Sinners Among Saints

Episode 68:The Monster of the Andes: Pedro Alonso Lopez

January 26, 2024 Megan and Lindsay
Episode 68:The Monster of the Andes: Pedro Alonso Lopez
Sinners Among Saints
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Sinners Among Saints
Episode 68:The Monster of the Andes: Pedro Alonso Lopez
Jan 26, 2024
Megan and Lindsay

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Our discussion with a somber look into the life of Pedro Alonzo Lopez. Dubbed the Monster of the Andes, his story is a chilling testament to the sinister depths some can plunge. Our narrative takes you through his tumultuous childhood, the horrific crimes that left entire communities in South America reeling, and the maddeningly lenient punishment that followed. Our episode peels back the layers of this enigmatic figure, discussing how justice sometimes falls short in the face of such unspeakable evil.

Ending on a peculiar note, we recount a bizarre tale from India that'll have you questioning if truth is stranger than fiction. Imagine being declared dead and then jolting back to life just in time to avoid your own cremation! This strange story, along with a sprinkle of cultural insights and a dash of humor, serves as a lighter counterbalance to the episode's heavier subjects. Prepare for an emotional rollercoaster as we navigate through the heartwarming, the grave, and the outright strange in this thought-provoking episode.

The Family Histories Podcast
A genealogy addicted guest, a Life Story, a research Brick Wall..... and a time machine.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Thanks for all the support!! Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Tik Tok, or email us, and remember we now have a Patreon!!
patreon.com/sinnersamongsaintspodcast
sinnersamongsaintspodcast@gmail.com
Tik Tok @sinnersamongsaints

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

Our discussion with a somber look into the life of Pedro Alonzo Lopez. Dubbed the Monster of the Andes, his story is a chilling testament to the sinister depths some can plunge. Our narrative takes you through his tumultuous childhood, the horrific crimes that left entire communities in South America reeling, and the maddeningly lenient punishment that followed. Our episode peels back the layers of this enigmatic figure, discussing how justice sometimes falls short in the face of such unspeakable evil.

Ending on a peculiar note, we recount a bizarre tale from India that'll have you questioning if truth is stranger than fiction. Imagine being declared dead and then jolting back to life just in time to avoid your own cremation! This strange story, along with a sprinkle of cultural insights and a dash of humor, serves as a lighter counterbalance to the episode's heavier subjects. Prepare for an emotional rollercoaster as we navigate through the heartwarming, the grave, and the outright strange in this thought-provoking episode.

The Family Histories Podcast
A genealogy addicted guest, a Life Story, a research Brick Wall..... and a time machine.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Thanks for all the support!! Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Tik Tok, or email us, and remember we now have a Patreon!!
patreon.com/sinnersamongsaintspodcast
sinnersamongsaintspodcast@gmail.com
Tik Tok @sinnersamongsaints

Speaker 2:

Hey guys, I'm Megan and I'm Lindsay, and welcome to another week of Sinners Among Saints. Welcome back. Thanks for coming, yeah, always. Oh, I was gonna okay, I wouldn't, I didn't even talk to you about this beforehand, but I just wanted to. I wanted like a PSA announcement today for women, because I don't know if any of you guys follow Tatum, my dude, on the TikTok, but she's hilarious, she's so funny. Tatum, my dude, yeah, and she's just like she's so funny and I love her. But I just randomly got on TikTok today and she is responding to a comment that some oh, I do.

Speaker 3:

Okay, I see all of her videos.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love her. So she was commenting on a comment that she had had from some guy that was like. I can't remember exactly what it said, but it was just essentially like the hell are you doing? What's happening to you? You look like you're gaining 40 pounds a day. Make some comment about this. And so she's on there and she's just like. First of all, I just want to say when I started making content on here, I weighed 87 pounds. 87 pounds. Yeah, she's like. As a grown woman I weighed 87 pounds. She's like. But since I've been on here and making content, my depression is better, my anxiety is better. I'm actually the happiest I probably have been in my entire life. So I've gained a little bit of weight and she like steps back because she's not overweight. No, she's beautiful. I think she's so pretty and she's so funny. She's not overweight at all no.

Speaker 2:

And she's like I weigh 125 pounds, so f off. And she's like so as a woman, like we're damned if we do or damned if we don't. And so I was like watching that and I'm just so floored by the, and she's even sat on there and I was like if you don't like the way I look, don't fucking look. She's like I'm here to make you laugh. That's what I'm doing. And if you don't want to look, close your eyes, bitch Like, stop looking at me, because that's not what I'm here for.

Speaker 2:

And I just like it's so frustrating because, like, as a person who has I think I weighed 125 pounds in sixth grade and I was not a fat kid at all, yeah, at all. I just am like big boned or like big frame, like I just carry, I don't know. I'm like kind of like a bulldog. I feel like I weigh more than I look, even though I'm not a little person. But I definitely like numbers wise, I think is higher than what people would necessarily expect. Yeah, but it's like so, so annoying that someone even like her that is beautiful and thin and young and all of the things, and there's still someone that has to get on there and comment about looking fat.

Speaker 3:

Like the people that comment that shit are either overweight themselves or like nothing to look at. Yeah, that's what she said.

Speaker 2:

She's like unless you are a 10 out of 10, built like a great God, I do not. Yeah, Unless you're a Donis Creed then no, she's like I don't like to see what you look like.

Speaker 3:

It was just like right, it was just, people have too much time on their hands. And putting other people down somehow makes them feel better, which I've never understood.

Speaker 2:

This whole world of like technology and social media could be so great because back in the day if you wanted to make music or make a podcast or whatever like not that those were even a thing back in the day, but like you would have to find a manager and you would have to find you would have to break into the scene. You couldn't just be like I'm going to go to my bedroom and film this and everybody in the world could see it and now we can do that and we can. We have that like avenue and people. So many people just use it to be such shitty humans. Yeah, I don't understand why.

Speaker 3:

We always say on here, like if you're enjoying the podcast, we would love to hear feedback, even if you're not like, message us and tell us what we could do differently. But you don't have to like go on and leave shitty comments.

Speaker 2:

No, and constructive criticism, yeah you don't have to be mean or rude. Like constructive criticism. We take that to account. Sometimes we we, you know are like oh, we should maybe not do that. And other times we're like you know, I understand what they're saying, but like this is us, this is us and this is what we're doing.

Speaker 3:

But you don't have to be like an asshole about it, and the great thing about online content is there's so much of it that you can find exactly what you want to hear and exactly what you want to see. And if that's not us, or if that's not her, if that's not whatever you're listening to, then just move on.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there's plenty of podcasts. I've listened to that. I'm like I don't, like I don't know why everybody likes this. Like I don't think it's that good, Just get on and message them and be like you're so shitty and terrible and your voice is dumb, and like you're dry and like I don't know. It just is not necessary.

Speaker 3:

No, you can just move on with your life On that and just not listen anymore.

Speaker 2:

On that same note, I saw another video and it's the cutest freaking little girl. She's probably like three and the mom's like are you? How does she say like are you happy? And she's like yeah. She's like are you strong? Yeah, are you pretty, yeah, are you kind. And then she just like takes on like a deep breath and then she's like not really, I mean.

Speaker 2:

if I'm being honest with myself and you, because it's like she really was answering those like truthfully, because it gets to that one and she's like uh, yeah, I was just like an automatic.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, she's like yeah.

Speaker 2:

She was like not really, it was so freaking cute.

Speaker 3:

I was like man oh, kids, I mean we always used to say like or that used to be the big thing, like. I wish we could be more honest like kids. No, we don't need that. We already have our kids telling us how shitty we are or commenting on how fat we are or squishy we are yeah, and in a mean way, they just say it because it's the truth, Right, yeah. So we already get that as moms. We don't need to hear it from anybody else. No, period. No, I do. I especially grown as adults.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I still have a hard time with some of the stuff that like Cody will say, because it's not mean at all coming from him, like he thoroughly says it, like out of love and admiration, yeah, and I know it, I know it's how it is, but he'll just be like you're so, like he will say like you're so comfy, like he'll cuddle up next to me.

Speaker 2:

You're so comfy and I'm like I don't know that I want to be comfy. Yeah, I don't know if I like that kind of wording but thank you, I know.

Speaker 3:

I remember my kids used to like lay on my stomach and they'd be like I'm loving on your stomach because it's so squishy like a pillow. You know what it's squishy because you were in there, yeah, so I'm going to punch your face like a pillow so yeah, no one always pillow and smother you.

Speaker 2:

No one always takes like like squeeze my arm and I'll be like oh, you're so squishy and I'm like go away. Yeah, thank you. Please leave now.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so I guess the moral of that is just nice.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, don't be dicks, don't be dicks. And if you don't follow Tatum, I do go follower, because she is.

Speaker 3:

I didn't realize that was the name and I don't know why, but I see all of her videos, so I love her and she's fantastic. Oh my God, I love her. She's just so funny.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so, yeah, so go follow her.

Speaker 3:

If you don't, and don't be a dick and then go follow us, yeah, and follow us. Follow us Follow her and the world will be right. That's like the mantra for today yeah, follow us, follow her, don't be a dick.

Speaker 2:

Yes, pretty simple, pretty simple. Yeah, life would be much better if you just followed that daily. So All right, do we have anything else? I don't think so.

Speaker 3:

I don't think we did either. I don't think we did either.

Speaker 2:

I don't think so either so thank you for all of our new. Sorry, it does seem like we have new listeners, so thank you to all of those. Yeah, welcome New listeners.

Speaker 3:

Our downloads have been going up significantly lately and we're very excited about this, so so appreciative.

Speaker 2:

So I hope you like it.

Speaker 3:

And, like we said, we are open to constructive criticism. Or if you have cases you're like, oh, I really want you guys to do this case, just message us, yeah, on Facebook or Instagram. Yeah, and we would be happy to cover whatever cases you want.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And we would have done a couple for listeners.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, absolutely, and they've been really great actually. Yeah, they've been great cases and if you want to help support us because you know we would like to someday do this full time jump on our Patreon and you get like bonus episodes and bonus content and all sorts of fun stuff. So go and do that.

Speaker 3:

And if you don't like the chit chat because some people like it, some people don't, patreon. We don't do a lot of chit chat, yeah.

Speaker 2:

No, we just jump right in so we do a lot of chit chat episodes.

Speaker 3:

So if you like us, but that might be your bag of tea.

Speaker 2:

Your bag of dicks. Your bag of dicks, that might be your bag of dicks.

Speaker 3:

I don't know why tea bag. You know my bag of tea. I don't know.

Speaker 2:

I think I'm going to use that now. Instead of like your cup of tea, I think I'm going to use my bag of tea. I feel like, if that's not your bag of dicks, that I don't know what is going on our t-shirts when we make them.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, my bag of tea, I like it. Any hail, okay.

Speaker 2:

Anyway, so are we ready? Yes, I don't know if we're ready. Actually, I randomly found this case and it blew my mind. I'd literally never heard of this person. You haven't, you hadn't heard of this one.

Speaker 3:

Nope, oh I have Never heard of it. I had no idea. A lot of the details, but I know it's like it's a lot of peeps that were affected by this dude. Yes, yes, a lot.

Speaker 2:

At first I was like that's a ridiculous number and I don't think that's true. And then you kind of research it and then you're like maybe it's not as yeah, like what do you call it? Like ridiculous sounding, once you kind of research it. So we are talking today about Pedro Alonzo Lopez. He was born October 8th 1948. He's a Libra, I know, which is not common for serial killers. It is very uncommon. And I'm a Libra and we don't want you.

Speaker 3:

There is much more in my realm of Gemini as far as serial killers go, and that doesn't even surprise me at all, doesn't? Shock me one bit.

Speaker 2:

No, let's. You know two people, two people in one. He was born in Colombia to Benelda Lopez and Medardo Reyes. I think that's his name. I literally found three different spellings of this person's name, and so that's the one I'm going for.

Speaker 3:

Great Sounds good.

Speaker 2:

So his mother was a prostitute who had 13 children. He was number seven of her 13. His father was murdered six months prior to his birth.

Speaker 3:

I just have to tell you a quick story, because this is a shitload of kids. But I had somebody in the office today and we were talking. She was a brand new patient and we were talking about how many kids she has. She's like, oh, I have 28. And I was like what? I was like floored. She's like, well, I'm a teacher. Oh, don't say that I almost shit myself. I was like you have 28 kids. And then I realized and I was like oh, okay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because even the, even the Duggers don't have 28 kids and that's what I told her.

Speaker 3:

I was like you'd have like a show on TLC if you had 28 kids, yeah, and I would watch it so as I just started watching Prison Brides, which is a new show on Lifetime. Prison Brides.

Speaker 2:

Yep.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

So far, so good.

Speaker 3:

So Megan is like into, like the real, the trashiest like trashy shows so much. And I love those things too, but I never find them.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I have to, because it's what I watched.

Speaker 3:

And then Megan tells me about what she was watching and then eventually I'm like wait, what was that show called? So then I'll try and tune in. I don't even watch half of the ones that she watches.

Speaker 2:

No, I watch them at the gym.

Speaker 3:

I really want to watch them.

Speaker 2:

That's how I get through them. Is I watch them at the gym? So?

Speaker 3:

maybe I'd work out more. I had trashy shows to watch.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's great, anyway, okay, so his father was murdered six months prior to his birth during love violence which was like a political war between, like, the conservatives and the liberals. Weird how that's kind of what we're going through now Not quite as violent, but he was apparently part of the right wing party and died during this time of war that took upwards of 200,000 people in Colombia. So it was pretty violent during that time and it was a lot.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and it really wasn't like a time that people say was great to like be born. It was very violent and very this is 1986. 1948.

Speaker 3:

Oh, 40. Oh, don't listen to me, I don't know what's happening in my mind. It's far before that. Yeah, so okay.

Speaker 2:

So it was a long time ago. It is said that Pedro's father was married to someone else, and I believe he was one of Banilda's clients.

Speaker 3:

I think that's how that kind of happened. Can you imagine in 1948 being a prostitute and having to support 13?

Speaker 1:

kids.

Speaker 3:

No, I mean I, you know probably from various fathers, right?

Speaker 2:

Oh, I'm sure, and I don't know what it's like to live in those countries Colombia in the 40s and have all these kids and no one to help take care of them. And so you know, being a sex worker was probably the easiest way to make a decent amount of money. Yeah, but Pedro does state that he grew up in a home full of violence brought on by his mother, and that he did witness a lot of her engaging in sex work.

Speaker 3:

I hate this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we've had this in a couple of times, that's where I kind of draw the line, Like if you have to do that to support your kids like you do you outside of the home.

Speaker 3:

Don't take it to the house.

Speaker 2:

But from what it sounded like, was that like there was just like a blanket separating the kids from her and they had to witness, you know, her getting abused and whatever by these men during these acts and all that kind of stuff. And so he says it really affected his psyche, which I'm sure probably did not help. But I don't think any of her other 13 children were serial killers, so I don't know. But his mom claims that she was not abusive, the household did not have violence, but I tend to probably kind of lean the other way, just because I just, yeah, I just don't think it was probably a great stable environment.

Speaker 2:

Right Now, when Pedro was eight, he says that his mother caught him fondling his sister's breast and threw him out on the streets, telling him to never come back. But he was able to at eight. Yeah, he was able. He found his way home and that pissed her off. So she took him to like the bus stop and sent him 200 miles away to Bogota, which was another city. Now Benelda claims that she did catch Pedro trying to rape his sister is what she says but that she never sent him away. Shortly after the incident he just up and vanished and she thought he had gone missing, like that he'd been kidnapped. So that's what she says.

Speaker 3:

Wow, these are wildly different stories.

Speaker 2:

Yes. So either way, whether it was by his mother's hand or by his own, at eight years old, Pedro found himself in Bogota, living on the streets begging for food.

Speaker 3:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

Okay, what a shitty life. Yeah, it's, I mean it generally is Eight years.

Speaker 3:

You know what I mean? This is real shitty. Yeah, real shitty.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So not long after he arrived, an older man approached him and offered him like a place to stay and warm food. And so Pedro was like, sure he's a little kid.

Speaker 3:

I have an almost eight year old. I don't like this. Like what does this man want in?

Speaker 2:

return. So Pedro went with him, but instead of taking him to the place he promised, the man took him to an abandoned building where he repeatedly sodomized him before throwing him back out on the streets.

Speaker 3:

I know it's terrible. This makes me feel so bad for him.

Speaker 2:

It's terrible. Now, after this, Pedro took to sleeping in alleyways and deserted buildings, only coming out at night to dig through garbage cans and dumps for food. No, it's really sad Now. When Pedro was about 10, so a couple years later, an older American couple noticed him and they were really worried about his young age and his skeletal appearance. So they took him in and provided him with what he needed. They enrolled him in a school for the orphans and it actually looked like things were finally looking up for Pedro.

Speaker 3:

This is in Colombia.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, but they were like super nice older American couple. They treated him very well. Everything was going good until he was 12. One day at school, pedro was molested by one of his male teachers, and this kind of sent him back into the whole mindset of his childhood and everything that had happened prior, and so he ended up stealing money from the school office and then running away. So now he's back on the ever familiar streets. He decides to start stealing cars to support himself, and then he would take them to chop shops and like piece them out. Okay, so what I could find? Apparently he was exceptionally talented at stealing cars At 10.

Speaker 3:

At 12. 12, I mean, yeah, I really am listening, I promise.

Speaker 2:

And he would get like top dollar for his fines. Like he was well known by the chop shop people and he was really good at what he did, that was until he was about 18 or 21, depending on the source. He finally gets arrested for stealing cars and is sentenced to seven years in jail. Within days of his incarceration, Pedro is gang raped by four other inmates.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and this, I think, is when the switch finally like flips in Pedro's head and he ends up setting out for revenge. So he makes, like makeshift knife, shiv shank, whatever you want to call it, and then he spends the next two weeks killing three of the four perpetrators, one by one.

Speaker 3:

I mean good for him. Yeah, that's what I say. If anyone freaking ever raped me in prison, I would try and do the same thing. Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 2:

And once the jail officials did their investigation, they did find that Pedro's acts were done in self-defense and they only gave him an additional two years for the murders.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

So I think they kind of felt the same way.

Speaker 3:

Well, they were probably like thanks for taking care of these comebacks, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So in 1978, pedro is released from jail once again to be free on the streets of Columbia, again with no place to go. He becomes a drifter, and this is when he says that he begins to stock, abduct, rape and murder little girls at an alarming rate of upwards of three girls per week.

Speaker 3:

Holy shit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, he says it was all in retaliation for his childhood. But for me I like feel a little frustrated because not that I want him to kill any child at all, but it's like his whole childhood was spent being victimized by men, by other men, and then he goes after and kills all these girls because he's pissed off about like why don't you go kill some creepy adult men? I don't know, but he does not.

Speaker 3:

so about that though, like this with the cycle of abuse, because, like a lot of males who are Sodomized and raped by older males when they get older end up doing the same thing, even though they're heterosexual they will go rape young boys, yeah. So it's like just a pattern, it's like a learned behavior, and I mean, at some point sex feels good, right? Yeah, for men especially.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean he, he does get like a sexual gratification out of what he does.

Speaker 3:

Yeah and so when you're taught that at a young age, yeah, Well, and you're watching your mom engage in Violent sex, essentially so many things that I'm young, age. It's it's not. Yeah, it is not helping with your healthy sexual relationships as an adult.

Speaker 2:

No. So what he said he would do is he would take girls from various Indian tribes throughout the region and, and one day he tried to lure a nine-year-old girl away from a group of Ayakuchos in northern Peru was an. Indian tribe, the Ayakuchos capture. Pedro stripped him of all of his clothes, beat and tortured him Before deciding to pour syrup all over him, bury him up to his neck and let Peruvian ants have that this is like some mafia level, like stuff you see in the movies.

Speaker 2:

They caught him and they were like uh, yeah, no yeah, no, not gonna happen.

Speaker 3:

That's not happening.

Speaker 2:

But unfortunately, in the midst of them burying him, a stupid, damn freaking American missionary woman Happened to be driving by and stopped. Oh no, she convinces the people that killing him was not Judy, just get back in your Jeep and keep going. She tells them that killing him is not godlike and that turning him over to the police was the right thing to do so eventually.

Speaker 3:

What would you do in that situation? If they, just if you saw somebody that was trying to abduct Lily, to rape her? Oh, I would be, the ever-loving I would, and you had them. You had the power to kill them in the desert. I think nobody would know. Oh.

Speaker 2:

I would do it in a heartbeat.

Speaker 3:

Lady comes by and it's like that's not god.

Speaker 2:

I would kill her to.

Speaker 3:

You know what else he was just gonna do to my child?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would be. I, I Mean, I'm Irish and Spanish, and I feel like I would get like a blind rage where I yeah, he would be so sad that that's who he tried to do hurt and it would. It would just not be good for anybody.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, anybody involved and cut off his penis and cover it in honey. Oh the ants eat it in front of him in his mouth, and oh, I would be yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

I would. It would not be good. No, nope, but she's able to convince them to hand him over to her. Oh, I just found.

Speaker 3:

I just thought of a torture device or a torture thing, oh okay. Well, let's hear Okay, so we're gonna actually inject. This goes back to the story you were telling me earlier about that show. Okay, yeah, let's inject some honey into his urethra and put his penis in clamps and then let the ants Kind in his urethra and eat his penis from the inside out.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's a good one. That's a good one. That's really good. Yeah, I like that one.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, that's what's happening If anyone ever touches my child. That's what you're getting and so when you hear on that, I don't care if they catch me how many years I go to prison for it, because it'll be worth it when you hear on the news what's happened to this this person will be like oh, so they hand him over to her and she offers to take him to authorities for them. Okay, so he kills her.

Speaker 2:

No, so they he's bound and gagged and they place him in the back of her Jeep and and so some accounts state that she did take him and hand him over to the authorities, but that the authorities didn't want to deal with petty Indian complaints and so they deported him back with back to Ecuador the petty Indian. Yeah, they were like I don't want to deal with this, so just we'll just just deport him. That's just, that takes care of our people right.

Speaker 3:

Another note in tangent, and I'm sorry, I don't know why I'm having so many right now, but what would you do if you were like, let's say, this lady just gets pulled over and she's like it wasn't me. I'm just helping a friend, this is the shit that I run into and I'm bringing him to you. There's this dude in your trunk that's beaten and like been beaten covered in syrup bites and honey and is like stripped, naked and bound and gagged in the back of your Jeep and you get pulled over. What's your?

Speaker 2:

story like my god, that would be great. I mean, I would just have to go with the truth, because nothing else is gonna sound and they're gonna be like I will take you back there. This could be a movie.

Speaker 3:

I will find these people and they can tell you we should produce the movie based on this, with our own Interpretation and I think it would be wonderful.

Speaker 2:

Now he says that she never took him to authorities and that she drove him to the border of Perun, ecuador, and just set him free. Okay, okay. So either way, he never saw any punishment for that crime and was now back in Ecuador. So now, out doing his own thing, he is traveling extensively around Ecuador, while also making frequent visits to Colombia. Now authorities begin to notice an alarming rise in the number of missing persons, cases that involve young girls, but they just think it's due to the rise in South American sex slavery rings.

Speaker 2:

Okay okay, and Most of the girls that are going missing are of lower class, so they don't really pay, they don't really give a shit too much mind to it. One news report it's terrible One news report even stated that a girl who had gone missing ran away because she had failed the class. These girls are like elementary age.

Speaker 3:

Okay, okay, my kids wouldn't even know if they fell the class in elementary and I wouldn't run away from home if they did. They'd be like okay, I don't know what that means. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So, like I said, the vast majority of the girls were of low economic status. The police really didn't look much into them and it left these families really distraught knowing that there was a monster on their streets and that literally nobody cared. Yeah, and you know, these are the people. They're out working out in the markets, out, you know, like.

Speaker 3:

Like the whole reason our economy runs yeah is because of these people.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they're selling the goods, they're making food, they're doing all of these things and they have to be out in the streets. They can't just be in their homes and now try and keep their kids protected like these. People have to go out and work. Yeah in April of 1980, flash flood hits embado, ecuador, and it unearths four bodies and four of the missing girls.

Speaker 3:

Oh shit.

Speaker 2:

And so when this happens, it makes police go like oh, maybe we should Look at this a little closer. Weird, yeah, super weird. So, due to the elements, they couldn't really determine like a 100% cause of death, but they concluded that they had all met foul play, Since one. Someone had taken the time to hide the bodies.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so nobody could find them.

Speaker 2:

They're dead and buried. And two it looked as though some of these girls had been strangled with such force that their eyeballs had popped out of their sockets.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, Whoa what I've heard of that happening when people hang themselves? Yeah, because of all the pressure.

Speaker 2:

That was crazy. Yeah, it creeps me out. Now, just days after this flood, at a local market there's a woman named Carlina Ramon and she's selling food and there's a man that's been at the market all day and he's there just selling like trinkets and random little things and he comes up to her and is just asking like what kind of food she has what she's selling, and so, as Carlina is going over the options and telling him what she's got, this man keeps trying to make eye contact with Carlina's 11 year old daughter, alicia.

Speaker 2:

Oh no now this makes Alicia like super uncomfortable and he keeps trying to like get her attention and she's just like trying to ignore him. And then eventually he gets done and he leaves. But after he's left and her mom just goes back to doing her thing, he still keeps trying to get Alicia to come to him. Oh no, and it just keeps trying to like get her attention, and and so Alicia finally goes and tells her mom what this man is doing and that it's making her feel like super uncomfortable.

Speaker 2:

Now Carlina, being aware of the missing girls in town and the ones that had just been on earth, she was like certain that this was the man who was taking these girls. And she gathers a bunch of other vendors in the market and he kind of notices, so he starts heading out of the market and they chase him down. Oh, she catch him just outside the market, drag him back in and wait for police to arrive. Okay, and she doesn't even like miss a beat before she starts like telling him that she knows who he is and that he's, you know, been stealing their girls and all this stuff. And he just tries to tell her like no, I'm, I'm a man with a pure heart and I'm just out here trying to make some extra money and blah, blah, blah, okay, okay. So when the police arrive, he's kind of like rambling on incoherently and all the way to the station and they kind of just start think, start thinking that they are just dealing with some like Dude, with like mental issues.

Speaker 2:

But they get him to the station and they begin to question him. But Pedro refuses to cooperate. He just remained silent throughout the interrogation, and so they Keep him. I don't know what the laws are in Ecuador in the 70s 80s.

Speaker 3:

There are no laws, they can do whatever the hell they want, right?

Speaker 2:

So they've taken him on suspicion of trying to like Attempted kidnapping of this little girl, essentially so they've got him in jail and while he's in jail they decide they need to use, like some other tactic, because they've tried, you know, interrogating him, they've tried, beating him, they've tried like all of the things that you would have done to you normal things if you were in Colombia and in jail.

Speaker 2:

Okay, and it's not working. He's not like saying anything. So they take, they have this man and he's either an Officer or a priest, depending on what source you read. Okay, okay, like very different Things, yeah, very different. But they decide to take this man. His name is Cordoba Godino, okay, and they are going to have him go undercover as an inmate and they place him in the cell with Pedro to get him to see if he'll confess right, because Every inmate's favorite thing to do is to tell their roomie literally everything they've done. So they place him in there. He's in there for about 27 days and he's able to gain the trust of Pedro and Before long, pedro tells Cordoba about all of the like repulsive crimes that he has committed. And it got to be too much for Cordoba and he eventually asked to be removed from the cell because he like he's like this is a lot.

Speaker 2:

He said it was like the worst thing he could ever think of and it just took a toll on him after a while.

Speaker 2:

So once police got the scoop from Cordoba on what everything Pedro had said, they bring Pedro back in and confront him with what they now know. And at this point Pedro doesn't deny anything and he just Tells them everything. He's just like yep, okay, here we go. So he claims that he had murdered at least 110 girls in Ecuador, 100 in Colombia and many more than 100 in Peru. He said that he liked the girls in Ecuador the most because they were more gentle and trusting. He also mentioned that he would stalk the white tourists with little girls, but that their parents were too watchful so he never was able to abduct them damn right.

Speaker 2:

So when they asked him exactly how he committed his crimes, he said that he would troll the village markets. He would sometimes follow mothers and their daughters for two to three days, waiting for them to be alone. Yeah, yeah, so he would like stock them putting in the work, yeah and wait for the like terrifying, yeah, so terrifying.

Speaker 2:

And they would wait for the girls to be left alone and then he would go up to them. He would give them like a trinket, like a hand mirror, something, and then he would promise them something for their mother. If they were to just follow him to, like where he had all of his stuff at the edge of town, they would follow him to his little secret hideaway where he would have previously prepared graves. And Pedro stated, quote I would take her to a secret hideaway where prepared graves awaited. I cuddled them and then raped them at sunrise.

Speaker 3:

At first the girl.

Speaker 2:

At the first sign of light I would get excited. I forced the girl into sex and put my hands around her throat when the sun rose. I would strangle her. It was only good if I could see her eyes. It would have been wasted in the dark. I had to watch them by daylight. There's a divine moment when I have my hands around a young girl's throat. I look into her eyes and see a certain light, a spark suddenly go out. The moment of death is enthralling and exciting. Only those who actually kill know what I mean.

Speaker 3:

Ew, ew, ew, ew ew. Gross huh, that is so gross. I cuddle them until sunrise and then I rape them and strangle them so I can watch the light in their eyes go out. Ew.

Speaker 2:

The cuddling part is so creepy to me? I don't know why.

Speaker 3:

It's like Me too, when you said that it was like gross.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's so gross, it's almost more intimate than a sexual act. It's so creepy, so creepy. Now he said that after death he would often act out these horrific tea parties as well, with the bodies of the victims. What, he would take several of his victims, he would prop them up in a circle and then he would talk to them, but eventually he would get bored because they didn't move and he would just go looking for his next victim. Ew, yeah, he called them at one point. Like his little friends, my little friends needed someone to talk to.

Speaker 3:

My little friends. That is the creepiest thing I've ever heard. No, they're not your little friends, they're far from that. Sorry.

Speaker 2:

Ew. So at first the police didn't believe all of what Pedro was saying because, like I said, it's like a ridiculous number of people.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Of, like murders, to say you have committed because it's just Over 300.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's ridiculous. But Pedro could tell that they didn't really believe him. So he told them that he would take them to the bodies to prove it. So, in leg irons and cuffs, pedro was led from the police station into a van, where he then began to lead officers to secluded areas in the Andean provinces of Okay, don't get mad at me about these words, but I'm gonna do my best Um, tunguraura, tunguraura, kotopaxi, chimborazo, pinchincha and Imbatura. Those were all the provinces. There you go, good job.

Speaker 2:

In the end, pedro had led them to the bodies of 53 girls. Damn, they were all aged from 8 to 12. And over the next three months they went to 28 other burial sites but found nothing. But the investigators believed that the remains had been destroyed by the predators because it was out in the countryside and by the floods They'd had pretty bad flash floods, and so they believed that everything had kind of the rest of their bodies may have been washed away. So, with the discovery of the 53 bodies and the four that were uncovered during the flood, his count now was officially at 57.

Speaker 3:

Confirmed 57.

Speaker 2:

Confirmed 57.

Speaker 1:

Although he claimed them 110, but still 57.

Speaker 3:

57. 8 to 12 year old girls. That is horrific, horrific.

Speaker 2:

The police had full confidence that his number was easily 110. And because he claimed all of the murders in Perun, colombia, his count was upwards of 300. The police stated, quote if someone confesses to 53 that you find and hundreds more you end.

Speaker 3:

You tend to believe what he says, oh yeah, especially because he said he was in three different countries Right, like that's 53. And then the areas that they couldn't confirm when they were, like you know what it could have actually been there because of these floods?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, it's. I mean, yeah, when you come out with a big number like that, but then you're actually able to lead them to, they're like oh, you don't believe me.

Speaker 3:

Half of what you said.

Speaker 2:

And that's I mean it's insane, yeah, that is insane. Now director Luscaño told reporters quote I think, this I think his estimate of 300 is very low because in the beginning he cooperated with us and took us each day to three or four hidden corpses, but then he tired, changed his mind and stopped helping. So I think at some point he did just kind of also, which was like you have enough.

Speaker 3:

Which this is like. One of those things about serial killers is that they remember everything. Every victim is not so weird and like the very location that they buried this body and can tell you the details of what they did to each person If he did it 300 times. I can't even find my car keys half the time. No Like, I can't even remember where I put my other shoe, let alone where I hid 300 bodies?

Speaker 2:

No, so we just got I just got a couple of checks in the mail that were refunds for services that Nolan had last January.

Speaker 2:

And it was like one was on the 17th and one was on the 23rd, and the way we have our insurance my kids are, their dad covers their insurance and he pays through. He has an HSA right, so he pays everything. So I obviously gave the checks to him because he pays for it all, and so I was given the checks. But I was like trying to think like I can't, even as a mother, remember why my child was in the doctor's office like two times within like a week, let alone remember where I put 300 bodies several months ago, several years ago, yeah, and they can take you to like the exact, like they can bury him in this big ass open desert.

Speaker 3:

Or in, like the forest, yeah, in the woods, and then be like, oh yeah, it's under that tree right there, yeah, how do you, how do you know? How do you remember?

Speaker 2:

that it's insane. It really is like I don't understand it?

Speaker 3:

I don't. It is nuts to me.

Speaker 2:

Don't they have anxiety or depression or anything that messes with their memory? Yeah, and childhood trauma. You guys didn't say they had traumatic childhoods.

Speaker 3:

I can't remember shit. No, me either and you can't remember every detail of 300 people that you murdered, yeah, which I think it would be even more disrespectful if they couldn't remember it.

Speaker 2:

Right yeah.

Speaker 3:

I'm glad that they at least can remember those things. Yeah, because that'd be real shitty to get murdered and then to be like, I'm just like, well, I don't know I don't know, I don't even remember, I'm just another person that I murdered.

Speaker 2:

Well, when we see this a lot too with serial killers, where, like, they take you to some bodies and then after a while they're just like meh, I don't want to anymore. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Nope, because they're dicks.

Speaker 2:

Nope, I just want nope. You can't know and it's like why do you gotta be such an asshole? Yeah, I know why.

Speaker 3:

Especially when they like die and then they don't tell the rest of Right. Yeah, the body specialist families don't get that closure, they don't get to bury their loved one yeah, or even know for sure. Yeah, that they were one of their victims. They were a victim, you know that would be so hard. It's terrible.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So while there's not a lot of available, like readily available, information on his trial, we do know that he was originally charged with the 53 murders, but the authorities decided to add his detailed confession of the other 110 that were committed in Ecuador. And then, 1980, pedro Alonso Lopez was convicted on the 110 murders and sentenced to the maximum allowed in Ecuador at the time, which was 16 years.

Speaker 3:

Stop it, 16 years. Not each Just 16 years Total.

Speaker 2:

Nope, they said it equated out to be like four months for each victim.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, they said three months and then they reduced it to two.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Four months, 16 years Was their maximum allowed. That was their life in prison was 16 years. Shut the F up, is that insane. And he didn't have the other four murders on there because that was in Colombia, so it was just the 53. But then they added the 110 because he had it says detailed confession. So like he, he had.

Speaker 3:

We needed to just take him back to that one tribe and let that finish the job. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and then they added the 110. Well, I mean the families of these victims, every single one of them, would have gladly done that.

Speaker 3:

I watched and I hope that nosy lady that was the tourist ended up hearing about this and was like oh yeah, well shit.

Speaker 2:

Well, and there was one of the I'll. I'll link the videos, like in the show notes, but one of them that was just like a YouTube. Um, it was like making a monster the worst serial killer ever, or something. It was just like on YouTube.

Speaker 3:

Didn't they call, wasn't it his nickname? The monster of?

Speaker 2:

the monster of the Andes, the.

Speaker 3:

Andes, okay, yeah.

Speaker 2:

That's how I knew him, but he um, anyway, I was sorry, I couldn't remember what I was going to say. They interviewed a bunch of like the victims family members in that and a lot of these like mothers were like. You know, God, forgive me, but I would like to murder him Like I would like for him to be murdered and be killed.

Speaker 3:

I think that's a normal response. Yeah, I do too.

Speaker 2:

I think that's the. The public was not happy with this 16 years and there was even someone that was like I get that this was like their maximum allowed, but this was a special case and that should have been taken into consideration. So he was taken away and he spent most of his time at the Garcia Moreno in Quito, ecuador.

Speaker 3:

He was housed in Pabellon D, which was the wing for rapists and murders which I'm hoping at this prison because it's probably, like I mean, third world country. We hear all about the horror stories of prison. I hope it was a terrible 16 years.

Speaker 2:

Well, he spent most of his days by himself. One because the families of the victims had put a bounty out on his head.

Speaker 1:

So they just in.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, they were like if anyone in the prison can catch him like anybody.

Speaker 3:

So do it.

Speaker 2:

He spent his days alone and the one thing the one like documentary I listened to said that he spent his days smoking basuco, which is cocaine. So basuco is a mixture of cocaine, brick, dust and chalk and it's like a paste, but it's drugs Like you just look at it do drugs all day. They sure have some cocaine. Rage it out in your cell by yourself. I don't understand. But he also said that he wrote in a diary and carved coins with Jesus on one side and the devil on the other.

Speaker 2:

So, then the heavier moment. So, like we said, the media was now referring to him as a monster of the Andes and, shortly before his release, pedro agreed to do an interview it was really one of the only ones he ever gave with a man named Ron Latiner, who was a correspondent for the National Examiner. Pedro described himself as, quote, the man of the century, and no one will ever forget me. Fuck off Pedro. Yeah, he talked about how he went after his victims and how he would kill them, and the details which I previously stated were all from that interview. So that's where I got that. But he also said, quote, it took the girls five to 15 minutes to die. I was very considerate. I would spend a long time with them making sure they were dead. I would use a mirror to check whether they were still breathing. Sometimes I had to kill them all over again.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, that's very considerate of you. You're so sweet, You're so sweet.

Speaker 2:

Thank you.

Speaker 3:

Pedro.

Speaker 2:

You're so sweet. He said quote they never screamed because they didn't expect anything would happen. They were innocent.

Speaker 3:

Stop, I hate this. Yeah, he five to 15 minutes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah it takes a lot longer to strangle someone, though, than like the movies make it out to be no they make it look like so easy.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's not easy no. And it's not fast, and these poor little babies, yeah.

Speaker 2:

While he's looking into your eyes and having sex with you. Gross, so gross. At the end of the interview, pedro says quote when I'm released, I will feel that moment again.

Speaker 3:

Okay. So he's like I'm just going to get it Absolutely. I'm going to do it again when I get out Absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Like he couldn't wait to get out and do it again. So, with all of this knowledge that the prison authorities have now, because he just gave an interview and said it, on August 31st 1994, pedro was released two years early for good behavior, 14 years. 14 years for like at least 53 murders of little girls.

Speaker 3:

And the 110 that he admitted to.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but the 53 confirmed Like 57. But they didn't do the four there, but yeah. That's 167 murders that he admitted to, that he was actually found guilty of in a court of law and you serve 14 years 14 years, like people literally go to prison longer for like robberies and drug deals, for drug deals for, like you know, aggravated assaults you hear about.

Speaker 3:

Americans getting in trouble over there and serving that long for like having drugs on them, but yet he's doing cocaine every day, every day Given to him by someone in the prison In the prison, just living it up for 14 years Wow.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the. And in the one documentary they film it like as he's being released and he's like yelling, like I'm free, I'm free.

Speaker 3:

And he's like I'll smiling and like nobody went and just killed him right there.

Speaker 2:

No, but as they're leading him out to the car because once he was released, he was immediately apprehended, because now he was an illegal immigrant in Ecuador, right, so they take him and they deport him back to Colombia. Essentially, I feel like these countries are just like we don't want you here, we don't want to deal with you, so we're just going to send you back to your country. But as they're walking him from, like the prison to the car to take him back, there's like people that are there and they're screaming like die and like spitting at him and, like you know, people were pissed.

Speaker 2:

So he's immediately processed and handed over to prosecutors in Tolima, which is in Colombia, and there they hope to take advantage of their country's harsher laws and put him away for good. Now, back in December 1979, pedro had traveled to Espanol and within a month, 12 year old Flora Sanchez had disappeared. Her body had been found in a rural area just outside the city, half buried. The murders seemed to fit Pedro's ML, and the Colombian authorities had more than enough to convict him. And that's what they were hoping to convict him on, to put him away for good. But yet again, he's able to dodge real punishment when, in 1995, the judge who was presiding over the case read all the files and declared Pedro insane and sent him to the psychiatric wing of Carcel Modelo, which is a prison in Bogota. So, just three years later, the prison psychiatrist declares Pedro sane and he is released with $50 bail. Now, his condition upon release was that he was to continue psychiatric treatment and to report once a month to a judge. Do we think he did any of?

Speaker 3:

that? No, of course he didn't. No, he did not. He just went out. He probably moved away and started murdering again.

Speaker 2:

So what he did was he immediately went to visit his mother for the first time in 19 years. Okay, and I'm going to play this clip for you guys.

Speaker 1:

The day he came to visit me. He says to me Mother, kneel down in front of me so I can bless you. And I said the one who should kneel down is you. The son is the one who kneels before his mother. He got down on only one knee. He said Mother, I came to see what you would give me of my inheritance. And I said to him I'm so poor, how am I going to give you something? I just have a chair and a bed. He took those two things and put them on the porch and I started crying and he said who will buy this? If not, I'll light them on fire. Then a woman bought the chair and the little bed and then he left. Okay, wow.

Speaker 2:

So he goes back to see his mom and, granted, maybe she wasn't a great mother, I don't know but he goes there, takes the only two things that she has, which is a bed and a chair.

Speaker 3:

First of all, he goes there and is like kneel before me and let me bless you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, one, you should see Like she really is a cutest old lady.

Speaker 3:

No one wants your blessing, no Sick mother effort.

Speaker 2:

No, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Nobody wants you to bless them.

Speaker 2:

Like you, have any right to bless anybody.

Speaker 3:

anyway, we don't want your hellfire, no, stay away.

Speaker 2:

And then you hear me, literally takes her only two things, which is a bed and a chair, and says someone's either going to buy it or he's going to light it on fire Fire. Wow, then someone buys it and he just takes the money and leaves and just leaves her there, kind of sad you dickwad. So he left, he headed back to the countryside that he knew all too well and that was the last time anyone ever reported seeing Pedro.

Speaker 3:

Stop. So, he's like not reported dead.

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 3:

He's like what would he be 75, 76?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So in October 2002, interpol released an advisory on behalf of the Colombian authorities, stating that they were looking for Pedro because they suspected him of committing a murder in Espanol In 2005,. The warrant was deactivated, but he is still considered a fugitive. He's also been named as a suspect in a 2012 murder in Tuna Tuna, colombia. Today he would be 75 years old, and, while I do really hope that he has had an ungodly end, his whereabouts are still unknown.

Speaker 3:

That is terrifying, pedro.

Speaker 1:

How many victims do you think you have killed Sir? To give you the exact number, I don't know if I could tell you. It's like a superiority I can, am a god, I give life and I can take it away.

Speaker 3:

Oh my god, I hate this guy so much, and that is Pedro Lopez.

Speaker 2:

I hate him so much. Monster of the Andes.

Speaker 3:

It's a monster of the Andes is such a good name, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So there was one thing I watched. I haven't kind of written down here was it's called the monster of the Andes, pedro Lopez, and that one I found on Amazon. This is season one, episode one, but I don't know if it's like I couldn't find that, it was like a TV show.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

I think it's just that one like episode, and then I watched making a monster, the worst serial killer, and that one was just a YouTube one that's made by. I think the guy's name is Mr Black, oh okay. He had like a Patreon and stuff on there, but they were two pretty good little documentaries to watch and damn, that is him.

Speaker 3:

So people, you can still find Pedro yeah.

Speaker 2:

I mean he's still capable of murdering at 75. I mean he was you. Look at when you see him like he was always a scrawny little little diesel guy. So 75, he can't be much worse than when he was younger.

Speaker 3:

Wow, with a bounty on his head, has he made it this long in his life?

Speaker 2:

I don't know, honestly, like it's, because you would think if somebody did kill him, that they would like let it known, or that they would find a body, or maybe not I mean, maybe he's one of the families or families of the victims like found him and just like brutally murdered him and then fed him to like some wild animals or something. That's what I would have done. I would hope that he is dead. Oh my gosh. But for the amount of murders even I mean, let's just say he only did the 57th of the actual confirmed ones you spend 14 years in prison and three years in a psychiatric hospital. That's insane. 14 years in a prison by yourself doing cocaine, and then in a psychiatric hospital, and then you're out on your own. Isn't that crazy? I?

Speaker 2:

don't even know what to say. That's appalling, it is. And then it was like in the early 2000s, I believe, or 20 years maybe. Yeah, so early 2000s, 20 years after his conviction in Ecuador. They did change it to life being 25 years, but they still don't have like a, at least from what I just in that documentary, and that could be different now it's like a death penalty or life in prison.

Speaker 2:

And I had to do something with like a death of a like high politician, is why they didn't allow for longer than that, and I don't know the ins and outs of whatever was happening then I would have asked that it has to do a lot, too, with how poor the countries are, because it takes a lot to keep people in prison. It does yeah.

Speaker 3:

It's a lot of resources to keep people in prison and keep them fed and housed yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's expensive, it's not like.

Speaker 3:

It's some cheap endeavor.

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 3:

So maybe that's why they're so low is because it's like listen might as well just kill them then. We can't afford this.

Speaker 2:

Like someone like him? Yeah, just kill him. We don't need him out anymore. He doesn't deserve to live and I think God is okay with that.

Speaker 3:

I do too, I really do. Wow, yeah All right, let's find him and do the penis thing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, let's do it. We need a guinea pig for that, so let's find him.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, I'm on board.

Speaker 2:

I'll have to look on our thing and see if we have any listeners in that area, because we can see, because guess what, Pedro?

Speaker 3:

We're not eight to 11 year old girls that can't fight back, we will fuck you up.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like especially back then, like it's just so trusting.

Speaker 3:

Just the way that you like, describes it too, like what he did to them and the cuddling. And he's still. He has no remorse, not one ounce. He never feels sorry at all.

Speaker 2:

No, there's one little like snippet. There's so much stuff I gotta put in here about him, but there's one little like snippet of like an inner part of the interview where he states that sometimes it's someone else that kills the kids, and I can't remember the person's name. They're like well, aren't you that person? And he's like no, I'm not. He said like if I didn't do it, he would kill me or whatever. And I'm not. I'm Pedro Lopez. And it's like okay, whatever, dude.

Speaker 3:

That's how I got into an insane facility for years.

Speaker 2:

And when he was declared sane there was another psychiatrist lady that was saying like she believes either the prison psychiatrist did think he was now cured or sane or he faked it. She's like he's so smart. I mean, she's like he murdered, you know, potentially hundreds of little girls, for you know, 10 to 12 years and he is absolutely capable of faking.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely, cause he admitted everything and then told you in detail and then when he's getting out, he's like, oh, I'm going to go do it again, essentially. Then he goes to his mom and is like I'm like a God, yeah, I've killed so many people.

Speaker 2:

I'm like a God. Let me bless you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I give life and I take it away.

Speaker 2:

Yeah no, shut up, yeah, no. Ew, I hate this guy. Yeah, he's terrible, terrible, terrible, so Okay.

Speaker 3:

Where do we think he?

Speaker 2:

is Uh, columbia is where the let's see, yeah, both of the, both of the murders from the 2000s that he suspected of were in Columbia.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

He'd think if you were going to like run away or whatever, like leave the country, go somewhere where people don't know you, are you sticking around, cause every time there's a murder that has your ML, they're like oh it must be Pedro, he's back, so go somewhere else. Yikes, yeah.

Speaker 3:

That is terrifying. It's terrifying.

Speaker 2:

So terrifying.

Speaker 3:

So he could have. He could have killed well over 300 people yeah, yikes, yeah, scary Yikes yeah. That's terrifying.

Speaker 2:

That's how, when I saw it and I was like 300. Okay, what are we talking about? And then you like research it and it's like I didn't realize it was that many.

Speaker 3:

Maybe I had heard of him, though, and I, like I knew some of the details, not a ton, but I didn't know. It was 300. Yeah, potentially over 300. And that was when he was caught. So now he's been out for Right.

Speaker 2:

For the last time he was seen was in 1999. So 25 years now. Yeah, so Wow.

Speaker 3:

Imagine, and he killed all of those in 12 years. So that could be. I don't even want to know.

Speaker 2:

I don't even want to know. No, I mean that's terrible. Yeah, I mean you look at like the other well known serial killers of our time and it's like, oh, they had 10 victims. That's insane. Yeah, 50, 57 confirmed.

Speaker 3:

That's child's play 57. You guys don't have anything on me. What, yeah, that's nuts?

Speaker 2:

No, it's, yeah, he's just terrible.

Speaker 3:

And I do think it's much higher than that, because it was 57 in that one little area. And he had been in the two other areas. Yeah, yeah, I totally think it's more. Yeah, wow, yeah, that makes me sick to my stomach actually. Okay, all right. Well, on that note, let's do our soul cleanse.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 3:

So this one was posted on January 15th and it's a very odd kind of funny, enlightened story from India, okay, okay, okay. So it's talking about potholes in India, okay, and how they're terrible.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I've heard that.

Speaker 3:

In India, the Indian version. They cause annoyance, discomfort and even expensive repairs. But India's famous potholes actually saved a life. On Friday, okay, the late, meaning dead, darshan Singh Brar was being transported to the Indian version of a wake after his untimely death from a chest infection at age 80. Family, relatives and friends had already gathered for a banquet and cremation when the ambulance he was being carried in received a nasty jolt from a pothole on the road in Nising in far northern northern India. It was then that Mr Brars grandson, who was on board the ambulance at the time, noticed his hand was moving, checking his pulse and finding, to his great shock, that there was one. So they notify the driver, who took them to the nearest hospital, and he was declared alive and savable and was referred to the hospital like a larger hospital.

Speaker 2:

He was on his way to his wake, to his wake.

Speaker 3:

They had pronounced him dead. All of the family had time to gather, well, does?

Speaker 2:

that take days to really just do it right away and a cremation of the body Jesus.

Speaker 3:

And he's driving his last drive to his cremation and a pothole jolts him alive.

Speaker 2:

It's like a defibrillator. What Jump started his heart, and then it says it is a miracle.

Speaker 3:

Now we are hoping that my grandfather recover soon, says Balwan Singh, another of Mr Brars grandsons. Everyone who gathered to mourn his death congratulated us and we requested them to have the food we had arranged. It is God's grace that he is now breathing and we are hoping he will get better.

Speaker 2:

What in the world? What, how Okay. I want to know how long it had been since they declared him dead to this point. And what kind of doctors are the Indian people are generally really smart. Yeah, what is happening? They're like your anesthesiologist general, like they're usually really smart. How did nobody was unable to tell that, like he was not all the way dead.

Speaker 3:

All the way dead, yeah, like if you've been dead for a while, there's no amount of potholes. That's kind of shocking back to life?

Speaker 2:

No, that's what I'm saying. Like, how long was it since they declared him dead? Like, do they just do a wake? Like, hey, grandpa died like in two hours, let's all meet it, whatever, and do the wake? Like, maybe they do because these countries are, like India's, so overpopulated, maybe they do have to like, do it super quick. Well, this, one, okay.

Speaker 3:

So it goes on to say hang on, let me see he had been feeling very ill and was taken to the hospital and put on a ventilator. So that's when he had the chest infection. After four days his heartbeat stopped, he was taken off the ventilator and declared dead, but it doesn't say how long he was dead before he was transported to his wake. Interesting, so they obviously had time to like.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm saying like I had to have been like a couple of hours at least to get like everybody together and they said when they took him to this other hospital.

Speaker 3:

They said that the grandfather is breathing without the aid of a ventilator and his heartbeat has normalized. They can't say for certain why the other hospital declared him dead, but speculated it may have been a technical error. The next time you were planning to go to town hall or the council about the potholes on your street, consider the story of Darshon Singhbar.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I want to know what hospital that is and like, do a PSA for people don't go there because they're equipment. They're equipment's going to say that you're dead and they're just going to be like well, or take the back roads and shock yourself back to life.

Speaker 3:

That's insane.

Speaker 2:

Can you imagine they were going to cremate him? They were going to cremate him, had that not? They thought he was totally dead. I mean okay.

Speaker 3:

So even if it was a malfunction of the equipment, you usually have to go in because at least in the US you have to pronounce them dead, like a physician or whoever's going to declare the death is supposed to put like listen to their heart for a full minute before they say like yeah, there's nothing, and like fill a pulse for a minute and like everything, Like you're not supposed to just be like oh look, it's flat lined on the machine, he's a goner.

Speaker 2:

Well, because here's the thing like, even if it, like I said, even if it was a malfunction of the equipment, did he just lay there motionless for?

Speaker 3:

like hours. Well, he had been on a ventilator, right? So?

Speaker 2:

I guess he could have been.

Speaker 3:

took a little bit of medication in him. Maybe he was breathing slow so that you don't fight the ventilator.

Speaker 2:

Right, yeah, maybe, I guess. Yeah, maybe it had to wear a little bit before he. Wow, that is like that's insane.

Speaker 3:

That's yeah, that's a funny story. That is insane. Like I'm so glad that they didn't create him.

Speaker 2:

I mean, he would have never know. No, no, no.

Speaker 3:

If they just like what if you woke up and woke up and was screaming, and then you realized that you really did just kill him?

Speaker 2:

That would terrify me if you were the I don't know what they call you when you're a cremation person. Are you just the mortician? I don't know who does that. I don't know actually either. I know they do it, at least here. Well, I guess I just know, when they cremated my mom, they like called and asked if I wanted to be there and I was like no, no, no, I don't know. Thank you, like I don't want to watch you do that.

Speaker 3:

But thanks for the invite. No, no.

Speaker 2:

Do people want to go see that? I don't want to see that.

Speaker 3:

It's not the same as burying someone. No it's not the same, like I don't want to be there when you like, slide her and I don't even want to be like body into the oven. Yeah, no, that's totally different. Yeah, and even with like a burial, I've never been there when they've like put the dirt and stuff on. Yeah, I don't want to be there for that no, no, no, nope yeah.

Speaker 3:

All right, well, on that note, yeah, that's amazing. Go over some potholes when you're feeling a little sick and it'll fix things Next time Grandpa dies.

Speaker 2:

just take them over some potholes and see if it's really true or not.

Speaker 3:

Oh my gosh, that's terrifying but great at the same time. So great. So remember to follow us on all of our things and remember to keep listening if you want in on the sin. Bye guys, bye.

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