Milo is the caricature of a gay man. Combined with Here's what he fancies himself. He fancies himself. The, the second iteration of God, I'm blanking out now. I just had his name in my head. The, the, no, no, no, no. The

Ben:

which is how the Log Cabin Republicans got their name by.

Gene:

yeah. No, no, no. No. The, the writer guy the British guy. What's his name? The,

Ben:

I don't know.

Gene:

he's a gay dude. Ah, he's a really good writer. He was very articulate, very good at quick comebacks. God damn it. I'm,

Ben:

I just don't know

Gene:

when I started the idea. You're the book guy, you all know.

Ben:

May or may not know that they're gay though. I just may,

Gene:

guess he was, I think he was Irish, but he's from the uk.

Ben:

Books, what type of books did he write? Let's

Gene:

the, the something of, something earnest.

Ben:

Ernest Heming. What? No,

Gene:

Oh, for fuck's sake, I'll look him up myself. Jesus Christ. I, I really

Ben:

there's something of something Earnest. I that, that's a lot to work on there, gene.

Gene:

the importance of being earnest Oscar Wilde.

Ben:

Oh yeah.

Gene:

fucking difficult is that? Come on, man. Darren would've gotten this, Darren would've known who I was talking about. He's good at guessing shit. I'm thinking of,

Ben:

Yes. Well,

Gene:

Yes. Oscar Wilde is who he fancies himself was. Oscar Wilde was absolutely a brilliant man. And I've, I definitely enjoyed reading his ratings, but also

Ben:

that's sir, to you.

Gene:

above him, sir. What?

Ben:

Sir. Oscar Wilde

Gene:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. So I think that's Milo's archetype. That's what he is going for, is that he, he is the Oscar Wild of his generation.

Ben:

I, I can see that because he, he thinks himself, another archetype that I think he follows is, you know, the fairy king, the mischievous

Gene:

Pan.

Ben:

popping out, huh?

Gene:

Pan.

Ben:

Yeah, exactly.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And, and I think a lot of people are susceptible to it, and I, I don't know, maybe I've just been around more gay people that I just don't really think he's all that interesting.

Ben:

Was this part of the eighties, gene

Gene:

It's part of the nineties, I mean, I don't know. I've had a lot of gay friends over the years that it's a I, I don't judge as everybody can tell, and therefore I'm perfectly happy to, you know, engage in activities, whether it's going out to the range and shooting guns or or other hobbies that I might have without any regard towards a person's sexuality. I've had plenty of lesbian friends too. I've actually had a business with a lesbian chick,

Ben:

Well, you know, it's funny over the holidays, Thanksgiving and everything else, one of my favorite people to always talk to is my cousin's partner Marty. And you know, they're, they're, they're lesbians. They've been together for a long time, but Marty is just she and don't get along so well. She is,

Gene:

Just got a six sense of humor.

Ben:

she's got a great sense of humor. She's very libertarian done a lot of business. She's in sales. You know, great, great, great woman. Love her to death, huh?

Gene:

Is she a turf?

Ben:

Not that I know of, but I wouldn't be surprised for either of them. So my, my cousin that, that's dating or been with her she runs a lot of marathons, very athletic. You know, it, it, it, I, I could see them being that way, but they are not so publicly that I know of.

Gene:

Hmm. Yeah, I just, I don't know. I, I've always, I just don't have a problem with like, chicks banging other chicks.

Ben:

Well, I, I, I don't have a problem with anyone begging anyone as long as they're of

Gene:

Well, you know. Yeah. Yeah. Wait. And yes, they're human

Ben:

I, well, I said anyone that would be a.

Gene:

A lot of people look at their pet and call them one one

Ben:

Well, a lot of people are idiots. What do you want me to do?

Gene:

That's true as well.

Ben:

Half, half the population is under average iq, so

Gene:

yeah. Over half, in fact,

Ben:

that's not the way Bell Curve works, but okay, sure.

Gene:

Uhhuh made you think though? So, so Milo I think is partly responsible, but I'm also not willing to give him the full credit. I am pretty sure that Milo himself is working under somebody else's control.

Ben:

Milo's being directed this, there's a point to this that has yet to be clear.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Cuz Milo was on Temple's show like a month ago

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

if that, and he would not shut up about Daddy Trump and how much he wanted to fuck.

Ben:

Dude. And, and,

Gene:

like it was in a good fucking context, not a bad fucking context with no loop, but it sure seems now like he's trying to fuck him the other way.

Ben:

Well, we'll, I, I will see. So I, I definitely think that was the oh shit. What is the preface to what is going on now? We will see exactly what ends up happening, but. I, I believe that Milo is in Trump's corner and what he is doing is ultimately going to end up pro-Trump. That's my feel of it. I could be wrong.

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, it's just weird that he's walking around with a guy who even before like doing the current shit, but a guy who's talking about running in 2024 and wanting to become president and when he

Ben:

and the cost of Tim over it.

Gene:

asked Trump to, yeah, definitely that, but asked Trump to run as his vp. I mean it like what is, you would think if Milo's in Trump's corner, what the fuck's he doing with this guy? Although, I mean, there are rumors that I remember watching on South Park of Kanye's sexuality there.

Ben:

yeah, there's that and you know, what I would say is that he's making Alex Jones look normal.

Gene:

Completely. Yeah.

Ben:

moving the Overton window to say that, hey, Trump is not this extremist that everybody's painting him as.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah, I maybe that's, that's the plan that, man, that would be a stretch in my mind, is to do all this and effectively ruin kin's life in order to make Trump look less deranged.

Ben:

So you think that your government and our ruling elites won't ruin someone's life in order to reach an end?

Gene:

No, I mean, Trump ruining Kenny's life.

Ben:

I don't think Trump's doing this. I think it's Milo,

Gene:

So Milo's doing it without any other

Ben:

Not necessarily without any other, but I don't think Trump's cognizant or involved with it.

Gene:

Yeah. One thing's for sure is, this is clearly a don't look over their situation, that attention's being thrown towards the Kanye situation.

Ben:

Oh, absolutely. We, we don't wanna pay attention to what happened yesterday.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. It's pretty nuts. So I don't know. So back to Twitter. So e. Musk forwarded a whole bunch of internal documents and communication to what's his face? The reporter guy God, do you remember the guy's name?

Ben:

No, I'm sorry. I'm blowing

Gene:

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. It's I just, let me click on an Elon Musk tweet here and see what the dude's name is, cuz he effectively the reporter was tweeting information that came from Musk, which I think is hilarious.

Ben:

And

Gene:

Musk couldn't tweet it himself.

Ben:

yeah, in such a way as to advertise Twitter,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yes. Yes, exactly. Exactly. It's not Matt Taibi, right? Or is it? Oh, it is. Okay. Yeah, yeah. That's what it's, so yeah, Matt's following last night, dude was increasing by a hundred thousand followers every 10 minutes.

Ben:

there you go.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. So Musk's definitely a king maker at this point.

Ben:

Well, 100%. And the fact that he's releasing this information, and I mean between Kanye this and everything else, everything seems to be skewing Antibi Pro-Trump up.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. I don't know about pro-Trump, but definitely anti bit.

Ben:

Yeah. So, well, I mean, the Biden laptop scenario and the communications inside Twitter, basically saying, how are we going to skew this? And who the fuck cares? And

Gene:

Oh, oh, skewing as far as what happened two years ago? Yes, yes, yes, yes.

Ben:

Democrats you know, involved in this. The whole thing is just when Trump goes out there and says it was rigged, he can immediately point to this as

Gene:

Yep, yep.

Ben:

100%.

Gene:

Oh, it was totally,

Ben:

I mean, I'm not sure crimes weren't committed here.

Gene:

no, I think this is no different whatsoever than Watergate and I think that the bad actors need to end up in prison out of this.

Ben:

So who's going to be the fall guy?

Gene:

Well, I think they all need to be I'd like to see the whole swath of them in prison. And I've been tweeting that, oh man, my tweets are, I'm, I'm curious

Ben:

who, who was it that went to prison for Watergate? G Gordon. Lenny g Gordon. Linny,

Gene:

Gordon Liddy. And there's another guy that went,

Ben:

Yeah. But Liddy's the one that made a talk show career out of it.

Gene:

Mean he did. So I don't know, but I, I, you know, the, the former head of safety and Bullshittery. Has been scared shitless and tweeting about how it's probably illegal for the names of the people involved on Twitter's confidential private email system to be released. It's like dumbass. You go do something illegal and there are consequences. Yeah, yeah. They're scared, man. They're really scared and they should be.

Ben:

Well, they should be because information's coming out that dude, I don't know how far away we are from a French Revolution moment in

Gene:

Oh, that's what I've been saying. That's literally what I've been saying on Twitter is like, we're, they're like, they're really pushing the US towards the French style revolution.

Ben:

Yeah. Which people may or may not remember, but the French Revolution that happened right after the American Revolution

Gene:

Yeah. It was a little

Ben:

go great.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

It was not a good time. The guillotine was just admitted and they kind of used it a lot.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. But you remember the guillotine has a bad rep because the point of it is to make death as painless as possible for the person placed in it. Because prior to the guillotine, the same people would've ended up dead. But they, you remember what the, the traditional method of dealing with a high level. It was quartering.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

Which do you think is more painful?

Ben:

Drawn and quartered.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah.

Ben:

No. Absolutely. I mean, the

Gene:

ripping your limbs apart over the course of minutes, or just a quick swift razor blade to the neck.

Ben:

well, it's worse than that. So the way quartering happened was you were literally tied by all fours pulled and stretched to the max till literally your sockets are dislocated and your flesh is starting to rip. And then the quartering part was gutting you and quartering you like an animal

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

while you're

Gene:

say the guillotine was very much a a plus to the folks that ended up being used in it.

Ben:

sure. As far as not as horrible of beads of death, but still,

Gene:

probably better than what we currently do, which is electro well, cooking somebody's brain essentially.

Ben:

yeah. I mean, we don't do that. It's all lethal injection now,

Gene:

I thought we were still doing it in Texas.

Ben:

As a backup.

Gene:

Oh, yeah.

Ben:

So if the drugs are not available, then yes, they could still use the electric chair.

Gene:

I don't think there's been an improvement on the guillotine as far as painless death, because firing squads worse. Hanging is definitely worse. All these things take time for you to die.

Ben:

Hanging, if done properly, it breaks your neck. Then it's the same

Gene:

Depends how good your neck muscles are. But why

Ben:

But lethal ejection is

Gene:

Oh, it's supposed to be the worst. I've read a number of doctors talking about it, about the Well, because you're conscious the whole fucking time. it's not instant. It's far from instant.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

It's, yeah. That is not a good way to go. Now you, you could say, well, why don't you just give'em like an overdose of LSD or something. That might be better. But the

Ben:

Ooh,

Gene:

is not in the business of making a death painless.

Ben:

I, I thought you were gonna say the government is the business of selling drugs, and I'd get to

Gene:

Well, they're definitely in that business. No, there. But I mean, at this point, they might as well just do a covid injection for instead of the,

Ben:

your new lethal injection. The Covid 19 vaccine.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ben:

We'll let you walk around until you get the myocarditis and drop

Gene:

Yeah. It's, it's not gonna be that long. You get these weird, weird white filaments floating around you and then you die. Mm-hmm.

Ben:

that documentary?

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

That's some crazy

Gene:

think there's gonna be a lot more stuff coming out over the years with Covid, but again, it, it sort of doesn't matter because the, everybody involved is immune from prosecution.

Ben:

Until they're

Gene:

of Well, and that's, and you know, when they're not, when there's a French style revolution.

Ben:

Exactly.

Gene:

And that's, this is the thing that will get you banned from Twitter and, and possibly have men in suits showing up to your house, is talking about the fact that armed uprising may be the only solution left if they keep pushing this for the United States.

Ben:

Well, you know, the sad thing is I saw a statistic that said in 2020 one, the number of daily people who are carrying a weapon daily doubled

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

to about 6,000 people.

Gene:

Per what?

Ben:

No total. this, that, that's this article's estimate, which I think is bullshit,

Gene:

total bullshit. I literally have most of my friends carry daily.

Ben:

I carry

Gene:

Yeah. Well, you're one of my friends. part of my stats.

Ben:

Good to know, Jean.

Gene:

Uhhuh

Ben:

Yeah, but I, I, I think there's some selection biased in your group. But the point is,

Gene:

yeah. People with guns. That's, that's my group.

Ben:

anyway, I think that they're, they're absolutely insane to think that that's the, the number of people who carry.

Gene:

In the United

Ben:

but, but I, I. I would say that I don't think it's a large majority by knee stretch. I think it is definitely a minority,

Gene:

a minority. Yeah.

Ben:

but I think it's around

Gene:

doesn't really matter how many people carry, it's how many people are willing to use the guns that they have at home. And, and who has guns at home is probably of 105% of the population.

Ben:

no, it's about 45% of the

Gene:

Well, it's 105% of my friends

Ben:

Okay. I don't know how that's possible, but Okay.

Gene:

Yeah. I'm gonna have to teach you the new math someday.

Ben:

Yeah. you, you're working with that Calvin Core shit, so Yeah,

Gene:

that's pretty uncommon really, if you think about it. But you know, occasionally two plus two does make five. That's a joke. Yeah.

Ben:

I had to blow my

Gene:

no, I, I got it. I'm sure you were

Ben:

whole cold thing. Yeah

Gene:

so, alright, we talked about carny, the, the Twitter stuff coming out and I'm sure it's probably not gonna come out, but I'm sure Facebook had the exact same conversations in their emails

Ben:

well it,

Gene:

being deleted right now, just in case.

Ben:

yeah. Yeah, but the, just to point out the whole Twitter thing, it was clear that this was not the fbi. This was not anything. This was Twitter internally.

Gene:

Not totally correct. There was a, was one of the other confirmations more than Revelations is that Twitter has a backend for the government for yeah. But that, that backend was utilized and they have those records quite often during the prelude to the 2020 elections. And it was utilized by both parties and in each situation it was utilized to damage the president. So it was the Republicans, just as much as the Democrats were telling to Twitter to ban people that were saying things that were positive to Trump,

Ben:

a hundred percent agree. I'm just saying

Gene:

the unit party was tipping its

Ben:

Ban the Hunter, buy laptop story. That was internal Twitter.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. That was a internal decision by Twitter. That's true. So in some ways, I guess this

Ben:

least from what Musk has said, let's say

Gene:

Cuz Facebook what's his face? The robot that runs Facebook. He definitely kind of laid the feet of the FBI saying, well, they came in and told us to, that there's, there's some new information that's about to come out and it's all Russian propaganda and lies. And that was immediately before that story hit. So I, I don't think the FBI's hands are clean here.

Ben:

I, dude, the fbi, when has the FBI's hands ever been cleaned?

Gene:

Yeah. I can't think of a, an

Ben:

I mean, the, the FBI is one of the most corrupt institutions that exists

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

since its formation.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Just has been so, and by the way, someone find me in the Constitution where the federal government has policing powers. Please. Thank you.

Gene:

don't, yeah.

Ben:

So, the fbi, the ATF, should not exist.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah. And that this is, this is one of those things where, again every bureaucratic organization will keep amassing power until the pushback is sufficient. It, it, it fills a void. This is something that happens. It doesn't matter if that bureaucratic organization is capitalist or communist or socialist or whatever the mark monarchist, whatever the proper term is for that. Like every bureaucratic organization, and by bureaucratic organization, I mean the government. We'll continue growing until the populace pushes back. And there is no benevolent government. It doesn't exist. all government's goal is to control every aspect of your life, including capitalist governments.

Ben:

You know, it's funny because the FBI wasn't even legislated into being, it was part of the executive branch deciding to do something. I forget which secretary decided to form the

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

but it was

Gene:

Well, neither was the dhs.

Ben:

place. No, no, no, no. DHS was part of the Patriot Act.

Gene:

So the creation of DHS was created by Congress.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

No, I thought that was an executive decision.

Ben:

I think region, originally it was, but it was codified by

Gene:

all these groups are getting funding from Congress approved stuff

Ben:

Speaking of dhs, you know the TSA is gonna start doing facial recognition.

Gene:

I'm pretty sure they've been doing test programs in cities for a while now.

Ben:

No, but they're officially moving to it. So instead of you heading your ID to a human, them looking at you, you looking at them and moving on, they're gonna start doing face scanning.

Gene:

Well that's gonna be interesting cuz that doesn't work on me.

Ben:

Why?

Gene:

I don't know. It's something about the skin temperature and the beard.

Ben:

Well,

Gene:

the, I've like, I've had issues with the face scanner correctly detecting my face as a legitimate face.

Ben:

Well, it's gonna be interesting because I'm not gonna do that. So

Gene:

How the hell, you're not gonna do that. You're gonna have to,

Ben:

we'll see,

Gene:

I don't think you'll be able to opt out, out of a camera looking at you. And I've been doing this forever with the the, what's the program? Global, global entry. Yeah. Cuz that, that looks at your face and looks at your fingers.

Ben:

Why do I have to give up my biometrics for this?

Gene:

I agree biometrics is not a good way of doing it. But the flip side is that you'll be able to get through customs faster.

Ben:

Yeah, well, which is gonna be a thing for me, apparently.

Gene:

gonna be a thing for you. Which, so I am saying you're definitely gonna do that, but I think it's better than getting

Ben:

starting a new job.

Gene:

Yeah. With travel

Ben:

Lots of travel. Yes.

Gene:

which is great. I, I've thoroughly enjoyed traveling a lot when I used to do that, which I don't anymore. Like, I'm down to like three flights a year, four flights a year these days,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

know, to Mexico. That's the only place they ever go.

Ben:

So should I do global entry or

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

There's a couple of them here that's

Gene:

Yeah. There's a few programs you should do'em. All

Ben:

Why should I do'em? Well,

Gene:

right. Cuz it just makes things easier. I would also get a passport in another country just in case.

Ben:

well you have to be a citizen to get a passport.

Gene:

you have to pay a few bucks. You really don't like, need to be a citizen. A lot of countries have passport programs for folks that are just long-term residents.

Ben:

Okay, interesting. Well, I'm not a long term resident. So Global

Gene:

be if you

Ben:

you a pre-check, huh?

Gene:

I guess, I don't know. Does it?

Ben:

Is what it says.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So pre used to be totally separate from global entry, but I, I guess they've combined them.

Ben:

It looks like it's just as you go through the one process, you qualify for the other to just do,

Gene:

Yeah. Good. Yeah, I used to do that. I just, you know, like with Covid stopped pretty much traveling and then didn't bother reapplying for it cause my thing expired. But if I start traveling a lot again, which I don't think is gonna happen, but if it does, I'll definitely get it again. It generally is faster because itself, it's basically self-serve. Border crossing is what it comes down.

Ben:

Interesting.

Gene:

put your hands on the scanner and the, the camera is looking at you, and then it spits out a thing that you just hand to the border as you walk through instead of stopping and talking to a human.

Ben:

Yep. Well, so yeah, my the new job is definitely going to open some horizons for me because global travel is definitely not something I've done before. So

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

it's

Gene:

Yeah. Well, you'll, you'll see just how much better international hotels and shit are than the US ones way better the obviously international travel. And if you either get to the point where you've got enough milestone upgrade yourself, or your company's nice enough to pay for the business class or better, or international travel, you'll see just how much better that is.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

It's it's night and day. I mean, American Airlines pretty much suck. Well, local American airline flights suck. International US airline flights are quite good, but my favorite

Ben:

depends. I think there's a big difference between like Polaris and whatever Americans take. I, it is,

Gene:

yeah, I'm, I'm not talking about shit airlines like Southwest or something.

Ben:

I'm talking like, well, Southwest doesn't fly internationally,

Gene:

If a lot of Mexico.

Ben:

do they?

Gene:

All, all the time. Yeah. If you're leaving Cabo, half the flights are Southwest.

Ben:

Interesting. I did not know this.

Gene:

Yeah. But I don't know, I, I fly American pretty much all the time when I do fly and I know you Well, you fly United, right?

Ben:

Yeah. Well just because I, I mean, I was a continental guy back in the day.

Gene:

right. Cuz United and Continental. Yeah. But Continental ended up going with well they did go with United. Yeah. I I flew a lot of Continental as well when they were a partner for Northwest Airlines

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

when I lived in Minnesota.

Ben:

Well, I mean, shit you know, between American United and Delta, I think we're gonna see a merger here pretty quick if it's allowed.

Gene:

If it's allowed. Yeah, that's, that would be my question is are do they really want to condense American Airlines into fewer companies? Cause a lot of countries just have one airline.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, and I, we are headed that way.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. Well, and that's one thing I sent you a a or maybe I didn't send you a clip of Trump. I posted it, I'm pretty sure I know Jim Social

Ben:

post a lot of nudge into social.

Gene:

about half. Yeah. Half. Half the post are mine certainly I post way more than the guys that own the actual service. But lately I've been cross-posting, which is fun with Twitter.

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

Oh, I also po I sent the tweet to Biden and reply, and, and he, you know, he made a tweet about ka well, one of his handlers did a tweet, obviously about the whole Kanye thing and talking about how you know, we must never forget or never forget, which is or, or comp, what the hell was it? It was essentially doing nothing is being complicit. Right. Being complicit to whatever the action is.

Ben:

you know, whatever

Gene:

a reference to the Holocaust.

Ben:

Yeah. Whatever happened to, I may disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death, your right

Gene:

that's scan. That's totally, again, anyway so my reply back was why does why does pots keep smelling children's hair? And then the same end line of, you know, doing nothing about it is being complicit. So I, I don't know how, how long I'm gonna be on Twitter, but

Ben:

not

Gene:

far I'm having fun. I'm, I'm, yeah, this range and not very long. But I'm definitely having fun on there, which, you know, I used to, before I was band the first time and unlike a lot of people that have been coming back, I had a fairly small account on there, so I don't it may be a year before my account, my old one gets reactivated, the rate they're going, cause they're turning'em on literally by manual review. And I'm sure they started with the ones with the most followers, which makes sense.

Ben:

Well, yeah. And but the fact that they are at least doing that is a, a win.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And Musk now has justification for doing it because of all these findings. Because he's saying, look, people were banned for political reasons, first and foremost. And, and he's reversing all those, and he is saying, it doesn't mean they're not gonna get banned again if we find that they're doing something that's illegal, but we're gonna bring him back under the assumption that they were banned for political motivation for,

Ben:

Well he, he said that unless you are a spammer and or have done something illegal that there was going to be amnesty. So

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

a bit more of that. Should I get the APAC business travel card?

Gene:

The apec.

Ben:

Yeah. Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation.

Gene:

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, you gonna be traveling there then? Yeah.

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

Yes. Yeah. I mean, basically you're gonna go through fingerprinting anyway, so you might as well get all the shit. That requires that all at the same time, so it has the same renewal date. But all that stuff is it, it does make it faster for you to transit in and out of international zones.

Ben:

Well,

Gene:

I, I've always wanted

Ben:

I guess I gotta give up my rights sometime.

Gene:

Yeah. I always wanted to have the best passport, but I've never quite got to that point. Maybe I still will. I've got a few years left, but I've always really wanted to have a diplomatic passport. It's a diplomat passport,

Ben:

Why?

Gene:

Because you just cruise through security. Through all international borders. They by mutual agreements diplomatic passports allow you to walk through and bring a bag of anything you want into the other country. There. There's no ability for them to search you or stop you. It's, it's actually against law, against the law in, in all the, well, maybe all the countries, period, but certainly all the countries I'm aware of to interfere with the business of a diplomat, like that's local laws that the, the police would be breaking if they detained you at all.

Ben:

yeah. You know, it's interesting that we grant our congress critters diplomatic immunity as well,

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

so,

Gene:

well, our congress senators have way more rights than we do. They can speak freely in Congress, they can call somebody a Nazi, and and they can yell fire, and there will be no consequences as long as it's on, you know, in the course of business.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

They have the ability do insider training, with no consequences. They have a lot of rights that have been given them that the average voter does not enjoy.

Ben:

Which, why the hell is insider trading illegal? If you have knowledge, why should you not be allowed to use it?

Gene:

Yeah, I mean, there is an argument to be made. There is no such thing as insider training. There's just such a thing as how knowledgeable are you?

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. I think the idea is that it's, it's meant to prevent actual scams, which is somebody that is saying one thing about their business in order to drive the price up. While they perfectly know that the company's about to declare bankruptcy, and then they sell all their stock to all the people that, you know, they got to go have the price go up. It, it would result in lawsuits one way or the other. So maybe it is just simpler to call it out ahead of time and make it that an illegal practice. But it's not to say that it isn't constantly being done on some minor scale people that, that work in the business or with the business as a vendor or contractor Absolutely. Trade stock in those businesses all the time. That's like a normal thing.

Ben:

Well, and you have a pretty good idea of where things are going, regardless if you're an employee

Gene:

if you're selling widgets to company X and all of a sudden they, they, well, yeah. Or they just told you, Hey, you know, our orders are fine right now, but in next spring I think we're gonna have to make a reduction. Like you, you totally have an inside track on what's going on with that business that will affect their stock price and you can make money at it. Totally. One of the easiest ways to do, not insider trading, but to have more knowledge about companies is to own one share of stock in a whole bunch of different companies,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

And now you have access as a stockholder to information that,

Ben:

get a lot of information of the prospectus and everything else.

Gene:

well you get yearly reports, but beyond that, you, you can jump, I mean, the best thing to do is to jump on a stockholder quarterly meaning call, where a lot of that kind of trending information will be revealed, and it's not gonna make the rounds and be published until usually the next days. Financial media reports about things, and a lot of times they don't report about everything anyway. So you'll definitely have more knowledge than the average person. Maybe not as much as, you know, the the hedge fund guys obviously, but it's it's a good practice. Or at least it used to be. I don't know, maybe it's not anymore, but it used to be a good way is just owning one share of stock of whole bunch of companies and comparing'em. See where you should put more money.

Ben:

Speaking of which, I'm gonna have to fork out a little bit of muddy here the next 90 days to buy the stock for my current company.

Gene:

Oh yeah, that's right.

Ben:

I gotta exercise my options.

Gene:

Yes, yes. But I, you think they're gonna do well, so that's well worth it, right?

Ben:

Yeah, yeah. I absolutely there. There's no way. I would let that go,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

very good. Well, things are exciting for you.

Ben:

it they are this is gonna be a big job to take on the

Gene:

I'm hoping you can continue doing the podcast. And they don't muzzle you.

Ben:

Well, again yeah. I, I, we are not big enough right now for me to worry about that, so, yeah.

Gene:

Right. You never

Ben:

fact, I think they're gonna have me doing industry podcasts and putting me out there a lot more.

Gene:

They're good. Yeah. Well, you've got the equipment for it.

Ben:

Indeed.

Gene:

Yep. What else is going on? So we talked about the big obvious stories with the Twitter stuff and the Kanye stuff.

Ben:

Well, there's the Oregon gun Law that just went into effect.

Gene:

Oh, that's right. That one's in effect yesterday. Yeah.

Ben:

Yeah. And

Gene:

That is

Ben:

there was a stay. Yeah. I thought there was a stay against it, but that ended up failing, so there was not

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And I, I just got reminded of that when I was at a gun website and they, right across the top, they had a banner that says you know, effective this time and this date, no more orders from this state will be allowed.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

They're, they're literally, I mean, that's gonna be an interesting test case. We, we pretty much know how it's gonna end up going down. It'll be reversed, but by the time being Oregonians are fucked. And yeah. And it, it's, you know, given that's the state where Antifa did the most damage and killed the most people, it's amazing that that's the state that wants to keep lawful gun owners disarm.

Ben:

Yep. Well, I mean, they, they're, depending on how you interpret it I mean, they could, semiautomatics could be banned under this entirely large capacity magazines, or standard issue magazines, if you would, either over five rounds. So basically, if you have a pistol, any pistol, you're, I mean, how are they gonna handle a revolver with six rounds in it?

Gene:

that's illegal.

Ben:

Well, the, I mean, the interpretation of this law is just silly, the way this

Gene:

It's draconian. Absolutely. And I, again, I'm sure it will get thrown out given the Supreme Court's recent rulings.

Ben:

Oh, yeah. The brood decision is gonna save us.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ben:

decision is absolutely. Going to have far reaching repercussions until there's enough of a Democratic well liberal Supreme Court to

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

it. But Bruin basically says, unless it, you can find precedent pre the right against the Second Amendment in the tradition of the Second Amendment. It's not legal

Gene:

Well, and I've seen posts now that I'm on Twitter by the liberals out there comparing the stupidity in their mind. The interpretation in Bruin of confidentiality saying, well, if you apply that standard you know, midwives have been providing plants to women that have had trouble with their you know, their, what do you call'em? Their pregnancies for many years, and certainly during their period.

Ben:

and things

Gene:

Yeah. And, and therefore it's illegal to have abortion be banned because this is a practice that's been around longer than the country.

Ben:

Well, so typically, so some of the herbs, the, the names are interesting, like Angels, mercy and things like that. Those are in lieu of A D N C and they are to. Help a woman go into labor and pass a

Gene:

it's still

Ben:

spontaneous abor abortion.

Gene:

Yep. Correct.

Ben:

different.

Gene:

Well, I think then result is what they're talking about is

Ben:

No, because the, the fetus is already dead. It's just still

Gene:

Well, but it doesn't have to be, I mean, you're drinking poison essentially.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. So I'll tell you a story. I grandmother on my dad's side had a miscarriage and it was a fairly late term miscarriage. And the doctor refused to do a d c, and she was not passing the baby. And literally had of it hanging out of her, but couldn't, anyway, bad situation. My grandmother could have died. My grandfather took, the doctor literally threatened his life and got it done. But this was pre-Roe v. Wade. And, you know, no one is

Gene:

the abortion illegal in Texas?

Ben:

yes, no one is suggesting that that's what we go back to. But when you have a, we, we can detect a heartbeat. We can know if the fetus is alive or dead, the fetus is dead to a dnc, take care of the woman, do whatever. I think there's a difference

Gene:

What the hell Is dnc?

Ben:

Where they go through and take out the dead fetus.

Gene:

Was that sand for something or,

Ben:

Oh God, yes it does.

Gene:

I've never heard a term, so I'm just curious. Yeah, I, I, I think that for things that are explicitly called out, In the Constitution, I think it is appropriate to look at them through the lens of the writers of the Constitution, but I do also see the potential for that being a slippery slope.

Ben:

it is a dilation and curative basically going in dilating the cervix and then wiping everything out, out in the uterus. So, yeah,

Gene:

it. Yeah. So, but for now certainly in Bruin, I think it does mean that every single past bit of gun legislation needs to be reexamined.

Ben:

The ATF does, should not exist under bru.

Gene:

No, they absolutely should not. Yeah. And, and you know, again, they're in like the current lawsuits with the bump socks and stuff, their arguments are based around taxation, the, and not control. And yet in what they do from a practical standpoint, it has nothing to do with taxation, but it has more to do with control.

Ben:

Well, the tax has stayed the same for how long?

Gene:

A hundred years.

Ben:

Yeah. So when you look at it based off of inflation.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. And they did the math, I think it was the equivalent of about$2,400 when it was.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

In today's money, which makes certainly it very expensive to again like that.

Ben:

Which is, here's the thing, I've never wanted an automatic because I can't afford the mo you

Gene:

Right. That's the biggest tax right there. The ammo tax.

Ben:

Yeah. But you know, a suppressor would be nice.

Gene:

Yeah. Well, and that's the other thing is, that's the other lawsuit that's going through is the Texas V ATF saying they have no power and no jurisdiction to control products made entirely inside of Texas and sold inside of Texas.

Ben:

Well, the reason why is because the authority that was used to for, for this is interstate commerce. Well, there's no state calibers fuck off,

Gene:

Exactly.

Ben:

which the commerce clause of the Constitution is, has screwed us so vitally. It's not even funny.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. And I understand why it exists, is the idea that a state that is between two other states and all three of'em are part of the union, should not be allowed to fuck with the commerce of those two other states.

Ben:

Well, yeah, it, a state cannot interfere with a, so if I raise some cattle in a while, I wanna sell it to someone in New Mexico. New Mexico should not be able to stop me from doing that. That said, the commercial clause has been a used and abused like crazy. Great example is why you cannot carry a gun on a school campus.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Do you know what the rationale that was used for that?

Gene:

it's stupidity. Low

Ben:

Because the education of the youth will inevitably affect

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

interstate Congress. The federal government thinks they have a right to say that no one could carry a fire

Gene:

I thought most of the no guns around school zones were local laws.

Ben:

Nope. There's a federal law

Gene:

That's

Ben:

high school and elementary and so on. Colleges is local. And when my dad was a kid, they used to have gun clubs at high school.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly. Dude. We had guns in school all the time. That was just not that big a deal when I was young. It was you know, not something you'd want the teachers finding out, but the number of kids that had guns was reasonable.

Ben:

So literally my dad's high school, they had a marksmanship club.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And that's the way things ought to be.

Ben:

I agree.

Gene:

Why that should be part of physical education in high school is

Ben:

Teaching them how to use guns. Yeah. Safety.

Gene:

and gun control.

Ben:

Yep. Which means using both hands.

Gene:

Yeah. Being accurate on target and not doing stupid things. So yeah. But half the country disagrees and we can say that it's less than half the country. I'm not gonna argue with that, but a very large chunk of the country seems to be completely fucked out of their gord.

Ben:

Well, it's gonna be interesting. Yeah. It's gonna be interesting if a civil war or French revolution kicks off.

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, the, and, and just if anyone's wondering the difference between the two is whether there's going to be just simply straightforward armed resistance against one side against the other, or whether one side is going to go for a blood bath. That's the French Revolution kind. And I think we're getting closer to the French Revolution than the, and moving away from the Civil War at this point. Because the more you start finding out about what one side has been getting away with, the more justified retribution is.

Ben:

I see. I disagree because I, I don't think retribution is the right way to, to go about it. I understand the impetus, and I agree with you that that is where we're heading, but I don't wanna see that

Gene:

We'll see how many people don't wanna see that. And how many people do wanna see it?

Ben:

that's what it's gonna come down to. I just, what it, what I'm saying is, you know, vis, vis is mine say at the Lord, right? I, I don't think you go down the vis path, but I, I, I utterly see the temptation. I think that that is quite possibly where this goes, but I hope it'll pray. It's.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. Yeah. Ezekiel 25, 17. That's all I gotta say.

Ben:

Ezekiel 25 17.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yep.

Ben:

Alright, while I look this up.

Gene:

Well, you don't have to look it up. It's the pulp fiction speech that Samuel Jackson

Ben:

Ah, I gotcha.

Gene:

My name's the Lord, and when I lay my veges Vondi, yeah. I, I think that retribution is absolutely natural and normal part of human character. I think the, the danger there is. Unfeathered retribution, which effectively is a genocide. But that is a mechanism that is built into the human psyche and not just humans, incidentally animals as well. That will ensure that a repeat of past events is less likely

Ben:

well, I mean, yeah, absolutely. And so.

Gene:

if a group of people is acting in a manner that drives another group to the point of having to arm themselves and engage in violent behavior. The, and this is not like a conscious thought that is debated politically. This is something that's just literally built into all of our brains,

Ben:

Well, violence underlies all human interaction,

Gene:

I, I all cuz we're animals, all animals deal with that. So we, we get, everybody has a line in the sand that when it's crossed, and usually it's, when people say all bets are off, it's like, okay, well now that you've done this, now that you've killed my dog, or now that you've, you know, picked your favorite thing, or least favorite thing, I guess would be the one to pick. All bets are off and I'm gonna go for you until you're dead.

Ben:

or I am, but yeah.

Gene:

Well, yeah. Right. It's when the, the desire to eliminate the the competition or the bad party, or however you wanna phrase it, is greater than the desire for self-preservation.

Ben:

Yes. It, you know, it, it's funny because our society preaches there's no, there's no reason for violence ever. There's no reason for violence ever. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. There is. You can only push people so far before. You know, give me liberty or give me death

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And that's what it comes down to. And I think you know, on your favorite topic, I think we're seeing that happening in China where more people are starting to take that attitude that, you know what? I'm willing to die because the alternative is worse.

Ben:

dude, China, I, the economic issues they've had, what's going on? Now they are set up for potential revolution.

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

Either the communist party is gonna squash this and they'll win. And, you know, we will have business as usual, but

Gene:

Well, the Communist Party could simply make win depo the fall guy. Stay in power and then blame him for all these restrictions with Covid. And then just ease up on those cuz they're not really needed. That's pretty obvious. So, they could end up still staying in power and coming off like they're the saviors of the population and then make him the fall guy. So it all depends on how many friends he's got.

Ben:

yeah. So I think these protests are actually driven by some of the elements of the party that did not want G to get a third.

Gene:

Yeah. I'm pretty sure that driven by cia.

Ben:

I don't know. CIA had a lot of their assets burned in the last few years. I don't know how much of presence they have in China, effective in China, and I think you know, G'S got enemies inside his own house, so

Gene:

He does. But that is literally what we pay the CIA to do. I mean, this is their, their mission is to, is to cause

Ben:

fuck with foreign

Gene:

chaos in countries that we want to destabilize.

Ben:

Yeah. And if we can, if we can do that, avoid World War II with China over Type a Taiwan you know, great.

Gene:

Yeah. But I do well, and exactly, and that's the thing. It's like, I'm not, like, I, I think the FBI is a lot more of a fucked up organization than the cia. I think the CIA has a mission that a lot of people may disagree with, but I think they're actually pretty good at doing their mission.

Ben:

the problem I have with the CIA is they do not respect their charter and they engage in activities inside the us, which they should not engage.

Gene:

Yeah, to some extent. But I think, I, I think that that is a lot more politically driven by the administration than it is by the CIA itself. I mean, the FBI is absolutely a liberal run organization. I, I've spent a lot of time hanging out with those folks and I've gone through the the FBI civilian academy and all that crap. I, I used to shoot the, the FBI range all the time. There is a, a very different mentality between the FBI and some of the other three letter agencies and I don't particularly think that the fbi, FBI one has been. Appropriately limited in scope. And all of them are always trying to push out the limits, right? That's a natural occurrence. But but I think in the FBI there's a little too much self-righteousness

Ben:

yeah, I mean,

Gene:

and I, and it's visible. Like I, you know, there, there's

Ben:

look at Ingar.

Gene:

yeah. Yeah. Well, there's plenty of that there too.

Ben:

Mean a great example of, Hey, we're gonna partner with business, we're gonna share information. You can get infor bullshit. I'm gonna end up telling you more than you can tell me.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. yeah. Yeah. And you know, I, and I've done, like back when I was part of that, the whole security thing I've done training for business personnel and, and how to handle government interaction,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

To minimize your own potential. To get entrapped Yeah, exactly. And a lot of people, well, why wouldn't we just do that? And it's like, no, no, no, no,

Ben:

a lawyer present.

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, if you, if you are finding yourself in the position where you are fighting illegal activity, you do have a duty to report that activity. To the appropriate agencies, but there's a, a way to do that, to minimize the potential involvement in, in, you know, them looking at you as being somehow responsible for what's happening. Well, and what I'm referring to are things like, you're working in it, in the company and then you run across child pornography on somebody's computer while you're doing something routine. Like, how do you handle that situation?

Ben:

You hand it over to internal legal counsel and walk the fuck away.

Gene:

Well, that's not how a lot of companies do it, but it, it's,

Ben:

okay, so in in, in my experience as a dude named Ben, they, Ben, when you find shit that like that

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Heaven helped us there, there are lots of things that you end up coming across, especially if you're a help desk or, you know, when, when you're at that level, you end up in it more than the security or the big servers or anyone else. But you know, when you come across something like that, you, at least the way it's always worked in every company I've been part of, you capture evidence, set it aside, don't say anything to the employee and go to internal counsel, hand it off to them

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

it. Let them contact law enforcement, let them do it, and, yeah,

Gene:

Yeah. Well, somebody's gotta actually contact law enforcement though if it's not gonna be the

Ben:

well, I'm just saying, I'm saying the InfoSec group isn't the one to do it. It's, it's legal

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

just to protect the company.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So there's a lot of a lot of things that, you know, could be happening but it's important to know how to react to those events or those findings, those discoveries, if you will. And so with the fbi they, they do have a tendency to see a, I think, a somewhat overly grandiose vision of their charter and and act accordingly. So I, I do, I do think that the cia historically has been better at sticking to their charter than the fbi.

Ben:

I, I don't think the CA has done very well at that at all, nor the nsa. I think the five ICE program and things like that really show how little regard for US law these

Gene:

Well that, but that's an say, that's not ca

Ben:

Okay. Signals intelligence versus human intelligence. Okay.

Gene:

mm-hmm.

Ben:

I mean, realistically, that's what's supposed to be the difference, but yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. And, and there's a, the, the scary part with the whole five ice thing is that I think they've crossed the Rubicon and stuck to a more of a literal, rather than a

Ben:

In the spirit of

Gene:

Yeah. Translation of the requirements and effectively said, well, we're allowed to share information. We're not allowed to gather information about US citizens. And even that has a big asterisk about it, which is if you are within two different or two levels of contact of a foreign national than they are allowed to gather information about US citizens. But

Ben:

is pretty, I mean, pretty much everybody.

Gene:

it's a lot. It's like what, 80% of the population lives within 80 miles of the border or something? I don't remember what the phrase was, but Yeah. Okay. But they, what they've gone above and beyond is by then saying, well, look, if we're not allowed to do this, the UK has similar laws, so how about the US spies on British citizen? And the, the UK spies and American citizens, because then neither one of us is breaking any local laws, and we already have these information sharing agreements. So the spying part is the really easy part. So it's sort of like the, the NSA has all the, all the actual infrastructure to spy an American citizens, but skirts this concept of, well, we don't spy on, on Americans by outsourcing that the use of that infrastructure to a foreign power, like that's supposed to be better

Ben:

Well, it's just a way of getting around the law. And the whole point in this is that when you amass this sort of capabilities into an organization, it is going to be abused.

Gene:

absolutely. And, and again, I've said this many times, what it comes down to is human nature. The only way to ensure true adhesion to the law, adherence to the law, and and fairness, is to remove the human factor.

Ben:

I, well, I

Gene:

It all has to be run by an

Ben:

to line

Gene:

All has to be run by our official intelligence,

Ben:

well, but if it's a true ai it can lie. So

Gene:

but it'll lie in a good. that adheres to the law.

Ben:

so.

Gene:

I absolutely do not trust humans to make decisions. It is humans are pretty good at making decisions about themselves, although not great, just good, but they're progressively worse and worse about making decisions the further from them the involved party becomes.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

And that's just that it's not a good or bad thing, it's just reality. I don't think it's fixable. I think it's always been that case, and it's always will be that case that the, the more you stratify the the decision point of reference from the person making the decision, the the worst that decision making capacity becomes. And as we saw, even with the, going back to the Twitter thing, we saw the the quote literal quote from one of the Democrat lawmakers that, that was in there saying, well, the First Amendment isn't absolute.

Ben:

The fuck it's not.

Gene:

And their argument is always the same bullshit thing. Well, you're not allowed to say yell fire in the crowded theater.

Ben:

I am.

Gene:

Of course you are. Absolutely.

Ben:

shall pass. No law

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

I, I think that's pretty absolute, you

Gene:

Well, that's the part that they, I think, disagree with. It's like, well, what it means to say is Congress shall pass a law.

Ben:

yeah. Yeah. Congress shall pass. No law.

Gene:

the word no is the part that they have issues with of not really understanding the true meaning of

Ben:

So switching topics a little bit, but not really on the free speech front. Jordan Peterson came out with a hell of an episode talking about the lab leak theory

Gene:

I saw the I didn't watch the episode, but I saw it pop up in my recommended so did you watch it?

Ben:

I did, and I would highly recommend it to anyone listening to this podcast. The guest he has on the way they talk about it absolutely represents the lab leak as the definitive cause for covid, I mean, goes through everything. A lot of us already know, says it extremely publicly on an extremely public YouTube channel. And the fact that that episode hasn't been taken down shows that Google is a little bit scared.

Gene:

Yeah. As they should be,

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

have the French Revolution.

Ben:

yeah. Well, it, the, as far as I'm concerned, the, the idea that this was zoonotic is just asinine, but

Gene:

total bullshit. It is statistically, exceedingly unlikely. But all of that was obvious. And this is part of the reason I didn't watch that video when I saw it in the feed. I'm kind of burned out on this topic because everything that's been coming out, all it does is reaffirmed what I said two years ago. And I'm like, it just doesn't matter. I mean, like, I know I was right. Yeah, exactly.

Ben:

If you'd listened to me two years ago, we could've skipped this.

Gene:

and what is amazing to me is that two years ago, more people didn't think this was all bullshit the way that I thought,

Ben:

Well, people get scared. People, people behave irrationally around things they don't understand.

Gene:

blame the Hollywood absolute love affair with zombie movies. I think that if we had fewer zombie movies and fewer zombie video games, maybe people wouldn't be as scared of a virus coming out.

Ben:

Well, an Outbreak Outbreak was a great movie that definitely would scare people. There's, there have been many.

Gene:

Yeah. Oh, there's, there's tons of'em. I mean, the Oh, shit, what am I, I'm, I'm horrible today. I'm blanking on again, the movie with Mila uo the based on the video game.

Ben:

Oh yeah. Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. That was, that whole series was fun to watch. I mean, they're kind of stupid movies, but they're they do, they do have a great evil corporation of them. The, yeah. The Umbrella Corporation. Yeah. Yeah. What was the name of the damn movie though? I'm still can't remember.

Ben:

Oh

Gene:

yeah, exactly. But there's a lot of'em, and I think people have been kinda conditioned to think that, you know, some, some disease, it'll turn everybody into a zombie and, and you have to be super careful

Ben:

Evil.

Gene:

Oh yeah. Rather than evil. Exactly. Which first was a video game than a a movie?

Ben:

Yep. Good video games.

Gene:

yeah. And there's a way too many video games in the zombie genre. I mean, like, probably 10% of all video games are zombie related.

Ben:

They're fun to play though.

Gene:

Mm. I don't know. I just don't think zombies are a good antagonist character.

Ben:

Well, so one of my favorite things in college was to play shit, what is it? Not Modern Warfare

Gene:

Oh, hold on, hold on, hold on. I just saw a headline here. Trump calls for himself to be reinstated as president by falsely claiming fraud over rights constitution. Well, this is obviously coming from a, a liberal rag, but I haven't seen this yet. So maybe this is a breaking thing of Trump saying that he, he should be reinstated as president. Do you think he's got a shot?

Ben:

no,

Gene:

No,

Ben:

no, the Supreme Court doesn't have the balls. I mean, you would have to. Prove fraud at a massive scale. And even then, I mean, we had,

Gene:

but wouldn't they? But it would, in no instance would Trump become president, they would simply redo the election.

Ben:

we, we'd be in a constitutional crisis that we had never seen before. So who knows what would happen.

Gene:

Yeah. But is that a good enough reason to not do it?

Ben:

No, I'm not saying that at all. I, I, but I, you know, so regardless of what you think of birther theory or whatever, with Obama, the question should have been asked, it should have been followed up and a decision made not what we got. I absolutely think that the 2020 election is suspect and should be looked at and questions answered. I think to do anything else is to invite doubt, is to invite people not not believing in US elections anymore, which is not a place we want to go.

Gene:

I think that'd be the rational thing to do, is to not believe in US selections.

Ben:

I agree. And I'm just saying if the general public goes that way, that's how you get the French style revolution,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. Which is why I brought up for, because I, I'm really seeing that, that writing on the wall, man, I think that we're fast going from a attempt at a peaceful here's my, here's my view of that.

Ben:

JFK said it best. Those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. okay. The, the way that I kinda see it going down, if it goes down this way, is an increase in. Vigilantism happening on a regular basis. We've seen a lot of videos of people breaking in, stealing stuff, people getting assaulted with no consequences. I think we're gonna start seeing an increase in vigilantism happening, and we're gonna see an increase in people cheering positively for that vigilantism. And I think that when the opposition to that starts coming in, we're going to see actual events that the January 6th was accused of, but actual versions of that happening on a state by state basis to where we'll have a full occupation of state offices and the destruction potentially thereof by a mob a nameless mob that goes in trashes and torches a building and effectively makes it unusable for that part of the government to conduct whatever operations they're conducting. The government's already proven that they're willing to give up land quite easily. If we look at Portland and Seattle, Chaz areas where the government effectively didn't enforce laws and, and didn't bring in any people for weeks. Like these were occupied portions of the United States with no rule of US government.

Ben:

I e Austin

Gene:

Oh, yeah, yeah. Austin. Well, okay. To some extent. Austin is pretty bad. I'll give you that. But when we had That would be awesome. When we had a the George Floyd marches start to happen here, and this literally was in the first few weeks probably the first week. In fact, when a car got stopped by these protestors, the end result was the guy pulling out a gun and start shooting.

Ben:

Cause

Gene:

And that was, and that was the last time that anybody tried to stop a car in Texas. Well, I shouldn't say that. There was more incidents in Houston after that, but only in Houston. That was the only city that still saw people trying to stop cars.

Ben:

So Houston and Beaumont have just so totally changed after

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Massive difference. Massive difference. So yeah, after Katrina, there were a lot of refugees from New Orleans that ended up settling in Beaumont and Houston, and it definitely shifted the demographics and politics of both cities.

Gene:

Yeah, you were telling me about that. It's, it's interesting. I have never been to Beaumont and I've only been to Houston on business, so I really haven't seen too much of that, but

Ben:

Yeah. Well my, my dad's actually from Beaumont and you know, got a lot of family there and

Gene:

Oh, you still do?

Ben:

yeah, yeah. Anyway, it's just, it's Beaumont's never been a great city by any stretch. Do not get me wrong there. Beaumont and Viter are both not great cities.

Gene:

that don't know, Beaumont is a smaller town on the east side of Houston, closer to new to Louisiana.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. But anyway, it just, it changed things when I was I was in college when Katrina happened and I was in student government at the time, and I we had refugees come in to read Arena, which ist s basketball arena. And we set up an area for them. And the fights, the, I mean, we, we were a

Gene:

And then when you say refugees, you're talking about New Orleans residents?

Ben:

correct from the hurricane and you know, had things not been where Stute government and people were there policing what was going on, it would've gone super dumb dude. It was not good. And that, that's really,

Gene:

So let, let's switch gears a little bit here cuz one thing we didn't talk about is the, the continuing implosion of Europe. Now signing over a, a European, I don't even know what the hell it is. It's not a law, it's not an agreement. It's a European stance that they will put a price cap on imported Russian oil, which I think is hilarious because as the buyer you don't get to dictate the price.

Ben:

Well, and Russia said, anyone trying to do that they will not sell to.

Gene:

They will simply not sell. Exactly. And and yet this pretty obvious thought that most rational people should realize that, wait a minute, if you're the buyer, how are you talking about trying to put a cap on on sales? It's a reverse. OPEC is what they're trying to do. They're trying to say, all buyers will agree to not pay more than this amount. Here's the problem. The sellers can go not selling oil for months, if not years. The buyers will literally have their populations die without energy.

Ben:

yep.

Gene:

It's not symmetric. And when the you're, and you know, when you're saying that we we're gonna not buy oil for this amount, here's what happens. Russia stops selling you oil altogether. And the other OPEC plus members, which Russia's a part of, will raise the price of oil because they're seeing demand go down. And now you are in a position where you refuse to buy oil for 60 or 65, and as a result you have to buy it from Saudi Arabia for 85.

Ben:

Yeah. So you're assuming that the European nations leaders want their population to survive this winter?

Gene:

Well, maybe they don't. I mean, I, I don't know. It seems like, again, we're coming to a French Revolution moment in Europe because at some point the surfs in Europe are gonna start pushing back and saying the, the leadership, the royalty of Europe, the modern royalty of Europe, has no regard for European human life.

Ben:

Yeah. There's

Gene:

willing to sacrifice their own people to better the ultimate king of the West, which is Joe Biden.

Ben:

Yeah, there's there's a difference though, between Europe and the us.

Gene:

Well, they don't have guns in Europe.

Ben:

Exactly.

Gene:

Yeah, but you know what? It doesn't, this is where the French Revolution comes in. It's, it's they didn't really have guns either. It's a matter of being willing to die to try and change the course of current events. And this is also where if you don't die, if you manage to survive, you're gonna be brutal to the government

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

because they were trying

Ben:

you see as a a, as your oppressors.

Gene:

When someone's trying to kill you, brutality as retribution becomes the norm.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

So I, I think they wanted a great reset. They're getting a great reset at this point, whether they want it or not.

Ben:

I don't know, man, I, I could, you know, this is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but with a whimper. I can

Gene:

That sounds poetic, but that's bullshit. The reality is

Ben:

I hope you're right.

Gene:

the, the, the internal drive for self-preservation, again, this is not a rational thing. This is a evolutionarily developed trait that we all have. And that will kick in as more people freeze to death, which they will, because Europe couldn't even try to do more to kill its citizens than it's doing right now.

Ben:

Well,

Gene:

we're gonna start seeing those numbers going up as the weather gets colder

Ben:

yeah. So what this comes down to is Europe has not produced enough of its old energy to be self-sustaining for

Gene:

anything. It hasn't produced enough of its own food. It's it doesn't have its own energy. It doesn't have any raw materials. Everything in Europe is imported.

Ben:

It, but they're not, they're not

Gene:

Well, how much lithium is Europe producing

Ben:

zero.

Gene:

Uhhuh? And yet they wanna move to all extra cars.

Ben:

But my point is they have enough coal in the ground in Germany. They have enough latenight and I mean low order coal that they could power their economy for a very long time. They are making the conscious choice not to do that.

Gene:

Well, hopefully the the next government of Germany will figure these things out. Is the current government sure as hell isn't?

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

And instead, instead they're sending flack pansers to Ukraine,

Ben:

They're sending what?

Gene:

fla, pansers,

Ben:

I don't know what that is.

Gene:

anti-air Batteries.

Ben:

well, yeah.

Gene:

So they're, they all seem to have this concept that whatever costs are incurred by the countries in deaths of its population are well worth looking good to the United States, the true master of Europe. Cause there, there, there's no other reason to be doing this other than to show the United States that, that you're a a good subservient, helpful country.

Ben:

Well, It'll be

Gene:

Ukraine will never do anything for Germany. Even. Let's pretend, let's take this absurd scenario where Ukraine somehow defeats Russia.

Ben:

Uhhuh.

Gene:

What is Ukraine going to do for Germany in the aftermath? Nothing.

Ben:

Yeah. I don't think anyone's arguing that they would.

Gene:

No. So Germany is trashing its economy and absolutely Germans will die this winter. Why? Because it wants to look like a good little subservient child to the United States.

Ben:

Well, you know, we'll see. There is the potential that US exports of l and g to sort of save the day there.

Gene:

There. There's not enough. There's not enough ships there to be able to deliver the volume of LNG that they need. You know, I think everybody's one big hope is Norway. Somehow Norway's gonna supply all the fuel for all of Europe.

Ben:

well there's the Turk Stream as well.

Gene:

Yeah. But that's polluted by Russians.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, I mean, if Turkey joins bricks with the, which they're set to do is going to be a very interesting thing because if they try the Bricks Alliance and their nato yeah.

Gene:

Well, and yeah, exactly. it is pretty funny. Turkey, I have to say Ergon is playing this extremely well. If this is a poker game, he is winning his hands.

Ben:

Yeah, it herto one is an evil dude, dude. I mean, there,

Gene:

Yeah. And who isn't? I mean, every, every leader is evil, dude.

Ben:

No, I mean, to an extreme. I, you know, I, I, I've talked about my buddy that passed away. So,

Gene:

Yeah. How's it different from Hillary?

Ben:

it's not,

Gene:

Okay.

Ben:

that doesn't mean they're not evil.

Gene:

No. And I, and did I see they're not evil. I said every every country's leaders are evil.

Ben:

Yeah. To an extent. Sure. I think there have been noble ones in the past. I don't think every leader in history has been as meia as some of the examples we've just given.

Gene:

Yeah, sure, sure. But again, er Gogan is extremely popular in Turkey because his actions put Turkey first.

Ben:

Well, and he's killed Ed suppressed a lot of the, the

Gene:

US back factions. I know. Yep.

Ben:

not just us back fashions, but the actual Turks. So Erdogan's popularity is with the rural areas of Turkey, these non secular, the religious areas of Turkey. He's backed by the Muslim Brotherhood. He's had a falling out with Fat Goland at the GOs. Which by the way, don't ever send your kids to Harmony Science Academy or any of the other Goed schools. Yeah. So there's a whole, whole thing there.

Gene:

Yeah. But I do think that the the quality of someone is always in the eye of the beholder. And I think for a lot of people in Turkey, they're happy with what he's doing.

Ben:

And a lot of people aren't you know, the, the Turks that want a secular nation, that want a non-religious government that want to be part of the rest of the world or not happy with him,

Gene:

Yeah. Well, that people like that in every place in the, in the world right now are losing it's a, it's the same liberals here in the us. It's a globalist. It's a, he's anti globalist

Ben:

which is not a bad thing. I'm, I'm, I'm an anti globalist, but I, I don't like, I don't like Erwan. I don't believe in the way he's going about it. So,

Gene:

Well, that's, sure. No, I get it. Plus he killed your buddy's family. But but also I think that you have to look at these people from the context of of what are they doing for their country. And there have certainly been plenty of leaders over the history of humanity that have done horrible things to their countries. But I don't think Iran is part of that mold. I think that, at least for now, his goals align with the goals of the.

Ben:

Yeah, it, okay. So I'm good with nationalism, I'm good with all of that. I would love to see a world where we are not global Exchange is not at the rate that it is. It's reduced by three quarters or half. That would be a good world. I don't know how we get there from here without drastic, drastic changes that,

Gene:

You mean a French Revolution?

Ben:

yeah. Jesus Christ. That should be the name of the episode and

Gene:

I think it has to be at this point it's the French Revolution. Yeah,

Ben:

Well, I, I mean, so in Europe you're going to have some crises this winter. Some estimates are showing that over half of businesses will go outta business in the

Gene:

Yep, yep.

Ben:

How does an economy survive that?

Gene:

Yeah. Well, UK is probably the best example of how an economy survives that because they did it after World War ii.

Ben:

With the Marshall Pull?

Gene:

Yeah. Well, they're all assuming that's gonna happen. All these countries in Europe are bending over backwards and looping up their assholes for the United States to fuck'em, because that's what they're counting on is the Marshall.

Ben:

and maybe that's how we saved the US economy, but Jesus,

Gene:

I don't know how that saves the US economy, because we're gonna print money that's worthless to give to countries to spend back with us that aren't producing anything themselves.

Ben:

but it drives our production

Gene:

It, it does, but our money's worthless.

Ben:

Well, I mean, no, no, no. So if you look at the Marshall Plan and the consequences in the 1950s, inflation was pretty high. But you also had the 1950s economy that led to the white picket fence, the American dreams style life.

Gene:

Oh, yeah, yeah. No,

Ben:

I'm not saying inflation's gonna be low. I'm not saying that at all. I'm just saying that there will be jobs in the us, there will be products produced, and there will be a market for those products.

Gene:

mm-hmm. Yeah, I, I don't know. I guess it's it, it, it seems to me like we're just shuffling the decks in the Titanic right now. The chairs, decks, we're shuffling the chairs on the decks of the Titanic.

Ben:

So we're, where do you see this ending gene?

Gene:

Where I see this ending is

Ben:

How black pill are we gonna go

Gene:

oh, I'm pretty black filled, you know,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

I think the, the great reset is absolutely coming.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

think we're probably gonna lose somewhere in the neighborhood of well, it'll be over, over a million for sure in Europe.

Ben:

High?

Gene:

yeah. Yeah. And it's not all gonna be from starvation. I think there'll be, I'm including in that million plus number the deaths as a result of the French revolutions that are gonna happen.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

I think Europe's done. That's it. We we're living literally in the last breath of Europe.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

It, it is going to be a free for all. I think some of the smaller, you know, maybe East European countries like Hungary and Romania are gonna carve out much bigger, better end result out of this because they're more able to survive this than countries like Germany and even France. Not because they have more energy, but because their people are more beaten down and will be able to withstand what's happening.

Ben:

well, they're former members of the ussr, so they, they know rough times.

Gene:

yeah. Yeah. I don't think people in Germany at this stage, they're too far removed from World War II and the rough times in Germany really were only on the eastern side. The western side was not that bad. So they're in for a huge shock.

Ben:

Dresden would disagree.

Gene:

Dresden doesn't have anybody alive that would disagree. So it's inconsequential. And that's what I mean by like, Dresden is a perfect example of the, the reaction of going all out towards total annihilation.

Ben:

Dresden is where I say I don't know the truth about World War ii.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. And did you ever dig into the research or any, or maybe our, our mutual buddy that's more of a historian, dig into any research as to how those decisions were made on the US side? That's what I'd be curious

Ben:

have long ago, but it was I forget which general was in charge of the bombing campaign, but it was made at that level. And you know, what happened to Dresden was essentially we went and fire bombed a, not on an I mountain, but how, I don't know how to say this. A target

Gene:

Largely civilian center. Yeah.

Ben:

that had really no military manufacturing or strategic value. We fire bombed it. We waited six hours till all the first responders were in trying to save people, and then we fire bombed it again.

Gene:

Yeah. Which I would say is the absolutely correct way to.

Ben:

Sure.

Gene:

If you wanna maximize, if you wanna, it has nothing to do with, it's a war is about winning. It's not about losing. So if you want to maximize the casualties, this is exactly what you need to do. You need to set the traps. And then as people come to rescue, there's no such thing. I keep repeating this. In war there are no civilians. There are simply enemies and allies.

Ben:

okay.

Gene:

It the, the concept that there are rules to war is made by countries that will lose the next one. War has no rules other than winning and losing.

Ben:

Yeah, I, I, I think that I think that being civil and not engaging civilian top,

Gene:

Why do you think the British lost to the Americans?

Ben:

why do you think they did?

Gene:

Because the Americans didn't fight under the British rules of warfare.

Ben:

How so?

Gene:

We didn't stand in lines with our muskets Squiring off against the British. No, absolutely we did not. Then maybe you need to do a little more reading, buddy, because we were shooting from the woods. We, we were.

Ben:

the, the difference maker, the US Revolution was that we were using rifles. That they were using muskets. That was the big differentiator. But the regulars, now the militia absolutely did exactly what you said.

Gene:

Without the militia, there would be no American

Ben:

100%. But the regular mil military under Washington and so on did not, they absolutely fought a British style campaign, which is why

Gene:

the war.

Ben:

at what? It's, why early on we got the early on in the American Revolution, we were getting our shit kicked in, right? And it took that change. But to say, we didn't fight that way, you get where I'm coming

Gene:

We didn't win that way. Maybe that's more accurate to

Ben:

you go.

Gene:

And that's, that's I think, been the case historically, is that if you approach war as a them or US life and death scenario, it becomes a lot cleaner and you do things that you need to do

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

rather than trying to stick to some agreed upon formulas.

Ben:

Well look at look at Vietnam. You know, the vie

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

us for all your worth based off of guerrilla warfare.

Gene:

Yep. And that was the same thing in Afghanistan. The the mujahadeen, you know, they're, they were not using warfare tactics. They were using terrorist tactics. And supplied with arms by the us, which is historically what the US does.

Ben:

know, one, one person's terrorist is another person's freedom fighter.

Gene:

Well, no. Do you know what the difference between terrorism and, and just the war actions is the terrorism is meant to scare the populace. It's meant to create more of a, a fear than normal

Ben:

so go back. Tore. Done.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly. That was absolutely a terror section.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

That's the net result. And I, I was gonna say this, I guess I didn't get around to it. Dresden's no different than the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It was meant to create an impression of we can do this. Do you want to continue?

Ben:

Yep. And for those who are interested, slaughterhouse number five is a Kurt Vette novel that talks about the fire bumping of Dresden.

Gene:

Yeah. And it's, it's pretty, it's been many years. I think I read it in college since I read it, but

Ben:

a big Kurt Vette fan, but that's a good one.

Gene:

I do. I I don't dislike him all that much. I think what was the other big book by him?

Ben:

Saturn something.

Gene:

I'm trying to remember. Kat's Cradle,

Ben:

Sure.

Gene:

I think.

Ben:

He also has Harrison de Bergeron is a

Gene:

Yeah, that was, that was a great short story. Very apt.

Ben:

Yes, absolutely. Also regardless of what you think of David Irving his book on Dresden, the fire bombing of Dresden is very good, very well researched,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

but you know, he's a Holocaust and I, at all.

Gene:

Right. But I just, I don't think that there's, I mean, you can call out fire bombing of dressed as being unnecessary and, and I don't know, cruel bad, whatever you wanna call it. But I would say that that is just good warfare.

Ben:

Fair enough. Whatever I'm just saying. Put the US and allies on a pedestal saying that we are always the good guy, cuz we're not.

Gene:

We're rarely the good

Ben:

and there there is no

Gene:

been victorious more often,

Ben:

Yeah, sure.

Gene:

And the victors gets the right history.

Ben:

exactly.

Gene:

And, and as we've said numerous times, part of our, our benefit here is the isolation of the oceans, or through the oceans, I

Ben:

Yeah. Our geographic isolation is well, and the Monroe Doctrine and basically controlling two continents,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

you know, whether it's direct political control or not. The, the fact of the matter is the US is in under control of North and South America.

Gene:

I thought you meant North American, Europe. I don't know that we have South America these days.

Ben:

Okay. I I mean China is definitely making inroads,

Gene:

Huge, huge, huge inroads.

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

Yeah, for sure. Although it sounds like we have a deal with Venezuela now.

Ben:

yeah, yeah. Chevron is going in and that's actually gonna be huge for the US oil markets and the global oil markets

Gene:

I think it'll be really good for them too, because it's probably a countdown timer of about seven years until nationalization happens and they get all that shit for free.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

All the investments that Chevron's gonna do is they're gonna be

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

of the government ownership.

Ben:

yeah. But Chevron gets to make some money off of that, the interim, and it's gonna

Gene:

Oh, of course. Of

Ben:

You know, Venezuela and Argentina used to be in the 1950s, very wealthy, very modern nations,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. And they had

Ben:

is what communism brings. Briggs,

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. But they had oligarchs. I mean, they definitely were not rich countries. They were countries that had rich people.

Ben:

Argentina was absolutely a rich country. It was one of the

Gene:

The average, the average income of an Argentinian was not all that high. It's just that they had more rich people there.

Ben:

I, if you look at pictures of Argentina and Cuba pre communism, it is drastically different. It looks like 1950s us.

Gene:

Oh, absolutely. That's, and this is one of the things that happens is that millionaires like to build things in the style that they admire. This has always been the case. This is, this is when rich people copy the architecture and the styles of far off places that they think looks nice. And you could say, well, everybody benefits from that because now the cities look nice,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

this is not the average. Argentinian making things look nice. These are oligarchs that do that.

Ben:

Fair enough. But anyway, I think Argentina and Venezuela was better off Precum than Post,

Gene:

Oh, I would totally agree with that. I think communism tends to concentrate wealth in the least desirable portion of the population. The the politicians and the crooks. But also,

Ben:

difference.

Gene:

well, sometimes, but there, there is a, maybe not that often though but I think right now, and I think the US is a good example of this is. When you, you have an environment that allows monopolies, you create oligarchs, and those oligarchs are the ones that get to determine the path of the country. And people like Bezos and bill Gates have been absolutely determining the path of this country. And Elon Musk, who used to be on the exact same side as those guys now

Ben:

He still is.

Gene:

acting a little differently. And he's now able to affect the course of this country as well. Yeah, you could probably make the argument that not much has changed with Musk and he still considered himself a liberal. But in the range of liberals, he seems to be doing the least harm

Ben:

Yeah, but at the same time, he's called himself a free speech app Absolutist, yet has banned Kanye.

Gene:

he's not a free speech. Absolute. So, and, and he's revised that statement and I've actually tweeted him about it as well. Not that my tweets would ever get read, but but essentially he said that he's focusing on the middle 80%, and he doesn't care about removing the extreme 20%, which is 10 from either side.

Ben:

Yeah. Well,

Gene:

That's not tism.

Ben:

see. Okay. I'm just saying what he had said himself.

Gene:

I know, that's why I'm, I'm agreeing with you, God damnit. I'm trying to say that he has revised his position and pushed off of that initial, I'm an absolutist because I think he has now been shown that no, you're not dude with Alex Jones and a few other people that he's not willing to have on, like Kanye certainly, and quite a few people that are more of the libertarian mindset have spoken out about that on Twitter and said, you know, even if he's saying completely retarded stuff, you shouldn't ban him.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

And I agree with that. I don't think Kanye should be banned. I think having crazy people still be willing to say

Ben:

'em show how crazy they are.

Gene:

Exactly. Because the, that's much better than having some cabal of rich people determining what people are allowed to say.

Ben:

Well, and suppressing it in such a way that people go, well, why are you putting him down? You know, let him show his own ass. That's the way to do it just like we do here.

Gene:

And I, I think the counter-argument is usually, well, we don't want crazy people selling their ideas to people that aren't well informed and having them start following, it's the, it's the anti cult argument is, We don't want a charismatic, rich person, or not even rich, but just a charismatic person enticing the average dumb American to follow them.

Ben:

Get over it. I mean, that's what happens anyway, so it's just different cabal.

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, look at guys like David Kresh.

Ben:

What about David Crash?

Gene:

what they would say. This is what happens when the government doesn't intervene, when the government doesn't prevent radical, uh uh, crazy people from spouting their ideas is you end up with a following of people that are willing to shoot at government forces.

Ben:

Oh, they got

Gene:

presenting their side here. I'm not, I'm not agreeing with it. I'm just presenting their argument as to why there needs to be control of speech. Because if you don't control speech, you end up with radicals, and if you have radicals, they're gonna radicalize a portion of the population. If that happens, then they're not gonna reelect you.

Ben:

so I had a conversation with someone fairly close to me about Ruby Ridge actually, and outlining the what happened, and the response I got was, oh no, that couldn't have been what happened. That, that certainly that's not what happened.

Gene:

and what evidence they have.

Ben:

they just utter disbelief that the government would do such a thing.

Gene:

The governor's made up of people, and I've said this how many times that if the police mentality is just one smidge away from a criminal?

Ben:

so I, I have some pretty deep ties to Ruby Ridge Jack Mcle. Who was there with Bo Rights who talked Randy Weaver off the mountain? Jack McCann was my first employer. Bo Rights was a neighbor of mine at one point in time. You know, I've met Randy Weaver. I think I know the story now. Granted, I know their side of it, but having read police reports, having gone through the evidence, watched many documentaries on it, I've seen the other side too. And you know, when Randy Weaver won a wrongful death case for his wife and for his son against the federal government, I think that says everything

Gene:

Yeah. Here's my question. Why do all these guys end up getting entrapped by creating sought off shotguns? Well, why would you ever do that?

Ben:

I, I mean, because there's no logical reason why a sought shotgun should be illegal.

Gene:

Hm, well fine that you can have that opinion, but why would you ever do that for somebody else? Why don't you just tell a guy, here's a saw, go make your own saw off, shotgun

Ben:

I don't

Gene:

It just that I don't understand that mentality. If somebody comes to, Hey, can, can you get something that's illegal for me? Cuz my natural instinct

Ben:

something illegal

Gene:

do, do get whatever. I mean, if you don't, yeah, but either way, my, maybe I'm too black pilled.

Ben:

than, you know,

Gene:

I'm like, no, I'm not gonna do that for you. I think you should do it yourself. You should have the right to do it. But you know, I'll watch you do it, but I'm not gonna do it for you or get it for you.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

it just seems like you're

Ben:

But entrap it works.

Gene:

but it shouldn't, like, people ought to have enough brains to not getting trapped. And this is the, the other statement that I make, you know, one of which is that the police mentality is just a smidge away from criminals. It's basically the same mindset. It's just a very slight variance in in where they end up going after their brain matures a little bit. But it's a, it's the same exact same people like they're. You could swap'em out very easily. And that's why we have a lot of police corruption out as well. But the other one that's in that same vein is that everything you know about criminals is based on poor performing criminals, the ones that get caught. And so people's concept of what a criminal enterprise is is essentially based on a failed criminal enterprise. And even those are pretty damn impressive sometimes. Like you look at the Mexican cartels,

Ben:

Have you have you watched Tulsa King.

Gene:

no, what is that?

Ben:

It's a new series out

Gene:

Oh, on what

Ben:

that goes to Tulsa,

Gene:

On what channel?

Ben:

Paramount Plus.

Gene:

Okay. I might even have that cuz I was watching Star Trek. I hate, I hate having to have all these separate subscriptions for all these stupid channels. The good news is, I guess I can start and stop'em anytime I want, so that's good.

Ben:

and you can do them a lot, a lot of them through Amazon Prime, by the way. Which makes it really easy.

Gene:

Yeah, but not, that's not the cheapest way to do it though, that they found.

Ben:

No it's not because, but it, it, it's a convenience thing cuz you have one thing to log

Gene:

it, it is, but like with, with the Paramount prime is if you do it directly through, You pay'em three bucks more and they add on Showtime through Amazon. You gotta get those two separately. And Showtime is like nine bucks.

Ben:

Yeah. But who cares about Showtime?

Gene:

There's stuff on Showtime I watch,

Ben:

Like what?

Gene:

I'd have to look it up. But I know there's been, I I've, every time I've gotten rid of it, I end up getting it back again a few months later. Cuz there's something that I wanna watch that's

Ben:

Did you ever watch Outlander?

Gene:

No.

Ben:

I think you'd like that show. Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

back to Jackman, Scotland.

Gene:

oh, that would be fun. Yes. Is that, is that kinda in the their show be only one kind of paradigm or what's the general

Ben:

No. It, it's, a woman gets thrown back in time and ends up meeting this Scottish Rogue who's very much in the Jackman trait and, you know, fighting against the king and so on.

Gene:

He did rape her.

Ben:

Huh?

Gene:

Did he rape her?

Ben:

Oh. Ironically enough, he gets raped in one of the seasons.

Gene:

Well, that's clearly a modern interpretation.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, no, you, you'll, you'll see what I'm saying. It's, it's a good show. It's a

Gene:

You know, the entire country of Australia was populated by women who got raped.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

It's true statement.

Ben:

Why?

Gene:

Well, because it was all press suits and criminals sent to Australia and you know, not much changed when they got there.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah, I've heard the stories.

Ben:

Have you ever watched the last gig?

Gene:

Yes. Yes. That I, years ago,

Ben:

the books are way better than the show, but yeah.

Gene:

Hmm. Hmm. Why do you bring it up?

Ben:

I dunno. Just good shows.

Gene:

Stuff I haven't watched,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

I still haven't finished watching that Star Trek one.

Ben:

Brave New World.

Gene:

Yeah. I still haven't finished. I've got a couple episodes left. It is, I agree. I think they did a pretty good job with it. I like the the plots that they've had so far. The they do a very good job of getting closer to the original trek,

Ben:

Absolutely.

Gene:

I think.

Ben:

Pike is not Kirk, but he's in the sa You, you would say that the way they're portraying Pike is a contemporary of Kirk.

Gene:

Yes. And, and I more so than that, I would even say that watching Pike from the perspective of a young Kirk, I could totally see how Kirk ends up making the decisions he made.

Ben:

Yes. Agreed.

Gene:

Cause he, he sees Pike as that sort of prototype of what a good captain is.

Ben:

Absolutely. And the way they have, number one the way Spock is, I mean, it's, it's just a good series

Gene:

The only character that seems really outta place there is the the lesbian chick.

Ben:

Yeah. That, that, that, that is a forced

Gene:

it is like if she wasn't a lesbian and she was just sort of a, you know, a chick

Ben:

Well, she could be a lesbian, just not a dyke.

Gene:

not a dyke. Right, right. But, but she doesn't need to be a lesbian. My point is that role, the lines for that role are written so that it could literally be a normal check. So I don't have any problem with the dialogue coming from her and the

Ben:

No, it's just the representation and

Gene:

just, yeah, it's the absolutely. Like you're, you're placing a, a blue-haired zoomer into a environment where they're being totally as though they're normal in a corporate setting.

Ben:

yep.

Gene:

And it's like, well, no, the words coming out of this person are fine, but the image that you're trying to portray them being is just false. It's not correct.

Ben:

Well, and the character, it's itself is, you know, like you said, good. It, they, they, the, the, the roles of the plot and the, not to get too spoiled early, but it, it's a good character, but it's just in your face, you know? Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly.

Ben:

I like the doctor story art too. The way they continued that through multiple episodes. That was a good one.

Gene:

I am not a huge fan of that storyline. It seems super simplistic. My

Ben:

You haven't finished,

Gene:

gonna do whatever I can to, okay. I haven't finished the season. But nonetheless, the idea of my daughter's dying and one of my, you know, I'm gonna do everything I can save her is like, okay, boring, whatever.

Ben:

Yeah. Well wait till you see how it ends. It's very, very ts.

Gene:

Okay. I do really like the nerve strick though. I'm a

Ben:

Oh, absolutely. Which, you know,

Gene:

Both, both appearance and and the attitude.

Ben:

Oh yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. And they, they

Ben:

around and find out attitude.

Gene:

yeah, definitely

Ben:

Literally.

Gene:

their, their deviation from the original track though is there's a lot more sexual innuendos.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

Like Spock is just fucking nonstop.

Ben:

To his wife.

Gene:

you know, his wife, but also flirting with the nurse trick, big time.

Ben:

Well, the nurse chick flirting with him.

Gene:

well, the nurse chick flirting with everybody. Every, you know, if they have a pulse, she's flirting with them. But they have a perfect fucking uniform for her too. I'm like, damn, that's just perfect that

Ben:

So if you wanna see jean's type, there you go.

Gene:

Oh yeah, no, she, I would fucking do her

Ben:

She's very slovic. Yeah.

Gene:

She's Slavic. I dunno about that. It's definitely fuckable though. Yeah, she's cute. She's got a little bunch, you know, her ass is a little big, but that aside, she's very cute. What else? Star Trek. So I was watching that. I'm trying to think of what else I've been watching. You know, mostly YouTube lately, honestly, it's maybe sad, but I, I've been watching a lot more reality TV with Tim Pool and other guys in YouTube than I have fiction.

Ben:

Oh yeah. Me, me too. I, I, I don't take a lot of time for fiction. Over Thanksgiving, I got introduced to Tulsa King by my cousin's husband, but yeah. Yeah. Jess Bush is who plays nurse chapel, by the way.

Gene:

Has she been anything else? I haven't looked her up.

Ben:

Halifax playing for keeps, not really a

Gene:

I see what you mean by Slavic features.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

She has cheekbones. Uhhuh

Ben:

that's the distinguishing characteristic.

Gene:

for sure.

Ben:

I bet. She's definitely cute. The show.

Gene:

Yeah, she, she definitely looks cute and I like, again, the uniform I think is fucking perfect. They did a great job with that uniform. Like more medical personnel ought to have that uniform, in my opinion.

Ben:

Gene's fantasy world,

Gene:

Yes. And you're just living in it. Mm-hmm.

Ben:

What can I say? I don't think there's anything left to cover. I mean, we even talked about Star Trek for Christ's sake. People are like, ah, God, dirt.

Gene:

So let's just wrap this one up.

Ben:

Later. Bed.

French Revolution
Nurse Chapel