Shine Strong

What do you do when your dreams shatter? Surf. | Mi Ola founder, Helena Fogarty Ep 31

March 18, 2019 Season 1 Episode 31
Shine Strong
What do you do when your dreams shatter? Surf. | Mi Ola founder, Helena Fogarty Ep 31
Chapters
Shine Strong
What do you do when your dreams shatter? Surf. | Mi Ola founder, Helena Fogarty Ep 31
Mar 18, 2019 Season 1 Episode 31
Helena Fogarty
Helena's dreams were shattered, so she picked up her surf board and started a new life.
Show Notes Transcript

Her dreams shattered right in front of her completely unexpectedly. Of course, she was devastated. What does a girl do in this situation?

Learn all about Helena's story and how she turned this gut wrenching situation into a major victory. She shares tons of great advice we can all take immediately into our lives -- and also shares a promo code for your ENTIRE ORDER at Mi Ola!

Use SHINE2019 for 25% off your entire order at Mi Ola. Get your sexy bikini (that stays on) before spring break!

Support the show

Speaker 1:
0:10
We need to be more vocal about what they want. Well, what if they don't know what they want? Join us as we go inside the minds that as imperfect women sharing how they discover, strive for, and he's wildly chase after their best self and where they get stuck. This isn't just another show on the top five ways to achieve your goals or tips solely from the CEOs or the super successful. No each conversation and bites you in the lives of everyday women who were in tenacious pursue of what makes them tick. Whether you've been looking to uncover your purpose are craving a more fulfilled, connected life. These mothers, daughters, sisters and wives are the mentors you've been looking for. Come on, let's do it.
Speaker 2:
1:01
Hey everybody. Welcome to the shine strong show. I'm your host Lelaray and I'm thrilled to have you. Thanks for taking time out of your week to come here and join us. So today we have Halena Fogarty. She is the founder of Mila swimsuits. What is Neela swimsuits? You might ask. Well, it's this really great brand. Um, they make sexy bikinis that stay on and they make you look great and you can run around and chase your kid in. Your swimsuit won't come off. Um, you can dive into a pool, you can surf, you can do yoga, you can do all of these things in your bathing suit won't come off like sisters. Is this genius or is this gene? Yes. Um, so I'm excited about this episode for more than just being obsessed with the brand and their bathing suits. Uh, the story that you're about to hear from Halena is epic.
Speaker 2:
2:01
I was literally sitting on the edge of my chair as I learned about what all went down, what brought her to start her brand. So as we think about being stuck and getting unstuck and just experiencing failure in life and hard times in life, like this episode is a perfect example. So for any of you girls out there listening and you're just feeling like nothing is going your way, life is hard. You don't know why things are happening. Listen to this, and I hope you're inspired because hauling out was chasing her dreams. She had her whole future mapped out and one day the walls came tumbling down and she would have never gotten to the place where she is today had she not been through that hard time. So I hope you all listened to the very bitter end. It's such a good episode. Um, and I hope you also check out my els. So if you listen all the way to the very end of the episode, you will find a promo code. Hurray.
Speaker 1:
3:05
So, I mean, you can scroll into the show notes and find it too, but definitely check out their website, check out their Instagram and get yourself a new suit. All right. Without any further ado, let's do it. Ladies. Here's how I know
Speaker 2:
3:22
Halena good morning. Good morning. How are you? Happy New Year. Yeah, no kidding. 2019. Here we are. All of a sudden, I know, I know, you know, 2018 was such a great year, but I know 2019 is just gonna like take it up a notch. I'm really
Speaker 3:
3:38
decided. I, you know, I feel, um, I feel like my business has been doing a lot of building work. Uh, in 2018 and we're ready to explode in 2019 and see some of the benefits of the, the groundwork that we've been doing.
Speaker 2:
3:51
Yay. Yay. So tell me, what is your business? Who are you? Who is Selena?
Speaker 3:
3:58
Alena. So cruddy and I'm the founder of Biola swimwear. Um, in short, we make sexy bikinis that stay on and we have that short Twitter handle because every woman I know
Speaker 2:
4:10
when I say that is like, Oh, good idea. Yeah. Yeah. Like me. Why? I've never heard of such a thing. Yeah. Most men are like, is this really a problem? And every single woman is like, that's something important. Yeah. Yeah. That's a big deal.
Speaker 3:
4:25
It really is. So what we do in a more explicit ways, we make performance swimwear that you can wear to the beach in the morning and do everything from yoga to relaxing to swimming. And it will take you all the way through since that services are relaxing with a drink on the beach, grabbing your, your sunglasses or playing frisbee without losing your top and flashing your neighbor
Speaker 2:
4:48
and yeah. Right. And if you'd like
Speaker 3:
4:51
two, you can even go, you know, do something even more intense like surfing or wakeboarding or cliff diving and you're not going to lose your top of your bottoms.
Speaker 2:
5:00
Imagine that. That's insane. I don't like really is this major need. And when I found out about your some suits, it was like got to have one right now. So tell me, I know there's a backstory before meal that, um, can you tell me a little bit about, you know, how this all came to be where you were before Mila?
Speaker 3:
5:23
Yes. So, uh, I have a bit of a winding road and you know, you always hear important people saying that your path isn't going to make sense the way you move forward through it. Well, when you look back it's going to make sense. Yeah. Um, so prior to me, Ola, I had been living in New York and uh, working in high fashion for a long time. Um, most recently at Chanel for a couple of years and I had been in a relationship with someone for a long time that happened to break up. And then I was at Chanel and I was super excited about Chanel. I thought it was going to run the place. Yeah. You know, working late, working around the clock. Um, and there happened to be an opening above my position, which I was excited about, cautiously excited. And then I had a lot of people around me saying, Oh my God, you are totally going to get this promotion.
Speaker 3:
6:13
Wow, this is your job. I have recommended you for it. Like I was not asking, I was not rounding up the troops, I was not doing the political thing and people were just coming up to me, uh, without any provocation. And in fact, we were in central park at the, uh, Chanel temporary Chanel Museum, uh, done by a very famous architect. Um, and it was fantastic. It was where we had our Christmas party. You can imagine. It was just so fabulous. And we're there and we have everything and everyone's just head to toe and Chanel. And as I'm circulating through the party, just saying hello to people and happy holidays because then you're going to get this job. Oh my God. I was really excited because my boss had asked me for a meeting the day after Christmas at 9:00 AM. Why? Yeah. So I was like, great. So I, uh, God dressed up head to toe Chanel and, uh, walked into the meeting and at nine oh five, I walked out and I had been fired and I mean, they, they said that I had been let go, you know, kindly they said they had been let go and they were eliminated my position and I said, oh, are you eliminating every position in my department?
Speaker 3:
7:26
Uh, no, no, no. Just you. Why did they give you a rationale? No, there. Um, there was no rationale provided for me. I think it was a pretty uncomfortable meeting. Um, that was before they asked me if all the Chanel I was wearing I owned or not, which I did. They were literally like ready to strip me down in the conference room overlooking Central Park, but I actually have it all. And, um, you know, I think what was going on was a political issue. And, uh, the, the lesson that I take out of it is that, you know, Shit happens and you've got to roll with it. But I think it was literally a political issue. My boss was new. He had been there for less than six months. He had had a lot of people recommend me for this position. However, the president of the company, I'm always, and I know this from a friend of mine who was higher up, always responded to people who are trying to promote from within with saying, well, is that really the best person for the job?
Speaker 3:
8:28
And I think because frank was new to the visit, the new to his job, he thought that was a vote of no confidence, which it may or may not have been, but he didn't defend me. And he was like, Oh, I've got to look outside. So they hired someone for the position above my position. They fired me. They ended up letting go. That person, that person go after six months. Gosh. And, uh, my colleague who sat at the [inaudible] next to me, the same level to me, said that trunk constantly came to her and was like, well, why is it that you do not know how to do this?
Speaker 3:
9:02
So, you know, it was just something that happened. It was unfortunate. Uh, I had, uh, post traumatic trusts, stress dreams of like fighting over, fighting over my actual belongings in my little cubicle with Karl Lagerfeld, which never happened, never happened. It was just your brain does crazy. Um, and uh, you know, that was literally the first business day after Christmas, December, 2008. So we were entering the great recession and I had been tossed out on my ass, excuse my language. So everyone was like, what are you going to do? And um, I said he had no clue, you know, like your James Ranch and now I was like, I thought I was going to be here running the place with my best friend who was the head of ready to wear. Like I literally thought we were going to be president and you know, second in command in a couple of years.
Speaker 3:
9:51
But wow, you know, stuff happens. And so I said, I'm going to run, I'm going to throw my normal New Year's Eve party, let's party. And then I'm going, yeah. I was like, I'm going to Costa Rica because I have a break. And the Costa Rica story is that I am a surfer. I have, well, I learned, I learned right after I got my MBA program, my MBA from Nyu, and I had a friend who said, what are you doing? I really want to go to the surf camp in Hawaii. And I said, sure, let's do it. Um, she ended up canceling because she got walking pneumonia. So I went by myself and it was great. That was obsessed, obsessed from day one. And uh, I came back to New York and New York Rockaway is the main place to surf in New York, a long beach. Okay. Um, my family happens to be from Rockaway, so I came out here quite a bit and it was flat and cold and gross.
Speaker 3:
10:48
So I googled surf camps and it brought me to a surf camp that I love. And Costa Rica for the first time. I went by myself and Labor Day weekend and was so obsessed that I brought friends back a month later with me and I, every time I had a break. And that was actually right before I started at Chanel. Every time I had a break, so I was consulting and I had some more free time. Every time I had a break, I would go down there. So long weekend to other people would go skiing. I would go to Costa Rican, serve that. So it was about the same amount of money at that point. The flights were pretty cheap and everything. Um, so, uh, I started going to Costa Rica Lot and uh, once I lost my job and the great recession was happening, I was like, alright, you know, I had a relationship that blew up my, yeah, that's all I was going to be.
Speaker 3:
11:33
My lifelong relationship. I had this job that I thought was of my lifelong job go away. So let's reset a little bit. And I went to Costa Rica with my girlfriend. And it was a little bit like the scene from forgetting Sarah Marshall where the hotel calls up to the balcony room is like, is there an old lady crying on your balcony? I kept on waking up in the middle of the night and dealing with what I was going through. And my very good friend dawn, uh, when she was there with me for two weeks for a boyfriend, broke up with her by email, shut up. Oh Man. Her live in boyfriend of three years broke up with her by email. So we were, we were basket cases. Oh yeah, absolutely. Yeah, it was great. But um, yeah, so went Costa Rica came back to New York. It was miserable. It was January. And uh, when we were in Costa Rica, my friend dawn was like, why don't we move down here?
Speaker 3:
12:30
Why don't we think about moving down here? It's like, no, that's crazy. That's just a crazy idea. And then when I went back to New York and there were no jobs and it was cold and miserable and like February now, and I said, you know what, let me, um, let me, I clearly love Costa Rica where I go, I go to a place called Tamarindo and it's a very small town. Um, and I said, well, why don't I go down for a month and just see, you know, if I like it that much, if I like it that much. And what I'll do is I'll study Spanish and I'll stay in a really cheap place and, uh, I'll have my ex boyfriend took our dog and, um, let's see, you know, let me consider another life, you know, and I listen, I love it. I can, I can completely recognize the privilege that I have to take a sip, step away and even take a vacation like that.
Speaker 3:
13:28
Um, you know, that's still takes money. So there's a lot of people out there in the world that can't do that, but I feel very blessed and I was able to do that. And it's kind of take a reset and think, just recognizing like you needed a reset, whether that's for you, that was Costa Rica, but for other people, that recent looks different. But yes, to recognize that you need that and then do it and not just like cover it up and be like, no, I'm just going to keep doing what I'm doing. So well obviously I have, I had been doing the same thing for a lot of time. Right. And I remember, um, after right before my MBA program, I had a chance to take a little break because I had gotten, I, I w w everything worked out in this situation perfectly for the first time in my life.
Speaker 3:
14:15
Um, you might, company had been acquired by another company and they were looking to let go people and I got accepted to business school and I was going to get paid for six months, but I got let go. So I was like, yeah, let's do it. Um, but I can remember I went to Spain also to learn Spanish, had been working on this for awhile. Um, and I was so nervous before that trip. Yeah. I was like, oh, what's it going to be like to be away from New York for six weeks? This is so scary. And I had none of that trepidation about Costa Rica. I was like, let's go. Let's just do it. Like different experiences in your life. They build on
Speaker 2:
14:52
each other and you know, that trepidation you had going into Spain wasn't there because probably when you got to spend you were like, oh, this is cool. Yeah. You know, when you're from New York City isn't all that bad. Um, but I just love, I love how things that you, like you said earlier in the show, you know, when you're in the moment, it doesn't, and I'm, I'm murdering this quote that you had, but when you're in the moment, your path doesn't look like it's going in the right direction. But looking back on it, everything fits together.
Speaker 3:
15:23
Right, right. Yeah. And I was murdering the quote as well. I can't remember the quote exactly, but it's just, you know,
Speaker 2:
15:30
looking back, it makes sense. Yeah. So you moved to, um, well you went to Costa Rica for a month and I mean, how did it go? It was amazing. Um, I actually
Speaker 3:
15:41
twisted my ankle really badly walking sober on the first week of my trip and don't, you know, it's like how badly or herself, but yeah, I did it. Um, so I wasn't actually able to serve, which is part of the reason why I was there. Oh crap. And I still loved it. I still loved it. I love the small town. I was going to Spanish lessons for four hours a day, which was amazing. Yeah. And um, and then kind of just being filled with, you know, some anxiety but also just relaxing as well the rest of the time. And it was just fantastic. And so I came back to New York. Um, I put my stuff in storage. I rented out my apartment, uh, cause I owned an apartment at that point. I rented out my apartment, uh, to cover my costs and I went down to Costa Rica and moved there with no, no kind of return ticket.
Speaker 3:
16:28
Yeah. You know, just like I didn't know how long I was going to be there. I figured maybe I'd be in Costa Rica for three months, maybe a year, you know, who knows. I thought maybe if I didn't like Costa Week, after a couple of months and I could Argentina or back to Spain again trying to, you know, trying to get Spanish a little bit better. Yeah, yeah. Um, and just places that I particularly love. And so, um, went Costa Rica, loved it with surfing every day, was taking Spanish. It became fairly fluent, um, started a company. They're doing production for us based companies like Coppertone during the winter months to shoot on the beach. Oh, cool. Um, so I was, uh, where I lived in Costa Rica is fairly remote from San Jose, which is the main city. Yeah. And so you would have a lot of smart, intelligent production companies in San Jose, but they would never shoot on the beaches of Bwana cost day, uh, because it was too far to get there and get back and do location work.
Speaker 3:
17:28
So I set up a location business where I would go out and scout the locations and provide them with the, the ground support for their entire team when they were in town. Very fad that was being done in Spanish and Spanglish, you know, kind of a mix. But it felt pretty awesome when I was able to do it in Spanish. Like that was, you know, whether people understood me or I just felt like, yeah, that's awesome. Um, yeah. And so I did that and a at the same time, uh, I met my now husband. Um, and so then there was a reason to stick around and, uh, at the same time I was surfing a lot and kept losing my suit. Um, I remember when I was down in Costa Rica, it was amazing because it was the first time that I had a concentrated period where I could improve in surfing every day.
Speaker 3:
18:16
So I was able to go out and serve every single day for two hours. Nice. Yeah. And, um, and I worked my schedule around that. Like, you know, unless I was working a job, like I worked my schedule around that. And so, um, I could see the improvement every day and it was really fun. It was like, wow, I'm getting better at this. Um, and I remember getting out of big wave right in front of my favorite Surf Camp and, uh, so I knew everybody around and I was like, Woo. And everyone's a Foodie and Hillary and I realized that my topic come off Oh, inside. And I was flashing everybody. And so it went from a moment of like, yeah, like this is the most amazing thing ever to, oh my gosh, I just flashed everybody on the beach, which I'm like, Gosh, you know, being a surfer you're still like, ah, whatever.
Speaker 3:
19:02
It's fine. But that made me realize, you know, and also when you're surfing, every time you duck dive under a wave, every single female surfer on the lesser wedding wearing a wetsuit, um, or one piece knows that you ducked out and then you paddle and pull up your bottoms at the same time. And then you, before you get up and sit on your board, you check your top to make sure your boobs aren't out. What a pain, what a pain. It's retarded. It's silly. Yeah. It's just, it's infuriating is what it is. And we put up with this because we want to look cute. Yeah. And stylish and you know, so, um, I started workshopping the idea of Mi Ola and um, worked up some samples in Costa Rica and the quality wasn't there. So then I came here and found someone to make samples here that were very high quality and we tested them out.
Speaker 3:
19:57
We tested them out, cannon ball, and we tested them out, duck diving, we tested them out swimming. I'm doing yoga and versions and you know, some of my girls who were my testers, I call them growth. Some of my women actually would wear, some are tops running, which I, I'm a c cup of or D Cup. I'm like, no, no, no, I won't. I don't recommend that belts in the suits. That's, um, yeah. And so we did a Kickstarter in 2012, a successful Kickstarter and then, um, really launched the company with an e commerce site in 2013. Okay. And have been growing since then. And we now have customers and I think 38 countries. Oh my gosh. Um, who know about Mila and we, um, we have thought about doing wholesale, uh, and we've tried that and then we decided that our money would be better spent reaching our customers directly because we could also represent the brand better and better customer service.
Speaker 3:
20:56
And we own the customer relationship. And that's what you want really. I mean, just my, my experiences from sales and I think half of your products, um, experience and like your customers positive experience comes from the brand. Yeah. It's not just, and especially with your brand, you know, you're solving this major problem that any active women woman knows about, like a swimsuit that just doesn't say Putt. Even as a mom, you know, I, I mean I do, I do anything that you can do active. Yeah, active wise. But like, even when I'm at the pool with my kids, bending over, grabbing one, grabbing the other, it's like, oh Geez, is my top. So on in this case. And I'm not saying you have a good butter bad, but, but like nobody wants to see your butt when you're at the pool with the kids. Yeah. Like you know, like you just don't want that to happen. Right.
Speaker 3:
21:50
You know, and no one, no matter how good your bud is, like you don't want to have a wardrobe malfunction of your top, your bottom when you're playing with your kids. Yeah. I love how on your website it says wardrobe malfunctions or so last year it made me laugh out loud and I mean, you know, as a mom, like you, little toddler feet love to try to pull down bottoms. Totally. And little toddler hands love to grab your boob. So if you're like, it's like a constant struggle to keep your bikini on in a different way once your mom. Yeah. Oh yeah. Yeah. Um, so you talked a little bit about your Kickstarter, so tell me a little bit about that. That's something I have no experience about with, but I hope to some days. Tell me how that, like what were some unforeseen challenges?
Speaker 3:
22:36
What went really well, what did it, so if it's all right, I'll talk about, we've done a Kickstarter, we've done an Indiegogo and last year we actually did a crowdfunding for equity, um, uh, kind of investment in drive or I am not sure, you know, um, it's, it's not, you don't get products, you're actually getting stock. Oh, nice. So it's a different, really cool. You've like done it all. Yeah. Uh, so the Kickstarter was a very much friends and family using my network from New York. All the people I went to business school with and I'm constantly hitting them up via email, constantly hitting them up. Um, I mean, one thing that people don't know until they do a crowd funding campaign is it's a lot of work to be successful. You know, you see, oh, this widget went up and in 24 hours they raised $3 million and now they're, they're making it, right.
Speaker 3:
23:30
Like that's an overnight success story. People love that. But that's not actually the truth. The truth is anybody that raised that amount of money really quickly did a lot of pre work. Yeah. You know, a lot of preparation, a great video, a great campaign. And they probably lined up the majority of that investment prior to prior to launching their campaign and one of the Games. And, and this was in the early days of Kickstarter, so I don't know that we, you know, I didn't even know this, but it's like you have to have people in your back pocket that are definitely going to invest or contribute within the first 24 hours and you really need to line that up and, and it's uncomfortable, right? It's like, oh, you don't want to ask your friends for money. Oh, you know, but you've got to and you've got to go out to [inaudible].
Speaker 3:
24:19
And the other thing is, um, at that point it was my company, only my company. There's no one else on the team. It helps if you have a bigger network. And if it helps, if everybody in their network is lining up, you know, 10 people plus that are going to invest or, or contribute the first, you know, 24 hours. Got It. Gives momentum. Super important. Okay. And that's uncomfortable, you know, cause you don't wanna be like, Hey, what's up? Um, unless you bikini company, can you, you know, putting $180 for a suit that you've never seen? Yeah, yeah, yeah. I'm sure you have to get really clear with like your value proposition. You've got to get really confident in what you're talking about. Yes. Can't even be an ounce of trepidation. I know there's lever can be the entire, I mean, the entire journey of this company is that, um, I always have to be pitching and there's never time for vulnerability.
Speaker 3:
25:15
There's never, unless I'm talking to my peers or my advisors. Yeah. Um, because there are times when people have come to me, um, who are potential investors or might help us along this product. And they're like, yeah, just tell me what's going on. You have to paint the prettiest picture and you have to paint the vision. Always we can't be like, oh man, yesterday was really hard. Yeah. Right. Nobody wants to do that word and I'm feeling terrible. You can never say that starter on. Talk to me about that a little bit because I'm like, I get that even when times are tough, times are really tough and like you been up all night trying to build your brand or like, you know, you just flew from New York to Costa Rica and then you have a meeting the next morning. Tell me about like, I'm, I'm sure you have a team now.
Speaker 3:
26:03
Yeah. How do you manage those two very different conversations? I would guess like if you're talking to an investor and then you're talking to your team, how do you manage that? Well, that's also its own, um, conundrum because um, you have to be truthful with your team because these people are giving their time. I mean, they're not giving I think, but there they are investing their time, building your brand with you. Yeah. In their heart. You know, their patch. Oh, absolutely. But at the same time, you can't be like, oh my God, well we have a dollar in our bank account. Like you can't do that either. So yeah,
Speaker 3:
26:44
you have to be, um, you know, with investors, I think with every unfairly real, um, I will paint, um, I will be pitching and I will be excited and selling the vision to investors. But if they ask me specific questions, I will answer that absolutely correctly and appropriately. That's not, there's no spin and that part, you know, cause you, you can't, if you've invested in that, you defraud them. And that's a big deal. So, you know, it's, uh, you have to be honest about those things. Um, but people will tend to invest in your vision and your passion and not where you are right now, but where you're going in the future. Yep. Because, you know, I have a lot of people who have watched what we've done and I've been on the sidelines and all of sudden we're like, all right, I'm ready. I believe in you and I know where you're going.
Speaker 3:
27:30
And I think it's amazing and I've seen you accomplish things that no one else has accomplished that I know. And so let's do this, right. Um, with, uh, with your team, you know, I think that there's a different conversation and there's a realistic conversation, but you also have to sell the vision. Yeah. I'm actually, I'm actually interviewing two people today to join our team and I'm super excited about them. I'm so, so, so, so excited. They're two very different people for the same position. So we've got to figure out who's the best fit. But like I am so excited to sell the passion to them, but at the same time we have, listen, remember we are a startup and we are raising our seed round. So our budget is not huge, but we have all the creativity in the world and we have like people who love our brand. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's, that's kind of, you know, I think that's the realistic way to approach it.
Speaker 2:
28:25
Yeah. Yeah. I think, you know, combining that honesty with the vision and the passion and when you have a product that works, and that's amazing. And that everyone knows is solving a major problem. You know, I feel like that, that right there just from, you know, my perspective in sales, like if I can believe in the product, if I trust who's making it, if I know it's top of the line, like absolutely.
Speaker 3:
28:50
Yeah. Sign me yet. Excellent. I love that. We need more of that.
Speaker 2:
28:55
Um, okay, so I, you filled out a questionnaire just to be on the podcast and you told me a bunch of really, really great stuff and something that you mentioned time and time again was managing your response and developing your response. And I want to talk to you a little bit more about that because I know that, um, you know, just from your story about Chanel moving to Costa Rica, launching in a couple of businesses, that sort of thing, I think you've learned a lot in, in how you respond to things, whether you choose to react and just like dig a hole and they in there or you know, manage your response to how you say, you know, sometimes it happens. Like, even if you're doing the best work you can possibly do, you know, stuff happens and you've got to manage your response. So can you tell me a little bit of what you've learned and how you manage your response?
Speaker 3:
29:50
Yeah. I don't know how much of it is wisdom versus my kind of innate character. I don't know, because we, we, I don't have that self knowledge, right. But I'm fairly unfairly like unflappable. I'm fairly stable. Nice. I don't know if that's because I was born in April and I'm a tourist. I don't know if that's just because of who I am, you know, I'm not sure if maybe I'm a surfer, I don't know. Um, but even when I was working at Chanel, people were like, you're very chilled out. And that doesn't mean that I'm not ambitious and driving and pushing things forward, but I don't see any reason to, um, use my energy to react to things. And if I can, if I can handle it. Sometimes I get angry, especially when I'm driving, if I can handle it, you know, I tried it again. I, yeah, I tried to manage my response because why aren't we putting out negativity or some kind of like uneven energy that's going to affect other people,
Speaker 2:
30:47
right. When you can just take a breath, like chill, take a little break, and then come back at it, you know? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, from what, like I, I've found very similar. I mean, I could get totally pissed and just like blow my top and sometimes like bubbling inside. That's what's happening, but it doesn't help anything. It's just, it makes everything worse. Like is long as you can keep your cool, and I'm not saying like just bury everything and never deal with it. There are some things that you definitely have to deal with and all of that, but managing a response and not just blowing up over everything. I think it's important for your career, for your work, for your marriage, for your mom.
Speaker 3:
31:31
You know, all of it. I mean, yeah, especially as a mom, um, you know, it's, you don't wanna lose your cool with your kids,
Speaker 2:
31:37
right? Yeah.
Speaker 3:
31:40
You also don't want to lose your cool with your investors. Like, it's just, you know, there's going to be good news, there's going to be bad news and people are going to handle it elegantly and sometimes they're going to handle it really. Inelegantly yeah. And you just have to, you know,
Speaker 2:
31:55
Aye.
Speaker 3:
31:56
You have to look down the road. It's like we're in this for the long haul. I'm not gonna I'm not gonna stop doing Biola because I got some bad news about something. Right. No. You know, like it's, I'm going to leave and that's what I feel about my marriage. Like I might be angry at my husband, but I'm not going to divorce them yet.
Speaker 2:
32:18
That's today.
Speaker 3:
32:19
You know, who knows. But like, that's like my husband likes to stay angry and I'm like, Babe, we're still going to be living together. Yeah. Tomorrow. So we might as well like kiss, make up.
Speaker 2:
32:29
I know. No, I'm with, you might as well just figure out whatever it is. Like it's a relationship, like somebody who you made the effort to marry, like if a worth fighting
Speaker 3:
32:40
for. But also with relationships and with, uh, with agencies that I deal with, with vendors I deal with, like we can discuss when things are not going well and I can be strong with you and express my unhappiness. Yeah. But there's no real reasoning, yell or make you feel worse than, you know, it's like, what am I going to get it? It's up to me to decide whether I want to continue working with you or not. I shouldn't make you feel like garbage and then want to keep working with you. Yeah. That would be, that would be unhelpful for, or feel like garbage for any reason. You know, it's like, it's just this was not acceptable. It's not working. So that's it. Yeah. No, it's just so I think that's important and that's important. Um, one of the problems that I see in the investment community, one of the challenges, one of the behaviors that people really get frustrated from, um, in terms of entrepreneurs is ghosting.
Speaker 3:
33:34
And I'm sure people get frustrated with that. And Danny as well. But luckily, like I'm married, so I don't know. It's like, you know, I've had people be super excited about what we're doing and basically give a commitment to invest and then just ghost us. And that's, and that's frustrating. And, and that's just silly as well because it's like, you know what? I want things to be uncomfortable. You just say no. Yeah. Yeah. It has frustrated me so much from a sales standpoint too. Like, oh gosh, that's the worst. You've, you know, they're interested. You've had all these great conversations. Like you both invested a lot of time. All of a sudden they go to, you don't know where they went. You can't, you can't reach them in any way. They're not returning emails, phone calls. I don't get it. Like, I wish that people would be more comfortable saying no from the get go.
Speaker 3:
34:27
I guess. Just help us both out say no. There's um, there's a saying in the investment world or in the entrepreneurial world, but maybe sales too, probably in sales. It's probably where it came from, which is a fast no is so much better than a slow no. And sometimes even better than a slow yes, yes, yes. Sometimes it is low, slow, yes. Can Kill you. Because even once they finally say yes, like their heart isn't in it. And especially if they're an investor, like then they're on your team essentially. And if their heart isn't in it and they're on your team, like, oh, that'll just drag you down. Yeah. Yeah. So it's, um, yeah, I think emotional honesty would be great. Uh, and I just think that, you know, there's so many ways to say no. Yeah. I mean, listen, it doesn't have, no, I'm just not in the right position financially to invest in your company right now.
Speaker 3:
35:19
Okay, great. I don't do swimwear. Okay, thanks. Like I, you know, I also think that people are scared of salespeople and as, as a, as a company founder, if you tell me no to invest in my company, not going to be like, well, what if I make the terms really comfortable for you? Like, I'm not going to try to sell you. I am going to hit you. I do want you on board. I do want you to invest, but if you say, no, I'm not going to tried to ring you in and another way. Yup. Yeah, just put a hundred dollars down today and give me the rest three weeks. Like I'm not going to do that. So that it's not that tough.
Speaker 2:
35:58
I, I feel like it's, there's such a big difference between like that used car salesman or like that nineties infomercial type of sale and really trying to find somebody who you align with and two is aligned with what you have to sell or what you have to provide them. Like, I think connecting, connecting, and serving people is really what sales needs to be. You know, connecting with the people who are aligned with the swimwear that you have to offer or whatever it is for you listeners, um, and, and serving them. You know, after, after you guys have made the sale or connected or invested, then serving them and serving each other, it can be such a beautiful thing. And it's not always,
Speaker 3:
36:41
yeah, it's too big. You're so right. It's gotta be the right fit. And I think that where people get the bad reputation for salespeople is when it's not the right fit, whether it's not a great product or they don't believe what they're selling or you know, what, whatever it is. And I think that's an uncomfortable position, will be the salespeople. It's tough position. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
37:00
So I'm totally switching gears on you here. Um, surfing I, that is one of the things that I've never really done because I, I mean, I grew up in Michigan, not a whole lot of surfing there. Why did you grow up in Michigan? Grand rapids.
Speaker 3:
37:16
Okay. Yeah. No, I, I'm, so I was born in, I was born in Illinois and then moved to Northern Indiana. So I spent a lot of times right on the border, you know?
Speaker 2:
37:26
Oh my word. Yeah. I mean there's like Michigan, but they're, I don't know. So tell me like a couple of quick tips on surfing. Like if, if somebody wants to get started surfing and raise my hand here. Yes. What do you do? How do you start?
Speaker 3:
37:43
All right. So, um, I would recommend regardless of what age you are, don't be afraid. Okay. That's number one. If you want to learn how to serve, go for it. Because I spent six months living in Australia when I was in college and I did not learn how to surf because I was too afraid of the bro Culture and didn't seem too intimidating and they have a lot of sharks, but it was more like, it just that it just seemed like it was really intimidating, cool and macho and I wasn't cool enough. And I mean, listen, I was in great shape. I should have learned how to surf when I was 20, so crazy. Um, instead I waited until I was 32. Hmm. And then, you know, I didn't feel this way because I was actually in better shape, but a lot of people are like, Oh, I'm 32, I'm too old or, or I'm 45, I'm too old or I'm whatever.
Speaker 3:
38:34
I'm too old. Yeah. You can learn how to surf if you're in good shape and you have flexibility and you liked the water. Yeah. You should like the water, like the water, you should be interested and uh, and you should be in fairly decent shape. Like you should work out. You don't want to try this when you don't even do yoga or you don't do any kind of fitness. Um, and then I would recommend if you really want to try it, um, take a lesson when you're on vacation. Okay. If that piques your interest and you're like, I got to wave, this is the most amazing thing. Book a trip to a surf camp for a minimum of five days, five to seven days, and just commit because that's when you're going to learn enough to go surf on your own and actually surf. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
39:20
First lesson you take, you're going to jump up on one way and you're like, I can do it. This is an amazing, and you're like in the Whitewater and you're on a big boat basically and it's great and it's hard work, but it's not, you're never going to able to take that and like go pass the Whitewater in a small board and surf. That takes like a week's worth of lessons. And being surrounded by it and having like, the reason I say weak is because the first day are gonna be excited and have a great day. The second day you might improve a little bit. I'm excited. The third day are going to be so sore. You're so sore, you're not going to want to do it. You're probably going to fall off the board and not do things right and maybe the fourth day too.
Speaker 3:
40:01
But like that's all building up your coordination and then the fifth day is going to be amazing and then you'd love it again. But if you stop with just one day or one lesson, you're never going to get to the point where you can actually serve. Oh Man. I, I'm excited. So like where are some good surf schools? Well, so, um, when I moved to Tamarind, oh, sorry to Costa Rica, I lived in Tamarindo, which is this amazing little sport and sorry, a little surf town, uh, right on the beach. And there's a lot of different surf schools there. But my favorite is, which is rock surf camp. Okay. That's the place that I went. That's the place that I went 17 times in three years because I love it so much. Oh my gosh, that's a place that I brought friends with me and they came back over and over and over again because they love it so much.
Speaker 3:
40:48
And, um, the reason why I love it is right on the beach. Um, it's in Tamarindo, which is great learning spot. Tamarindo is a very cool little town with a lot of restaurants and some nightlife, nightlife, if you don't want night life, there's three amazing yoga studios in like a 10 minute walking distance. Nice. And so, and, and it's an easy commute from, um, New York and from a lot of different places because JetBlue goes from JFK to lar, which is Liberia airport. Okay. Which is an hour away from Tamarindo. So it's a really easy trip. Yeah. Uh, most people, many people, well, most people in tourism in Costa Rica speak English. Um, most people in Costa Rica speaks some English. You can use the US dollar there and it's just awesome and it doesn't feel like you're in the United States. Oh. Even though you can speak it like it feels very different.
Speaker 3:
41:38
Awesome. Now I want to like go check that out. That's great. You should totally check that out. And if you do, I'll call Joan Holly and be like, Hey, I'm sending her, make sure awesome. Uh, the sunsets and Costa Rica and the sunsets in Tamarindo particularly are just amazing. Yeah. And locals, locals who live there, if they can go and watch a sunset every day, really like unless they're stuck in the office are stuck like you, even when you live there for seven years, I would go watch the sunset. That sounds how spectacular. Wow it is. Wow. Yeah. That's amazing. And so one more thing about Costa Rica though, cause I clearly love it and I'm like to Costa Rican, um, it's a nice contrast to a lot of the high powered ambition that we have here in the u s particularly in these cities to feel you in New York especially.
Speaker 3:
42:32
Um, I felt like my time in Tamarindo and my time, whenever I go there, you're much more able to be present and disconnect. And at first that was because there were no cell phones and there's no fairness there. It was crazy. Like it was literally when I first moved there, you had to go knock on people's door to be like, hey, you want to go out? Oh Wow. Or let's go meet at, you know, at five 30 at this spot. And you'd be like, I'm going to be there for 15 minutes. You're not there. I'm leaving. Like, you know, like it was crazy. Like old school now everybody, you know now, um, I know with my phone on t-mobile and a lot of other phones, you can get data there, no problem. And so you're more connected, but it's just a great place to like find peace.
Speaker 3:
43:14
I love it. I, you've got me sold, I've got me sold. I just want to back, uh, for a shoot a couple of weeks ago and we were like, did it make sense for us to move back here? I Dunno. Trying to figure it out, man. So how can our listeners get connected with you? How can they find me all the swimwear? How can they follow you on Instagram and things like that? Sure. So if you're interested in having an awesome suit that is literally the most comfortable, best fitting suit of your life. And it also stays on and they're all super cute, super cute. And they, I mean we don't sell it for this because I think that everyone's body is a good body, but like they make your boobs and your butt look like wicked good. So we give good but, but if you're interested in that, please go to [inaudible] dot com that's [inaudible] dash o l a.com. Mi Ola means my wave in Spanish. It just a reminder. And then we're on Instagram. Our Instagram is meal surf, m I L A S U R F and a. Our Facebook is also Mila. Okay, awesome. And I'll have that all linked on your page. So every guest on the podcast has their own page on the website. So everything will be linked there.
Speaker 2:
44:33
You can get to it from the show notes for all.
Speaker 3:
44:35
Set up a discount. Yeah, hold on. We have a promo code
Speaker 2:
44:41
that all of you, amazing listeners, you need to go out, get a newsletter ad, a discount. Here it is.
Speaker 3:
44:47
Um, so we have a 25% off your entire order. Um, the Promo Code is shine 2019, so s h I n e 2019 for the new year, happy new year everyone. And um, we recognize that our suits are not the cheapest suits out there. Um, and they are not cheap in terms of money and they're also not cheap and the way they look or feel. Um, these are really high quality suits and what we find is that when women were our suits, they come back and they spend more and they were more of ours. Um, yeah, we got an email from, yeah, we got an email from a woman, uh, in Sweden who bought one of our suits because you heard about it and went on vacation to Mexico and she had like 10 bikini's in her suitcase. She's a mom as well, young mom. And she said once she put on me, Ola, she did. Were any of her other Bikini's? No Way. Because it was so comfortable and she felt secure and like covered everything in its place and her husband loved the way it looks. So yeah. So I was like, oh my God, can you please do sales for us?
Speaker 2:
45:54
Credible. Like that is just such a great story. Yeah. And it just speaks to the quality of the Su, you know, the fact that like I love it that you build the suit for the problem that you faced, you know, is something that you knew just so, so well with the issue of a suit coming off and like what a pain in the butt that was. So you solved your own problem. Like you know which things, right? Like nobody knows the problem better than you. So you build the best suits to solve it.
Speaker 3:
46:25
Yeah. Before we did this, because I have an Mba and I know how much work it takes to brand to build a brand and how much investment it takes. I actually knew it was my own problem. And then along the way of development, I had a child and an 18 months she started fussing with her top and her bottom, like pulling her suit up. And I was like, man, we have women had lost years of our lives. Yeah. Pulling our suits up and down and making sure, sure we're covered like an 18 month old. Wow. Started struggling with their suit and we still wear them, but still I wasn't 100% convinced. And so I did. Um, I did a survey monkey of 2000 women that I did not know in the u s and our target market and 95% of them said that they have lost their suit jumping into the water and the other 5% that they don't go in the water really cause they don't want to lose their suit. Which I think is so sad.
Speaker 2:
47:17
That is so sad. Like you're losing out on life because of your stupid suit. Yeah. Well I can't wait to get my new swim. So
Speaker 3:
47:27
awesome. I'm so excited.
Speaker 2:
47:29
Yes. So listeners, again, that's shine 2019 for 25% off your total order. Um, all of the links will be in the show notes. Thank you so much for being on the show. It was such a pleasure. This was so much fun. Yes, likewise. I can't wait to meet you soon. Alright, bye. Bye.
Speaker 1:
47:51
Thanks for listening. If today's episode made you think of someone, someone who could really be served from today's episode, please share it with them, shoot him a text, then head over to the website and sign up for the shines rung rundown. It's an email that goes directly to you with all the key tips, key takeaways, the quotes and links to get in touch with the people on the show. It's a great way to get everything you need without having to stop everything you're doing and take notes. I know you're way too busy for that. While you're listening to the podcast, please just hand it over to whatever platform you listen to the show on. Give us a rating, subscribe, even leave us a review. I read those reviews and I'm just so thankful to all of you. We're really building a cool community here. Shine strong this week, ladies.
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