Just Two Good Old Boys

036 Just Two Good Old Boys

August 06, 2023 Gene Naftulyev Season 2023 Episode 36
036 Just Two Good Old Boys
Just Two Good Old Boys
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Just Two Good Old Boys
036 Just Two Good Old Boys
Aug 06, 2023 Season 2023 Episode 36
Gene Naftulyev

Link for video on Subs mentioned in video https://youtu.be/Ulk4hw7pUZY

  • Ben and Gene discussed the auction process and the potential for buying a gun. They also talked about the state of Illinois challenging the regulation of suppressors, highlighting the confusion and contradictions in gun control laws. - PLAY @0:03
  • Gene and Ben discussed the possibility of obtaining suppressors in Texas without the need for a tax stamp. They explored the idea of someone without firearms purchasing a suppressor made in Texas, potentially challenging the existing laws and regulations. - PLAY @6:15
  • Ben and Gene discussed their frustrations with the NFA and the need for stronger pushback against it. They also mentioned the importance of clarity and the practice of jury nullification in challenging and overturning unjust laws. - PLAY @12:49
  • Gene and Ben discussed various topics including the potential violation of constitutional rights due to selective enforcement of laws, the need for registration of certain items, the controversy surrounding religious exemptions for vaccines in schools, and their shared belief that the state education system should be controlled by local parents rather than the government. - PLAY @18:46
  • Gene and Ben discussed various topics including the idea of neighborhood-controlled schools, the Connecticut ruling, the traffic situation in Austin and San Antonio, and their experiences with toll roads. They also mentioned the possibility of building a new interstate, but had differing opinions on the presence of cops on tollways. - PLAY @24:31
  • Gene and Ben discussed their past experiences working on a battery storage project and connected with someone who was an electrician on the same project. They also talked about the classification of Pluto as a planet and discussed a game set in the future that is based on a one-to-one model of the Milky Way Galaxy. - PLAY @30:50
  • Gene and Ben discussed their recent interests and hobbies, including playing a space game, exploring radios, and considering getting into ham radio. They also mentioned the popularity and affordability of the Baofeng UV-5R radio. - PLAY @37:43
  • Ben and Gene discussed various communication devices, including radios and satellite phones. They talked about the pros and cons of each option, with Gene preferring satellite phones for their speed and convenience, while Ben mentioned the affordability of radios like the Balfang. - PLAY @43:45
  • Ben and Gene discussed the Ukrainian conflict and the potential blame on Joe Biden if Russia were to use nuclear artillery. They also expressed frustration with the Zelensky government and the Warhawks

Support the Show.

Read Ben's blog and see product links at namedben.com
Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
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or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
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Just Two Good Old Boys
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Show Notes Transcript

Link for video on Subs mentioned in video https://youtu.be/Ulk4hw7pUZY

  • Ben and Gene discussed the auction process and the potential for buying a gun. They also talked about the state of Illinois challenging the regulation of suppressors, highlighting the confusion and contradictions in gun control laws. - PLAY @0:03
  • Gene and Ben discussed the possibility of obtaining suppressors in Texas without the need for a tax stamp. They explored the idea of someone without firearms purchasing a suppressor made in Texas, potentially challenging the existing laws and regulations. - PLAY @6:15
  • Ben and Gene discussed their frustrations with the NFA and the need for stronger pushback against it. They also mentioned the importance of clarity and the practice of jury nullification in challenging and overturning unjust laws. - PLAY @12:49
  • Gene and Ben discussed various topics including the potential violation of constitutional rights due to selective enforcement of laws, the need for registration of certain items, the controversy surrounding religious exemptions for vaccines in schools, and their shared belief that the state education system should be controlled by local parents rather than the government. - PLAY @18:46
  • Gene and Ben discussed various topics including the idea of neighborhood-controlled schools, the Connecticut ruling, the traffic situation in Austin and San Antonio, and their experiences with toll roads. They also mentioned the possibility of building a new interstate, but had differing opinions on the presence of cops on tollways. - PLAY @24:31
  • Gene and Ben discussed their past experiences working on a battery storage project and connected with someone who was an electrician on the same project. They also talked about the classification of Pluto as a planet and discussed a game set in the future that is based on a one-to-one model of the Milky Way Galaxy. - PLAY @30:50
  • Gene and Ben discussed their recent interests and hobbies, including playing a space game, exploring radios, and considering getting into ham radio. They also mentioned the popularity and affordability of the Baofeng UV-5R radio. - PLAY @37:43
  • Ben and Gene discussed various communication devices, including radios and satellite phones. They talked about the pros and cons of each option, with Gene preferring satellite phones for their speed and convenience, while Ben mentioned the affordability of radios like the Balfang. - PLAY @43:45
  • Ben and Gene discussed the Ukrainian conflict and the potential blame on Joe Biden if Russia were to use nuclear artillery. They also expressed frustration with the Zelensky government and the Warhawks

Support the Show.

Read Ben's blog and see product links at namedben.com
Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
Email: gene@sirgene.com Or dude@namedben.com
or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
Can't donate? sub to Gene's GAMING youtube channel (even if you never watch!) Sub Here
Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Get EMP protection for your car using our code sirgene

Gene:

Hey, Ben. How are you today? Hey,

Ben:

Gene. I'm doing well. He sounds bright. Eh, I'm good. You know, I never thought I'd say it, but, uh, you just sent me a video that I'd actually seen some of the updates on, uh, already. And I never thought I'd say the state of Illinois is actually doing us a favor when it comes to

Gene:

gun control. They are. Absolutely. Explain

Ben:

how. Well, so their, uh, their silencer or suppressor ban, uh, they are going before the court and arguing that suppressors are not arms and thus not subject to Bruin, not subject to Heller and that they can regulate them however they see fit. Well, if they're not arms, then they are not covered by the NFA, any other weapon

Gene:

has no purview over them. Yeah,

Ben:

exactly. So, you know, the left hand of the government, not knowing what the right hand's doing and shooting themselves in the foot. Yeah, exactly. Which, you know, to me, I hate to say it, but I really kind of hope that the, uh, that Illinois, so I, I'm, I'm kind of of 2 minds. I, I really think that. Okay. Firearm and firearm accessories, um, especially something that modifies like the report of a gun, um, is part of the gun, right? It's. That's like saying the barrel is not part of the gun, right? And it makes no sense, which we do, by the way, right? A lower receiver doesn't even have a chamber on it, um, on an AR. And then even some of the other guns, depending on the manufacturer.

Gene:

I've never looked into it, but whose idea was it to make the lower rather than the upper, the serialized part? Uh,

Ben:

it's where the fire control group is on the AR platform. Yeah.

Gene:

But I would think that the upper should be, it makes more sense to me if that was a control

Ben:

part. Yeah, except that the early portion, you know, the early versions of the M16 were fully automatic. And when they went to that fully auto, being able to control that means you have to control the lower. So if the upper serialized and the lower is not, how do you control what's a full auto AR

Gene:

and what's not? Well, first of all, serial numbers don't control jack shit.

Ben:

Legally tracking on manufactured date and so on. So if a lower receiver is manufactured today and it's not serialized, how do I prove when it was,

Gene:

you And how do you prove that it was, if it's serialized?

Ben:

Uh, the serial number should tell you.

Gene:

And what makes you think that there isn't a whole bunch of firearms with the same serial number?

Ben:

Uh, well, then that manufacturer is going to be in a lot of trouble with the ATF.

Gene:

Well, they may be, but my point is, it's, it's just all,

Ben:

Yes, I understand. It's the

Gene:

gun free zone sign. It's the same thing as a gun free zone sign. Yes. It's like, oh, well, the criminals had better behave and not bring any guns here because we have a sign up.

Ben:

And we know how effective those are. Mm hmm.

Gene:

Exactly. More crimes committed in gun free zones than any other. It's a shocker.

Ben:

I'm shocked. Shocked. To find gambling going on here.

Gene:

Exactly. You know what movie that's from? Casablanca. Yeah. Good.

Ben:

Good. I've actually seen it. Thank you. A lot of people your age have not. Okay. Just saying. I think we've established I'm not your average millennial.

Gene:

I know. I know. I know. But it's still fun poking you with that stick. Oh, not really.

Ben:

The millennial stick. Dude, I, I'm in that elder millennial category where we're part Gen X, part millennial, and just kind of this weird in between. We really should be our own generation. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Cause we don't fit with either of you to

Gene:

anyway, I seem to keep playing video games with guys that have, uh, security clearance or, or actively working for the government. It's hilarious.

Ben:

Uh, okay. I don't know what it is, but you're being introduced to your handlers. Yeah. If,

Gene:

if only, no, it's probably the other way around. Oh,

Ben:

okay. Mm hmm. Yeah. Um, yeah.

Gene:

So tangential to that, but still hilarious. Um, I told you about my, uh, my buddy, Eric, that after getting his security clearance, he, uh, constantly like on a weekly basis gets LinkedIn, uh, contact requests from these anonymous. Uh, Asian, Chinese sounding named women.

Ben:

I'm pretty sure that's anyone involved in cyber security. They all

Gene:

have cute photos. I am. It's like, Jesus fucking Christ. It is

Ben:

too funny. Yeah, nothing, uh, nothing new there. So what is new? Uh, well, uh, other than the potential changes to the suppressor laws that we all eagerly await, um, yeah, which would make me a very happy person, even though the, well, I thought there were any manufacturers anyway, get find one, find one that's manufactured in a company that's willing to sell it. That's the problem,

Gene:

I guess. I haven't really looked to be honest, but my understanding was that. As long as it's manufactured in Texas.

Ben:

Manufactured, sold, and stays within state lines, then, yes. And then

Gene:

Texas position is that the ATF does not apply.

Ben:

Well, uh, according to Texas state law, yes. According to the ATF, that's

Gene:

not true. Well, it's, well, you know, I mean, shit, California did the same thing with weed, right? Oh, exactly. And now, what, 35 states?

Ben:

I don't know, but Texas is on its way, and good for them. We'll see where it lands, I would love to buy a made in Texas suppressor. Um. You know, uh, but that said, it's one of those things it's never been worth the tax stamp to me to go ahead and get and go through that entire process. But if we remove the tax stamp, you're damn straight. I'll have, uh, several.

Gene:

Texas silencer company. There you go. Go check them out.

Ben:

Okay. Fine. Uh, yes, I have. Oh yeah. Okay. Yes. Yeah. Show me where it's for sale. Do they not sell it? You have, well, they, but you still have to get the tax stamp. What

Gene:

if you just drive down to Weatherford?

Ben:

I mean, see if you can, uh, but I haven't, well, according to

Gene:

Reddit, uh, it's really easy for anyone to get a suppressor in Texas.

Ben:

Oh, well, yeah, yeah, well, they're, they're not wrong that Texas is a pretty easy state because local law enforcement, when you go to get your tax stamp is obliged to give it to you unless they have an affirmative reason not to, um, so they have to know and, you know, know that you've committed a crime and so on and, um, which should come up on your background check anyway. So why the hell do we have to go to local law enforcement? That's a whole nother thing that said, uh, Texas law is, you know, basically a shell issue state.

Gene:

So this is somebody has good advice. If, if you want a suppressor ignore state law and follow federal law. If you want the case law named after you or federal law, state law, that's a good point is that, um, the Sterling decisions. Oh, yeah, exactly. Exactly. This is just waiting for someone to take the reins and do what has to be done in all these situations. And that is say, no, exactly. And then, uh, bring a lawyer with you and you say, no,

Ben:

well, and just be prepared to spend a lot of money to fight it and potentially lose all your guns. Yeah. Mm hmm. Because you would be a felon.

Gene:

So this would be a better, uh, a better thing for someone to do that has no guns.

Ben:

Well, but here's the thing, um, so you have to have someone to

Gene:

manufacture. We needed a volunteer that has no interest in firearms.

Ben:

Who also has no interest in voting or cares about having a felony on their record

Gene:

record. Yeah, but it wouldn't be a felony if you win. True,

Ben:

true. Right? So, but if you, if you win, you're not going to lose your guns

Gene:

either. Exactly. So what we bet, but if you mitigate the risk by having someone who doesn't own the guns, then just buys a suppressor that's made in Texas. I think that would be a better... So you, you

Ben:

have to have a company that's willing to manufacture it as well.

Gene:

Yeah, I don't think that'd be as hard to find though. Um, I think manufacturing, uh, they're, you know, there's a... There are companies that manufacture them here. It's more a matter of finding a dealer that'll sell it. Because I think most of these companies don't sell direct.

Ben:

Well, um, so the, the, the law requires every component of the suppressor to be made in Texas and that begs the question. Okay. What about the aluminum? You know, uh, where was it mined? Where was it produced? Uh, where was it smelted? Things like that. Does that have to be made out of aluminum

Gene:

to be made out of plastic? Which is manufactured in Texas. Okay,

Ben:

um, where'd the oil come from? Prove the provenance of the oil.

Gene:

Came from Texas. You can't prove the provenance

Ben:

of the oil. Anyway, my point is, The Texas law is based off of interstate commerce. Which, I get it. Uh, but the Texas state law is done to circumvent the NFA instead of directly challenge it. I have a problem with they should just directly

Gene:

challenge their, well, there is a, I mean, the attorney general said actually who's being impeached, which is so stupid. I swear to God, it's like, this is the type of bullshit and fighting that ends up getting Republicans out of power. Um, if it based on, on past lawsuits that he's brought, I guess the federal government, I don't at all think that it would be unexpected. That if there was a case in Texas, so a genuine Texas, you know, something that follows the Texas law that ends up going to court that the, um, the Texas attorney general would end up filing a, um, what the hell is the Latin term for it? The front of the court thing, and you'd probably get quite a bit of support from them. Now, they're not going to just be your lawyer, but, uh, it is in Texas's best interest to demonstrate that it has the power to enforce its own laws.

Ben:

Yeah. Uh, and again, I, I, oh, sorry, I bumped the mic. Um, again, I think that we have a problem that we have manufacturers of suppressors here in Texas. Mm hmm. But they're not willing to try and sell them under this law. Um, at least I haven't found any. Uh, and every gun store that I know is still following, you know, well, they have to because if they don't, they're going to lose their FFL and

Gene:

everything else. Yeah, yeah. And that's, yeah, because the FFL is a federal, not a state license.

Ben:

Yes. Which, again, the NFA just needs to be overturned. It

Gene:

does. It's a bullshit law passed during a period in time in American history when a lot of bullshit laws were passed.

Ben:

Yes, indeed.

Gene:

So a revision of the legality of a lot of those laws seriously needs to be... Investigated.

Ben:

Yeah. So my first gun, uh, that was my dad's first gun. That was my grandfather's at least first shotgun that my great grandfather bought out of a catalog. Right. And was shipped to his house. Um. You know, that was normal back in the day and it needs to come back to it instead of this FFL transfer nonsense.

Gene:

Exactly. It's, um, well, it's a combination of fear mongering and just people willing to sit around and ignore bad laws for so many years that the federal government got its foot to hold in there. If we had a stronger pushback against the NFA, um, when shortly after it was passed. Like, for example, during World War ii, if the vet's coming home had said, these are bullshit laws, we're not gonna stand for it. We just fought a war for freedom, and we're not gonna lose freedom at home.

Ben:

Well, you also have, I blame, have the enforcement that you have. It's the worst generation that

Gene:

that's the problem. Well, that's true and that's, but again, this is how they, they do it right. It's the whole toad and the boiling water thing. Where or frog or whatever it is then what or lobster which is bullshit, but

Ben:

yes

Gene:

I don't know, dude, I've sat on the hot tub until I passed out, so I, I can attest to that being

Ben:

true. Well, I can guarantee you that a frog and or a lobster are smarter than you, then. That is likely,

Gene:

but nonetheless, um, I personally can attest to that. No, but crawling to the shower, uh, on your hands and knees because you can't stand up and then turning in cold water and passing out is, is. Not a fun experience that I've experienced multiple times. Yeah, that's called heat exhaustion. Right, or otherwise known as the frog in boiling water experiment. Uh, but I don't know, man. It's just when there's a bad law and they tell you, well, don't worry, we're not going to enforce it. Worry more.

Ben:

Well, here's the thing is we need, we need jury nullification during nullification has to be practiced a lot more. I don't, I don't

Gene:

want to count on that though. That's the problem is juries vary and there could be a jury that nullifies the other direction as well.

Ben:

I

Gene:

understand. So I would much rather there be clarity that freedoms like that shall not be infringed period. I agree. So, um, but yeah, unfortunately this is, this is part of the reason I didn't take up the offer for free, uh, a free registration of short barreled rifle with the whole, Oh, now we don't think it's a pistol. We think it's a rifle bullshit is because they don't have the authority to turn an item that barreled rifle. Into a legal and registered short barrel rifle with no money being exchanged. They literally don't have that power. So they're saying, well, don't worry, we're not going to enforce this. Yeah. Today, maybe what about tomorrow?

Ben:

Yeah. Well, and you know, they're waving of the tax, um, creates up actually, uh, You know, a potential constitutional problem because you don't have equal enforcement of the law. So it becomes a potential 14th amendment issue.

Gene:

Beyond that, they literally have no power over deciding what the dollar amount is. For the same reason they can't raise the amount, they can't lower the amount to

Ben:

zero. But there it's selective enforcement, which then, uh, violates equal protection under the law. So, even in so doing, they are potentially violating the Fourth Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause.

Gene:

And like they ever gave a shit what they violate and how many people they violate.

Ben:

Gene just because you're dreaming about being violated. Yeah. Yeah. That's me.

Gene:

Get out of my dreams. Damn

Ben:

it. Uh, anyway, I'm just saying, man, I, you know, yeah, I, I, I get it. I'm just, the point is, it's not something for, first of all, they could come back and be quote unquote required to. Get that, uh, money. And then when you don't have it or can't do it or whatever, then you, you're in trouble. Um, why would you register an item? You're legally allowed to have, why would you do that to yourself?

Gene:

Yeah. Well, why would you register a car?

Ben:

Um, why would you have a driver's license? Um, you know, people sit there and say, drive,

Gene:

I can make a little more of an argument for it. It's not a very good argument, but more of one. Which is, it's that the driver's license is your permit to the, uh, public road system. Like you're welcome to drive

Ben:

a car. Which historically has never been a thing. You're welcome

Gene:

to drive a car where there has not been historically a public road system. Uh, you're perfectly welcome to drive a car on private property without a driver's license.

Ben:

Yep. And I've done it as a kid.

Gene:

And a lot of kids have done, Oh, a lot of kids drive a, uh, a 14 ton tractor before they drive a, a car.

Ben:

I don't think not so much anymore.

Gene:

Well, in, in my fond memories, anyway,

Ben:

by the way, for anyone who, uh, really, uh, wants to just, I would only recommend doing this on private property, outside of the purview of. Certain people, but Amazon sells a two pack of thread adapters that go from half by 28 to three quarter by 16 for 1850.

Gene:

Yeah, the whole, you know, non standardization, uh, in the United States of threads is crazy. Like everything should be metric and commonly available. It's just silly. Silly the other way around. Apparently, Paxton already sued the ATF, uh, in one case for silencers in Texas. Yeah, he has.

Ben:

Back in February. Um, but again, what difference is it going to end up making, um, when it comes down to it? And again, without both parties, uh, both the manufacturer or manufacturer reseller combined, let's assume, and someone that bought it and used it. And then as going, being gone after by the ATF, I don't know how much precedent we're actually going to get out of that.

Gene:

Let me ask you this direct question. Let's say there was another Waco that happened. Do you think the country is in the same frame of mind as it was the last Waco or is it in a different frame of mind and the outcome might be different? I

Ben:

think there are a lot more people like us and I think the outcome would inherently be different. Um, you know, I, I think this, uh, while we're on court decisions, this recent court decision, and I was posting about it on in a social. Uh, last night, uh, I sent it to you of the Connecticut rule being found constitutional that they can, uh, remove religious exemptions for vaccines, uh, requirements in schools. It's just asinine. Um, and it's something that I don't think any parent should stand for.

Gene:

There's two views in that, like, I don't

Ben:

care about the right view and there's the

Gene:

wrong view. Okay. I don't think there ought to be a religious exemption, because there ought to be no right for them to mandate vaccines at all. Period.

Ben:

Completely agree. A religious exemption should not, you, there should no, there should not be a, there is no right for them to issue a mandate for anything.

Gene:

Regardless of whether somebody's religious or an atheist. Like, they can't. They can't force you to get a vaccine

Ben:

except so we already have, um,

Gene:

but then again, the governor has no business of being in the business of schools.

Ben:

Completely agree. Amen. I 100% agree. Um, in fact, I think the entire. Uh, state education system, even at the state level is abhorrent in many ways. I think if parents want to come together and found a co op to hire teachers and do that locally, um, that's fine, but I think it should be an NGO. Uh, it should be a non governmental entity formed by the local parents controlled by the local parents. They should have no fucking say in it. Whether that state be federal or local little house in the prairie exactly work

Gene:

one room schoolhouse Yep, one room schoolhouse and the well, that's essentially the idea that Tucker Mac's did and when they founded their school Their school's got hundreds of

Ben:

kids, but think about it If every neighborhood just had their own school that they the local parents controlled Some schools would be fantastic It's like some souls would be sucky, the parents would pay what they could to support it. And that would be that. But anyway, um, anyway, with this Connecticut ruling, um, I, I, I sent this to a friend of mine that recently moved her family from New York to Texas and. You know, it's stuff like this that makes her very happy that she did. And, uh, you know, it, it's part of the reason why you see the right flight out of, uh, California, New York and everywhere else. Um. Fortunately,

Gene:

there's plenty of left flight too.

Ben:

Not as much. Uh, every. Come to Austin, my friend. Okay, well, you know, uh, we, we just need to build a wall around Austin with you.

Gene:

There was

Ben:

a, a corporate it and let's take care of the problem. Yeah, exactly.

Gene:

I can't remember what, which comic it was in, but there was, oh, it was probably the B. I mean, what else could it be? But there was a, uh, like a, a news report talking about the need to build the wall and that. You know, the, the Texas is getting over, over flooded with people coming here that are going to be causing trouble for everybody else. And then they zoom out on the map and the wall is not on the southern border. The wall is around the border of Austin. Yeah. As it should be. I thought it's hilarious.

Ben:

Hmm. Yeah. Screw Austin, man. I, I, I just, I, I haven't liked Austin a really forever because of, you know, I went to school at a and M so there's that whole thing. But beyond that friendly rivalry, which is restarting and I cannot wait cause it's going to be hilarious. Um, But beyond that, it's just, Austin's never been the type of town I've liked. Austin reminds me a lot of Atlanta. I don't know how much time you've spent in Atlanta, but there's Not much. I mostly live in suburbs. The big problem with Atlanta is there's one north south corridor. Mm hmm. What's that sound like? Yeah, that sounds like Austin. Yeah, traffic wise, everything else, the way the, uh, suburbs are laid out and all that. It's

Gene:

The city almost stretches all the way down to San Antonio at this point. Uh, I was down there last week and I'll be coming down again this week, San Antonio. And there is no quote, getting out of town unquote on the highway.

Ben:

There's a little bit on 35. It

Gene:

is a continuous traffic jam from Austin to San Antonio.

Ben:

Right. Right. But you do have some countryside. Well,

Gene:

yeah, there's, uh, areas where you can't see houses, but I'm, I'm talking about the amount of traffic that's going on that highway.

Ben:

Yeah. Same with I 10 though. I 10 has been that way from Houston to San Antonio for a long time too. Yeah. Yeah. You know, I mean, it's constantly in construction, constantly being permanent construction. Yeah, exactly. Um,

Gene:

dude, I 10 is like six lanes each way out of Houston.

Ben:

But it drops down to big three going into Beaumont and actually drops down to two at one section going into Beaumont and three going into San Antonio. So they've gotta, they've gotta up that mm-hmm. they do. Uh, now if they go through and build Interstate 12, that'll be pretty interesting. Look at that. Maybe Elon can build a tunnel. Have you looked at Interstate 12? No. Where's that? So it's gonna come through College Station. If they build it, it's gonna follow one 90, but it's gonna go literally between 20 and 10. So it'll be interstate 12,'cause it's gonna be closer to 10. And it'll follow 1 90 all the way across Texas. So, from East Texas to West Texas, new interstate. Mm hmm. Which would be

Gene:

awesome. That would be cool. It'd be even better if it was a toll road. No, no. I like toll roads. Toll roads, don't have any cops on them, everybody's going 90 miles an

Ben:

hour. Oh, that is not true. That is not true. It is not. It, DFW, the sheriffs of the counties definitely patrol the toll roads and will ticket you.

Gene:

No way, dude. I, I, I lived there for three years. I went on the tollways, uh, almost exclusively, my, I'm paying like 300 bucks a month

Ben:

in toll fees. I'm telling you my experience. Well, you're driving like madmen then. Okay, it wasn't just me that, uh, got popped, but okay. I don't know, I've never seen

Gene:

a single cop on the tollways. I've seen plenty of cops on the freeways, I've never seen a single cop. Pulling anybody over on the tollways in the entire three years I was there. Yeah. And I, like I said, I almost exclusively use the tollways because I don't like sitting in traffic.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, sometimes the bad thing would be if you got a, if there was a wreck or something on the, uh, tollway that it would just. Yeah,

Gene:

which way were you next to which one are you talking about? Uh,

Ben:

the little expressways, uh, on, uh, so I lived in grapevine and commuted to Irving quite a bit. So right there on 114

Gene:

where 114 like going towards the airport.

Ben:

I lived near the airport and then I was going back towards Las Colinas area on 114 and then back. Back and forth. Okay, well. Our headquarters was literally on 114.

Gene:

And they, yeah, they need more lanes on that one too.

Ben:

Well, that's why they had the expressway. Yeah.

Gene:

Um, yeah, I don't know, man. I mean, like I said, I was very pleasantly surprised in three years, not a single cop to be seen.

Ben:

Anyway, stuff changes. It's been a while since you've lived there. So I think, uh, I think my, uh, experience is probably more updated and

Gene:

relevant. More recent. Well, let's hope that, um, what's the, um, I'm trying to remember. So I was on the.

Ben:

So, speaking of my former employer and me being up there, it was funny. I posted a thing on, uh, no agenda social because, uh, my former employer, the, the batter 1 of the battery sites that I worked on quite a bit, uh, was, uh. Now touted as the largest battery storage of its type in the world, uh, because they finally finished the, uh, latest upgrade, which is not the last upgrade that they're going to do to it, by the way. So that mass landing facility is going to continue to, uh, expand, but I posted on social, Hey, I worked on this and I got a guy that replied, Hey, I was an electrician on the price. That's funny. Yeah. Who'd you work for? I worked for these people. Oh, well, I was, you know. This and, uh, yeah, sorry, it was just funny,

Gene:

you know, small world. Well, it is, but you got to keep in mind that like the. Job description of 90% of the people on no agenda social is a dude named Ben, right?

Ben:

But this guy was actually an electrician which is unusual. Yeah. Yeah. And so I, you know, he's like, oh, how, what, what, what did you do? Well, I was 1 of the corporate guys designing the network and putting in the security and my team was the 1 executing it. Oh. Okay. Yeah. Anyway, it

Gene:

seems like basically he just kind of scoffed at the fact you didn't actually do anything on it. You just drew things on a whiteboard.

Ben:

Uh, no, uh, me and my team actually deployed things and made changes to the control system. And I was one of the people behind project no brainer that got the crappy control system replaced, even though it was brand new. Uh, lots of things like that.

Gene:

Right. But he actually did things. Oh

Ben:

yeah. He, he did the wiring up and everything else. And if there's ever a thermal runaway event, I'll, uh, I'll give him crap. Which the Tesla battery plant literally a mile and a half down the road actually did have a thermal runaway event and burnt down. Uh,

Gene:

well, amazingly lithium birds really well. Yeah. And

Ben:

doesn't stop. No, that's the thing.

Gene:

No, lithium is a really cool fricking metal. I've always liked lithium ever since I, well, lithium

Ben:

is in the metal. It's a metallo. Okay,

Gene:

Mr. Science here. There is a difference. Back in my day, we referred to Lithium as a metal. Okay.

Ben:

Back in my day when we had ww

Gene:

do squat, when, when? Back when Pluto was a real planet.

Ben:

Hey, I actually agree with that one. Uh, the problem with Pluto is that Pluto and Pluto's Moon are in, you know, an orbit around each other. Mm-hmm. and Pluto is very small, but given its orbit and given its position mm-hmm. um, You know, I, I tend to think of it as a planet, not a planetoid. Yeah.

Gene:

Although technically speaking, there's like another six planetoids of the same size, a little further

Ben:

out. Yeah, but they're in the order cloud. So, you know, that's where all this shit that's different. Yeah. You know, uh, if, if you're in a, which the, or cloud is not exactly densely packed, right. People have this idea, but it's, it's really not, um, it's not a

Gene:

fog,

Ben:

even though we depict it to that way.

Gene:

Yeah, usually, usually. Um, you know, that reminds me I need to go visit the Voyager. I haven't done that for a while.

Ben:

Visit Voyager. Yeah, yeah, yeah. How are you gonna do that? Yeah. Yeah. How, how are you gonna do that one? So, the game

Gene:

that I've been playing a lot

Ben:

Oh, in your game. I was like, dangerous Gene. Are you, uh, are you willing to admit something now that the government has Yeah,

Gene:

exactly. Oh, we can start taking off these, these people suits all of a sudden.

Ben:

What's this wee stuff?

Gene:

I mean, I mean, uh, uh. Yeah, you know, in, in dangerous, um, the game is set in 3000, something, whatever. So it's basically a thousand years in the future, but

Ben:

so technology, it

Gene:

is infinite technology is barely further along than it is in currently, which is funny about all these games, like they, they can't conceive of just how, how much can happen in a thousand years. They always think it's like a thousand years. It's kind of like a hundred years. Not really,

Ben:

but

Gene:

what year does, um, uh, does the expanse take place? Do you remember? Uh, only a few

Ben:

hundred

Gene:

years, a couple of hundred. That's probably more accurate. But anyway, in this game, it's built around a one to one model of our Milky Way

Ben:

galaxy. And just to, uh, just to be very clear, the expanse, um, is very true to physics. Uh, except for the magical MacGuffin that I won't put it, you know, but other than that, you know, they, they explain their ability to move around the solar system with a, uh, radical change in, uh, a fusion tea kettle that gives enough thrust that they can do. So

Gene:

if you can get a compact enough power source, then they're not really breaking any laws of

Ben:

physics. Exactly. And enough reaction mass for that matter, but that's, yeah,

Gene:

they're not, they're not just completely pulling shit out of them. They're, uh, they're just extrapolating to what currently is not possible. Um, but anyway, and so in this game, which incidentally, uh, is also fairly true in terms of physics, not 100%, but it tries to be like, for example, if I'm flying between, um, I don't know, earth and Jupiter, uh, it's much more fun places to be than that, but let's say I'm flying. Uh, it will do, uh, a brachychrome trajectory so that you're constantly accelerating for half the voyage, and then you're constantly decelerating the other half. So it's the most, um, if there's no cost to fuel, it's the most efficient way to travel. So there,

Ben:

uh, Paul Assuming no cost to fuel though. That's a huge thing.

Gene:

Yeah, totally. Uh, but it's, it's a way to get like from earth to Mars in a matter of, I think it's six days. Uh, if you use that trajectory at one G six days at one G. So you have constant gravity, the entire time earth gravity, there's no space sickness, bullshit to deal with. Um, and all you gotta do is just find this, uh, really compact power source. Uh, but in there, one of the things they have is an ability to go visit the then current location of the two Voyager probes so you can fly to where they are and actually see them. It's pretty cool. Yeah. Um, like I live on Sirius, uh, it's a cool place, you know, all the cool kids hang

Ben:

out there. And, and by Sirius, you mean Sirius?

Gene:

Sirius? Is it? I thought, yeah. I guess it is Sirius. Yeah, yeah, yeah. The, the dual star. Um, but it's a, it's a neat game and I know I've talked about it before a few times. I also talked about plenty of other space games that I like. I like space games. But, uh, lately I've been playing with a lot of friends that are getting back into it. This game's been around for almost 10 years. Um, and, uh, I think a lot of people are kind of, they're tired of the current games they've been playing and seem to be falling into it. Ah, let's do this one again. So, it's been kind of fun.

Ben:

Well, cool. Uh, I've been playing around with radios lately. I am like, yeah. Um, well, no comment. FCC, I'm

Gene:

taking your test yet. Why would I? Oh my God. Because you got to give 65, 70 year old men something to do.

Ben:

Yeah, I, I will, they can, they can, uh, they can Fox hunt me down, but Hey, I'm giving them a better experience. They can sit there and try and triangulate me as well.

Gene:

The thing is you can joke about that, but a lot of these guys don't have jobs and they literally will drive around in their pickup trucks with

Ben:

antennas and they can send that to the SEC can send me a letter.

Gene:

And there are plenty of people that would enjoy ranting somebody out. Okay. Just saying. I'm really not worried about it. Alright.

Ben:

Just saying. Anyway, I've been

Gene:

pulling around. Might lose your ability to own time. Resolve

Ben:

that. No, you won't. Um, you'll see. Okay. Look at the FCC enforcement over the last 10 years. You're

Gene:

literally talking about it on the podcast

Ben:

that has dozens of people proving I, so far I have not transmitted illegally. I have just taken a really cheap, nice little radio and programmed it for emergency use purposes. And that's about it.

Gene:

Why don't you do what your buddy did? Let's get a license. Thanks. Yeah,

Ben:

it's just, I'm not that into it. I really am not, but I, I, I should, I should, but then I need to renew my kind of get to get into it if I'm

Gene:

not worried about it. Yeah, somewhat. Um, but I told Josh that, uh, if he starts getting serious about it, I've got a couple of radios that are not getting used. I wouldn't mind moving, but yeah, I've got a D star and then I've got a, um, what was the highest end. Uh, Yasu back eight years ago, both

Ben:

nice handheld. Yeah. Yeah. Well, let's talk. I might, I might get that Yazoo after coffee.

Gene:

All right. All right. I don't, when I got it, it was like four 50. Yeah. It's not anymore. No, obviously. But it's literally not been turned down in like six

Ben:

years. The, the, what's really cool though, is, um, these little bow fangs, which they're not rated for this

Gene:

around even

Ben:

back then. Oh yeah. But the UV five are, um, they've come out with a new version, the UV 17. So these have gotten really, really retarded cheap. Um,

Gene:

they were under a hundred

Ben:

bucks back then. They're under 20. What? Yes. You can get these radios on

Gene:

one chip though.

Ben:

Uh, they're teeny, but 1 of the things that's really kind of cool about this is you can program them for the family service radios, which yes, I know legally they are not certified for those frequencies, but they will work on those frequencies, which does not require a license. And, um, so you're using an illegal radio on a frequency that. No one gives a shit about, but anyway. Um, so you can use them on lots of different frequencies. Uh, they have a decent amount of power that they can put out. They're not like a gaze or anything else. No one should ever make a comparison, but for the price, it's ridiculous. Um, so to me for a cheap radio that I can. Plug into my computer. I can program with the relevant repeaters, you know, from here to my bug out location, things like that, that I can program with certain channels. I can do everything I need to do. I can, I can have a battery pack that accepts double A's, or I can have a battery pack that I can charge with a solar panel. This is a great throw in the bug out bag radio. And that's what I'm looking at it for.

Gene:

Yeah, I guess, I don't know. I, I got it mainly because Adam will get into, uh, Into the whole ham radio thing back then.

Ben:

Well, I'm talking specifically about the cheap Balfang UV5R. Yeah. Which, by the way, is the most popular radio ever made. How

Gene:

much are the, uh... There are more

Ben:

Balfangs out there than any other radio type

Gene:

out there. Oh, I'm sure. That makes total sense. Why wouldn't there be? Um... You know, they're, they're cheap, so most people get them. Uh, does ICOM still do all the DSTAR stuff or have they moved on? Oh, you don't know? Okay. So DSTAR was their, the ICOM's own digital proprietary version that then they opened up afterwards to other manufacturers. But, uh, I don't know the problem with all this shit. It's just the size of the antennas you need to do any serious communication is just too damn big. Uh, from a practicality standpoint, I, it didn't have two things that I wanted. One is digital, which kind of barely had, but not really. And then two is just the range.

Ben:

Well, and that's where, you know, if you can get like a slip lead antenna or something to throw up over a tree that you can do quite a bit

Gene:

there. Yeah. If you're stationary, I much prefer to just pull out the satellite phone. That's faster and smaller and easier. And that'll charge off solar, by the way.

Ben:

So 1 thing I do recommend, uh, not doing, there is a CD that comes with the Baofeng radios that, uh, is not even a labeled CD. It's just a burned copy little mini disc. And what I would say to that is. Uh, don't stick that in your computer.

Gene:

Oh, yeah. It's probably Chinese

Ben:

infected. Oh, it's definitely Chinese. Uh, go, go to chirp and download the software you need from there. Yeah. But anyway, it's pretty ridiculous how cheap you can get it. So like you can get, uh, bow fangs. Like, here's a pack, this is how cheap they are now, uh, Gene, you can get the current generation UV5R, which is an eight watt power radio, uh, with two chargers, three different antennas, two different headsets, batteries, and programming cables for 60. Wow. That's

Gene:

dirt cheap. That's cheap.

Ben:

That's super cheap. So anyway, this week in ham.

Gene:

Yeah. I guess. I don't know. I like, I, this week on pirate radio seriously need to just decide if I need to bother renewing or not. Cause I just never use that shit.

Ben:

Well, I, you know, I, I don't know, I, again, I, I don't care about being on a radio, uh, you know, CBs, I CB generation, right? We, we had CBs. I. Took a CB one and I was hiking and everything else to be able to call home. And, you know, and this is, this is mountain to Valley sort of communication. So you can, you can get a decent amount of range as long as you get clear line of sight. And if you're willing to break the law, which,

Gene:

you know, I always liked the rhinos. I never bought them cause they were always overpriced, but the, the Garmin rhinos seem like they actually had features that I don't understand why nobody else did. Like the ability to send your location to the other handsets. So you all know where you're, where you are, you know, you can have a heartbeat of all your buddies you're going out hunting with, uh, so you could stay like, you know, half a mile apart and know exactly where everybody else, you know, like that's a no

Ben:

brainer. There's some, uh, GMRs radios out there now, like BTEC has one that has built in GPS and it has, it really is made to interface with your phone, but, um, it's a GRMS radio and, uh, has the ability, uh, to kind of do that today.

Gene:

Well, that's good, but yeah, they were doing that 20 years ago, but. They were, they were, they were like 600 per radio and good luck getting your buddies to buy. Well, this is like

Ben:

150, so that's much

Gene:

more reasonable. Exactly. Yeah. The last time I used a CB was, uh, would have been five or six years ago when I did a trip to Arizona with a buddy of mine. So we, we, he was going to keep driving to California and I was going to make a loop de loop in Arizona and go back to Texas. Um, but we were going to be driving out there for a few days together. And so I thought it'd be fun to do a CB radio. And so we did that. And after about, um, I don't know, half an hour, we just switched the phone.

Ben:

Yeah, so I, uh, I did, uh, the last time I really, really used a CB was when I actually moved back to Texas in 2004. Uh, if that tells you how long ago it was almost 2 decades ago, but I was driving down. And this was probably in 2005 because I was driving down by myself and not with someone. So I was driving down. I had a little handheld CB and a little magnetic antenna on top and, you know, driving my car back down to college. And, uh, I started talking to this one trucker on there and I'm heading to college station. Oh, yeah. He's going to school and so on. Yep. He goes, yeah, I went to UT. And I, uh, just deadpan, like keyed up, look at where that got you. Oh,

Gene:

and switched it all. You guys probably making a hundred grand a year, but okay. Yeah, well, anyway,

Ben:

still, it was a pretty good, in the early 2000s, I doubt it was that much, but regardless, it was funny. Probably

Gene:

not,

Ben:

that's true. Yeah, it was just part of that rivalry and a dig, you

Gene:

know, I, I think it's hilarious. I, I've never been much for rivalries. I think it is fun to kind of poke people with that stick occasionally, uh, when, when they're into rivalries, but I've never really like, you know, the, the North stars before they became the Texas stars, they, they were about the only team that I gave a shit about and followed. And I was a little sad when they left, but, um, I really could just give a shit about different teams, different colleges, different anything, it's like, uh, whatever. It's, it, I don't, I don't even care about different countries. People on, uh, it's the, based on what I've, what I've said, people keep calling me like a Putin pologist, and, you know. Well, you clearly are. You, no, I, I, I would be doing the exact same thing if the situation was reversed, except to the other country. It's, it's just, you got to use your brain people. That's all. That's all.

Ben:

You watched Friday's Tim cast, right? I watched a little part of it. I watched most of it last night, then we record this on Sunday morning. So, um, first of all, some of it was just, uh, Jesus Christ, but anyway, um, he made an interesting point about the Ukrainian conflict and who would be blamed if, uh, Russia were to use. Uh, like, you know, nuke artillery or something. And, uh, he, he thinks that the blame would fall on Joe Biden, which I don't know about, but. It was an interesting take and, you know, he's of the opinion that, well, you know, had we not interfered, Russia would have just walked through and taken the Don Bass and that would have been it, which, you know, according to our politicians, Oh no, they wouldn't stop there. And so on. Well, maybe they would, maybe they wouldn't. Who knows? Let's,

Gene:

it was very simple. All that had to happen like a year ago for this to not have been a war that's killed off, uh, tens of thousands of people.

Ben:

At least a quarter of Ukrainians, military agents.

Gene:

Yeah, and, and about a third of the country fled. Which, by the

Ben:

way, that is also their reproductive age, man.

Gene:

Yeah, but that doesn't matter, because Ukrainian girls are better off somewhere else anyway. They don't need Ukrainian boys.

Ben:

For the future of a country, they may, they may see that differently. Yes,

Gene:

there's plenty of Americans willing to adopt Ukrainian girls. Don't worry about it. But, uh, what I, where I was going with that is, All it had to happen was that Zelensky government had to fall. That's it. That's literally it. Every single death that has happened since about two months into that, uh, special military operation could have been avoided if the Zelensky government folded, if Zelensky ran away, he went to the U S if the United States didn't start telling them, you have to fight to the last Ukrainian. Uh, all of this would have been over like Russia wouldn't have even tried to take over and, um, uh, re categorize the Eastern Ukrainian provinces as, uh, as part of Russia. Now had a more favorable government sprung up somebody that would say no to NATO expansion. That's all they were looking for a government in Ukraine that would say, no, NATO expansion is not in our future. We're going to stay impartial, just like Finland. That's all they had to do. Well, that did somebody wanted to twist this, uh, into a different direction. And the war Hawks on this ultimately are responsible for every single death that's happened. And the Warthogs are sitting in Washington,

Ben:

uh, I agree and

Gene:

well, that was that was the end of my spiel. I took a drink of tea. I was done talking. Go ahead.

Ben:

Anyway, I, I just think that there is a, uh, contingent that's starting to recognize that. Hey, um. It's it's time for this to change that our government is not representing us in the best light and then the best manner. How about causing issue? It's just I'm being reserved in my speech. Um, you know, again, if anyone's been following me on no agenda social, I've been a little less reserved there, which may or may not be great. Um, but the entire point is. Uh, you know, at some point we have to stand up and say, you're not representing me. We're done here. And, um, uh, there was a great point made to one of my comments that, uh, it's not civil war. It's a revolution. Exactly. That's a great way to put it. I think that's, that's where we're going. And I think it's a good one.

Gene:

Yeah. I just. Wish the French would hurry up and set a good example.

Ben:

Has the French ever set a good example on a revolution?

Gene:

Yeah, I mean, I think the guillotine was brilliant. It makes its point and it's a minimally painful process.

Ben:

Yeah, said the, uh, inventor.

Gene:

Well, it is, it is, because he's watched a bunch of chickens get you

Ben:

to try it out, and we'll go from there.

Gene:

I will happily manage the process,

Ben:

and I will, I will convey,

Gene:

I will convey, well, no, you need volunteers for that, but I will happily convey their impressions. Uh huh. You know, the human brain stays alive for about five seconds after the, uh, blood supply is cut off. I'm sure. And, um, so the idea of watching your world tumble as you land in the wicker basket and then look straight up, I think is, uh, probably the, the least brutal way to die. Uh, I,

Ben:

okay. Again, you first.

Gene:

I mean, compare that to the way that the U. S. does it. With the electric chair where. You, you literally experienced the most excruciating pain,

Ben:

firing squad, you experienced, again, hasn't been used

Gene:

in quite a while, for fuck's sake, how do people kill people these days? Because Texas still kills people, right? Yeah.

Ben:

Lethal injection. And then there are backup methods that are quote unquote legally authorized, but haven't necessarily been used. Lethal

Gene:

injection. That's, that's where you get to stay alive and experience, uh, your entire nervous system burning. Uh, it's not what people that have been killed that way say, man, it is not a trip. I don't think they get much of a say if they've been a handful of people that have survived it, and that's not, they don't call it a trip. Uh huh. Now if, look, if you want to do it the drug way, you don't have to use this, this concoction which is basically made up of toilet boil cleaner. You, you should just really up the opium. That's all you need. Uh,

Ben:

no, you should just, you know, anyway, I'll keep my mouth shut.

Gene:

Yeah, because remember, there are innocent people that occasionally get killed as well.

Ben:

Yeah, and this is why I think that, uh, we should go back to a much more judicious use of legal force. Like lynching. Sorry, what? There should be no, um, there should be no capital punishment unless it is 100% clear exactly what happened and, and or a, an admission. Um, you know. But it's never 100% clear. 100% can be, but okay. Hmm.

Gene:

There's always mitigating circumstances.

Ben:

Okay. Um, the whole point here is that, uh, you gotta be careful with it. And I, I don't think that there should be, uh, the state enforcement that we have today, and I think everyone who knows me knows that I, I, I really think we need to go way back to cowboy esque Justice of, I totally agree. You know, um,

Gene:

handling show. Well, that's a total lovefest episode. You're agreeing with me. I'm agreeing with you. What the hell, man?

Ben:

Okay. Well, you know, maybe you're just turning into bemrose. Um, oh,

Gene:

Bemrose and I always agree Yeah.

Ben:

Anyway, uh, what it comes down to is, You know, if you piss someone off, if you insult someone, then expect a boot in your ass and, you know, not this, uh, everybody filing assault charges at the drop of a hat. And, you know, if someone admits to something there, so there was a scene. And, and spoiler alert for anyone who is following me on any of the books I read, but again, I've been reading this survivalist series for a couple of weeks now. So, like, um, yeah, I'm on book 7.

Gene:

Okay. So yesterday I was talking to a guy that that's, um, another listener of ours and I happen to be playing a video game called Elite Dangerous, which is set in the future. Universe, but anyway, uh, and, uh, yeah, I know I'll get you back on track here, but he had mentioned to me that, hey, uh, I just finished, uh, reading my, uh, last few books here. I, I need some suggestions for books. I said, dude, my, my buddy, Ben, my co host is the guy that'll set you up on books because I read like a book every 3 months. He reads a book a day. Uh, not quite. I guarantee, while I was being hyperbolic, he'll, he'll get you set up on what to read. So go ahead. Hit your books. Well,

Ben:

I, yeah, so this survivalist series or aka going home series, um, have, have been fantastic. Uh, I, I don't think they're, uh, they're a little formulaic in that you have this storyline that's going on that it's not repetitive, but they're formulaic in that. One book leads into the other and they are very much a to be continued each and every time. Um, which is part of the reason why I'm on book 7 and like 3 weeks time. Right? Because they all end with this. Okay. Now we've set up the next challenge for the next book. Um. Which is why there's as many of them as there are, and they've been as successful of a of a series, but, uh, in book 6, there's this spoiler alert. If anyone, this is a minor plot point, but it's it's a characterization that I think needs to be talked about. So, um. This, uh, this guy, uh, is, uh, you know, uh, a survivalist. He he's, he's made sheriff of the County after a EMP happens and all this, and he goes into town and, uh, there's the MP. There's an EMP that wipes out everything. Right. And, uh, anyway, so he, he's chair for the county and he's in going in town and all of a sudden they're walking around town and they hear the state is a state place in Florida. You know, the shot, the shot rings out, followed by another shot. And this guy runs out from behind this. Barn or whatever and says, they're trying to kill me. They're trying to kill me. Save me. Save me. Well, it turns out he was trying to steal a chicken and when he got caught, when he got caught, uh, the owner of the chicken shot at him missed and he ended up shooting the owner of the chicken hitting him in the arm. And his brother was a little pissed off that he shot his, you know, himself. Right. And in this, he starts blabbering and saying, Wait, You know, well, I got a right to eat just as much as anyone, and okay, you see where this is going. So he's admitting he tried to steal their property. And then when caught, he admits to shooting the other guy. Oh, yeah. So he gets hung. Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no. The guy who is sheriff just draws his gun and pops it. Done. Yeah. Okay. Like no hesitation, no, no, nothing just, he admitted to a being a thief and espousing communist of, you know, property ownership and then be shooting a guy who was defending his property.

Gene:

Yeah, it reminds me of, um, uh,

Ben:

that that that is where capital punishment

Gene:

should happen. Yeah. On the streets. I agree. No, no, no,

Ben:

no. In that sort of scenario where you sit there and say, well, it's not theirs. They don't have a right to it, even though it is their property and everything else.

Gene:

It should, but, but that's also assuming you're going to trust in the. Political ideology of the police.

Ben:

Oh, absolutely. Absolutely not. That's why I don't think there should be police outside the sheriff and the sheriff should be an elected position and should be highly monitored

Gene:

and not, you know, elected position than source is going to get his. Hundreds and hundreds of sheriffs all over the country. Okay,

Ben:

it doesn't matter. It should still be an elected position and that is the only law enforcement, um, that's not a bad thing. And here's the other thing. Uh, all prosecution, all prosecution should be at the purview of a grand jury, not a prosecutor in the prosecutor as a class. There are

Gene:

so many stupid people in grand juries, dude. I haven't, it's,

Ben:

it's, it's fine. I'd rather a bunch of stupid people in grand juries than prosecutors making plea deals and doing what they're doing

Gene:

today. Uh, well, that's how we ended up with Trump having now 87 different, uh, felonies hanging over him.

Ben:

Yeah, 600 and some odd years.

Gene:

Because of grand

Ben:

juries. Well, all I can say is, uh, this last indictment. Did you actually look at it? This last indictment? I'm bored with them. Uh, well, it's kind of a jump, jump the shark moment, dude. Um, for one, since they're doing it in D. C., the odds of it going directly to the Supreme Court afterwards are Almost certain

Gene:

the Supreme Court is not gonna touch anything political with 10 foot stick. It ain't gonna happen

Ben:

Then the Supreme Court will no longer

Gene:

be relevant. They would rather let Trump go down than touch anything political

Ben:

I don't see how they can if they do that then they are no longer a valid institution And why would they

Gene:

stop being a valid institution when they allowed? The election to be stolen. Okay.

Ben:

So then there is no hope and we should just burn it all down.

Gene:

That's what I've been saying literally for three years.

Ben:

Okay. Um, anyway, I, I don't see how this is going to stick, uh, at all, uh, because of, you know, what they're charging Trump with and the victim.

Gene:

I guarantee you. Oh,

Ben:

well, you know, D. C. Uh, if, if it's held in D. C. Yes, uh, they are trying to get a change of venue. They'll convict

Gene:

them in Atlanta. They'll convict them in D. C. And they'll convict them in

Ben:

New York. If he gets a change of venue for the DC to Westford, uh, DC charges to West Virginia, that's going to be hilarious.

Gene:

So there are too many people whose careers rely on Trump going down. And what did I say as soon as, uh, Trump lost last election on that episode of Sturgeon speaks. I said, this is, this is something that is a painful pill, but since the Couldn't figure out what to do to win and how to prevent the sabotage. They need to pick a young candidate without baggage so that Democrats don't try as hard and what, what happens instead. Trump's in the lead.

Ben:

Uh, well, you know, we'll see. Um, number one, I think if unless barring something drastic happening, Trump is the nominee. Uh, that's just the way it's going to be.

Gene:

You may be the, this would be a perfect scenario for the Democrats. They want Trump to be the nominee. And be in prison. That is the ideal scenario for them. Okay. Cause that, that literally means whoever runs, runs in the post.

Ben:

I don't agree. Um, and I,

Gene:

I'm telling you right now that if, if Trump ends up being guilty, not even in prison, he's just guilty found guilty. There are at least six States that will take him off the ballot. We're going to have an election. Like no other election before that I'm aware of, at least where one of the two main candidates isn't on the ballot in several States. And what do you think is going to

Ben:

happen? On huge constitutional challenge and people losing their mind and a revolution if they

Gene:

do that. Yeah, because the Democrat position on this is going to be, we've been telling you, the Republicans are insane Nazis for years now. And they're literally running a fascist who's in prison right now. Can you imagine what they're doing? They, they need to literally all be tagged. They can't be allowed

Ben:

to run free. Don't care what it, what it comes down to. That's half the country, man. Uh, no, it's not. Uh, here, here's what it

Gene:

comes down to. It's not. They, they let this happen. It's half the country. Disagree.

Ben:

Anyway.

Gene:

Okay. That's worse though. If you disagree, if you think that there are Republicans that don't give a shit enough to let the last election happen the way it did, then fuck them. I don't like them more than I don't like the obvious communists.

Ben:

Anyway, like I was saying, um, I believe that if you make. Peaceful revolution, impossible. You make violent revolution, inevitable. And when you tell someone they can't speak, they scream. When you tell someone they can't scream, they fight. And we're getting to that point. And

Gene:

I think that sounds beautiful for somebody that reads a lot of books, but the reality is quite different. And that is that less than 1% of the people that are, uh, crowded in like rats will ever do anything about it. The rest, we'll just put up with it. Look, we talked about this. Look at the number of people that were actually. Actively involved in the American revolution.

Ben:

3%. It's all that's

Gene:

required.

Ben:

If that, yeah. Okay. That's, that's great. That's fantastic for us. 3% over through an empire. That was

Gene:

a three weeks journey away. Okay. Across the sea. And this is, so I was going to mention this earlier anyway. I want to get that guy who's a listener of ours on, that's a, like a big history buff. Um, and, uh, I told him we, we may need to put him through a, a voice changer box so he doesn't end up compromising his position. Uh, but, um, I asked him, so like, what do you think is going to happen when the, uh, when the troops are called out? To essentially put down a, an American, uh, rebellion. They said, well, no, of course, no one's going to do that. No one's going to be willing. I said, well, keep in mind that this is, we're using the Soviet unit as a template in the United States right now, because that's the direction we've been heading. The way it works is that the, uh, the New York national guard will be sent to Texas and the Texas national guard will be sent to Seattle. Everybody's going to get moved around so that there is nobody. In the area that they're actually from that makes a lot easier to actually shoot people and do you think for a minute that, um, the. New York National Guard's going to have a problem shooting Texans.

Ben:

Yeah, I really recommend that everybody go read this book series and DHS and FEMA are definitely the bad guys. Um, I, I, I, I get your, your point is taken to an extent. Um. This is why we don't let them do that. This is why, uh, you know, you, you have to stand up and say no at some point. And I, I would include the armed forces amongst that and say, yeah, no, I'm not, uh, I'm not going to, uh, not gonna follow those orders.

Gene:

again, keep in mind who they're attracting into the armed forces. That's

Ben:

a whole nother story.

Gene:

Yeah, that's the Gen Xers are just about at retirement, out of the armed forces. So then you got millennials. Now the, the new guys coming in the Zoomers, uh, with the pink hair and the nose rings and the tattoos. Which the government has had to make allowances for, because that's literally all they can get now. Nobody else is volunteering. Um, yeah, half of them are in Antifa. Unfortunately, I don't think you're wrong. I'm not wrong. The guy that was killed here in Austin, uh, when he tried to, uh, stop a car during an Antifa protest a couple years back. And he was holding an AK 47. And he was shot by the driver, which was absolutely a good kill. That guy was in the military. He was in the national guard and he was in Antifa. I'm just saying that, that for as much as we can talk about the way that. Most of the people around here feel now granted, I'm in Austin. So it's more the way that they feel where you live, not necessarily where I live. It, it seems like it's a large contingent of people that are just, are going to be ready to pick up the challenge and, and, uh, you know, prevent the country from turning into a USSR, unfortunately, that is not a large number of people. And 3% to 1% may be the correct number. But there's also plenty of people at least 1 to 3% and maybe even more on the other side that literally are ready to do the opposite. They're ready to go after us. In a very brutal way. Another guy I was talking to yesterday.

Ben:

So one, one key point there though, um, brutal in reputation, savaging, brutal. They want those dead with no ability to execute it other than the state's power.

Gene:

So this guy I was talking to yesterday, um, who's another listener. Uh, Cause I, you know, I just only talk to people that listen to this podcast, apparently. Yeah, only people who agree with you. Right, exactly. That's, well that is kinda true. I, I do mostly talk to people that agree with me because people Nothing dangerous there. People who disagree with me tend to not like to listen to me and they go away. And the only ones left standing are the ones that agree with me. I have that, that particular thing around me always have, but this guy, uh, he was saying he was, um, he's like a finance dude and he was used to work at Ernst and Young. And then he was talking about how they, they started on the UI. They had as part of official company communications, they literally had meetings to come up with ways to, uh, stop the fascist Republicans. On company time, like this was an activity I did. They, uh, they, uh, as a company and through donations of employees paid for professional protesters. All throughout the, um, BLM stuff, like they literally were sending

Ben:

money. So there are a few corporations that I would describe as evil corp. Um, Ernst and young is definitely up there. And then so is McKinsey and co, um, I think all the big four are frankly, Oh, well, McKinsey's different than the big four, but yes.

Gene:

No, but I'm saying, I think all of the, not just the in white, but all the big four, I don't disagree. It's just, this happened to be the one that he was actually had personal experience and he ended up having to leave. He was just like, I can't work with those guys.

Ben:

Yeah. So I turned down jobs at EY, um, Accenture and a couple others. Um, basically I never wanted to work for the big four or get the security clearance for various reasons. So, yeah,

Gene:

it's a, uh, for, for as much as. Somebody listening to this podcast may agree with us in general, but then think, yeah, you guys are also a little crazy. You're a little too, you know, out there and talking about revolution,

Ben:

dude, we are mild and good.

Gene:

Well, but, you know, I, I think we're probably on the same general, uh, we're kind of middle of the road. Yeah. We're middle of the road. We're on the same general strata as Alex Jones. I think that, no, I think, I think we are, uh, I think the same kind of person that listened to his radio show would podcast.

Ben:

Uh, okay. Um, I, I mean, as someone who's listened to and known, I, I have been around the Alex Jones podcast and radio show. For a very long time. Mm-hmm. um, you know, I grew up listening to certain radio shows on shortwave, um,

Gene:

oh, the, the voice of Russia

Ben:

before, uh, Alex Jones even started his radio show. Mm-hmm. Um, you know, I, I've been in the Patriot community pretty much all my life.

Gene:

Yes, yes. We all know about your time in Idaho.

Ben:

Well, not just that, but I'm just saying I don't think that we're on the same, I've even played a video game, GA position. I know. Oh God, no. You haven't. Uhhuh.

Gene:

Uhhuh. It's got my favorite music in it. What do you mean? I haven't, uh, it's not

Ben:

the same thing. It just doesn't, anyway. Mm-hmm. I, I just think we're very different than, uh, AJ not to disparage him or

Gene:

we're not, don't, we're not saying we're like him. I'm saying it's the same audience. That's all I'm saying. I don't think so. Well, figure out why not, because we'd like to get some of that audience.

Ben:

Well, first of all, we don't talk about the frickin frogs being gay enough.

Gene:

Well, that's, everybody knows that at this point, there's nothing

Ben:

to talk about. So that's the thing about Alex, is he talks in hyperbole that's very entertaining. And, uh, you know, ultimately correct, to be honest with you. Um, but said in such a way as to... Be easily ignored by the mainstream.

Gene:

But it's a funny thing to say that it's turning the frogs gay, because obviously it's not turning the frogs gates, turning the frogs into females. But, um, if you're going to call anybody gay, I would say dogs are gay. You look at almost any dog is going to hump another male dog. Like that's not a thing that dogs seem to care about. There it's, it's just a sign of dominance that you're going to hump somebody of the same sex as you for dogs. So being gay, uh, and even tell a gay frog,

Ben:

uh, uh, squirrel,

Gene:

uh, I'm just saying it's, it's, it's, I can't, I couldn't tell a gay frog. I'm sure you

Ben:

couldn't. Oh, you think you could? Don't think I'd look.

Gene:

What are you going to look at? Oh. How do you know if a frog's gay?

Ben:

Uh, what's their behavior? I don't know.

Gene:

Male frogs and female frogs behave exactly the same way. There's no freaking difference. Well, by definition, they can't. Yeah, that's... No, they do. They do. They have no external genitalia. Correct. They have cloacas. They do not babysit their

Ben:

babies. Mmkay. You know, it's just like... Tadpoles. I've raised a few in my life.

Gene:

You, yeah, yeah. And have you seen a mom frog taking care of her babies? Well, obviously not. Obviously not. So I'm just saying it's kind of like saying fish are gay. Well, let me do an episode about that

Ben:

South Park's done on an episode on just about it.

Gene:

I'm gay fish. Yeah. What was that guy's name? That that rapper dude? The one that was the gay fish.

Ben:

I don't remember there been that South Park is that I haven't I've missed a lot of Recent South Park. I was I was watching it up and through the 20

Gene:

Up until you were no longer single, you mean Kanye West, Kanye West episode was the, yeah, where he turns

Ben:

into the dolphin. Yeah. Or no, that's Randy that Randy

Gene:

turns into the dolphins. That was, that was a different gay fish. This was back from season 13 squirrel. That's amazing. That was back in 2009. They predicted Kanye West. How did they

Ben:

predict Kanye West? What do you mean?

Gene:

That he's insane? uh, that he's arguing with people, telling him that he's a gay fish.

Ben:

Yeah. I, I don't know that Kanye West is actually insane. Oh, I do. I wouldn't

Gene:

classify it that way. He's got all No, I totally would. As a non-practicing psychologist, I would totally say that. Uh,

Ben:

okay. Well, on a different note, um, I'm playing around with the idea of getting a pistol caliber carbine.

Gene:

Okay, now, I will say in general, I think that's a stupid idea, even though I own some of these things, because. If you're going to get something that has the length of a rifle, why don't you have a, it chambered for something that has enough gunpowder in it to make a bigger boom, like a rifle

Ben:

would. Well, one, uh, suppressing it is easier. And then, uh, two, uh, I really am looking at a hundred yard and in gun, uh, which nine millimeters, especially plus P loads, which I know defeats the purpose of suppressing. We'll get to that later, but. It gives me that a hundred yard reach pretty damn easy. Nine

Gene:

millimeter is not a horribly accurate round. If you were doing like five, seven or something, you'd have much better results.

Ben:

I agree. Um, now nine millimeter out of, or the mass of a 45. Nine millimeter out of a 16 inch barrel. That's pretty good. Um, and it's easily a hundred yard.

Gene:

Now depends on how accurate you want to be, man.

Ben:

Again, at a hundred yards, if I can get a two MOA group. I am thrilled.

Gene:

Okay. Well, I'll give you that. You probably could do two MOA, but why settle there when you get a half inch MOA at out of a, or a half MOA, uh, which would be about because

Ben:

at a hundred yards, a two inch group is very effective for anything I want to

Gene:

do for shooting an apple off a person's head. I don't know, man, you might miss

Ben:

anyway. Uh, the whole point of getting a pistol caliber carbine for me for a truck gun, if you will, or a. Um, you know, I need to have access to one type of ammo and that's also my sidearm ammo.

Gene:

Green tip 556. Oh, Lord. That's perfect for cars. It'll go through

Ben:

them. And you carry that. Oh God.

Gene:

Anyway, but you could, if you want a truck gun, anyway,

Ben:

I'm just saying, I'm looking at it. And you can even get it in the

Gene:

pistol format.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, not, not a pistol you can conceal carry.

Gene:

Um, You know, I guess it depends on how big your pants are.

Ben:

Is that your pistol? Are you just happy to see me?

Gene:

Yes. I have a 16 inch barrel.

Ben:

Jesus.

Gene:

Uh, yes, this is the kind of humor we get into.

Ben:

Anyway, I think I've decided on the gun I'm going to get just as a, this will be a fine plinking gun if nothing else. And I'm looking at the Ruger. Not a Kel Tec I hope. No, I'm looking at the Ruger PC, uh, carbine, which is a takedown carbine and a

Gene:

pretty correct

Ben:

carbine PC stands for pistol

Gene:

caliber. Okay. That's what I meant for politically correct.

Ben:

No, no. It's the caliber. And the reason why I'm choosing it is the reason why I'm choosing it is it will accept Glock mags natively. Um, you can actually swap between the Ruger and Glock mags pretty easily. Um, it's the same mechanism, same design as a Ruger 10 22, just upscaled. Um, And they, they've been out for a few years now and they've been proven to be pretty damn reliable guns.

Gene:

I do like the takedown 10 22s they got.

Ben:

Those are nice. Well, this is the exact same design, just scaled up. Right.

Gene:

Right. So I guess. And accepting

Ben:

different bags, literally the trigger control group, same as the 10 22.

Gene:

So I guess compared to a 22, this is definitely more of a rifle. Yes. But also carrying a hundred rounds of nine millimeter versus a hundred rounds of 10, 22 is a huge difference in weight and stopping

Ben:

power and lots of things.

Gene:

But what are you going to go stop?

Ben:

Oh, the hunting, just hunting round.

Gene:

Right. So like bigger than the rabbit, you, you mean, can you kill a deer legally with a nine millimeter in Texas? Absolutely. It's a

Ben:

centerfire cartridge.

Gene:

They don't have a, uh, a minimum size, uh, for the, for deer hunting here? You

Ben:

can kill a deer with a 17 HMR centerfire legally in Texas.

Gene:

Wow. Uh, that would be quite the challenge.

Ben:

No, no, no, no, no, uh, actually the 17 HMRs and things like that are actually more powerful than 22 Magnum ever thought of being. They're really hot rounds. Um, you can look at some of the 17 center fires and they're pretty awesome. Actually, like, if I were to get, if I didn't have a 22 Magnum and I wanted, um, that type of varmint gun, um, I would definitely go with some of the 17 center fires. Now they're at the most expensive, but if that weren't a thing, interesting, anyway, I've, I've looked at this. I've looked at some of the other options, including the Smith and Wesson. Uh, I didn't like the charging handle in the Smith and Wesson. I didn't like the ergonomics of it. Um, this, I, you know, if you shot a 10 22, you know, the ergonomics of 10 22, this has some improvements on it. Um, it's definitely in line with what I was kind of looking for. And, you know, I might be able to pick one up cheap here or there. So, yeah.

Gene:

Um, how expensive are they?

Ben:

Well, depends. So it depends on the stock, depends on some of the features. Um, the one in the gun store I was looking at was retail for 7. 25. The one I'm hoping to get on gun broker, which hopefully will be done by the time we post this. Um, so no one tries to go steal it from me, but right now it's going for 3. 99. Okay.

Gene:

Well, that's a pretty good price if you can get it for that. Yeah, yeah. Hmm. Yeah, I had to look up while we were talking here, cause I could have sworn that, uh, there was a minimum cartridge size in Minnesota when I was hunting up there. Um, but I think it's actually the same thing. I think it's just a, uh, center fire, which is somewhat surprising. I would have, cause I know there was, I guess it's not a law thing, but there's always a debate about. Whether it's ethical to hunt deer with, um, five, five, six.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, um, I think it's very ethical depending on where you try and place it. Um, you know, one of the things that my dad taught me early and I've moved away from, but he always taught me, especially, uh, you know, hunting on, uh, longer, uh, longer range shots, you know, uh, Same small, Ms. Small sort of mentality of take a head or neck shot, you're gonna either drop the deer or you're gonna miss it. Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. you know, you're, you're not going to, I mean, if you, you're shooting in the neck, you can graze it. Mm-hmm. Yeah. Okay then, and the deer will survive. But if you make any meaningful impact, the deer is dead. Mm-hmm. So, you know, if you hit the upper neck, you're blowing out the spine. If you hit the lower neck, you're blowing out the airway. Either way, you're dead. Um, very, or if you, you know, headshot, same thing, um, you know, I'll do body shots today just because it's, you know, easier, quite frankly. Um,

Gene:

yeah, I think if you're shooting at a close enough distance, then doing a headshot makes more sense to me, but I wouldn't want to do a headshot at 150 yards. Yeah,

Ben:

so here are the firearm rules for game animals in the state of Texas and non migratory birds. Rimfire ammunition of any caliber may not be used to hunt white tailed deer, mule deer, bighorn sheep, or pronghorn. So, those are the only animals that rimfire cannot be used for. Do we have pronghorn anywhere?

Gene:

Oh yeah, yeah. West Texas. I've never seen one. How far West? Oh,

Ben:

look at their range. I've never looked at it. You cannot use fully automatic

Gene:

firearms. Well, okay. That makes sense.

Ben:

Shotguns are only legal. Firearms may be used during spring East Turkey season. So that's for non migratory birds. Um, which is

Gene:

a slug

Ben:

for deer. The way this reads on the Texas website. That's a good question. I would assume so. Yeah. Anyway, magazine capacity, uh, is a thing muzzle loaders.

Gene:

Okay. So that's the thing I never understood. What do they give a shit what my magazine holds?

Ben:

The number of shells or cartridges allowed. There is no restriction on the number of shells or cartridges allowed. Legal firearm may hold while, uh, when hunting or blah, blah, blah, except migratory birds. Right. Why? It's an illegal shotgun. Because that's a federal rule for migratory birds because they cross state lines. But according to the state of Texas, I'm dead serious. According to, and this is a myth that's been out there is, Oh, you're only allowed so many rounds when you're hunting and so on. Yeah. Magazine capacity, according to state law in Texas does not matter, but this is all for Texas, correct? Anyway, suppressors, AKA silencers may be used to take any wildlife resource. Yeah. Well, federal state and local laws continue to apply.

Gene:

Honestly, I'm, I'm shocked that somebody hasn't. Come up in the government during the right administration with the idea of encouraging people to buy suppressors, um, especially now when 200 is not what 200 used to be, I would be doing a fucking PSA campaign. Uh, and putting ads on, on hunting shows, telling people about the benefit of buying a suppressor and, uh, how you're, it's, it's a, it's the right neighborly thing to do to, for everybody to keep their ears from getting, uh, blown out. Um. And it doesn't scare the wildlife. There's so many pros to running with a suppressor and of course the government makes some money off of it, but they shouldn't make this process feel like it's, it's a bad thing. It's restricted. You shouldn't be doing it, but if you are, we'll take your money. They ought to be advertising the hell out of it and occasionally running a sale. Do you

Ben:

disagree? No, I, but I think the tax stamp should go away because it's a moral and illegal. Yeah, I

Gene:

agree with that. But if I was the government and I didn't think there's a problem with morality, which the government doesn't, um, at the very least, I would try and make more money off the tax stamp by encouraging people to use it.

Ben:

A hundred percent. Um, let's see, where was I going to go? I have a knack for

Gene:

that. I have a knack for the sidetracking knack.

Ben:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Uh, oh crap.

Gene:

Hm. You talked about your gun that you're wanting to get. We talked about my video games. So I'm just going

Ben:

through the bingo card here. Yeah. I sent you the link to the Texas state website. Yeah. That throw that in the, uh, the, uh, show notes. I'll

Gene:

forget to, but okay. They can look it up.

Ben:

Um, anyway, the, uh, what else you got? Well, I'm trying to remember what I was going to say here, since you just. Yeah,

Gene:

hey man, I'm not the one that forgets what I'm talking about. It must not have been all that important. Just the one that interrupts everybody. Uh, did you hear the stats that, uh, on my other show, unrelenting that Darren had mentioned?

Ben:

Uh, what do you mean? The show that doesn't exist according to

Gene:

AI? Yeah. According to AI, that show does, well, he does not do that show. Yes. No, he has no agenda. That he does no agenda. That's correct. And I think he'd like to think he does too, but the, the stats for a two hour episode and our episodes on that show are always exactly two hours because it's basically the time between when Darren, uh, finishes breakfast or no, it's the time between when he gets off his exercise bike because he eats breakfast before that. But it's between when he gets off his exercise bike and when his wife comes home, it's exactly two hours. So that's when the podcast is. But during that two hour episode, he found that I spoke for, uh, 80 minutes and he spoke for 50. No, no, I was more than that. Maybe I spoke for 90 and he spoke for 60. It was something like that, but it basically added up to like three hours. But I did the majority of the talking, which is surprising.

Ben:

So that means you're talking over each other constantly.

Gene:

Well, I don't think that's the case, because I can't really hear him talking, so, I think, I think he must be mumbling, is my guess.

Ben:

That or he's, you know, Grrrr, Gene.

Gene:

Yeah, maybe it's just the fact that he's subsonic, that, you know, I can barely understand without speeding him up. That's Larry. No, Larry is subsonic. There's no barely that, that goes with Larry. Larry is completely subsonic. Yeah. I,

Ben:

I, I won't necessarily screw that.

Gene:

I mean, he might have a size 13 shoe, but, uh, or whatever. You can't understand the guy if you can't hear him.

Ben:

He might have a size 13 shoe. Okay. Now I don't know why that's relevant.

Gene:

Well, usually that's the kind of thing that, that people that are subsonic would say. I just noticed that seems to go hand in hand.

Ben:

Well, I definitely am not subsonic. No, you're, you're the right,

Gene:

proper pitch level. Um, there's something musically related. I was going to ask you to, um,

Ben:

now I did see something that I wanted to send to Darren, but I didn't, and it was a picture of Taylor Swift kind of bent over in the angle of the, uh, picture. The microphone was placed rather interestingly,

Gene:

really. Yeah, up front. No.

Ben:

And in there. Nice. I wonder if that's a new musical tone. She's generating

Gene:

might be. Uh, yeah, she's, um, she's a tall gal.

Ben:

Yeah. I got into an argument, uh, earlier this week around, uh, Cardi B. I don't know which one that is. Oh my God. She's the WAP author.

Gene:

The WAP

Ben:

author. Okay. The song WAP.

Gene:

What's WAP? It's an acronym. No,

Ben:

it's a, it's an acronym

Gene:

for what? White something? No. What's the acronym for it?

Ben:

You can Google it. Anyway, the, this, uh, this rapper, just

Gene:

tell me, Jesus Christ.

Ben:

No, it's not appropriate. W A P. Yeah. Urban dictionary. Anyway, this, uh, uh, rapper was also

Gene:

working on pussy. Is that what it is?

Ben:

Yes. Yes. That is what it is. Okay. Anyway, uh, she was also twerking on stage, uh, without any underwear on commando with a tampon string hanging out. So there's that, um, that's just gross, man. Exactly. I mean, there's the point was there's nothing redeeming about this person. And, uh, the person I was in an argument with said, well, she's just unapologetically her. Okay. So she's unapologetically trash. Great. You know, this is not a relevant argument here. Um, so yeah.

Gene:

Why does the word ass have to be there? Why can't it just be a wet pussy?

Ben:

Because she's using it to manipulate men. If you look at the lyrics and the whole point, and this is her life and what she's done

Gene:

is... Whores in the house. There's some whores in this house. There's some whores in this house. There's some whores in this house hole up that's

Ben:

not reading. That's not great.

Gene:

I mean, I mean, she's repeating the same thing three times. I said certified freak seven days a week, that rhymes. Wet ass pussy make that pull out game, woo. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. You fucking with some wet ass pussy. Bring a bucket and a mop for this wet ass pussy. So far, give me everything

Ben:

you got to be a somewhat, you know, friendly show somewhat.

Gene:

It's never been a friendly show to families. Come on,

Ben:

it certainly isn't not a fan of Cardi

Gene:

B fan of modern music. I'll just throw it all in there.

Ben:

Well, I, you know, not to sound too much like a commercial curmudgeon or John C. Dvorak, but I tend to agree with you that it's just get off my lawn time. Um, but you know, Oh my

Gene:

God, this has like 14 verses, Jesus Christ.

Ben:

Yes. And this is held up as an empowering song for young women. There's

Gene:

some whores in the house. Um, I mean, this isn't. Does the whore usually have a pimp?

Ben:

It's just, you're overthinking it and going too far down the

Gene:

rabbit hole. No, I'm just thinking about empowerment. I mean, isn't this really more of a song about, like, men winning?

Ben:

Uh, well, you know, the funny part is that she's sitting there talking about making the pullout game weak, so she's trying to get pregnant? I just, I don't understand here.

Gene:

Well, that's how you make money, as a... Yeah, well, a whore,

Ben:

uh, anyway, uh, doesn't have an

Gene:

impressive tongue length though. Jesus Christ. She can like lick her own, uh, neck with, uh, uh,

Ben:

so you're saying she's going to compete with Gene Simmons. Got it. Um. You

Gene:

know, he's kind of a man who are, so that is kind of a competition though.

Ben:

Maybe there's a correlation between tongue length and, you

Gene:

know, I remember at some point he said that he'd sex with like 3000 women. Why? Probably

Ben:

cause he could. Yeah, but I, I just, why?

Gene:

They could share makeup tips. I always thought Kiss was pretty gay.

Ben:

No comment. Um, dudes

Gene:

wearing leather, uh, high heeled shoes and facial makeup isn't gay.

Ben:

I, I, I'm not a KISS fan, so you're not gonna offend me. I'm

Gene:

not trying to offend, I'm just kind of noticing to the bystander who's not like a fan or a hater. It just always kind of seemed

Ben:

a little gay. I will say this, gene Simmons, staying as clean as he has from a drug standpoint is impressive.

Gene:

I'll tell you, gene Simmons getting Shannon Tweet is pretty damn impressive. Why is that? Dude, she was so fucking hot back in the eighties.

Ben:

I don't see that, but okay.

Gene:

Well, you got to look at some 80s photos. Okay. Send me one. Come on. That's what I'm doing right now. What do you think? I'm Googling.

Ben:

Uh, yeah. On a update, uh, for some people who might be interested, um, yeah, on a couple go bag items, um, uh, Patriot, my Patriot supply has some quick clot alternatives that, uh, Are pretty price effective and effective. That's something to look out for.

Gene:

What does that mean?

Ben:

Well, Quick Caught is a brand that's expensive. I mean, you go to Academy to get their basic trauma kit. It's going to be 20 bucks for a single use pack of their, uh, Quick clotting agent and a bandage and, you know, maybe some antibiotics or not. Um, my Patriot supply doesn't include the bandage in the package, but it's got the clotting agent and the antibiotics, um, for like 5. So it's pretty, pretty effective. And you know, then you throw in a couple of Israeli bandages or tourniquets and things like that, um, which you may or may not need to use the quick clot with. That's why packaging them separately makes more sense

Gene:

than Amazon for 49. I'm sorry, what now? Well, I said, yeah, you include those bandages and the tourniquets and you sell it on Amazon as a kit for 49. Yeah, sure. If you want to do that. Well, that's all those kits are. That's all they do. Which is

Ben:

why you don't buy those kits. You buy the components and you go to your local, uh, pharmacy and get what you need there too. Yeah. All right, man. Well, other than that, I don't really have a lot more to say, I guess at this point, because I forgot what I was going to say.

Gene:

Dude, it's it's clearly not that important. So, you know,

Ben:

it was something. Yeah.

Gene:

Well, if you think of it, call me back.

Ben:

Yeah, well, there, there were a couple of times we talked this week, which is kind of abnormal. Yeah, we talked a little, yeah, sure. When, uh, you know, when the, uh, temperature isn't a hundred and fucking five outside. It is, yes, pretty damn hot out there. But we do need to get a meetup going and, uh, a gun range day set up. And, uh, I think we've got at least half, you know, half a dozen participants already lined up counting you and I. Right, okay. Yeah, so, um, a couple of my buddies, yeah, Josh go, Josh should go, uh, my buddy Tony that, uh, works at the restaurant, you know, uh, and then, uh, uh, John, uh, Janice, uh, who's from, uh, Germany, he's a little German guy is, uh, you'd like him, he's a what guy. He's a gang guy from Germany, young guy from Germany. Okay. Yeah. I'm not likely to go back. I kind of screwed with him the other day and I asked him what the hell's wrong with Germans. And he goes, what do you mean? I said, Germans and Japanese. All you get to do is look at their porn. And those are screwed up societies. And he looked at me and goes, You have a point. Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. No, that is true. There, um, there is a, it's not the same thing for both of us, but no, but there is something off about both types of porn from both countries. Well, they're obviously like their mainstream porn is fetish porn. Yes, but then again, I'm sure people are looking at Americans that, you know, people that don't live here and goes like, how, what the hell are furries? What the hell is that?

Ben:

That is not a purely American thing. That's fortunately an American

Gene:

thing. Okay. Well, who else is into that? The Europeans. Interfering Asians, Asians are into cartoon animals, not like people walking around. There's a video I watched recently of somebody that was de transitioning from being a furry. I

Ben:

know that just hurts. The one that's a real thing.

Gene:

Oh, cause they have to like, they've, they've been a Fox for a number of years and now they have to transition back to being a human, human girl. Hmm.

Ben:

Um, the Don don't make fun of people. Okay. So this photo from the eighties is, you know, okay,

Gene:

it's eighties hair, same hair that Adam Curry had

Ben:

Oh, that's such a horrible You can't look at, you can't see me that picture and go, that's the same that Adam had That's a bad image,

Gene:

dude, Dave. It's the same hair. Oh, Jesus Christ. She was, Shannon Tweed actually did a great job in mm-hmm. a movie that I really enjoyed. Boy, it must've been like 91. Maybe it came out right around there, maybe late eighties, but it was the movie that was really the start of, um, the career of, uh, uh, what the hell is the guy's name? The politically incorrect guy. Uh, but, but, but, uh, like, you know, the same Bill Maher. So this was like Bill Maher done some clubs and stuff, but this was his first real breakthrough movie that got people to see him that weren't going to comedy

Ben:

clubs. Yeah. And by the way, Bill Maher had two guests on recently that kind of shocked me. And he

Gene:

had a long, long form interview with, uh, Jordan Peterson. And Riley

Ben:

Gaines, I didn't see that one. Yeah, very, very worth watching both of them. Yeah, um, you know, the Riley Gaines interview and the Peterson interview kind of shocked me.

Gene:

That's the guy who gave a million dollars to the, uh, don't reelect Donald Trump campaign. Mm hmm. Um, although I will say that interview with Jordan was a little bit. I don't know. It felt like

Ben:

he's a fan

Gene:

boy. Well, I don't know how much of a fan boy because I don't think he realized just how big Jordan is. What do you mean? I mean, it sounded like he still thinks of Jordan as that kind of. You know, darling of the right that those people will, uh, use for memes. I don't think you realize how much money Jordan's generating.

Ben:

Oh, I definitely think he does. You think? Yes, absolutely. If you go back and watch that interview, they, they even talk about being wealthy and being able to survive, um, survive the, uh, yeah,

Gene:

yeah. No, I think that the interview. Started off a little weird, but I'd say the first 10 minutes were a little off and then they got into a groove after that.

Ben:

Yeah, yeah. But I think Bill Maher is definitely a fanboy.

Gene:

Okay. Well, I did not get that take from it, but anyway, Bill Maher, uh, the movie I'm referring to is called the, uh, the Amazon women of the avocado jungle. Oh God. It's a great movie. I saw it when it first came out. Uh, Bill Maher plays, I'll take your word for it. It is. I recommend everybody drop what you're doing right now and track this movie down and see, uh, you see. So the premise of this movie is you have Shannon Tweed, who's playing a feminist studies professor, uh, gets a cryptic message from a female anthropologist who's researching, uh, female led societies and who has disappeared. And she needs to go and find this woman. And she ends up running into this complete, uh, misogynist dude in a bar. Who, uh, who ends up getting hired to take them to the avocado jungle. And that's of course, Bill Maher. And the movie is just so chock full of the it's making fun of all these stereotypes. I mean, it's like, so it's really the movie, I think got him the politically incorrect job because the character that he played much like Zelinsky played the character of a president of a country in this movie, Bill Maher played. The character of a guy that's demonstrating, uh, the idiocy of political correctness. I know it seems ironic now, there was a point in time where Bill Maher would have been considered far right.

Ben:

Well, I, I, so first of all, I, I think Bill Maher is way more right than quite frankly he even realizes. And what it comes down to is man, he... I think the left has really left him in such a way that I think he's starting to, and a lot of other people are starting to realize that, uh, he's, he's not, he's not the darling of the leftist by any stretch.

Gene:

But he's still clinging on to it. He hasn't really been red pilled. He's just kind of like, boy, where's the left going? Rather than, holy shit, you people are crazy. You need to figure out that you completely lost all your marbles. Um, so see money is an insulator. It, it allows people to adhere to supporting leftist ideology while at the same time being immune from its effects. So that's why we find a lot more rich liberals than we find poor

Ben:

liberals. Yeah. Again, I don't, I don't necessarily disagree with that, but why

Gene:

would you, we agree on everything.

Ben:

My point is, I think Bill Maher is actually further down the. Okay, this has gone too far. The left is a colt rabbit hole, then, then you're giving him credit for, and I think that Peterson interview, and I think the Riley Gaines interview very much show that,

Gene:

um, okay, but I've been watching Bill Maher for 30 years, and I've seen that he's gone from just a guy that made fun of the, uh, you know, political correctness and, uh, the institutions that push it. To being a guy that was donating a million dollars.

Ben:

Yeah, I think some of that's going away though, I think he's done with Biden, I think he's done with a lot of things and I think he's waking up. I really do. But again, go watch the Riley Gaines interview and rewatch the, uh, the Peterson one. So you sent me a, uh, video earlier on, uh, you know, a, a, a Caterpillar drive for water. Yeah, cool. Yeah. I mean, it's okay. Duh. But the problem is doing that at scale to generate enough force to move. Anything requires a shit ton of energy. Well, and not to mention back in the eighties. Uh huh. Sure. And not to mention that it would require

Gene:

October prove that.

Ben:

Yeah, yeah. Okay. Yeah. Anyway, um, first of all, using a permanent magnet would not be the answer. You would use an electromagnet

Gene:

first. Totally. That was my first sort of thing. And when I was watching the video, I'm like. Dude, why are you using a neodymium magnet? He's trying to use these neodymium... What the hell, dude? He's using an electromagnet.

Ben:

Yes, something that you can scale with the voltage so that you have... And here's the thing that he immediately does wrong, and you have to send the link to this, but what he's doing is using an electromagnetic field, so he's, he's, he has two permanent magnets, and then he has... A anode and a cathode in saltwater that he is then creating ionized water across and then allowing the magnetic field to create a force. Yeah, um, the problem with what he does immediately in this is that. He immediately outscales the ionization of the water to the magnetic field so that the amount of ionized water and the strength of the ionization is not correspondent to the strength of magnetic field. Right. So, yeah. And this is where excitation. Magnetic field excitation in a, uh, power plants generator, uh, comes into play, right? Because this is the exact same thing that you're doing as the amount of force that you're putting behind the spinning turbine that's spinning the generator. You want to increase the resistance of the magnetic field to get the most flux out of the generator to then generate electricity. So I'm sure there's 4 minutes and this would

Gene:

be the inverse. And I'm sure there's formulas to calculate all that stuff. Yeah, yeah. And he was just kind of trying shit by the seat of the pants. But that's what he does. It's his whole channel. It's just trying shit by the seat of the pants.

Ben:

Again, I mean, she's okay. I don't know why you're so like hubba

Gene:

hubba. I don't know, man. She was a hottie back in the 80s, I think. Uh huh.

Ben:

I think you were just in a certain position in the 80s to, you know, be.

Gene:

To appreciate that, yes. Jazzercise was a great thing. Uh, dude, I, you know, I grew up being a member of tennis

Ben:

clubs and, you know, I actually remember those like jazzercise exercise videos and the little spring thing that you put between your legs that they used. I remember those infomercials on TV as a kid. 100%. Yeah,

Gene:

exactly. There's a show, I think it's on Showtime, um, or maybe HBO, it might be on HBO, but it's a, it takes place during the eighties and it's chronicling like a woman who really jumped into the whole, um, you know, that whole craze of working out to music, uh, which was very popular in it. And I think it was pretty new and it was really. In my recollection, it was sort of like bringing the disco in from the clubs to the tennis club and putting all these suburban, suburban, really at that point, still relatively young because people got married younger and hot and with no need to work women, bringing them to the tennis club during the day. To sweat out the calories and try and they had been drinking. Yeah, and, um, and, uh, somebody had apparently discovered in the late eighties that coke was bad for you, which kind of fucked things up. Um, but man. It was as a teenager going to the tennis club was always a fun time.

Ben:

Yeah. My dad's kind of at the same opinion. You, you are. That's neat. He claims that's why he learned to play tennis. So

Gene:

yeah, dude, I played tennis all the time. I, I, I had like, I wore nothing but white. That and Neon, of course.

Ben:

Right. So, uh, also on the, uh, how do I put this on the, um, scale of things that I believe are nonsense, but you, like mm-hmm. um, I think you'll really like the strange New World's musical episode. Like, I, I, knowing you, knowing you, I haven't seen it,

Gene:

but I'll, I'll watch it. I, I think you'll, you'll actually like it. I'll dig it. Yes. I could very well be, I've generally enjoyed the I know musical episodes of other shows.

Ben:

Well, this is actually, it's somewhat corny, but, um, it's not just random musical, it actually is full blown, like moving the storyline numbers and everything else, and

Gene:

did you ever see the, uh, Buffy the Vampire Slayer musical episode a

Ben:

long, long time

Gene:

ago? Yeah, that was great. I really liked that. That was a good show. I really enjoyed Buffy.

Ben:

The movie or the

Gene:

show? Uh, both. Um, I, I saw the movie when that first came out and I thought that was pretty cool. Cause, uh, plus I was also a fan of Paul Reubens. So him having, you know, be the, the evil, the bad guy was really hilarious in there. Paul Reubens, Peewee Herman for people that don't know, but that's his alter ego character. Uh, he did. I didn't know that.

Ben:

Yeah. He passed away when this last

Gene:

week. Oh shit. I keep people, people get old. You keep talking about dead people. Buddha

Ben:

judges. Peewee Herman making jokes. Oh

Gene:

man, that sucks. Uh, Rip Paul Reuben. Um,

Ben:

Peewee Herman Death. Paul Reuben. Best known actor from, Yeah,

Gene:

July 30th, 2023. Holy shit. Yeah, that's nuts.

Ben:

Um, Peewee and shown as Peewee in a theater. Yeah,

Gene:

I remember seeing him in Vegas. He was awesome. Yeah.

Ben:

His, his Pee wee Herman's career was derailed when he was arrested for indecent exposure in an adult movie theater in Sarasota, Florida. Exactly. How do you get exposed? Jesus Christ.

Gene:

Yeah. What kind of asshole calls the cops on him

Ben:

in an adult movie theater? Exactly. Yeah. And by the way, this is back in the day when that's where you went to watch porn.

Gene:

Well you already had videotapes. This is like back when you were traveling and you were doing comedy shows and your hotel was really shitty and cheap and didn't have porn. And so you got no choice. And Gene is

Ben:

now speaking from experience.

Gene:

Not at all. I've always stayed in hotels that had porn. Thank you very much. Jesus Christ.

Ben:

Thank you.

Gene:

I just want to have to resort to that

Ben:

is one thing I am thankful for is I never had to deal with any

Gene:

of this. Yeah. Yeah. No. And then you, you, uh, get one of those decoders to bring with you when you travel that does the, uh, the pay per view porn in the hotels and let you watch them. Everything's a little, little fuzzy, but you can still mostly see the, what's happening. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. It's a thing. It used to be. Used to be. Back before the internet. It's, it's a thing before the internet that, uh, hotels, like the nicest hotels, all hotels have pay per view porn on the TV. Still do. Do they really? Oh yeah. I don't think I've turned the TV on in the hotel in like a decade. I just,

Ben:

you can still do, uh, you can still do adult content on, uh, that's

Gene:

amazing. Who would pay for that shit?

Ben:

Who would pay for any pay per view at this point?

Gene:

Well, who would pay for porn? Oh my God. The internet is like 50% porn. That is a

Ben:

drastic

Gene:

underestimation. Look at that Cardi B thing. Yeah,

Ben:

exactly. All right, man. Anything else we need to chat about?

Gene:

I'm just, I'm trying to see here, looking at the bingo card. Was there anything that we haven't talked about? Well, yeah, every podcast has a bingo card of frequently repeated topics and, uh, quotes. And so,

Ben:

yeah, who has generated ours? Um, the bingo card. Yeah. If this is self generated, it doesn't count.

Gene:

Um, well, I mean, we sell them on online, so I kind of hope they count people who are going to be buying them. What

Ben:

did you stand up a story that I didn't know about? Yes.

Gene:

I'm not sharing the profits from this shit. It's all me.

Ben:

That would not be out of character for you.

Gene:

No, that wouldn't be out of character. Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you. Actually, you know, we can joke about this stuff, but... That frickin co host of mine, Darren, uh, he's mentioned a number of times about the donations that were sizable, like a hundred plus dollars coming in. And he keeps forgetting to send

Ben:

me, my god. I think forgetting their gene is a, uh, yeah.

Gene:

It's a euphemism, I know, I know. There's no forgetting there. It's a very calculated thing that he's doing.

Ben:

Well, I mean, you know, if he's paying taxes on it, and doing all that, then, you know.

Gene:

Yeah, well, who wants to pay taxes? You might as well keep the money and not do that, I guess. But he, uh, I know he just bought a very fancy sump pump for 2, 000. I wonder where that got paid from.

Ben:

Mm. Mm. Mm. Mm. Mm. Uh

Gene:

huh. I'm just saying. But yeah, it's it's all good. You know, I think people and I've said this on the other show. So I'm just going to repeat it on here is I think that it's, it's nice that people can support podcasters and people they listen to honestly, the way the economy is going in the U S and in most Western countries right now, you'd be better off not supporting people and just save some money. Like build up a little more of a nest egg.

Ben:

So I just got a very interesting fundraising email from the Trump campaign. Okay. Should I debate that's the email subject? No, it's the subject. And then it goes on to say, we have a 50. Point lead in the Republican primary, my, uh, primary opponents call me the front runner, dah, dah, dah, dah. Some of the qualified, uh, candidates that would be in the debates have only 1% in the polls. Uh, and he goes on to say how he, uh, is going to be watching the debates looking for his running mate. Well, considering it an

Gene:

audition, he's going to pull a Biden then.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

Just basically decide that it's not worth debating anyone. Uh,

Ben:

I don't know if it, I would. Say he's pulling a Biden, that's a little insulting, but sure. Well, that's. He's doing your intention. I understand. Uh, what do you think about that? Um, I think he's somewhat right. I don't think there's any way in hell. Anyone's going to catch him. I think the Santas is absolutely done. Desantis campaign was done quite frankly, the moment he announced and the way he announced and the lackluster crap that was that announcement.

Gene:

Yeah. Unfortunately, I think the senses burned whatever bridges and credibility he had. Um, a year ago, because a lot of people a year ago, including guys like Tim pool, we're like, I don't know. I think the Santa's the guy and now I think all of that is gone. He's whether it's true or not, he certainly allowed the impression to be created that he is. Part of the Republican swamp and he's right now. Well, but if you look at what he's done in Florida, I think he is. Oh, he's a good governor. Yeah. Yeah. Well, he, he can be both.

Ben:

Uh, actually he can. I don't think so. Okay. Well, regardless, uh, I think his campaign's done and you know, if. Your prediction holds that, uh, Trump is arrested and not going to make it politically. Uh, I think Vivek is in a very, very good position. I think Vivek has a real shot,

Gene:

actually. Um, I think he should. I don't know that he does, but I think he definitely should. Why do you

Ben:

think he doesn't?

Gene:

I think the Republican Party right now is divided into three groups. And those three are? And the three are the, uh, the rightos. Uh huh. The, um, the Trump supporters that... We saw quite a few of them when we went to the Trump rally.

Ben:

Yeah. I think that's only grown. Yeah.

Gene:

And the. What I would kind of describe as the, the libertarian wing of the Republican party, which are people that would prefer the Indian guy over Trump.

Ben:

Uh, yeah, but here's where I think if, so I think Trump Rameshwami is unbeatable.

Gene:

Yeah, cause he'd have the first, uh, brown vice president. Okay. And, you know, that makes it more difficult for...

Ben:

Um, you, you gotta look at Kamala, but okay.

Gene:

Oh shit, she is an Indian, isn't she? Goddammit, I kept thinking she was black, but she's not really black, she was brown. Fuck it. They beat him. That's it. They, they beat Trump. Oh God, that was the only reason Biden got elected is because she's Brown. No, I don't think it's quite that bad, but it's a very good point. You caught me on it because, uh, I, I totally spaced out that she actually is Indian, but I don't know. I mean, like if you just go purely off of what each candidate says, Rameshwami is definitely speaking for guys like me. And me. Yeah. And, well, yeah, I

Ben:

would hope so. I actually bought some of the swag. Did you? Okay. Yeah. I got a campaign mug. I got a shirt and a sign, but I, I collect political signs and buttons and things. I actually at an antique store and I've got a couple of these now, but I found a nice big one. I found a Goldwater Miller button from 64.

Gene:

Okay. Well, someone's got to own that, I guess. I'm sorry. So someone's got to own that stuff, I

Ben:

guess. Well, I mean, have you ever read Conscience of a Conservative? Uh,

Gene:

no, but you've brought it up enough times that I kind of feel like I know enough about it. Well, I'm

Ben:

gonna kick you until you go read it.

Gene:

I'm not making fun of it, I'm making fun of people collecting crap. You're, you're pissed off at the wrong thing. It's, the collection thing. I was talking to somebody last night, in fact, and I was saying, you know, as I've gotten older, I just find that That was

Ben:

me, and we were talking about, uh, firearms. Oh, was

Gene:

that you? I can't keep track of all the people I converse with on a daily basis. There was this some dude I was talking, I can't remember who it was.

Ben:

I can't remember who, uh, that, uh, that, that was me, asshole.

Gene:

See, this is the best part of the show, people that have stuck around till the end. Uh huh. Now they're getting laughed about it. Yeah. What did I say in my great wisdom?

Ben:

Uh, that you just don't care that guns are tools and that you'll sell them. And I, I was like, yeah, well, you know, since you don't have any kids, who's getting your guns, and unfortunately it wasn't me. Yeah,

Gene:

exactly. Yeah. I, I just, as I've gotten older, I just became less sentimental. Uh, things that in my ute I would have held on to because they held a, uh, sentimental value to me, uh, at this point no longer do it's just kind of like, well, it's everything's replaceable, you know, it's, uh, in fact, quite often with a better, younger model. I mean, newer are, are we talking? I meant newer

Ben:

uh, Freud in slips here. Oops. Uh, all right, gene, have you got anything else?

Gene:

I think we talked enough. I feel like you've been trying to end this for 20 minutes now, so I, I'll, I'll let you win after.

Ben:

I forgot the main thing I wanted to freaking say to you,'cause you interrupted me. I just, you know, well,

Gene:

you should write down things you wanna say just in case you forget it. Oh, I don't wanna do that. You know, you are an elder millennial, so, uh, that memory's. Not going to get any better, my friend. Uh, and for me, like the visual memory stays, so I can picture things almost every time, but what the hell the person's name was, that's a hard one for me these days. Yeah. I

Ben:

actually have a pretty decent memory. Um, when it comes down to things, let's

Gene:

hope so. You're still young. Okay.

Ben:

Well, young ish, I'm getting old, man. I'm starting to gray

Gene:

out. Yeah, that's a good, that's a good time in life when you're starting to gray up. I'm starting to be at the point where there's almost no black hair left anymore. No Brown hair left. So

Ben:

certainly

Gene:

on the top of your head. Well, there hasn't been any on top of my head for a long, long time. Uh, I, one of these days I'll, I'll show you a, uh, a photo of me, uh, with a full head of hair, you won't recognize me. It'll be

Ben:

crazy. Well, I'll tell you what you start look, trying to look up certain people online that don't have much of an online presence. And it's kind of interesting when you do find some stuff out about them. Do you think,

Gene:

I don't know. I usually find it's, uh, usually pretty boring. Most people are.

Ben:

Well, you remember that, uh, company I sent you some info on and said, Hey, look at this and see what you think.

Gene:

Yeah. And then you remember what I told you.

Ben:

Yeah. The UAE is definitely got some spookiness going on there. Did you realize that the UAE and I want to know how they did this? How the hell did the UAE become, uh, have, uh, a power plant, uh, built? Without, with the non proliferation treaty. How did that happen?

Gene:

Uh, well, they don't have nukes, right? Uh, they

Ben:

do now. Do they? Uh, that will hold on, I haven't read about that United Arab Emirates, nuclear power total generation in 2020, 137, uh, carawatt hour, a breeder reactor, um, looking yeah, but, but, but, but, but United Arab Emirates right here, the background power plant, which is built also by South Korea. Those pesky

Gene:

South Koreans.

Ben:

So I don't know if they got around it by South Korea, technically owning it or how. But, uh, Korea is not a nuclear power. Uh, they have built react. They have reactors and have done things. And what do you mean?

Gene:

Well, I mean, it depends on what you call a nuclear power. I'm talking about nuclear power. Somebody who's got nuclear missiles. I'm

Ben:

talking power plants. I mean, that, that falls under the non proliferation treaty.

Gene:

Well, there's lots of countries that have those now. Okay.

Ben:

Well, anyway, UAE now has

Gene:

like six months ago, I think. Half the African countries have nuclear power plants now.

Ben:

Okay. Well, the u a e has, uh, a nameplate capacity of 50 Wow. Almost 5,400 megawatts. That's a big sucker.

Gene:

Well, and for a country that pumps oil, that's pretty interesting. Mm-hmm.

Ben:

there you go.

Gene:

Okay. It's a bit, bit of a non-sequitur that you threw at there. Right at the end, but

Ben:

it came up, it came up, surprised me. I didn't see a Persian state building a reactor like that other than the Iranians, which, you know, peaceful,

Gene:

you know, so as of, uh, last year, no, as of 2021, there were 32 countries that operated nuclear power plants.

Ben:

Isn't that lovely? And why is it the U. S. construction? Now, I will say this Vogel 3 is in commercial operation before Vogel Vogel 3 made it to commercial operation. That's a huge, huge thing. No, it here recently. So Vogel Vogel 3 and 4 are. Two power plants being built by Southern Company in Georgia power, um, that bankrupted Westinghouse, uh, that had they not been completed, you would not have seen another commercial, uh, light water reactor built in the United States. Um, and now these are. Billions of dollars in, uh, over budget and overruns and only a company like Southern Company could have done this and pulled it off. But Vogel 3 is now in commercial operation, which is huge and Vogel 4 should be following, um, pretty close behind it, uh,

Gene:

Georgia. Okay.

Ben:

But do you mind worked on vocals one and two? So,

Gene:

yeah. And when you say work, you mean like he was an electrician and actually did something or did he just sit in front of a whiteboard?

Ben:

Uh, he was actually an INC tech and board operator at Vogel one and two. Okay.

Gene:

No, it's just, this is going to become a recurring, make in front of people like that actually do work versus talk about doing work.

Ben:

Yeah, the plant wouldn't have a right to operate if it wasn't for some of the work that I did,

Gene:

I know, but it's still fun, uh, you know, two countries that have zero power plants that are about to have several come online, uh, which ones, Turkey. Uh, uh, Egypt.

Ben:

Interesting. Mm hmm. Yeah. Nothing could

Gene:

go wrong there. The, the Arab world is nuclefying.

Ben:

Well, it's not just that, but I'm also thinking of, you know, uh, earthquakes.

Gene:

Yeah. Right. Well, that, that'll completely depend on whether the earthquake machine is tuned to those countries.

Ben:

Which, uh, by the way, Cyprus. Boy. Does that look like an interesting country in many ways? To me, I

Gene:

think so. Um, you should go visit.

Ben:

I have looked at flights, Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah. Um, yeah. Uh, what do you think of the whole eu, uh, requiring, uh, visas? Visas starting next year? I think it's about time. When's the US gonna require visas for u a e? Uh, are you, not you, a, you for

Gene:

you? Yeah. Since they're going to require visas for us, are they, are they, are we not collecting? No, they're a part

Ben:

of the

Gene:

visa waiver program. Wow. That could go away instantly.

Ben:

Well, and it should, if they're doing it to us,

Gene:

it should, it totally should. I, I'm, I've never understood why, uh, why Europeans should be allowed to come here without visas or anybody, honestly, except of course, through the Texas border where you don't need jack shit for paperwork, but. Other than that, why anybody should be able to come to the U. S. without a visa?

Ben:

Well, the polls were always wanting in on that visa waiver program and never got it. The, the Poll

Gene:

X? Well, um, yeah, I know that there've been, I guess we haven't had the visa thing, but we have had the mandated vaccine thing,

Ben:

which is just, oh, Jesus,

Gene:

which you, if you want to travel, you have to do what the government tells you.

Ben:

So you saw that, uh, article that I sent you on Connecticut, right? Yeah. And the ruling, yeah, we,

Gene:

we talked about that

Ben:

literally. I know.

Gene:

What about it? Would you forget what you were going to talk about again?

Ben:

So, no, no, look, I, I get the law passed. Okay. That was two years ago, but it's been held up in the courts, but for the courts to sit there and say that that is constitutional, I guess is the part that just really grinds my gears to pull a Peter Griffin, you know, who's from there. Yeah, exactly.

Gene:

I can only do the laugh. I can't

Ben:

remember us. That sounds nothing like him though. No Sanders farms is a trope from the nevermind. Apparently watch South park, but not family guy. Um,

Gene:

you know, I, I occasionally would watch family guy, but mostly for Mila Kunis, but I don't, I'm not like religious about it.

Ben:

Family guy is hilarious anyway. So they have Pepperidge farms remembers is the joke, right? So, you know, Pepperidge Farms remembers the guillotine era. So what is that supposed to make fun of their commercials anyway, it's, it's a whole trope in the show.

Gene:

Um, it's the whole show is non sequitur show agreed. Like it's a situation joke show. There's no continuity.

Ben:

Oh, there, you mean from episode to episode or contiguous inside an episode. Exactly.

Gene:

It's, it's, it's like a sketch

Ben:

comedy show. Yeah. To a degree, but I think there is some continuity across if you watch it enough, but regardless the point I was written by manatees, manatees or otters, which one manatees said the South Park trope was otters though.

Gene:

You're manatees. It wasn't others.

Ben:

The super intelligent otter episode of South Park,

Gene:

the, the episode of South Park where the otters are writing the show family guy.

Ben:

No, nevermind. I'll find it and send it to you.

Gene:

Uh, yeah, you, uh, yeah, you do that because cartoon wars is named the episode. And,

Ben:

um, I'm not talking about the manatees, I agree with you there, but I was making a further evidence reference to the episode of South park where otters are super intelligent. And I think it's, uh, let's see. God on the go. There you go.

Gene:

What's that have to do with Family Guy? Never mind. I'm saying that the episode where South Park makes fun of Family Guy was Cartoon Wars. Okay.

Ben:

The South Park has made fun of Family Guy, Family Guy has made fun of The Simpsons, you know. And the trope that The Simpsons already did it. Everybody's just copying The Simpsons. Oh, that, that part's true. Yeah, except The Simpsons have gone woke.

Gene:

Oh, completely. Well, and, and ironically, woke means racist because they fired their, uh, brown guy. A pool,

Ben:

how they

Gene:

fire a poo, they got rid of a poo because they said the poo is a racist character. We're no longer going to have a poo.

Ben:

This is like Disney with the pre warnings on, uh, the cartoon saying, you know, Hey, we realized this was racist.

Gene:

Uh, you mean like the, uh, snow white,

Ben:

snow white, um, that's coming out jungle book,

Gene:

everything else. Snow white and the one drawer woke

Ben:

people. The seven diversity candidates and snow white's brown. Yes.

Gene:

Yeah. What do they call her? Brown snow brown. The whole other kind of snow. Didn't we have this goddamn podcast like half an hour ago already? What's going on?

Ben:

Don't eat the yellow snow. Exactly. And on that,

Gene:

I'll talk to you next week.